* Posts by m0rt

570 posts • joined 16 Jul 2010

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Jailed Brit con phishes prison, gets bail

m0rt
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All I can think of is Moist Von Lipwig.

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Appeal court bombshell: Google must face British justice for 'Safari spying'

m0rt
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How do you think the cookie got on there? Magic?

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Home Office awards Raytheon £150m over e-borders cancellation

m0rt
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"RSL continues to be a valued supplier to the British Government on key defence and commercial pursuits"

So we value suppliers who don't deliver value.

Yep, there is the hand of the Civil Service in this.

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Ford: Our latest car gizmo will CHOKE OFF your FUEL if you're speeding

m0rt
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Re: visibility -v- illumination [was: My wife's car has automatic headlights.]

"So you're saying it's not safe for cyclists to enter a gap between vehicles less than 102" ? (36" + 30" (width of bike) + 36")"

Don't be ridiculous. You know he wasn't saying that and a cyclist passing a stationary vehicle is NOT the same as a vehicle passing a cyclist and if you cant see that then I hope I never end up on the same road as you whatever vehicle I am on/in.

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m0rt
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Re: If you need to be seen, sidelights.

"use headlights at night, except on a road which has lit street lighting."

I did not know this.

Not that I am going to go off driving without my lights on *In theory!* ....

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m0rt
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Re: If you need to be seen, sidelights.

I should point out that when they were off, they had actually been put into the OFF position inadvertantly. Because I was so used to them being on automatically, it took a while before I realised they were not on when they should have been.

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m0rt
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My wife's car has automatic headlights.

So they come on when the car deems necessary.

Only problem is, because my street is quite well lit, if I use it in an evening and the auto lights are off, I don't notice they are not on for a few hundred yards. Because the Dash is profuse with an OLED display, and lights make up everything these days on car controls whether day or not, there is no visual indicator.

This is *my* fault. I am not blaming the car in the slightest. But with these features comes an over-reliance on technology which is inherently dangerous. ALl the modern tech in a car will get you out of trouble you *shouldn't have been in, in the first place* yet regulation starts to see these things as the only way we can be safe drivers.

Sad, really.

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ROBOT INVASION has already STARTED in HIPSTERLAND

m0rt
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Time for a judiciously placed...

...paperclip.

Or, a bit of blutac over the camera. Hilarious...

or or or or office ROBOT WARS! Now I can see the point of these...

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Review: McAfee Endpoint Protection for SMB

m0rt
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@Sarah Re: Permission to ask a COMPLETELY off-topic question…?

Micro USB cables I have ever had personally go 'a bit weird' tend to be ones that the cat chewed.

However, I have noticed a disparity in quality of cables which I think is down to the wire used.

IIRC, more thinner strands of cable are better than less thicker strands for longevity. However, thinner strands are more costly to produce. Since cables are inherently seen as consumable and a necessary in most packaged devices, you tend to get cheaper ones.

Interestingly, the cable that came with a Palm Pixi a good few years ago is one of my favourite go-to cables when travelling because it is pretty robust. Despite the tooth marks.

edit: Re-read your post. When you say 'ruptured', do you mean the insulation only around the bottom or actually the wire cable starting to show?

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m0rt
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ESET

Another one to add to the pot.

So far, the Free Eset scanner has found things that Malwarebytes has missed.

The non-free one has a disgusting UI though...

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Dear departed Internet Explorer, how I will miss you ... NOT

m0rt
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Re: PSP

"the "250 of 30 days remaining" trial period?"

I completely forgot about that bit!! Ha. Thanks for that extra memory.

Oh yeah, I typo'd - it should have been "How I loved thee..."

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m0rt
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PSP

How I loved the....

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Microsoft sniffs around Xiaomi Mi 4 smarties with Windows 10

m0rt
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Re: Kind of pointless with ARM

Get back under your bridge.

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m0rt
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Re: Kind of pointless with ARM

Most Windows Phones are ARM based socs. So universal apps will run on both x86 and arm.

In theory.

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Winning a brand new BOFH T-Shirt is as simple as...

m0rt
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Clean Desk Policy!

I have heard of them but never witnessed one!

Cor....thanks for that pic. I would never have believed it otherwise.

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Fanbois: We paid $2000 for full satisfaction but now we have SPREADING STAINS

m0rt
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Still funny!

"The Register contacted Apple, but has not received a response as of publication."

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Vince Cable opens hipster-friendly London tech creche

m0rt
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"greater innovation and greater synthesis"

Am I a bad person for wanting to hurt the person who came up with that tagline?

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Watching porn makes men BETTER in bed, say trick-cyclists

m0rt
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Any Judges...

in that subset?

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Nvidia tears wraps off GeForce Titan X (again) and $10,000 GPU brain for DIY self-driving cars

m0rt
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Re: most trannies on a chip ?

But will it run Cry...oh yeah. I see it does.

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BBC gives naked computers to kids (hmm, code for something?)

m0rt
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Re: Great idea and all that...

"teachers will be using these as coasters and ash trays"

You know what? Screw you.

There are crap people in all areas of life. Doctors, teachers, programmers, journalists, drivers, cyclists, and bloody commentards.

But there are also good ones too. To turn around and consistantly churn out the useless drivel that X are crap without looking at the general reason why they can't produce what is necessary is downright insulting. How often have good coders been screwed over by useless managers (and, let us be blunt, vice versa)? When politicians consistantly use the education system as a bargaining chip and point scoring system, make benchmarks that have no real world meaning, make the educators not *just* educators but sodding social workers, parent replacements etc...even to the point that they are going to be criminalised for not saying something about potential abuse when rumours abound in schools and always have done.

Teachers should be allowed to teach. A lot of them are good at it. They are not replacements for your lack of parenting skills and they shouldn't be made that. They shouldn't be given short shrift for all of a sudden not being equipped to teach how to code, when even people who have had the supposed training are still crap and work in business. I was schooled in the 80s. There were no real computing lessons at my school. But they had BBC micros and I had the kind of mind that was just interested. So you can't force this on kids who don't want to learn. And you can't entice kids to want to learn if they don't have a good environment to foster that and in order to do that you have to let the teachers have the skills in the firstplace to actually provide that basis and foster encouragement.

IT teachers have taught what the curriculum mandated, which has been what we consider to be mostly office type skills. Now that has changed and people love to sneer and hold up their superiority as how things should be done and how much better they are in tthe technological world. Tell you what, why don't you go down to your local school and offer to volunteer to run a (supervised, because we all know there is a PDO lurking around every corner) workshop so they know how to use these Micro Bits?

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RIP Sir Terry Pratchett: Discworld author finally gets to meet DEATH

m0rt
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I'm sad

That is all.

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Faux ‪pro-IS Facebook‬ shot down within hours of launch

m0rt
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Re: "Cats with Kalashnikovs"

Thanks for that! I had never heard of that before....

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m0rt
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"Cats with Kalashnikovs"

I had to search on that term.

http://www.gifbin.com/bin/g65098109.gif

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'Roly poly' soft, wobbly robot BANGS EXPLOSIVELY, leaps 0.5m in air

m0rt
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Re: Where

" it will also be a farting robot."

FINALLY - I was reading all the comments and was expecting a raft of farting jokes and not one. NOT ONE!

The quality of commentators has really gone uphill. :(

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Apple Watch: HOT WRIST ACTION plus slim $1299 MacBooks - and HBO TV

m0rt
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"...Game of iPhones"

Unless, of course, the new "Game of iThrones" is coming out to coincide with that other, necessary tech paradigm shift to hit us.

The new Apple Toilet. Excrete like you never have before, in more convenient ways than before.

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Quantum computers have failed. So now for the science

m0rt
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Re: 4 pages ?!

Is it that you can discuss the structure of the article, or the content of the article, but not both at the same time?

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The Rise of Islamic State, Touch and I Am Radar

m0rt
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"Where did ISIS come from?"

I still think Mallory Archer.

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Win! El Reg exceedingly fine mug collection

m0rt
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Re: Ummm

So, you really are Spartacus, then?

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m0rt
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Yorkshire Tea is for Mugs.

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Privacy? What privacy? EU's draft law on your data is useless, say digital rights orgs

m0rt
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"internet browser settings could constitute consent for being tracked and profiled online"

I smell lobbying...question is was this businesses or was it government agencies? That ties nicely with profiling citizens later on in the article.

Just thinking aloud, if this was put in place and a government decided that all websites, or isps, based in the UK or whereever had to provide tracking data on what was visited by which IP at which time, whether in realtime or batched, would this be 'legitimate' if the above was set as yes? Despite the uproar that would come out of this - so they would certainly wrap it up in something else, like "Monitoring the digital integration of society to see how we can improve the infrastructure for a better, cleaner, digital future for you!"

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Windows XP's market share grows AGAIN!

m0rt
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Re: As usual

"Collect another badge of fail. Your assumptions 1 and 3 are the same and number 2 is very similar to them both (if A is more generalised than B then B must be more specialised than A. You only qualify this by indicating where the specialisation may be). "

Assumptions used in a conjecture do not necessarily have to be a reasonings without overlap - one and three are restating the same thing but the language used shows the approach to each one. It may be said that by stating the assumption from two viewpoints clarifys what is being said.

But it *was* sloppily stated. Can't downvote myself but I will upvote you on that.

"t doesn't really matter because the assumptions are only relevant in a hypothesis that you are going to test empirically. Which you can't because El Reg doesn't provide the numbers. This is logic, we haven't even got to the statistics."

Very true. The fail badge is worn for this alone.

"Furthermore, you might want to get out your dictionary and look up corroboration. El Reg's numbers don't have to be the same as either of these two services to provide corroboration."

I know they don't have to be the same and that wasn't what I wanted to convey. What I should have said is the numbers will be considerably smaller overall so any corroboration indicated could be considered an anomaly - you would really need another data collecion over a larger pool of websites - like you say, Akamai's own findings.

I am not defending the result of netmarketshare, I just don't think that El Reg's stats would be meaningful in determining whether or not XP increased market share. But, as you say, without evidence of the figures then this conversation is arguably pointless, although I welcome your well reasoned arguments. It could be that El Reg's figures show an *large* upsurge in XP takeup which would certainly shoot my expectations down.

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m0rt
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Re: As usual

That is a good point. What we can postulate is that the readership of El Reg is more technically orientated unless there are more masochists or lost carrion bird fanciers than we could assume would visit. This means that we expect a skew compared to the internet as a whole.

This means we have a smaller pool which targets specialists. So a reasonable assumption is that a smaller pool for one website will not be reflective of the netmarketshare pool, unless they are only operable on The Register.

Now, it would be possible to check the benchline of OS breakdown for the Reg and it normally wouldn't be unusual to see if there is a corrosponding drop in stats for 8.1 and rise for XP, but at the same time, XP is more likely *not* to be used amongst IT professionals apart from those locations where they are forced to in an enterprise situation and theregister isn't blocked.

So we have three assumptions here:

1. Netmarketshare is more generalised than The Register visitors.

2. The Register visitors are more likely to be in IT service businesses/departments

3. Netmarketshare doesn't just show results from the The Register.

Reasonable taken separately, but combined that then starts to increase liklihood of error.

Not remarkable a conclusion, maybe, though I thank you for making such a claim on my behalf - I don't often get such praise. But it certainly is a reasonable set of assumptions to make that any corroboration The Register visitors make is only ever going to be meaningless considering the size of the dip/rise in question, it would just be too small a comparison even if there were a similar spike/dip.

Then there is the possibility of a DOS attack from a botnet of compromised XP pcs on one particular site - that could produce an alteration in stats of that magnitude, theoretically.

Welcome to statistics.

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m0rt
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Re: As usual

Oh dear. So a company publish results that are to do with the IT world in general. El Reg publishes what the company said, and also states quite clearly:

"even when one takes into account the less-than-stunningly-accurate method both market watchers use of observing traffic as it hits web servers."

Plus, no spelling errors that I noticed, so a solid win I thought.

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m0rt
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Re: As usual

Thing is, El Reg is a tech site so any stats are going to be skewed to the readership base so you wont corroborate with general stats.

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Sick of Chrome vs Firefox? Check out these 3 NEW browsers

m0rt
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"Will Firefox quite copying Chrome's "users are morons" approach and stop dicking around with the GUI?"

Upvoted for this alone!

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Tim Cook chills the spines of swingers worldwide

m0rt
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Re: @lusty and all the others who missed the preceding sentence. OH RLY?

We have to disagree and leave it there. You are linking successful business with doing 'the right thing' whereas TC was deliberately setting those apart in his statement .You think Uber are doing the right thing? If profit is an example of it, then you must hold Google in similar regard.

Apple nearly went bust was nothing to do with moral compass, just bad business sense and leadership under Gil Amelio (Could be a faulty memory to who was in charge back then and I cant be bothered to google it on my phone)

I cant comment in what Samsung did or didn't do. I can comment on that Apple responded to extensive coverage on the plight of workers in Foxconn.

As for making devices more green, this has been called for for a long time. Apple doing this, if you think they have a corporate conscience then good. I envy your optimistic viewpoint and happier position and you should pity me wallowing in my cynicism.

Personally, I will wait until there is evidence of Apple having a core value of 'not just being about money' and 'doing the right thing'. So far, I don't see your comments as evidence of TC's assertions. Let's just say I'm too thick.

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m0rt
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Re: @lusty and all the others who missed the preceding sentence. OH RLY?

But the inference was, in TC's statement, that it isn't just about making money. Trying to uphold Apple as an example to us all is a little sickening I feel. An example of a well run company that makes money, superb. There are few, if any, that excel.

But you mention two things.

"Another example of Apple doing the right thing is their employment policy. There have been many stories on the Reg recently about Apple changing working policy for the better, both in the west and in their factories. They didn't have to do most of the things they have done, but they did them anyway."

That employment policy - which came first, and i really would like to know because credit be given where due, the complaints and mainstream media coverage before they clamped down on some of the disgusting events that were purported to come out of Foxconn? Or were they pretty solid before?

Also, are they any better than what employees would receive in western nations? By bringing them to the same level, you could argue that this is what you should have expected from Apple in the first place.

"ANOTHER example of doing the right thing, is making devices almost entirely recyclable. Using materials such as aluminium and glass, and glueing rather than screwing means their shiny gizmos won't end up in landfill. Their policy of return to store for recycling backs this up, they even give you money to return old gadgets!"

Yeah....but how many years was it that Apple was castigated for not being environmentally friendly?

http://www.wired.com/2013/09/ifixit-teardown-apples-latest-iphones-not-as-green-as-schiller-claims/

Reacting to bad publicity regarding an approach to life which should be a the forefront of a company that claims to be such is not evidence of TC's statement.

This sounds anti-Apple, it isn't meant to be, although i am not a fan, but I take exception to trying to present oneself as a paragon of virtue and a successful as opposed to 'just' a successful company. That is why i wanted some evidence of that statement because your statements regarding the evidence of that are not really evidence of that. I feel.

Arguably, everything they have done is to make money. that isn't a bad thing - that is what companies do. But to try and make out that they are in some way better than just that is urinating logistically.

However, I think I am alone in this judging by the reaction. :)

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m0rt
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Re: @m0rt

I don't think I did. TC states one of their core values isn't about making money and doing the 'right thing'. I am asking for an example of that core value in action.

I have no issue with Apple making cash in exchange for products that people want to buy. I have no issue with Google offering 'free' stuff in exchange for peoples data (that is up to the people in question). I have issues with companies stating high ideals that are obviously complete tosh. Google's Do No Evil and that last comment by TC are comedy gold. They are big corporations. Nothing more, nothing less and pretending that even a smidge otherwise without some proof of their high ideals that don't have a hidden agenda.

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m0rt
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@lusty and all the others who missed the preceding sentence. Re: OH RLY?

I should have included the two sentences.

" But life isn’t about money, life is about doing the right thing. This has been a core value of our company for a long time."

So, Apple claim a core value is "Life isn't about money, life is about doing the right thing."

I want to see examples of that core value in action. Not 'monetising customers data' isn't an example of that. Google give you stuff in exchange for them making money by you using that free stuff. Apple don't. You give them money in exchange for stuff. This is just their respective business models.

My question to Tim Cook is: Please can you give examples of that core value in action? Because from where I stand, all I can see is a company making a product and selling it for cold, hard, cash.

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m0rt
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OH RLY?

"This has been a core value of our company for a long time."

Since when, and please give examples...

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El Reg regains atomic keyring capability

m0rt
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Re: Errr....

Maybe, but think of the drinks you will be taking from the mouths of El Reg staffers...

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How good a techie are you? Objective about yourself and your skills?

m0rt
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Re: Why?

The fact you read businessinsider is also something you should keep to yourself.

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m0rt
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Sign it.

A professional body is just that. You can have idiots, geniuses, amoral, moral, sadistic, altruistic people in any professional body. Pretty much the same in society as a whole.

So better for the rest of us if those bodies have people who abide by a sense of duty and integrity to counter those that don't.

Plus it will do your career a world of good.

EDIT - btw - I wish I had some professional qualification in IT as a whole. As it stands, I am effectively a IT jack of all master of none and it is a pita, especially as I approach middle age..

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'Utterly unusable' MS Word dumped by SciFi author Charles Stross

m0rt
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I admit, I am Word Processor inept.

Back in the 80s, when using whatever it was on BBCs (Wordwise?) I got them. I could work it. Margins, indents, tab positions, everything. Then came WordPerfect and even though it wasn't wysiwyg i could use it because it was all that was around, was quick, made sense and *because* of it not being wysiwig, you had to know it. Papyrus on AmigaOS, then the first versions of Word Perfect for Windows and it still made sense. Over time, however, I did less and less documentation to the stage that now I tend to write everything in a text editor, depending on what platform I am on. Usually Scite.

The reason for this is because I am ignorant on how to do even simple things. I never learned because I was always needing to do something straight away, so just did it the way I could. So now my approach to any Word Processor, even Libreoffice Writer, which is all I ever use if I need one, is severely hampered. It is a little like asking a programmer to do a complex Exel spreadsheet. It just doesn't compute.

This is my fault. There is no one else to blame. I hang my head. I get asked questions about how to do things and I don't know. Fortunately they do not mock me because i am the first person they call when their computer does something they don't understand...but there is no one i can call on when a Word processor question gets asked, because most other people in IT that I know also don't know. Is this just me?

This really hampers me. But I suppose I should learn it correctly. So....are there any recommendations for actually learning the whys and therefores of document creation?

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Linux clockpocalypse in 2038 is looming and there's no 'serious plan'

m0rt
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@Jedidiah Re: Too late!

Read my reply. I was specifically commentarding on:

"I cannot think of a single thing I have which relies on time values and is over ten years old, let alone twenty, but that's just me."

I was being pissy because of the blanket disregarding of any possibility that there was anything he relied on that didn't use time values. I took the comment to mean time values in question, not specifically linux/unix.

I should point out that I have not worked for a bank, but I have worked for a financial loan company and code over 10 years is not uncommon.

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m0rt
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Re: Too late!

"I cannot think of a single thing I have which relies on time values and is over ten years old, let alone twenty, but that's just me."

Your bank's central IT system?

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m0rt
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Re: rant alert

I am really interested in hearing how you come to that conclusion. Please enlighten me.

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Superfish: Lenovo? More like Lolnono – until they get real on privacy

m0rt
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It doesn't matter to me if it was on all their range or the cheap end or consumer or mil-spec or Spongebob Squarepants signature model. The fact it happened at all by Lenovo is what is so monumentally galling.

It is a little like having those American TSA locks on your luggage, except this is your internet connection. It is like the illusion of security, people who are not internet savvy are always told that "...do not do anything secure if you don't see this sign on your browser etc...but hey. Actually that is bollocks. No - it isn't even a 'hack' as such - it was Lenovo what did it."

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m0rt
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You are right. But I won't buy em. But hey, who cares?

My main problem is that:

Acer - I knew who did the repairs in the UK. That put me off.

Sony - Oh Sony. How i do loathe thee.

Dell - some nice machines but at the same time some crappy decisions. Bought my previous dell because it had a really good 15" screen at full HD. Then having to remove the keyboard to replace the wireless card? sheesh.

Lenovo - So sad.

HP - seriously, what happened to you?

Apple - Hahahhhahahaa....the funny thing is I was an Apple user for years and got all my family on to them because it meant less work for me. Then SJ got all super control freaky and it just all went weird. So I never went back after 2009.

Panasonic - oh lucky you. Could it be?

Asus - I want to like you, I really do and I have some really find memories of netbooks...

Shame it isn't so easy to build your own like you can desktops.

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m0rt
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Thing is, Trevor, whilst I think your article is well written and rational and actually is a breath of fresh air...what Lenovo did was STUPID. As you said, not really out of greed or malice, just plain idiocy.

Thing is, Lenovo have a good past. They bought the Thinkpad name and, because Thinkpads are well used by us in the industry, indeed this is being typed on one write now, we tend to hold Lenovo to a higher standard.

Forget the shiny, we cry out of decent screen resolutions in a sensible format. Keyboards we can actually use! Machines that survive being taken to the ends of the earth and abused. Machines we can strip down and replace stuff easily. Machines that we use as tools, and as decent tools get regarded by those that wield them, we regarded these.

And there are several things which, over time, we have started to get a little annoyed over. Change that didn't seem to make sense to those of us who felt we had an affinity for Thinkpads. We felt a little shortchanged, but we stuck by because we have some loyalty and they are still nice machines, we can use them and recommend them when people ask us what should they get, even if we still need to remove a lot of bloat.

So this, even if it was stupid, was an act of betrayal. I mean, think about it...they actually had fake certs? Trivial to resolve yes. But it goes against everything we, supposedly, stand for. I say we, I mean those of us in IT who work with these things every day.

If this can happen so easily for something as silly as advertising, then just think how easy it would be to compromise firmware, whether any government or criminal body (probably interchangable terms) wanting their own piece of the action.

I too, will not buy another Lenovo (Lenomo ?). Nor Dell, for that matter, but that is because they are a pita to do anything to, and usually they spec some esoteric Dell own hardware that uses some piss poor driver that never gets updated properly.

I don't know where I will go next, and I will be sad not to use Lenovo hardware again, but the only voice I have is my wallet.

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