* Posts by streaky

755 posts • joined 5 Jul 2010

Page:

HP insists 'we don't have a global dress code' – while deleting one from its website

streaky
Bronze badge

Re: Not sure what the fuss is about...

Clothes that show to much flesh (short shorts, crop tops etc) are a no-no as are clothes with rude words or offensive logos

I know what we need. Burkas for everybody!

6
0

Contractors who used Employee Beneficiary Trusts are in HMRC's sights

streaky
Bronze badge

Re: @Rol Pay your tax like everyone else

"Should HMG decide to disallow any of these, should HMRC be able to go back x years and claim unpaid tax?"

It is somewhat the cost of doing business, tax systems work like this - I don't know if they should or not but they do. Just be happy you live in a country where you can't be jailed for it; directly.

Also by the way the rules on retrospection only apply in criminal law.

1
0
streaky
Bronze badge

Re: Pay your tax like everyone else

"Contractors have none of that and that's why businesses pay high rates - because they know they can get rid of them at the drop of a hat"

And they have to pay tax on those earnings. Many contractors do at the standard rates. I don't know enough about the specific scheme to be able to comment directly on it but given the HMRC think they're getting money it's fair to assume they think it was obviously bullshit.

Also the HMRC doing idiotic - nay, arguably criminally corrupt - deals with the likes of Voda and many others doesn't negate your requirement to pay tax on your earnings (and yes it sucks). If everybody paid their fair share (i.e. what most other people pay) then no doubt the tax rates could come down generally; rather than the bullshit situation we've dug ourselves into.

3
0

And on that bombshell: Top Gear's Clarkson to reappear on Amazon

streaky
Bronze badge

Re: 12 Years a Wage Slave

In fairness I don't think they cared about either but caved to inevitable pressure on all occasions it was reasonably valid (and the slant one still bemuses me to this day). If we start getting worried about racist terms from other countries that we don't know we're going to have some major problems - well, we already have.

I think the issue is the constraints that they place on people regardless of all that; but how the fk should I know..

6
1

US State of Georgia sues 'terrorist' for publishing its own laws ... on the internet

streaky
Bronze badge

Re: Lets hope he isnt black

It's not just black americans that randomly die in the US when dealing with the police. That's the irony; actually way more white people do *AND* there's no reporting standards with regards to who/why, so naturally there's no reliable data available.

This is all stuff you want to be happening in a democracy of course.

7
1

Want longer battery life? Avoid the New York Times and The Grauniad

streaky
Bronze badge

Re: and the same tests done with

Disable js/css/all plugins and you're good to roll. It'll look like shit and be unusable but hey.. Battery right?

On this theme amazon.co.uk blows my 2KW desktop PSU every time I use it ;)

2
1

Antitrust this! EU Commish goes after HOLLYWOOD’s big guns

streaky
Bronze badge

Geographical sports rights, TV show rights, movie rights; the works - this all should be up for grabs. If all this is fixed piracy will mysteriously drop and nobody will know why, but it's important to note that the two things are in no way related. You have no data proving that.

6
0

Reg reader casts call centre spell with a SECRET WORD

streaky
Bronze badge

Re: Lawyer magic word...

When somebody implies there's some sort of legal action in the offing there's nowhere for the discussion to go. It's not a case of striking first or cancelling contracts but if you're sane you're not going to talk to people when they're talking about that.

Like I said, either look for a better solution or just do it.

1
0
streaky
Bronze badge

Lawyer magic word...

Doesn't work.

Most companies, especially ones with tight procedures like large call centres usually have rules about what to do when somebody uses a word like "sue", "lawyer" or "court" and that's to terminate all contact and pass the case onto the legal department. If you're in an emergency and need to get things moving this is absolutely not the play. Words like that should only be used if the situation has broken down so that the only option left is to actually do it - if you're planning on using your lawyer to read through contracts or actually sure you need to either use better to use more neutral language to state that (we're going to need to pass this onto the board and/or legal department to consider our options if this isn't fixed asap or something similar) and/or just if you think you're going to court surprise them with it rather than declaring intent like many people do.

6
0

Microsoft attaches Xbox stream bait to Windows 10 hook

streaky
Bronze badge

Re: not on my network in a million years.

Win10 allows you to open programs just like the previous Windows versions

Indeed microsoft actually quickly backed away from the apple-tablet model once they figured it doesn't work at all, much less for them. People that bought into it notwithstanding.

2
0
streaky
Bronze badge

Re: MS's Game Plan

1. Write an OS

2. Abandon gamers

3. Have poor OS sales

4. Oh shit!

5. Write new OS

6. ????

7. Profit

1
1

Brit school software biz unchains lawyers after crappy security exposed

streaky
Bronze badge

Re: Legal advice

They're completely legal, what's more now they're going to end up with every blackhat in the world trawling though their code.

Some people never learn from the mistakes of others.

5
0

Mozilla's ‘Great or Dead’ philosophy may save bloated blimp Firefox

streaky
Bronze badge

Re: Chrome sleek and fast, Firefox bloated and slow

I love firefox and I do believe it doesn't get the recognition it deserves but it does try my patience sometimes, even as a software dev.

2
0
streaky
Bronze badge

Re: Chrome sleek and fast, Firefox bloated and slow

Except firefox's gc classifier can't figure out where 90% of memory goes and then can't do anything about it.

Firefox is easily the worst offender for all sorts of slow browsing failures. I use it every day and it's by a long way the best web dev platform - and lets not even talk about Chrome's font rendering on high pixel density displays - but if you're doing stuff like watching twitch streams or using amazon's site very bad things happen when they don't in Chrome or IE. You could say "ah but that's twitch's fault" or "it's Amazon's fault" but when you can point to another browser that doesn't fail so catastrophically with the same code somebody just isn't competitive.

3
2

'The server broke and so did my back on the flight to fix it'

streaky
Bronze badge

Re: graeme@the-leggetts.org.uk

People suffering from severe pain are not renowned for their acute mental faculties and diligent decision making processes

I've always managed, if you're taking that many paracetamol you're gonna notice it and realise you have a problem that can't be resolved by self-medicating, *especially* if you're still in pain. They're not addictive, so there isn't much excuse.

0
0
streaky
Bronze badge

Re: graeme@the-leggetts.org.uk

Not to mention that paracetamol is no more effective than a placebo for back pain.

Works for me. Science. Seriously though it depends what exactly the back pain is.

Plus also it takes a fairly massive dose of it to do any sort of damage, more than a mentally stable person would actually take.

0
0
streaky
Bronze badge

Re: "Apple server"

The thing I always remember about Apple servers was it's the thing they could actually do competently in a world where Linux wasn't the big deal it is today. Weird how times change.

2
1
streaky
Bronze badge

Hubswitch..

Hubswitch earned his name because he kept using the word to describe any piece of kit he thought might be the problem

We sure it wasn't because he was one of those people who couldn't tell the difference between them, which not all that many years ago was shockingly common amongst allegedly qualified network engs?

7
0

7/7 memories: I was on a helpdesk that day and one of my users died

streaky
Bronze badge

There was nothing noble about the IRA, but if you're gonna bomb things I'd prefer empty buildings over people is all.

Personally I advocate heavy use of drones and carpet bombing for dealing with terrorists... but apparently we can't have that for reasons.

0
0
streaky
Bronze badge

I assumed first time reading that it was bombs versus bomb, multiple distributed attacks haven't been common in the UK. There have been bigger single bombs by a large margin but there were usually warnings; I think that warning versus not changes the feeling of personal danger to a fairly large extent.

The IRA attacks were pretty nasty but with exceptions they were smart enough to more damage buildings than people.

1
1

Britain beats back Argies over Falklands online land grab

streaky
Bronze badge

Re: Argies are too late @Flocke Kroes

As for "more capable militarily", I'd say the current lack of fixed wing aircraft capable of being used on ships would argue otherwise. As is the inability to bomb the runway at Port Stanley from a fixed base.

Things we have now we didn't then:

Trident.

Cruise missiles by the metric fk ton.

SAMPSON

Drones

Way more capable defensive and offensive missile systems

A military that's had some practice

The list continues but I'm bored, carriers are for halfwits.

Come to think of it when we've used all that kit and the yanks get bored of selling us tomahawks at roughly the end of time we can just start doing aa refuelling runs over the atlantic for months on end. That said there'd be nothing left of Argentina after day two but still..

0
0
streaky
Bronze badge

Re: Argies are too late @Flocke Kroes

I am old enough to have heard the same thing said about Northern Ireland

Oh sorry is NI part of the Republic now? Must have missed that one.

The British government WILL give up its claims to the Falklands the moment the Falkland Islanders vote to go somewhere else

Which will happen roughly when hell freezes over, even if they vote by referenda to be an independent state they'll still be a protectorate of the UK and everything that follows. It's not going to happen regardless, but that's what would happen.

Falklands is strategically useful to the UK because of it's proximity to Antarctica, regardless of the views of the Islanders it's going to keep its legal status for centuries.

There's no non-military solution to the debate that favours Argentina in this, and obviously the military option just doesn't work either, the UK being much more capable militarily than it was last time they had a shot.

3
1

Mobe encryption guru Charles Brookson picks up OBE from the Queen

streaky
Bronze badge

Re: Queen != Government

She's well advised to keep her nose out of (nor be influenced by) political debates

Problem.

David Cameron's insane government makes the list of people to give honours to. Queen just hands them out.

0
0
streaky
Bronze badge

Re: Secure from the security services?

all mobile networks have a lawful interception clause written into their licences

Yeah but then you have to go to court and explain why you need to tap somebody's comms and expect a competent person to not think you're full of it.

Gemalto is my answer to this statement.

1
0
streaky
Bronze badge

Re: Congratulations

rightfully honoured for his contributions to ensuring that our privacy is protected by one arm of the government whilst another is bleating about how encryption is going to mean the end of the world and that the sky will fall in

Isn't it the same crypto that was generally considered staggeringly weak long before anybody had even heard of Snowden (was assumed completely broken in circa 1998)?

Uses a PSK stored by the (apparently idiot) SIM card maker, which means if you get into their gear you can just take all their keys. But I'm sure that would never happen.

I can make the leap between that tech and getting an OBE to be honest, surprised the CIA didn't award him the Intelligence Medal of Merit.

In all fairness I'm not sure if we blame the networks of him for all this but I think most people found GSM fairly sketchy on day 1.

1
0

Australian government demands signoff on telco network designs

streaky
Bronze badge

Order Changes

order changes to networks

Including installing this little black box we have here, don't ask what it's for. Patriot Act school of network eng one assumes? Notify us of changes (honest it's nothing to do with us back-dooring your gear). I'd literally rot in jail/raise up and army before I found any of this acceptable.

Terrorists? These guys are jokers, try fighting a few thousand people who know what the fk they're doing.

6
0

So much for rainbows, Zuck: Facebook staff still overwhelmingly male and white

streaky
Bronze badge

I realized it would not have even paid for an apartment there even with 0 left over for living expenses

Call the chap racist then back up the argument, interesting.

0
7
streaky
Bronze badge

Re: Why is...

Isn't it more important to hire people based upon their ability to do the job?

You really don't want a slice of this cake. Simple answer is apparently no but don't go down this rabbit hole of silly, I've been there and it stinks of mediocre.

0
0

Humongous headsets and virtual insanity

streaky
Bronze badge

By Default

What is it about VR that makes it so people are going to have it the same way as they have a 3d tv?

You need to buy a TV, if manufacturer makes it smart and 3D at the same price you have a 3D TV, if it's more expensive people will question if they need it and not buy. That all makes sense.

People aren't going to get VR kit by organically when buying something else (unless they start shipping them with washing machines/PCs). People who buy into this generation are mostly going to be gamers who are buying it because they're intending to buy it. There's obviously some business use too.

Maybe the next generation down it becomes ubiquitous when we get this kit in the hands of a critical mass of developers and we figure out what to actually do with it, maybe people stop buying TVs at that point and just get VR headsets instead, I don't have a crystal ball but it all seems reasonable.

1
0

Assange™ celebrates third year in Ecuadorian embassy broom closet

streaky
Bronze badge

Re: What prison sentence would he be looking at if found guilty? Failure to surrender

Already the sureties have lost their money

Good? Wasn't enough to make sure they fulfilled their role. My understand is it was only a part of what was offered anyway which is a joke in itself.

0
0
streaky
Bronze badge

Re: What prison sentence would he be looking at if found guilty?

but it does sound plausible

It's never at any point sounded plausible; claims are claims but the US and UK have a comprehensive extradition arrangement, and yes more comprehensive than any he would be in jeopardy over in Sweden. All the US has to do in the UK is say "we want z, because y" and he's essentially on a plane, no evidence needs to be presented.

It's been claimed many times that extraordinary renditions happen through UK bases that the US military is in possession of (the claims also state this happened with the full complicity of the British government), if Assange is concerned about anything related you don't come to the UK.

3
0

Fujitsu shrinks SMB file transfer metadata traffic jams

streaky
Bronze badge

Re: Steelhead?

Blergh scratch everything I just said.. http://www.riverbed.com/partners/find-a-partner/find-a-partner-tool/Fujitsu.html

0
0

UK.gov loses crucial battle in home-taping war with musicians

streaky
Bronze badge

Re: format shift?

The law as it technically stands is unworkable in this sense, it's not a criminal offence regardless and the music industry have no legal authority to demand to see the contents of your phone, aside from the fact they'd need to look at 10 million phones in the UK alone.

That's why the change was sensible in the first place, laws that nobody wants and are unenforceable are a threat (directly) to democracy for the same reason slavery was never legal in the UK. They might have legislators in the US bent over a barrel but it's not going to happen here, even if they get a judicial review to agree with them (and they absolutely won't) parliament will just change the law directly like I said a few comments up and there's nothing they can do to stop that.

4
0
streaky
Bronze badge

Re: Hang on a mo

Don't worry about it, it's just a judicial review. Worst-case scenario primary legislation can be written and they can all gtfo.

That said as a taxpayer I'm utterly livid.

2
0

Chrome, Debian Linux, and the secret binary blob download riddle

streaky
Bronze badge

Re: Disabling/Linux

Forking Chromium as a Linux distro is a major investment of time and expertise that most can't afford.

0
0
streaky
Bronze badge

Disabling/Linux

chmod 000? Nobody?

On a more serious note I don't see how the chromium project backdooring people's PCs is Debian's fault regardless of it being their problem. Protip: even OSS distros rely on upstreams that are supposedly trustworthy not behaving in a nefarious manner; anybody who believes otherwise has serious grip on reality problems.

2
0

The insidious danger of the lone wolf control freak sysadmin

streaky
Bronze badge

Re: It happens

The 'star' player who refuses to write up documentation , then snoozles upto the management with ideas hes 'had'(in other words , pilfered off the rest of us) and finally can be seen working 12-14 hr days to prove to the management how valuable he is.

And the management pay him as such.

I highly recommend to people who hire people to read this book. You wouldn't believe the "oh wait.. *facepalm*" response when you read it and realise you've come across the issues described before and suddenly you realise what is actually going on.

I've read it front to back a bunch of times and I can tell you that what you're describing could easily be one of the case studies in that book.

3
0

Would EU exit 'stuff' the UK? Tech policy boss gets diplomatic

streaky
Bronze badge

Re: 51st state?

Britain would probably be better off joining the US than the EU if it came down to a choice

How about we just have good working relationships with both - and China and India; and anywhere else. The UK is the home of international free trade and we shouldn't be locking ourselves into dealing with any one bloc, the EU is so big and cumbersome it takes decades to put FTAs together because they themselves have to be big and cumbersome - and in the end they don't work for us anyway, look at the state of TTIP.

Protip: there's no reason the UK can't have an FTA with the EU without being an EEA member, it's something Germany is going to want.

The EU is still debating (and only in the back-burner sense) if it should even have a FTA with China - before it even gets to the decades of negotiations - whilst Australia is set to announce theirs within a few days. This is obviously an untenable state of affairs.

3
0
streaky
Bronze badge

Re: A question of English?

The UK is sure as hell angry enough to leave the EU. Take it either way, it's the sane and measured thing to do.

5
4
streaky
Bronze badge

Re: “national measures” continue to entangle the single market

Hey we're not in the EU any more, we can't trade with the EU, we can't have immigration from the EU, we can't travel to the EU.

Yeah, no.

As for tariffs, Germany has way more to lose than the UK does, especially when we can buy better stuff for cheaper from China - which would be great after we have negotiated a FTA with China within months that's decades away from a possibility for the EU.

5
3
streaky
Bronze badge

Re: Well, we're screwed then

The problem with PR is it generally hits a situation where one person has one vote and somebody else has six; which is a nonsense state of affairs in a democracy. Smart small parties wouldn't spread themselves so thin as for example UKIP's case - trying to stand in every constituency cost them heavily.

As for the Scots, I wouldn't even start trying to decode that one; how so few people can hold the keys to so many parliamentary seats is nothing to do with PR and everything to do with how asymmetrically seats are allocated. Scotland has too many constituencies, parliament is too big: Scotland should loose a lot of seats, and I say this as a Labour voter who realises that probably means Tory governments till the end of time if Labour don't get their act together.

4
4
streaky
Bronze badge

French is the official language of the UN. It's used in the public sessions.

French is an official language of the UN (protip: German is not) it has nothing to do with the language used in meetings, which are usually in English where possible; failing that translators are big business in New York - but only between the official languages. Official languages of the UN are besides that mostly related to documentation that is produced.

4
0

Duqu 2.0: 'Terminator' malware that pwned Kaspersky could have come from Israel

streaky
Bronze badge

Re: Kaspersky Talks Shit About Viruses..

Are you talking about Kaspersky or Gemalto now? :)

0
0
streaky
Bronze badge

Kaspersky Talks Shit About Viruses..

... v4.1.

Somebody found 3 zero-days all at once, must be a state actor.

A friend of mine who works in infosec has about 40 lined up to report at basically any given time. It's not difficult, it doesn't take state actors (or even teams of people) and it isn't (that) impressive. What it takes is ignorance, naivety or just plain bad luck on the part of the people who wrote the code in the first place.

Also blaming Israel is fairly convenient. It's either the USA or Israel. It's never Russia or China, even though Russia and China have the largest budgets of any nation state actors for this stuff.

BTW - I'm not saying it wasn't Israel by any stretch, it's just saying calling states out without any evidence is absurd - it doesn't actually achieve anything either.

3
3

Brace yourselves: Facebook plans MORE PHP jiggery pokery

streaky
Bronze badge
Boffin

Re: Statistically typed

It's double (lets not talk about floats) wrong anyway, too lazy to email a correction, but, HipHop used to translate to C++, HHVM actually translates to an IL (HHBC) which is translated to good old fashioned machine code.

0
0

Facebook: Your code sucks, and we don't even have to run it to tell

streaky
Bronze badge

Re: Nothing like reinventing the wheel...

Assuming that the existing tools are actually fit for purpose much? It's surprising how sometimes you start with a tool; thinking you're gonna modify it to be better and end up just starting from scratch because what's there is either crap or you can't get it to do what you want.

Then again even when you do some projects pointedly refuse to accept submissions.

1
2

A 16 Petaflop Cray: The key to fantastic summer barbecues

streaky
Bronze badge

Re: 2 million lines of FORTRAN code

I found that FORTRAN code actually ran faster than it's similarly written C equivalent

Blind benchmarks are the best benchmarks.

Errrr, Standard Fortran (note spelling) has never had a punch construct. And your history is wrong as well

Sorry I never meant to give the impression I cared about either Fortran or FORTRAN.

0
5

Feds dig up law from 1789 to demand Apple, Google decrypt smartphones, slabs

streaky
Bronze badge

Re: "George, did you chop down that cherry tree?"

Still could be the UK where you get thrown in gaol for not giving out your encryption keys

Has this ever actually happened?

0
0

Undetectable NSA-linked hybrid malware hits Intel Security radar

streaky
Bronze badge

Re: NSA - Nice Sensible Authority

They vote themselves their own payrises, numbskull!

Like they're not into their own payroll systems anyway.

0
0
streaky
Bronze badge

Re: If it was truly firmware?

Firmware update jumper the way forward for sure..

Re: doing updates at a distance, it's called *REMOTE HANDS* - if you're not set up to deal with this you have way bigger fish to fry. Even still leave the update jumper in place and accept the risk, job done.

Seriously though what do you do when you have failed disks or motherboards or ethernet cables?

0
0

Page:

Forums