* Posts by streaky

735 posts • joined 5 Jul 2010

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Britain beats back Argies over Falklands online land grab

streaky
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Re: Argies are too late @Flocke Kroes

As for "more capable militarily", I'd say the current lack of fixed wing aircraft capable of being used on ships would argue otherwise. As is the inability to bomb the runway at Port Stanley from a fixed base.

Things we have now we didn't then:

Trident.

Cruise missiles by the metric fk ton.

SAMPSON

Drones

Way more capable defensive and offensive missile systems

A military that's had some practice

The list continues but I'm bored, carriers are for halfwits.

Come to think of it when we've used all that kit and the yanks get bored of selling us tomahawks at roughly the end of time we can just start doing aa refuelling runs over the atlantic for months on end. That said there'd be nothing left of Argentina after day two but still..

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streaky
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Re: Argies are too late @Flocke Kroes

I am old enough to have heard the same thing said about Northern Ireland

Oh sorry is NI part of the Republic now? Must have missed that one.

The British government WILL give up its claims to the Falklands the moment the Falkland Islanders vote to go somewhere else

Which will happen roughly when hell freezes over, even if they vote by referenda to be an independent state they'll still be a protectorate of the UK and everything that follows. It's not going to happen regardless, but that's what would happen.

Falklands is strategically useful to the UK because of it's proximity to Antarctica, regardless of the views of the Islanders it's going to keep its legal status for centuries.

There's no non-military solution to the debate that favours Argentina in this, and obviously the military option just doesn't work either, the UK being much more capable militarily than it was last time they had a shot.

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Mobe encryption guru Charles Brookson picks up OBE from the Queen

streaky
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Re: Queen != Government

She's well advised to keep her nose out of (nor be influenced by) political debates

Problem.

David Cameron's insane government makes the list of people to give honours to. Queen just hands them out.

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streaky
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Re: Secure from the security services?

all mobile networks have a lawful interception clause written into their licences

Yeah but then you have to go to court and explain why you need to tap somebody's comms and expect a competent person to not think you're full of it.

Gemalto is my answer to this statement.

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streaky
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Re: Congratulations

rightfully honoured for his contributions to ensuring that our privacy is protected by one arm of the government whilst another is bleating about how encryption is going to mean the end of the world and that the sky will fall in

Isn't it the same crypto that was generally considered staggeringly weak long before anybody had even heard of Snowden (was assumed completely broken in circa 1998)?

Uses a PSK stored by the (apparently idiot) SIM card maker, which means if you get into their gear you can just take all their keys. But I'm sure that would never happen.

I can make the leap between that tech and getting an OBE to be honest, surprised the CIA didn't award him the Intelligence Medal of Merit.

In all fairness I'm not sure if we blame the networks of him for all this but I think most people found GSM fairly sketchy on day 1.

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Australian government demands signoff on telco network designs

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Order Changes

order changes to networks

Including installing this little black box we have here, don't ask what it's for. Patriot Act school of network eng one assumes? Notify us of changes (honest it's nothing to do with us back-dooring your gear). I'd literally rot in jail/raise up and army before I found any of this acceptable.

Terrorists? These guys are jokers, try fighting a few thousand people who know what the fk they're doing.

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So much for rainbows, Zuck: Facebook staff still overwhelmingly male and white

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I realized it would not have even paid for an apartment there even with 0 left over for living expenses

Call the chap racist then back up the argument, interesting.

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streaky
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Re: Why is...

Isn't it more important to hire people based upon their ability to do the job?

You really don't want a slice of this cake. Simple answer is apparently no but don't go down this rabbit hole of silly, I've been there and it stinks of mediocre.

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Humongous headsets and virtual insanity

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By Default

What is it about VR that makes it so people are going to have it the same way as they have a 3d tv?

You need to buy a TV, if manufacturer makes it smart and 3D at the same price you have a 3D TV, if it's more expensive people will question if they need it and not buy. That all makes sense.

People aren't going to get VR kit by organically when buying something else (unless they start shipping them with washing machines/PCs). People who buy into this generation are mostly going to be gamers who are buying it because they're intending to buy it. There's obviously some business use too.

Maybe the next generation down it becomes ubiquitous when we get this kit in the hands of a critical mass of developers and we figure out what to actually do with it, maybe people stop buying TVs at that point and just get VR headsets instead, I don't have a crystal ball but it all seems reasonable.

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Assange™ celebrates third year in Ecuadorian embassy broom closet

streaky
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Re: What prison sentence would he be looking at if found guilty? Failure to surrender

Already the sureties have lost their money

Good? Wasn't enough to make sure they fulfilled their role. My understand is it was only a part of what was offered anyway which is a joke in itself.

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streaky
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Re: What prison sentence would he be looking at if found guilty?

but it does sound plausible

It's never at any point sounded plausible; claims are claims but the US and UK have a comprehensive extradition arrangement, and yes more comprehensive than any he would be in jeopardy over in Sweden. All the US has to do in the UK is say "we want z, because y" and he's essentially on a plane, no evidence needs to be presented.

It's been claimed many times that extraordinary renditions happen through UK bases that the US military is in possession of (the claims also state this happened with the full complicity of the British government), if Assange is concerned about anything related you don't come to the UK.

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Fujitsu shrinks SMB file transfer metadata traffic jams

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Re: Steelhead?

Blergh scratch everything I just said.. http://www.riverbed.com/partners/find-a-partner/find-a-partner-tool/Fujitsu.html

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UK.gov loses crucial battle in home-taping war with musicians

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Re: format shift?

The law as it technically stands is unworkable in this sense, it's not a criminal offence regardless and the music industry have no legal authority to demand to see the contents of your phone, aside from the fact they'd need to look at 10 million phones in the UK alone.

That's why the change was sensible in the first place, laws that nobody wants and are unenforceable are a threat (directly) to democracy for the same reason slavery was never legal in the UK. They might have legislators in the US bent over a barrel but it's not going to happen here, even if they get a judicial review to agree with them (and they absolutely won't) parliament will just change the law directly like I said a few comments up and there's nothing they can do to stop that.

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streaky
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Re: Hang on a mo

Don't worry about it, it's just a judicial review. Worst-case scenario primary legislation can be written and they can all gtfo.

That said as a taxpayer I'm utterly livid.

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Chrome, Debian Linux, and the secret binary blob download riddle

streaky
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Re: Disabling/Linux

Forking Chromium as a Linux distro is a major investment of time and expertise that most can't afford.

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streaky
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Disabling/Linux

chmod 000? Nobody?

On a more serious note I don't see how the chromium project backdooring people's PCs is Debian's fault regardless of it being their problem. Protip: even OSS distros rely on upstreams that are supposedly trustworthy not behaving in a nefarious manner; anybody who believes otherwise has serious grip on reality problems.

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The insidious danger of the lone wolf control freak sysadmin

streaky
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Re: It happens

The 'star' player who refuses to write up documentation , then snoozles upto the management with ideas hes 'had'(in other words , pilfered off the rest of us) and finally can be seen working 12-14 hr days to prove to the management how valuable he is.

And the management pay him as such.

I highly recommend to people who hire people to read this book. You wouldn't believe the "oh wait.. *facepalm*" response when you read it and realise you've come across the issues described before and suddenly you realise what is actually going on.

I've read it front to back a bunch of times and I can tell you that what you're describing could easily be one of the case studies in that book.

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Would EU exit 'stuff' the UK? Tech policy boss gets diplomatic

streaky
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Re: 51st state?

Britain would probably be better off joining the US than the EU if it came down to a choice

How about we just have good working relationships with both - and China and India; and anywhere else. The UK is the home of international free trade and we shouldn't be locking ourselves into dealing with any one bloc, the EU is so big and cumbersome it takes decades to put FTAs together because they themselves have to be big and cumbersome - and in the end they don't work for us anyway, look at the state of TTIP.

Protip: there's no reason the UK can't have an FTA with the EU without being an EEA member, it's something Germany is going to want.

The EU is still debating (and only in the back-burner sense) if it should even have a FTA with China - before it even gets to the decades of negotiations - whilst Australia is set to announce theirs within a few days. This is obviously an untenable state of affairs.

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streaky
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Re: A question of English?

The UK is sure as hell angry enough to leave the EU. Take it either way, it's the sane and measured thing to do.

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streaky
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Re: “national measures” continue to entangle the single market

Hey we're not in the EU any more, we can't trade with the EU, we can't have immigration from the EU, we can't travel to the EU.

Yeah, no.

As for tariffs, Germany has way more to lose than the UK does, especially when we can buy better stuff for cheaper from China - which would be great after we have negotiated a FTA with China within months that's decades away from a possibility for the EU.

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streaky
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Re: Well, we're screwed then

The problem with PR is it generally hits a situation where one person has one vote and somebody else has six; which is a nonsense state of affairs in a democracy. Smart small parties wouldn't spread themselves so thin as for example UKIP's case - trying to stand in every constituency cost them heavily.

As for the Scots, I wouldn't even start trying to decode that one; how so few people can hold the keys to so many parliamentary seats is nothing to do with PR and everything to do with how asymmetrically seats are allocated. Scotland has too many constituencies, parliament is too big: Scotland should loose a lot of seats, and I say this as a Labour voter who realises that probably means Tory governments till the end of time if Labour don't get their act together.

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streaky
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French is the official language of the UN. It's used in the public sessions.

French is an official language of the UN (protip: German is not) it has nothing to do with the language used in meetings, which are usually in English where possible; failing that translators are big business in New York - but only between the official languages. Official languages of the UN are besides that mostly related to documentation that is produced.

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Duqu 2.0: 'Terminator' malware that pwned Kaspersky could have come from Israel

streaky
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Re: Kaspersky Talks Shit About Viruses..

Are you talking about Kaspersky or Gemalto now? :)

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streaky
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Kaspersky Talks Shit About Viruses..

... v4.1.

Somebody found 3 zero-days all at once, must be a state actor.

A friend of mine who works in infosec has about 40 lined up to report at basically any given time. It's not difficult, it doesn't take state actors (or even teams of people) and it isn't (that) impressive. What it takes is ignorance, naivety or just plain bad luck on the part of the people who wrote the code in the first place.

Also blaming Israel is fairly convenient. It's either the USA or Israel. It's never Russia or China, even though Russia and China have the largest budgets of any nation state actors for this stuff.

BTW - I'm not saying it wasn't Israel by any stretch, it's just saying calling states out without any evidence is absurd - it doesn't actually achieve anything either.

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Brace yourselves: Facebook plans MORE PHP jiggery pokery

streaky
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Boffin

Re: Statistically typed

It's double (lets not talk about floats) wrong anyway, too lazy to email a correction, but, HipHop used to translate to C++, HHVM actually translates to an IL (HHBC) which is translated to good old fashioned machine code.

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Facebook: Your code sucks, and we don't even have to run it to tell

streaky
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Re: Nothing like reinventing the wheel...

Assuming that the existing tools are actually fit for purpose much? It's surprising how sometimes you start with a tool; thinking you're gonna modify it to be better and end up just starting from scratch because what's there is either crap or you can't get it to do what you want.

Then again even when you do some projects pointedly refuse to accept submissions.

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A 16 Petaflop Cray: The key to fantastic summer barbecues

streaky
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Re: 2 million lines of FORTRAN code

I found that FORTRAN code actually ran faster than it's similarly written C equivalent

Blind benchmarks are the best benchmarks.

Errrr, Standard Fortran (note spelling) has never had a punch construct. And your history is wrong as well

Sorry I never meant to give the impression I cared about either Fortran or FORTRAN.

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streaky
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Re: 2 million lines of FORTRAN code

the point is that FORTRAN code is nice and portable

So is C, it's a question of aged met scientists that refuse to write C/CPP that the met office *refuse* pointedly to fire wasting CPU cycles on effectively BASIC: Scientist Edition.

Never trust a language that has a PUNCH language construct.

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Feds dig up law from 1789 to demand Apple, Google decrypt smartphones, slabs

streaky
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Re: "George, did you chop down that cherry tree?"

Still could be the UK where you get thrown in gaol for not giving out your encryption keys

Has this ever actually happened?

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Undetectable NSA-linked hybrid malware hits Intel Security radar

streaky
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Re: NSA - Nice Sensible Authority

They vote themselves their own payrises, numbskull!

Like they're not into their own payroll systems anyway.

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streaky
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Re: If it was truly firmware?

Firmware update jumper the way forward for sure..

Re: doing updates at a distance, it's called *REMOTE HANDS* - if you're not set up to deal with this you have way bigger fish to fry. Even still leave the update jumper in place and accept the risk, job done.

Seriously though what do you do when you have failed disks or motherboards or ethernet cables?

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Obama issues HTTPS-only order to US Federal sysadmins

streaky
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Re: For the want of another IP ...

The majority in some demographics are still using non-SNI compliant browsers (notably XP/IE8)

What demographic, is it actually true even. These numbers are based on estimation rather than direct measurement.

I own a site that's used heavily by normal people in South America, Africa and Asia; if it was salt measurements on a packet of crisps it'd say "trace". Even directly measuring this stuff is sketchy; < 1% of my IE users are using version 999.1.

999.1; let that sink in... That's measured by JS not the UA string.

Even if any of this is relevant it doesn't mean it's actually sane to pander to these people. Most people on XP should expect they have a serious security problem anyway and use Firefox/Chrome/Something Else.

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streaky
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Re: Encryption Protocol

I'd imagine that would come under the purview of the usual NIST guidelines, once the declaration is used it would go into more detail about what to use and what not to use.

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streaky
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Re: Why?

Every site you use everywhere needs encryption. This site needs encryption.

The more encryption you have elsewhere helps secure the stuff that really really needs to be secure, aside from the fact I could figure out when to rob you by the stuff you don't have encrypted.

Because you're not bright enough to see the implications of sending everything in the clear doesn't mean everybody should be under threat.

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streaky
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Re: For the want of another IP ...

"There is no named virtual host support in https 1.1 So you pretty much have to have website == IP"

What.

There's no such thing as "https 1.1" what are you talking about.

SNI support starts around where TLS 1.0 was supported (FF2, IE7 et al). It's ancient technology and every browser you care about supports it.

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NSA slapdown prompts Privacy Int'l to file new lawsuit against GCHQ

streaky
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I'm leaning towards...

...these days - there's an easier way to get the public annoyed about this stuff.

Just point of that it's costing billions of pounds of taxpayer's funds to get no intelligence about anything whatsoever. Apparently the public are not interested in having any privacy so you have to "follow the money" as it were.

If we can get the government to start hacking and slashing at their budget they might start going back to doing what they're supposed to be doing.

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HP to buy EMC? We think so, say Wall St money men

streaky
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Re: Innovation, Invention?

aren't capable of anything more than buying other companies

They've made it pretty clear they aren't even capable of doing that competently, or at minimum integrating the company competently, anyway.

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So why the hell didn't quantitative easing produce HUGE inflation?

streaky
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Answer to headline question:

It did, move along, nothing to see here, look at some graphs?

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ISIS command post obliterated after 'moron' jihadi snaps a selfie, says US Air Force

streaky
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Re: Official Title

This rag-tag army of 30,000 medieval butcher bastards is doing a pretty good job of avoiding complete destruction by billions of dollars worth of western might

Probably help if the "west" was actually trying to end them. It's literally a 3 day job if they used an equal amount of air power and just went to town on them.

They're rabid animals that need putting down regardless of the competence of the war against them.

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streaky
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Official Title

"Medieval butcher bastards ISIS"

I wish the BBC would use this name rather than calling them the terminally incorrect "Islamic State".

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HMRC ditches Microsoft for Google, sends data offshore

streaky
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Re: FATCA

you might want to read up on tax treaties, the US FATCA legislation means that the UK is already committed to reporting on any US relevant tax data in a format requested by the US.

From a legal perspective companies within the UK are required to report these transactions to HMRC who then provides them to the US IRS.

*facepalm*

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streaky
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Easiest way to hand it off to the NSA for data mining, just store all tax data in the US (preferably at Google - it's not like they've publicly stated they've secured their network yet). Cheaper than setting up a dedicated HMRC->NSA link and no legal oversight needed.

(seriously what's wrong with open office if your goal is to remove Microsoft).

its not like they will be hosting all the HMRC databases at google

Yeah I'm sure it's not possible that somebody at the HMRC has ever copy-pasted a crapton of cells into an excel doc filled with private information before. Oh wait I'm sure they actually have.

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Virgin Media wins ELEVENTH patent case against Rovi

streaky
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These are the clowns..

Who used to be known as Macrovision. Yes, that one.

They're also the clowns who bought divx for 750 million USD - a product that as far as I've ever been able to work out has only really ever been used for piracy around the time when said pirates were all moving in droves to Matroska and h/x264 (and very few home users licensed it anyway). Either way, one of the dumbest acquisitions in history in both purpose and value (yes even when you start throwing Yahoo into the mix).

These are the clowns who think you can stop even casual content buyers from ripping media with copy protection methods that aren't even slightly secure (macrovision, ripguard et al).

Their product line was at best idiotic and at worst fraudulent (totally relied on legal means - i.e. courts/laws - and not technical means to actually prevent copying) - and reading this patent, if it's anything to go by, their patent library is even worse.

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Sysadmins rebel over GUI-free install for Windows Server 2016

streaky
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Re: Growing up is tough

think like Bash, but more modern / powerful / secure / more fully featured / parallel executing / object orientated / multiple data type support, etc. etc.

Shame Microsoft still can't make a console you can just drag to resize.

No really, powershell might be (and might not be for a long list of reasons) more useful than bash, doesn't change the fact Microsoft hates text consoles. They might foist it on people but it doesn't make it any better for the average windows admin in the same way as a bash shell on a linux server does for an equally competent linux admin - and it won't change 20 years of corporate culture of being all about the GUI. The windows registry is one of many symptoms of this problem.

I say this as somebody who manages servers with both, and has been managing windows systems for hitting 15 years now - they're not comparable precisely because of the way microsoft buries configuration. You need a GUI just to have clue what is going on. Sure you can manage a farm from a single server but you can with linux too, this isn't something that helps most people.

That said - as I said as long as it's installable, preferably from an unattend one way or another; it's mostly irrelevant anyway.

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streaky
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Re: Growing up is tough

"What is the proper analogy here: losing the training wheel or losing the diaper?"

The rear axle of your car snapping off at 80mph going round a corner. Windows isn't competent gui-less like Linux is. That being said, seems like automated deployments will probably fix all this regardless.

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Gamers! Yes, gamers – they'll rescue our streaming Fire TV box, hopes Amazon

streaky
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Renting and streaming games works great for... well... no-one

I'm not so sure this is true, it kinda makes sense in the console space, in the PC gaming space it makes no sense at all though.

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The Good, the Bad and the Ugly (of the net). Make your vote count

streaky
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Re: Take GCHQ's crown?

I don't really blame GCHQ they're going to keep asking for more powers and more money, it's for the civilian oversight to make sure they're behaving and are limited in the things they're allowed to do especially against perfectly innocent citizens. That's why you vote Theresa May, the biggest threat to democracy and freedom since Hitler, and parliament for their complicity/bit part.

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It's FREE WINDOWS 10 time: 29 July is D-Day, yells Microsoft

streaky
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Re: How many of you Windows user will be...

consumer OS licensing revenue is not as important as it used to be

To be fair I'm pretty sure it's a major deal for Microsoft and shareholders are going to take some convincing.

As for parties, OS works, get on with it.

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Queen's Speech: Snoopers' Charter RETURNS amid 'modernisation' push

streaky
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Re: "close a capability gap"

The capability gap argument is bullshit you're right. The ability to monitor phone "metadata" as they say only exists because the data is held for billing purposes - once you create the data it's arguably fair game for law enforcement.

The records of who people are emailing, and who and what they're tweeting and something something facebook both doesn't need to be held for billing and is encrypted anyway. This means to trawl through this data you actually need to do two wholly new things - have companies track/record packets and probably somewhere decrypt them.

That's not a capability gap caused by technology, it's a capability gap caused by phone companies pretending we still use mechanically switched telephone networks and ripping everybody off.

If they need to see somebody's comms they should have to require access on an individual basis like they're supposed to do with phone lines because that's the equivalent - they ARE looking at content, the "metadata" IS the content which is precisely why it's so useful if you're going on a fishing expedition. Also, it shouldn't be admissible in court like other wiretap evidence for the same reasons (it's actually not anyway, courts won't have it, but it should be made explicit in the primary law).

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streaky
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Re: Time to leave

If they intend to kill the NHS, they're taking their time about it.

They were taking their time, all pretence has long since passed. Not for nothing but every time they've been in government previously they've all but completely choked off enough funding so it can't run effectively - ostensibly so people would demand some "new" (see: old/bad) system to replace it and they can sell the bits off it to their mates at massive discounts on the true value. Not that I'd ever suggest the Tories are corrupt like they work for FIFA or something but they have a pretty substantial track record of doing this with taxpayer owned assets.

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