* Posts by streaky

1011 posts • joined 5 Jul 2010

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London-based Yahoo! hacker gets 11 years for SQLi mischief

streaky
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Business model only lasts as long as the class actions aren't awarded punitive damages. Feels like this [2014] Yahoo case could be an exception that could become a trend.

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WTF is OpenResty? The world's fifth-most-used Web server, that's what!

streaky
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Re: surely of rather more note?!

It *is* important to go by what sites do. For example what facebook uses is far more important information than what your dog's blog is using. Important datapoint is how many requests are served by each but that's data we'll never see...

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streaky
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lighttpd..

.. had (has) a lot of lua interwoven into it, obviously they were onto something. Shame it's essentially abandonware at this point.

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RAF Reaper drone was involved in botched US Syria airstrike

streaky
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Re: 39 Sqn RAF

Fairly sure that article on the MoD site is wildly out of date* - they did re-form years ago now at Creech but it was my understanding that they've moved at least mostly to Waddington now. I'm happy to be wrong about that but I'd be surprised if they're not almost totally back there in terms of personnel at least.

* "the RAF formed 39 Sqn at Creech Air Force Base in Nevada two years ago" - they re-formed in 2007, 2 years means that was written in 2009.

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streaky
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39 Sqn RAF

Nevada based? Creech? Fairly sure they've been at RAF Waddington for a while now?

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Encryption backdoors? It's an ongoing dialogue, say anti-terror bods

streaky
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Re: What could be done to counteract terrorist groups

My mum voted leave because she was convinced it would stop Syrian refugees coming to the UK stowed away in trucks

Well then she's an outlier. There's a problem with the EU that they were (and continue to be) paralysed in the face of them: which is something we all should be embarrassed about and it's true that if the EU was competent it'd probably have had an effect of Syrians trying to cross the channel but I don't buy into a direct relationship.

Farage also missed this key point.

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streaky
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Re: What could be done to counteract terrorist groups

The fallout of which lead to the Brexit vote

This is amusing and massively untrue. Nobody voted for Brexit because of Syrian refugees. They may have voted for Brexit due to the EU being paralysed in the face of them but those numbers are low. People voted for Brexit because the EU is the EU and nothing more need be said.

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streaky
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Re: The answer

Like, the BND are up to their necks in US-led mass surveillance and Russia is.... Russia. Open source for security tech but it has to be funded by... somebody.. or you get clamav type tooling.

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Sorry Nanny, e-cigs have 'no serious side-effects' – researchers

streaky
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Re: Going off on a tangent

why does the government get to pick and chose which lifestyle choices get rewarded or punished

Because the Daily Mail?

The correct socio-economic answer to this probably revolves around what the middle classes are doing at any given point be my guess. In the UK the middle classes are the largest grouping and relatively the highest payers of tax as a whole and per-capita and relatively to their own net worth and middle classes are the ones having the most babies and probably won't countenance taxation on family expansion. Or at least that's what people advising government most likely believe.

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streaky
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Re: Who do regulations protect?

@OP of this thread - I've said this before elsewhere but if you're getting cravings on ecigs you're doing something wrong somewhere. There's no reason to rush into cutting your nicotene intake. You're already doing better than if you were still smoking.

I started on 18mg last year and I'm currently vaping 6mg and I see no sensible reason to reduce that not least because (sue me) I like nicotene in the same way as I like caffeine. If you want to fully quit just take it steady with strength reductions, give yourself time to settle in.

One of the biggest mistakes people make IMHO is they think they can essentially use ecigs as a way to go semi-cold-turkey and there's no reason medically to do that and also it'll have less chance of working. Enjoy your vape, don't try to feel like it's a battle. You're now a non-smoker.

And yeah those pen ecigs are complete trash (note: this is what the EU is trying to unhelpfully push on people).

Also the guy suggesting menthol liquids - if there's any risk at all from vaping we already know the biggest risk is most likely to come from menthol flavours and FWIW throat hit (and burn) is always a function of VG/PG ratio. Higher VG = less burn feeling in the throat.

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streaky
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Nobody sensible anywhere is suggesting people who don't smoke take up vaping. Yeah, it's addictive but evidence suggests that the nicotine in ecigs is actually way less addictive (working theory is that it's due to the combination of chemicals when you burn tobacco - which is corollary to ecigs can help you stop smoking).

Nobody is saying it's a thing but as far as anybody can tell (with very extensive testing having been done) that even if non-smokers and children are taking up ecigs it's probably not going to be the end of the world.

Think of the children? Sure - but here's the thing: kids who are likely to take up ecigs are likely to take up smoking if we live in a world where ecigs don't exist but regular cigs do so if that's the choice it's logically a better option. We should be carrying on educating kids and that's fine but my thing is if they're gonna do one or the other either way (and these kids definitely are) ...

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streaky
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Pirate

Re: Looking for an excuse to regulate (tax) them

If that was true they'd already be doing it. There's three different government types in this: there's the South American tobacco grower type who will lose GDP if people actually give up smoking, then there's the EU type where they'll do whatever the pharmaceutical companies say because they want to keep their revenues and the EU thinking that's completely normal and fair and last there's the UK type who are running policy off the (self-contradictory) ASH play book.

None of it is any use though luckily in the UK we have PHE doing what they can in the face of insanity being argued from a position of ignorance.

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Speaking in Tech: Testing data center fire snuffer and... and pow! I just s$%t my pants

streaky
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Loud Noises

I doubt it's loud noise causing a failure, more likely to be the pressure differential and it is extremely common with fire suppression systems in datacenters, it happens literally all the time.

People always reference the Seimens testing when discussing failures caused by suppression systems which blames the noise but testing generally only shows temporary reversible performance degradation.

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Ad flog Plus: Adblock Plus now an advertising network, takes cash to broker web banners

streaky
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They're offering companies the ability to pay them to not block their ads. We used to call this racketeering..

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Hello, Star Trek? 25th Century here: It's time to move on

streaky
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Coffee/keyboard

Quark

"runs a strip bar in Deep Space Nine"

This triggered me because untruth and I didn't even like DS9...

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Inside our three-month effort to attend Apple's iPhone 7 launch party

streaky
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Linux

'Reg will be around long after Apple are consigned to bankruptcy court, maybe Bill Gates won't save them next time.

We know who you are, Apple.

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When Irish eyes are filing: Ireland to appeal Europe's $15bn Apple tax claw-back

streaky
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Re: What if taxation is inherently unjust?

Strange place we got to in society where the definition of avoidance has been changed to not include the word "evade".

My thing, fwiw, was to point out the fundamental falw in the EU model where one state can offer up absurd rates that hack away at the economies of other states and then those same other states having to pick up the bill when it all goes wrong.

€22.5 billion from the European Financial Stabilisation Mechanism (EFSM),

€22.5 billion from the European Financial Stability Facility (EFSF) and bilateral loans from the Euro non-member states United Kingdom, Denmark and Sweden

€22.5 billion from the International Monetary Fund (IMF)

Just throwing that out there.

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streaky
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Re: What if taxation is inherently unjust?

Just to.. y'know..

All this nonsense for a massive 5500 Apple employees in Ireland; and most of those probably aren't even Irish and many of them will be low-skilled jobs (I know a couple of people who work at Apple in Cork so I know what kind of work they're doing). I really don't see what the country gets out of the deal.

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streaky
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Re: What if taxation is inherently unjust?

That's an oxymoron

No, it isn't. One state is sponsoring tax evasion in other states. And as I said then the other states have to bail out that state because they're running enormous budget deficits because they're not charging these companies who are costing them money, by the way, the tax that even they say they charge corporations.

It's a something-moron but it isn't an oxymoron. As I said nobody is even taking Ireland to task on this (they should be though) - just simply that it's anticompetitive for companies in their own state.

Ireland had a rating of A+ from S&P and AAA from Moody's, with outlooks varying from Stable to Positive.

Educate yourself

I'm educated plenty, thanks. Is it really not established in the zeitgeist that the ratings agencies, especially Moody's/S&P, have no idea what they're doing?

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streaky
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Re: What if taxation is inherently unjust?

So I could not care who, how and when offered this rate it walks like a form of illegal state aid, it quacks like a form of illegal state aid, it is a state aid.

It walks and quacks like state sponsored tax evasion. Which might even be fine if the rest of Europe wasn't bailing out that state with emergency loans because the markets won't lend them cash at a rate they can afford because their economy is completely fucked. I don't get how nobody has tied this together yet.

As I stated on twitter earlier, if they won't collect on the bill their bailout loans should be recalled.

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streaky
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Re: What if taxation is inherently unjust?

It's not a question of taxation or if it's just or not. It's a question of it's not the tax rate offered to every other company that runs cash through Ireland. It's a competition question. Faster the Irish figure this one out the better for all concerned.

It's not even a case of Ireland's actual tax rate being unfair to the rest of the EU despite other countries have to pick up the costs of Apple doing business in their countries (although it should be) it's that the Apple tax rates miss the mark on fundamental issues of competitiveness. It's not even a question of the fact that what is going on being massive tax evasion. It's just simply that Apple isn't paying even Ireland's tax rate and that isn't on offer to me if I start up a business there.

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BT boils over, blows off Steam, accuses Valve of patent infringement

streaky
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Mushroom

Re: A perfect example of why software patents aren't allowed

There's always at least one BT employee on the 'reg comments downvoting my posts. I see you :)

But no seriously I don't see how they have a case. As I said it's not even a case of US v UK patent systems here, they're nonsense even by the US standards on inevntiveness.

Some of the patents discussed include massively inefficient ways of transmitting data that we were doing better than even at the time of filing; much less the kind of systems valve probably uses now.

I don't get it and every time I look at the patents I SMH. That said I commonly SMH when I look at software patents and recall how things were just the done thing at the time.

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streaky
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WTF?

Re: A perfect example of why software patents aren't allowed

They look utterly trivial for the state of the art at the time they were filed. Forget software patents versus not: they don't even look patentable even by US patent standards. Plus I can't imagine a way in which they're related to Valve anyway.

Another reason to burn BT to the ground - they're patent trolls.

Props to Valve for ignoring communications with these guys.

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Londoner jailed after refusing to unlock his mobile phones

streaky
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Re: Petty crime

But plea bargains are illegal here

Steady on a little bit. If you were even close to being aware just how broken the US plea bargain system is you wouldn't even be joking about this stuff. It's heavily corruptive of the very idea of criminal justice.

Yeah in the end the guy is saving everybody money but he hasn't committed an actual crime against a person (natural or otherwise) as far as the police are claiming so there's leeway. With that in mind nobody can really claim is sentence is anything but hefty. I'm not in any way suggesting his sentence should be lighter but if you kill somebody because you're driving and sending text messages you get less time for death by dangerous. Perspective is all I'm saying.

The US system is plead guilty to stealing 10k USD and get 3 months or get 40 life sentences type stuff (and I'm not exaggerating at all).

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streaky
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Re: Petty crime

I would say he made a limited attempt to contest the RIPA stuff because he was screwed anyway. I've never seen a case (unfortunately) where an essentially innocent (looking) party has fought back.

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California to put all your power-hungry PCs on a low carb(on) diet

streaky
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Re: I wonder what they're planning to break

Cloud computing is the 900 pound energy hog

Now I have a problem with cloud being the saviour of humanity it's always claimed to be - but if anything it should be reducing power requirements of computation. Because it's all in one place doesn't mean it's using more power for work done which is what energy standards should actually be based on. Mind you that would probably result in us using ARM for everything so lets pretend I didn't say anything.

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Non-volatile MRAM coming to servers in early 2017

streaky
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Take of the e

.. and add ing. Just saying 'reg. Just saying :)

Cacheing :p

Oh yeah and is it end times for BBUs on raid cards? \o/

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Don't want to vote for Clinton or Trump? How about this woman who says Wi-Fi melts kids' brains?

streaky
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Re: herd immunity

Somebody has never heard of herd immunity. There are actually genuinely good reasons for specific people not to get vaccinations, so you need to hit another % of vaccinated population or the entire system breaks down and you end up killing the people who through no fault of their own can't be vaccinated. Personally I think it should be an executable offence but I'm old fashioned like that.

There's a lot of very nasty diseases out there that we're lucky in the west to be able to be vaccinated against safely, relatively cheaply and efficiently. People taking that for granted drive me wild.

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streaky
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Boffin

Uhm

because it's very hard to study this stuff

It's 2016 and we're still claiming things that are very easy to study are actually very difficult.

In the EU we got vaping (gas chromatography and, y'know, mountains of research into carcinogens/poisins/toxins in vitro and in vivo), and apparently in the US they got WiFi because it's not like anything like MRI or basic cognitive testing of any sort was ever invented or anything.

If WiFi was damaging to brains (or in fact the opposite of reality where kids are getting smarter because despite falling funding pretty much globally we're as a species getting better at education) it'd be really obvious in the available data.

It's fine being against things that are essentially good but at least present a shred of evidence.

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Reminder: IE, Edge, Outlook etc still cough up your Windows, VPN credentials to strangers

streaky
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Re: Ouch

Strictly speaking it's why protocols tend to use nonces not salts (though technically speaking they're the same thing in some ways they work differently and are used for different purposes). Salts prevent dictionary attacks and nonces stop the hash being used in different contexts.

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streaky
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Re: Screw you Redmond

The solution is to disable msft browsers sending these requests or as somebody else noted blocking smb from leaving the local network at the firewall.

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streaky
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Re: Windows for Warships won't work without it

I wonder is samba is affected too

It's affected by the fact that the protocol itself is shitty on unsecured (see: WAN) networks, the actual issue is a browser specific bug completely unrelated to SMB itself.

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streaky
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Alien

Re: Response time?

Given that each version is supposedly written from the ground up, and yet the same flaws continue to exist in each verion, my answer is one.

Because they write these bugs in intentionally to support old things and keep customers - they're worried that if they make they make their OS actually secure but break people's software that relies on these bugs that those customers might just start fresh. I think that's unreasonable and also have serious concerns about anybody who actually relies on a flaw like this; but I don't work for microsoft.

Intel and AMD do the same thing with CPUs - once a bug exists it tends to stay around unless it's completely game breaking. Problem is a lot of Microsoft's are isues in security context and they still keep them around. Itanium was supposed to be a clean sweep of historical bugs that people rely on but we all know how that went - don't think Microsoft would ever try to emulate that unfortunate failure :)

Also in my earlier comment I was supposed to write "hash of your MSFT account password".

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streaky
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Re: Windows for Warships won't work without it

I'd assume it's purely for backwards compat reasons, possibly even with samba.

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streaky
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Re: Response time?

although not considered a serious problem, it was something that should have been fixed

Well it's a bigger issue than ever now because of the tie in between your MSFT account and the desktop. Now it splurges the hash of your MSFT account hash over the internet for all to see and that's, y'know, risky.

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Uber: Why we use MySQL

streaky
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MySQL's replication isn't the only available replication in the MySQL ecosystem though. So, erm, oops.

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Harrison Ford's leg, in the Star Wars film, with the Millennium Falcon door

streaky
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Re: Good job..

so I suspect not relevant to HSE regulations

Doesn't sound like a safe system of work to me, of course it's "relevant" - it's a serious injury (arguably worse than Ford's) in the work place. It's literally why the HSE exists.

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streaky
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Good job..

Nobody told the HSE about JJ Abrams (claiming, at least) to have broken his spine in the same incident.

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UK membership of Council of Europe has implications for data protection after Brexit

streaky
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Re: Out means out

Don't Brits deserve to have their human rights protected?

Because why is the ECHR nescessary to do that. The UK literally invented human rights and due process.

No mention of the ECHR or any other international convention or organisation.

We'll still be in the Council of Europe post-brexit which requires membership of the ECHR - indeed the ECHR is the Council's court not the EU's. Not taking a position (well not expressing one at least), just relaying fact.

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streaky
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Mushroom

But..

"if PrivacyShield is deemed adequate for transfers of personal data from the European Union(EU) to the USA"

But it isn't. The only thing that would be adequate is wholesale change of US constitutional law to cover non-US citizens outside the US; which is never going to happen in - even with legislative branch support (which there is none: they think it's hilarious that people outside the US have expectations of a right to privacy. No really, they actually laughed when they were asked about it) - more than 25 years, best case really.

People hiding behind this stuff are ignoring the basics of the issue that brought Safe Harbour crashing down. That the 4th amendment doesn't cover non-US citizens outside the US and that the president has the power to do pretty much whatever he/she(? maybe?) wants even if it did. Corps in the US have zero control over any of this and are in no position to certify, guarantee, prove, attest, swear by anything.

As Caspar Bowden said, the only thing they're really going to understand is stopping the data flows.

I don't think it's even fit for the UK either if we get the kind of law that's been floated recently, there's effectively zero checks and balances in there so..

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Failing projects pray blockchain works as 'magic middleware'

streaky
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Yep

I've been saying this for some time now, it's a solution looking for a problem and instead of letting it be applied naturally where it makes sense (it genuinely could be a solution to some actual real-world problems) it's going to get shoehorned into a lot of things where it doesn't belong or simply isn't needed.

This would all be fine because Darwin - the issue is a lot of it being floated by government departments and it's going to be money wasted at taxpayer expense.

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Ofcom should push for fibre – Ex BT CTO

streaky
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Re: Why not wireless?

Why are we investing in cable systems when mobile can offer just as good or in some cases a better connection?

Because it, y'know, can't.

There's isn't a wireless system anywhere at any price that can push 40Gbit at the lowest latency possible. Because you're an outlier doesn't make physical connections the "wrong choice".

What makes what BT is doing the wrong choice is they're not investing (enough) in the right tech at the right time and they're taking huge taxpayer funded windfalls for doing that.

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UK.gov digi peeps hunt open source chief

streaky
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If..

I planned to stay in London long term (I absolutely don't) I'd be all over this like a rash, sounds like an interesting job.

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One in five consumers upgraded to Win10 for free instead of buying a PC

streaky
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Re: Once again. We have passed peak PC.

I don't agree but one thing is for sure: people are only going to upgrade hardware when they have a compelling reason to do so which I think is what you're really trying to say.

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Cryptocat dev reckons WhatsApp is blocking calls to Saudi numbers

streaky
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Do people really..

still think that decompiling Java is anything but trivial to lie about this stuff?

No really though I imagine if it's blocked by the country then it wouldn't be unreasonable to block it in your app just to stop negotiating it and extra load to your gear. That said the sensible thing to do would be to tell people that.

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CloudFlare probes mystery interception of site traffic across India

streaky
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95% chance it's directly related to..

the idiotic block from 2014 where they blocked access to many sites (declaring an interest: including one of mine) because they were hosting "terrorist material" despite the sites involved a) not doing that and b) the Indian government making no attempt to contact the sites involved.

India doesn't like user generated content and more-so doesn't like user generated content that's arguably legitimately critical of the Indian government.

They went around accusing such terrorist organisations as Github of being, y'know, terrorists and that was that. Don't need to contact the sites explaining the issue or anything. If this isn't in the same vein I'll be amazed.

P.S this sort of blocking never ever ever works.

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Use Brexit to save smokers' lives and plug vaping, say peers

streaky
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Re: The Brexit cloud

Our government agreed the rules on Vaping via the council of ministers and our elected MEPs then approved it too.

I'm fully aware but the government has shown it can be moved on vaping. EU has proven it is utterly incapable of even discussing the issue. The progress that's been made with the Lords alone has underlined how much even a little public pressure can be brought to bear against the people who listen to ASH and get them to change their opinions to align with reality.

If it was possible to get the commons to agree to discussing it without saying "it's EU law so we can't do anything anyway" (which will be the post brexit outcome) then that same pressure can have an effect. Government departments are already being completely reasonable even in the face of the TPD.

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streaky
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I make my own eliquid because I can be sure of the quality of the flavours that go into them; I only buy flavours and base liquids I can get datasheets for and frankly that's what sensible regulation would have looked like. If we're all using the same sources for our liquids why do companies who make liquids have to individually go get every flavour at every strength tested to reach the same conclusions. It's illogical on all sorts of levels and completely ignores everything we've learned from science, ever.

The fact the EU completely missed this simple point is the exact problem with the TPD. That and the fact that there's no point in limiting the size of something you can refill (i.e. the tanks) other than just to annoy people.Same with the actual size of liquid bottles you can buy; why in the name of all holy hell not just require that caps are childproof (which *all* manufacturers are doing anyway). You wouldn't limit a bottle of bleach to 20ml so why do it with eliquids.

Also yes it only benefits manufacturers (see: traditional tobacco companies who have been buying those manufacturers) of the kind of ecig that you can buy from your local garage and those things suck if you actually want to quit smoking.

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streaky
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Re: The Brexit cloud

TPD confirmed to me everything I knew about the EU before and made it absolutely clear that the EU wasn't prepared to discuss anything sensible on any level. One doesn't vote to leave solely for that reason but it cemented my decision in stone.

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Trial to store benefits claimants' personal data on blockchain slammed

streaky
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Re: Misdirection

Any competently instantiated blockchain should be cryptographically secure.

This is utterly untrue. Blockchain attests data it doesn't secure it against reading (you could crypt the data you push into it though but that would be very unsmart)

Also not for nothing but storing personal data permanently and indestructably (even if it was secured) in a blockchain is obviously illegal in EU and (as it stands today) UK law soooooo...

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