* Posts by streaky

564 posts • joined 5 Jul 2010

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Landlines: The tech that just won't die

streaky
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Metaphor

Having to pay for it is a little like a garage selling you a Ferrari, and then charging you extra to be able to drive it at more than 50 miles an hour

No it's like having a 1980's Skoda that you can't buy only lease that was paid for by the taxpayer anyway and costs them close-to-zero to maintain and they put no effort into improving the roads and them charging you an lease on the car stereo that you can't not have at 15 quid/month.

This stuff actually gets worse if you're a Hyperoptic customer or certainly what VM used to do, not sure if they still do - you have to actually pay more if you don't take a phone package. Now I love Hyperoptic but that policy is idiotic - the only way they can get away with it is because BT massively distorting the market; you're still better off and your ISP is a million times better anyway so you have to bend over and take it.

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Sly peers attempt to thrust hated Snoopers' Charter into counter-terror and security bill

streaky
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The Hilarity..

.. is this junk isn't what Cameron and May are saying the security services need to "do their job" and save the children from ASBO-wielding nutjobs (yeah seriously - ASBOs) who can apparently piss off to Syria and come back when they like (so what's the point again?).

Seems to me that the security services always know full well who these people are whenever something happens but simultaneously refuse to crawl up inside every available orifice of the same people - they're far more interested in what you're doing on facebook.

the incident culminated in an attack on two members of the public who were beaten to the floor, punched, kicked and struck with wooden placards

Me or you would go to jail for this shit.

How can we have got our system so wrong? Is it just the boomers after more tory rape-the-country-finances pork that let these clowns slip in or what?

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YouTube: Nobody needs to get hurt Zoe, just sign the Ts&Cs

streaky
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"Anyone starting up a new video service?" she asked.

No because you all go to Youtube anyways so it isn't worth our time. QQ, tough shit.

There's no alternatives when all the drivers of all the traffic cling to Google or Facebook or whatever else for dear life. Gotta dance with the one that brung you I'm afraid.

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Hola HoloLens: Reg man gets face time with Microsoft's holographic headset

streaky
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All Microsoft have to do is have the option to be able to give the thing some power while you're using it at your desk and some battery power to last all the times when you're not. If they do that (and it functions like claimed) they're gold regardless of all the other noise.

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streaky
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Re: Truely holographic?

It's not a hologram in that way (well it isn't at all). Arguably it's more realistic in it's attainability - but the effect from the viewer perspective should be the same (arguably better, to look like an actual thing rather than a weird-ass projection). Enough people have said it really is what they're advertising for me to believe it, if you look at the technical specs it does look sound.

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Obama makes net neutrality pledge in State of the Union

streaky
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Re: Obama never met a lie he didn't like.

I don't think you understand basic economics. Also protip: you're not rich on the scale of things and never will be so chill out? Obama is probably the best thing to ever happen to the US and it's been squandered by people pandering to billionaires who keep their money in the Caymans anyway.

He's a terrible political operator but he's got his head screwed on.

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Give ALL the EU access to Netflix, says Vince Cable

streaky
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Re: iPlayer

I know a few born/bred/current brits who don't watch TV and therefore don't have a TV license who would gladly do same for access to the content they want to watch and not paying for drivel like EastEnders and strictly. I'm one of them.

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Just WHY is the FBI so sure North Korea hacked Sony? NSA: *BLUSH*

streaky
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Re: @Jimmy: Would have been more impressive (and believable) @fruitoftheloon

Or where it might by comparison be silly to say anything about the NSA having compromised the DPRK's network?

I'm positive that North Korea are aware that security services from various countries are in their systems and that passing on relevant information would have made zero difference to the NSA's capabilities.

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streaky
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Evidence?

The argument is the NSA in NK's gear. Well no kidding that's what they're supposed to do. Then <conjecture> therefore it must therefore be NK. The article actually contradicts itself:

The N.S.A.’s success in getting into North Korea’s systems in recent years should have allowed the agency to see

Yeah, no shit, one would think that, wouldn't one?

Don't get me wrong I can't imagine how or why it could have been anybody but North Korea but I've still not seen any evidence it actually was.

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Snowden doc leak 'confirms' China stole F-35 data

streaky
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Re: This is probably very bad..

"Crash from being harassed by opponent fighter jets?"

Goes the propaganda. If either of the claimed "it was somebody else" theories were correct we can be sure of some things:

* The Soviets would have shouted it from the rooftops

* The project wouldn't have been cancelled as infeasible

Chinese competition to the F-35? Heh. In the same way as the T-50 is supposed to be (popularly) competitive with the F-22 but patently isn't, I assume?

Some people need to find a grip. It's pencils in space and graphite in your sensitive safety-critical electronic systems all over again...

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streaky
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Re: This is probably very bad..

They can steal all the designs they like it doesn't give them the technical capability to actually build one or counter it.

The F35 is an inherently (designed) unstable aircraft, if they made a carbon copy it'd just do a Tu-144 at the Paris Air Show type deal.

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Prez Obama snubs UK PM's tough anti-encryption crusade at White House meet

streaky
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Re: The problem is...

Well look at the track record. Skype has end to end encryption, but they happily share the encryption keys with everyone claiming to have something like a warrant.

Most of these cases are fairly well documented. I don't think it's ethical for skype to exist in that environment - you take your chances, it does economic damage or it doesn't.

You can't back-door OpenSSL, you can't back-door PGP, you can't back-door TOR. PFS destroys the usefulness of handing over keys. They can do what they want but we get no more security for active and significant (financial and actual due to security weakness) harm to UK (and considering your link) US business - people can go elsewhere and not have this problem. The inability to validate Microsoft's crypto stack is doing them actual harm right now, today - same Apple; imagine what it would be like if people knew for a fact there was an issue with say Microsoft's RNG as opposed to conjecture - good luck share price. If they could somehow manage to tame Linux (and given most distros are moving towards reproducible binaries - good luck) people would just push untamed sources. Cat, meet bag.

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streaky
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Re: The problem is...

Obama, as well as many parts of the industry, would be in favour or at least not opposed to a ban on strong crypto

This guy is getting some good weed.

Don't be comparing what Facebook does with personal data with what your bank needs to securely auth you or that Google needs to be able to keep it's network secure from third-party non-state actors even if your primary assertion is true (it isn't).

When David Cameron was talking about this he was talking about in extremis - meaning effectively in exceptional cases they might need to come along and ask for keys. If you don't like that make sure your crypto supports perfect forward security so that giving up keys would be a waste of time, but to an extent yes - the industry is generally happy turning over data on people who they are told are a threat to various institutions and where possible.

As I pointed out to David Cameron on twitter which I imagine wasn't read by a single soul but I thought it important anyway; the NSA and GCHQ's attitude to all-you-can-eat data out of the pig trough means that crypto is getting much stronger - keys are getting larger, protocols and cipher suites are being abandoned in the hope people can have a little bit of privacy again. There's literally nothing the NSA or GCHQ can do about any of this even if they legislate (because data will move out of the jurisdictional control of either party and US/UK tech companies will collapse as a result) so they might as well put the money into what GCHQ are supposed to do and more humint.

Because I'm a British national it isn't ethical for me to start a tech business I want to start in the current environment so I don't - this is the primary effect of the current environment we live in.

Strong crypto is important, the end.

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Scary code of the week: Valve Steam CLEANS Linux PCs (if you're not careful)

streaky
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Re: If my memory serves me right...

This isn't SteamOS it's the Linux Steam Client, they aren't the same thing.

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BT bemoans 'misconceived' SUPERFAST broadband regs

streaky
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Re: BT Fibre

I see the reg forums are frequented by BT/OFCOM/ASA employees. Hiya fellas - learn what a fibre connection looks like - mine's GigE up/down; how's yours?

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streaky
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BT Fibre

"The Brit telco monopoly is the largest provider of fibre broadband services over its network"

I can't possibly be the only person in the country who disputes this. They have precisely zero consumers on fibre and almost no businesses.

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Grand Theft Auto 1997: 'Sick, deluded and beneath contempt'

streaky
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Re: I loved the top down GTA Games

So what are the "driver's countries"? Not Italy or Germany then?

I've never driven in Italy but I've experienced the roads.. I'm going with no.

They make nice cars but..

https://www.youtube.com/watch?v=s0MDY9fl-IA

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streaky
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Re: I loved the top down GTA Games

"that most countries drive on the right hand side of the road rather than the left hand side"

He said correct; all the driver's countries drive on the left, for example Japan, which is why Japanese cars tend to have the indicator stalk on the correct side unlike many supposedly British cars (hey lets play indicate and change gear at the same time).

Driving on the right is a throwback to stagecoach driving (much like the suspension "systems" on the average US-built vehicle) and something to do with mailboxes in the USA and nothing to do with being correct - which is why many drive-on-the-right countries have to come up with weird road rules to support it.

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What do UK and Iran have in common? Both want to outlaw encrypted apps

streaky
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Re: Risk vs benefit

@Jim 59

Yeah neither the internet nor crypto have anything to do with terrorism. If there was somehow some way to stop all internet terrorist activity they'd just switch to sending letters around or the ever classic two tins and a long piece of string or better still meet in a bar once a week.

For damaging the security of crypto (which is so disgustingly outside the realms of the UK security services capability I've lost my earlier sense of humour on the subject) you trash the UK's economy and arguably the world because all banking, shopping, trading etc transactions have to stop while we come up with something new.

VPNs, your connection with Amazon, banking trades, TOR etc work off the same protocols which is precisely what confers security on them in the first place - they all look the same to anybody who doesn't have the right private keys.

"Would we rather give up all privacy and possibly have a few less terrorist attacks or put up with the CURRENT LEVEL of attacks and keep all of our encryption."

If the level of attacks increased (much as I've been ridiculing Donald Trump over this issue) we should probably look at revisiting the relevant laws for defensive weapons before we break our entire way of life and economic system.

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streaky
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Alien

Re: Ahh The dereaded VPN

Guys you can't "outlaw VPN" without crashing the entire economy of the entire country (because one can't tell the difference).

By even arguing over this you're actually worse than Cameron and his clueless government. If it did come to pass I'd raise up an army anyway so..

Also one does not arbitrarily "break encryption", and DC would never make the rich pay enough tax to even throw 1 trillionth of the required resources at the first email they want to read sooooo.. It's a funny joke but it has no basis in reality.

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FBI has its fingers deep in NSA surveillance pie, declassified report shows

streaky
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FBI gets access to foreign military intelligence what could possibly go wrong.

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Police radios will be KILLED soon – yet no one dares say 'Huawei'

streaky
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Re: Push-to-talk latency

"I understood it and am carrying out any orders contained within it"

Roger doesn't confer that, it means "message was received". The other word I mentioned "wilco" means that.

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streaky
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Alien

Re: Push-to-talk latency

"You mean like this?"

Funnily enough, exactly like that ;)

"IIRC, aviation types actually use the shorter "affirm" for yes, precisely so that it can't be confused with "negative" if the start gets truncated and all you hear is "...ative"."

If all you hear is "...ative" and you make no attempt to ask for the message to be repeated you almost deserve to be at the Hague.

Not for nothing but last time I used good old analog military radio frequencies "rodger" or the ever popular "wilco" was still in fashion which sounds nothing like negative. I really do hope our radio comms haven't been replaced with Americanisations in the name of lets all work together because it's the yankees who have this wrong, much like their salutes :)

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streaky
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Conflating issues but we know for sure the US govt has asked US business to backdoor their kit and there's zero evidence the Chinese govt has asked Huawei to. Would Huawei do it? I don't know but it's arguably casus belli if anybody found out.

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streaky
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'is still regarded with suspicion by anyone making strategic Telco decisions and has been described Michael Hayden, a former head of the CIA and the NSA as an “unambiguous national security threat”'

We only took this slightly seriously *before* we found out the *real* "unambiguous national security threat" is the NSA. Now it's some sort of funny joke. There's strong evidence against the NSA and *none* against Huawei, we in the UK should take their investments with open arms. Cautious, evidence-based open arms, but open arms all the same.

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streaky
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Re: Push-to-talk latency

What's wrong with putting an audible tone in the software when the thing is ready to transmit on the network? Seems like a very simple problem to solve rather than invoking OPERATION GUESSWORK.

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MI5 boss: We NEED to break securo-tech, get 'assistance' from data-slurp firms

streaky
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Re: Indeed

Just to be clear I'm not saying that they shouldn't be using more "traditional" forms of threat assessment, what I'm saying is that they need a parallel system that can tell them if they're maybe missing people or mis-allocating resources - Bin Laden FWIW isn't as big an actual direct threat as the Hamza al-Ghamdi type; Bin Laden confers threat status on Hamza al-Ghamdi, not the other way round - yet who were the resources being thrown at. That's what I mean.

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streaky
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Re: Indeed

I've said it before quite publicly, if you read the report on the specific case you mention it's fairly obviously a catastrophic failure of the services that the government managed to somehow contort into "it's Facebook's fault" and the press followed it dutifully.

It's pretty clear they had multiple opportunities and the information available to have recognised that they were both a pretty serious threat without hindsight - seems to me there's no system in place to recognise that the more dangerous people a subject comes into contact with pretty much guarantees that person themselves should be escalated as a threat.

They knew what was going on and they did nothing about it, and we all know the result. For that incompetence we get "we need to decrypt everything". They could get all the private keys in the western world and it will still do nothing for them because they have no useful threat escalation systems (namely that aren't prone to the massive human errors as noted in the report) in place so they won't be able to join the dots. It's not even an AI problem it's a simple look at the communications we already know about problem; it's solvable even with an upside-down page-rank style algorithm targeted at people, organisations and aliases.

If all comms were in the clear all the doors they'd be kicking down would be the talkers and the trolls as opposed to the real threats that as I mentioned they seemingly have no way to classify.

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streaky
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My keys just got bigger. Haven't we stopped yet?

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What an ACE-HOLE! This super-software will whip you at poker, hands down

streaky
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Strictly speaking the way a human plays is an irrelevance. Solving a game means you have a fair idea that you're going to win totally regardless of what another human does.

Now, when you do play poker - and this is the great thing about poker, and why it isn't just pure luck and I imagine what you're alluding to - a human opponent can maximise their wins and minimise their losses and if they're any good still monetarily beat you even if they're statistically (hands won at showdown whatever) losing.

Without having actually looked at the way their system works and I assume it doesn't do this but you can look at the system's degree of confidence about a hand and decide to bully people off the pot or call large all-ins. It would be absolutely fascinating to see it play against both pro and not pro players. There is a piece of software they could plug it into that will actually play hands for them at various poker sites based on their strategy. The trouble with a "please don't bully me off the pot strategy" is if somebody suspects that you'll generally fold large bets thrown at you unless you have say AA/AK preflop or some such is they'll just keep throwing huge bets at you which in heads-up is the end of the game essentially.

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Pastebin: The remote backdoor server for the cheap and lazy

streaky
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Uhm.

Speaking as the owner of a competitor site to pastebin, I've never heard so much trash in all my days.

Blacklist pastebin isn't the answer to any sort of problem.

Firstly you'll note wordpress is the actual issue here (as described) - if you want to be worried about something be worried about the insecurity of your actual app. What happened there might not be relevant to your problems (it's extremely likely it isn't).

Secondly what we're really talking about is the ability to both upload content and then fetch it from somewhere. Good luck with that particular game of whack-a-mole. What you're essentially saying is don't allow internet access of any sort. That might be a reality depending on the systems involved but there's no sensible half measures with this problem.

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FBI boss: Sony hack was DEFINITELY North Korea, haters gonna hate

streaky
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Re: Yeah...

The "evidence" strongly suggests the FBI might be terminally retarded. There's literally no politer way to put it.

They're just dumb and incompetent.

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UKIP website TAKES A KIP, but for why?

streaky
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Re: They arent a serious party..

The UK needs immigration, nobody with any sense (including Farage) has denied that. UK membership of the EU allows any low hanging fruit that decides to just show up to take a chunk of the wealth the country has accumulated and walk away. Doesn't apply to everybody but to call people asking the question either racist or "extreme right" is utterly absurd; it's the centrist position on immigration in the UK, today. That isn't healthy in any way shape or form either economically or politically - it pretty *clearly* sows seeds of discontent, which could easily turn into who knows what.

The UK should be able to control its immigration, be it wide open or essentially closed borders, based on the needs and wants of the country and the people who live there. Anything less can only lead to people quoting Powell, as we have seen.

"I don't know about you, but I hear very few people talking about this"

I live in London but I'm from the north and any time I return it's basically *all* I hear about.

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streaky
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Re: They arent a serious party..

"kippers conveniently forget to mention when spouting their anti- EU rhetoric are the EU rulings and regulations that actually protect us from the worse depredations of our own government"

Conflating wildly different issues, but more than that the more silly stuff gets stomped on by British courts than European ones without generally even having to look at EU law, European courts don't generally take cases at all and that the ECHR is full of the terminally convenient "other than such as are prescribed by law and are necessary in a democratic society in the interests of national security or public safety, for the prevention of disorder or crime, for the protection of health or morals or for the protection of the rights and freedoms of others".

The ECHR nor any other EU law protects you from anything. How does one define morals or national security or anything else that allows workarounds. On top of that if it really came down to it government would derogate regardless.

This idea that the EU is some sort of last bastion of freedom in EU member states is *nonsense*. Proof is in the pudding here, they're not interested in dealing with GCHQ, the end - even changing position from their own rulings on the subject. QED my friend.

Even if all that wasn't true the ECHR and ECJ are overworked and have no time for dealing with even a small percentage of cases sent to them, they'd much rather piss about arguing over rights of prisoners to vote knowing full well in the end the government is going to *ignore them* anyway.

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streaky
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Re: They arent a serious party..

They aren't a serious party because they only have one public policy (not to say they couldn't come up with more, more on that a bit later..). There's nothing racist or extreme right about wanting out of the EU. Now they might not be serious but they are a major player because they're the only party interested in talking about probably the one thing that bothers people most of all - the UK's membership of the EU. Both Labour and the Tories could pretty much end UKIP's existence over night with a single sentence - and the longer it goes on the more likely UKIP are to become a legitimate party (by defining policy related to what happens *after* the UK leaves the EU).

Some of their members on the other hand.. Wow.

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streaky
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Re: Hey 123-reg

@qwertyuiop - Eh you're right actually, still a bit sketchy morally. Even to the extent it's true one would be questioning the future relationship - well I would anyways, can't speak for NF.

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streaky
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Re: DNS game of "chase the record"

Not if you actually want cloudflare to service requests for you?

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streaky
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Hey 123-reg

"UKIP did not fail to renew its domain name and in fact has a long term registration with 123-reg. This morning we have helped UKIP to restore its website to normal service."

I'm sure what you meant is "we can't possibly comment on the billing status of a customer's account, you should contact them" - right? Can we get the ICO up in here?

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streaky
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What will we do if we can't gob off in the comments? Might as well remove the comments section =)

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Healthcare: Look anywhere you like for answers, just not the US

streaky
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No it only works because it's a rich city-state with wealth based in international trade rather than actually having to work where all the kids are healthy and well educated. Give them a healthy dose of obesity and scale it up to 250 million people and it'll collapse pretty catastrophically.

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Ex-Microsoft Bug Bounty dev forced to decrypt laptop for Paris airport official

streaky
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"Silly person has laptop that decrypts everything on desktop login" - it's reasonably newsworthy when you consider the field this person works in.

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Snowden leaks lack context says security studies professor

streaky
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Re: worse

@OP

Couldn't agree more. Not only what you said but assuming what you said is true why are we throwing so much money at them [NSA/GCHQ].

It's all going to end badly because as time goes on more things are going to be crypto-by-default (http/2 is a pefect example) and it's going to speed up adoption of stronger ciphers and bring about the faster demise of the weaker stuff (see: Google's jihad against sha-1).

When all this comes to pass what do NSA/GCHQ do? Nothing - they effectively cease to exist because they have no real-world capability and all the money has to go where it should be going anyway, into humint.

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UK.gov: Sod SIGINT, let's turn GCHQ into a TECH CRECHE

streaky
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Re: I don't see why not.

"If one is worried that they'll code in some backdoors, then don't hire them"

I probably wouldn't due them them likely having no perusable development history, which prevents all kinds of checks and balances, never mind fear of backdoors; see this recomended reading on a directly related subject.

"Code reviews will mitigate the injection of backdoors. In my current workplace, no change gets committed to the working codebase until it has been peer-reviewed by someone competent"

Yeah because it's always really easy to see when lets say an RNG is backdoored, given there's no standard test for it unless it's compromised *very* obviously, if the Linux RNG was backdoored today, right now, even with the source code available it'd probably be very difficult to do. Which is to say that your assertion depends on the nature of the work. Given you're specifically talking about ex-sigint folks you're probably talking about specialist algos in the first place as opposed to cheapo facebook clone perl devs you can find on any rent a coder type sites.

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streaky
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Re: Meanwhile, in the U.S....

"Agree to a 5-6 year stint with the NSA after school, and they will take care of your undergrad college bills"

This wouldn't apply in the UK because they look for rich kid establishment types from the Big Two who don't need the money. And yes this *is* directly linked to GCHQ's a) competence and b) ethical direction or lack thereof.

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streaky
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Re: First Step

Privatising GCHQ. Then they'd have to respect, y'know, the law. Can't see that.

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Want to have your server pwned? Easy: Run PHP

streaky
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Re: Seriously, he actually believed the advertised PHP version on the server?

I loosely know Anthony aka ircmaxell in an IRC context, if he wasn't hiding I'd be saying this:

Backports, backports, no seriously, backports...

The methodology is sketchy at best in the context of most people will be running distro-installed versions with security fixes backported into what are at face value older "insecure" versions - and there's no reliable way to measure this, which is why one doesn't ordinarily bother. Don't get me wrong there's probably a lot of insecure PHP installs but the version doesn't have to be misreported for the secure/not secure data and drawn conclusions to be *wildly* incorrect.

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Robox: How good could a sub-£1k 3D printer be?

streaky
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Re: I Think

SLS is the way to go frankly. The materials used are simply a question of laser power - if you're wanting to print plastic a lower power model will do you fine, if you want to move to metals you just need to upgrade the laser. You end up with effectively a sponge - if you're happy you can dip the object in an epoxy and away you go.

There are projects around but there's a question of size/cost but these will inevitably come down.

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Why has the Russian economy plunged SO SUDDENLY into the toilet?

streaky
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Re: So, Crony Capitalism doesn't work!

@veti -

"That's what deposit guarantee schemes are for. In the UK, you're covered up to 85,000 pounds per banking license. So as long as you don't have more than that amount deposited with any one banking license, you're literally as safe as if the money were in the Bank of England itself"

You're right - but who pays for it. Oh, yeah. Taxpayers do - and again there's no chance of recovering it, and the state would probably have to borrow to cover it. End result huge black hole versus sellable assets.

"To really "break even", the shares would have to reach around £10 (by the end of next year - and as more time goes by, the breakeven point only goes up)."

It does - but not by *that much*. Remember that interest rates are effectively negative. You actually make money by not keeping it in a bank but by spending/borrowing. There's a cuttoff sure, that cuttoff does move but not by the amount you're suggesting. It could but it hasn't.

The reality is if they were sold today the taxpayer would make a loss but nowhere near as significant as the loss on burning all the accounts, compensating everybody and the admin costs of stripping the bank apart.

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streaky
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Re: So, Crony Capitalism doesn't work!

Such concepts like banks that are "too big to fail", prove this

Can't believe this still has to be explained.

The issue isn't that the banks are too big to fail, it's that banks have too many customers (you, me, small/large businesses). If a bank fails and takes a billions of dollars/pounds/euros debt down with it the people who lose out are the customers - there is a long queue and the bank customers are to be at the back of it. The houses you borrowed against are now assets of a liquidator and inevitably they will be sold to pay of some (probably foreign) investor and the whole things costs admin time and money. Outcome: everybody is poorer.

On the other hand if you rescue the bank you can fix it's fundamentals and eventually sell it off you can stand to make money, or potentially significant volumes of money, effectively for the tax payer. Yes, rescuing a failing bank is an investment in both it's customers and the bank itself.

RBS is the classic example in the UK - if it's shares are worth £5 each the taxpayer breaks even, any more they make a profit, i.e. we're richer than we were before. They've hit £4.03 and most investors can see a time when they'll hit the target, frankly they'd probably have been there already if it wasn't for the various banking scandals since. The share price has tripled from the lowest point, the gap is easily made up - and no customers ever lost their homes/savings/pensions/jobs so the state didn't have to invest in that directly where there would be no possibility to recover the costs.

The problem isn't rescuing banks, it's the effective lack of prosecution and consequences for people who let it happen in the first place; be it regulators or people who worked at those banks. That's where the cronyism has to be rooted out.

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Tor de farce: NSA fails to decrypt anonymised network

streaky
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Re: SSL private keys

Yeah that's probably most egregious of the nonsense points in the article. CA attests your signing request, it never sees your private key. If it did then PKI would be even more fundamentally broken that it actually is and nobody would use it because it'd have been replaced by a system that works more like PKI actually does decades ago. Yes PKI is broken, no, not that way.

Just no.

Even the CA handing over their [root/intermediate] keys would only allow them to create new certs pretending to be you but the thumbprints wouldn't match and that CA would go out of business 3 days later because their root certs would be revoked left, right, center and on mars so no court (secret or otherwise) would ever do it because it'd be the end of a significant number of large US tech companies which the NSA, CIA and other alphabets would full well know.

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