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* Posts by Chris Cartledge

70 posts • joined 31 May 2007

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Behold the Lumia 535 NOTkia: Microsoft wipes Nokia brand from mobes

Chris Cartledge
Meh

Naming/Numbering

I find it difficult to engage with a range of goods named/numbered: 530, 535, 630 and 635. This is even less enticing than Windows itself.

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First pics: Comet-chaser Rosetta hurtles towards icy prey, camera in hand

Chris Cartledge
Facepalm

maneuvers?

I would have thought manoeuvres...

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Google erases G8 venue from Earth: Microsoft doesn't

Chris Cartledge
Pint

Hysterical data

Google did not do a very thorough job! You only have use Google Earth to View Historical Imagery to see that the complex was indeed here (in black and white) in the image data 3/7/2010 (7 March).

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BBC boffins ponder abstruse Ikea-style way of transmitting telly

Chris Cartledge
Unhappy

Not so good for real time...

Title says it all really. Already digital cannot get the pips right with satellite being worse than terrestrial...

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Look out! PEAK WIND is COMING, warns top Harvard physicist

Chris Cartledge
Coat

Professor David Keith

This will be the same David Keith which leads the Carbon capture company Carbon Engineering...

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Red supergiant Betelgeuse heads for SMACKDOWN with 'dust bar'

Chris Cartledge
Boffin

Perhaps in front or behind

How do they know it will actually hit this this band of dust? Do they know the distances so precisely they know it can't go behind or in front of it?

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Gaia scientist Lovelock: 'I was WRONG and alarmist on climate'

Chris Cartledge
Facepalm

Gaia

James Lovelock has a such history of grand extrapolation based on insufficient evidence, that one wonders why he is taken seriously. But look you at the piece of puff about Gaia in the Wikepedia...

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Brits trapped in confusing council website labyrinths - survey

Chris Cartledge
Unhappy

Re: Nostalgia ...

You are in a twisty maze of local government. It is dark.

There is a bin in front of you. It is emptied not well and not often enough. Whose is it?

It might be the County, District, Parish Council or National Park, but it is dark and you cannot tell. You ask a passer by but it is dark and she does not know. You ask a policemen but it is dark and he cannot tell. You go on a web site but it is dark and you cannot find bins.

Maybe the bin is nobody's? But it must be somebody's because a van comes and empties it, not well and not often enough. The van has a symbol on the side but it is dark so you cannot see where it is from. The cleaner works for MegaClean Co. but he just cleans the bin when he is told. It is dark.

You are in a twisty local government maze. It is dark.

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Ten... sub-£100 mono laser printers

Chris Cartledge
Boffin

Re: Re: Electricity Consumption - a Real Cost

The TEC on the SUST-IT site is that given by the manuafacturer when registering the product for ENERGY STAR. It does measure the electricity consumption under a standard workload. The formula for number of pages printed is complex but can be found here:

http://www.energystar.gov/ia/partners/prod_development/revisions/downloads/img_equip/TEC_Test_Procedure4-21-06.pdf?12bb-aac8

and it does work out as high load for personal printers, I think. Most personal printers spend most of their time doing nothing and it is interesting to see the consumption for idle mode:

Brother HL-2130 0.8W

Brother HL-2250DN 0.9W

Epson Aculaser M1200 8W

HP LaserJet Pro P1102w 2.7W

So the Epson is costing about £10 per year just to leave plugged into a live socket!

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Chris Cartledge
Boffin

Electricity Consumption - a Real Cost

It is a great pity that no information on electricity costs is given. These are significant, particuarly when compared to a low capital costs, as is shown by the Typical Energy Consumption (TEC) for the four printers that are listed on:

http://www.sust-it.net/

On a UK average electricity tariff for 2011, these costs are:

Brother HL-2130 £32.24

Brother HL-2250DN £35.83

Epson Aculaser M1200 £40.68

HP LaserJet Pro P1102w £16.05

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Chrome passes Firefox in global browser share

Chris Cartledge

Where are the phones?

Is this only about desktops? How are smart phone browsers (and apps) factored in? Is phone access not yet significant yet?

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Ubuntu republic riven by damaging civil wars

Chris Cartledge

Unity-2D

Unity is slow, but happily Unity-2D is much quicker, indeed almost lightweight. However I hope they do something about the usability which is very poor when you have multiple windows open for the same application. LibreOffice integrates particularly badly with some files appearing under a generic Office symbol instead of Writer, Calc or Impress as others do.

It might also be good if some fundamental issues with Linux were fixed, such as caching network information. It is a pain to have to delete Auto Ethernet and then reconnect to it when I have powered off broadband overnight (and there are similar occasional problems with Wireless Ethernet).

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Hubble detects new Plutonian moon

Chris Cartledge
Headmaster

Dwarf planet

Currently, I understand, the second largest dwarf planet in the Solar System (after Eris).

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Fukushima: Situation improving all the time

Chris Cartledge
Coat

Improving?

How can the situation be improving? According to Lewis there has never been a real problem...

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Intel outs 'Poulson' speeds and feeds

Chris Cartledge

ROI

But will they ever sell enough to get a return?

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Portsmouth redefines the Olympic-sized swimming pool

Chris Cartledge
Alert

It's Easy

It is easy to get things like this wrong. You only have to think of the mirror on the Hubble telescope ($2 billion repair mission) or wiring on on the Airbus A380 (cost €2.8 billion) to remember that it has happened before and it will happen again. Show tolerance to the anally retentive project manager who wants everything checked - it is the only way to ensure no slip ups. When doing carpentry I measure twice to cut once but I still get it wrong...

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Spanish whispers on Microsoft and Nokia

Chris Cartledge
Coat

In the meantime

Nokia must continue to release new hardware for its existing software platforms or it will be as dead as Motorola...

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Google open video codec faces second challenger

Chris Cartledge
Happy

@ D. M

Plenty of low end portable players support Ogg, from suppliers you may have head of: SanDisk, Cowon, Trekstor, HTC, Archos, Grundig, iRiver, Philips, Samsung. See: http://wiki.xiph.org/index.php/PortablePlayers.

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Nominet asks what you think of police domain grab

Chris Cartledge
Big Brother

Internet is the now the real world

So real world protections are needed and one would expect to see the courts and judges involved. Closing a web site wrongly might have far more serious implications than for example a search (Anton Pillar) order or an injunction against libel.

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Nokia C5-03 budget touchscreen smartphone

This post has been deleted by a moderator

How I built a zero energy cost, zero carbon home server

Chris Cartledge
Jobs Halo

Mac mini

For those like me who could not do all the techy stuff, a low power but expensive Intel solution is Mac mini. which uses less than 10w when idle.

In passing I can never understand why the idea of saving electricity seems to offend some commentators so much.

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Buyer's Guide: Budget Mono Laser Printers

Chris Cartledge
Boffin

Power consumption

Although costs are discussed, electricity consumption is not, and it can be very significant as shown below. Consumption is very dependent on how much the printer is used. The annual TEC (typical energy consumption) figures below are based on printing for 1 hour per day, five days per week for 52 weeks per year on a typical UK electricity tariff. Where possible, figures come directly from http://www.sust-it.net/ .

Brother HL-2035: £37.05

Canon i-Sensys LBP3010: £11.85

Dell 1130: £6.31 - £9.44? (No Dell devices listed on SUST-IT; first figure from Dell literature, 0.78kWh per week; second from US ENERGY STAR, 1.3kWh per week at 230V)

Epson Aculaser M1200: ?? (No figure in Epsom literature and no Epsom devices listed on SUST-IT, ENERGY STAR sites)

HP LaserJet P1102w: ?? (No figure in HP literature though ENERGY STAR compliance claimed; this device not listed on SUST-IT; US ENERGY STAR consumption figures blank)

Samsung ML-1665: £7.26 (No figure in Samsung literature; not listed on SUST-IT; this from US ENERGY STAR, 1.0kWh per week at 230V)

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Brother HL-2035

Chris Cartledge
Boffin

Power consumption

Although costs are discussed, electricity consumption is not, and it can be very significant as shown below. Consumption is very dependent on how much the printer is used and the annual TEC (typical energy consumption) figures below are based on printing for 1 hour per day, five days per week for 52 weeks per year on a typical UK electricity tariff. Where possible, figures come directly from http://www.sust-it.net/ .

Brother HL-2035: £37.05

Canon i-Sensys LBP3010: £11.85

Dell 1130: £6.31 - £9.44? (No Dell devices listed on SUST-IT; first figure from Dell literature, 0.78kWh per week; second from US ENERGY STAR, 1.3kWh per week at 230V)

Epson Aculaser M1200: ?? (No figure in Epsom literature and no Epsom devices listed on SUST-IT, ENERGY STAR sites)

HP LaserJet P1102w: ?? (No figure in HP literature though ENERGY STAR compliance claimed; this device not listed on SUST-IT; US ENERGY STAR consumption figures blank)

Samsung ML-1665: £7.26 (No figure in Samsung literature; not listed on SUST-IT; this from US ENERGY STAR, 1.0kWh per week at 230V)

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Paul Allen launches patent broadside on world+dog

Chris Cartledge
Gates Horns

Time limited

The good news is that patents are time limited. The bad news is that two of these are dated in 2000 so this nonsense could go on for a further 10 years...

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Apple Mac Mini 2010

Chris Cartledge
Boffin

Electricity Consumption

Apple claims it beats the ENERGY STAR 5.0 requirement for typical electricity consumption (TEC) by 80%. Machines from other supplier typically scrape by with a margin of less than 20% (so using around four times the electricity of the Mac Mini), which mitigates somewhat the higher capital cost of the Mac Mini.

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'Completely useless' Windows 3.1 hits Google's Android

Chris Cartledge
Gates Halo

Truetype

The killer feature of Windows 3.1 over 3.0 was Truetype WYSIWYG support. I loved it and later versions brought no killer improvements for me. When support for modern hardware became an issue, I moved on to Linux, never to return.

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US patent office gives i4i Word up in Microsoft snub

Chris Cartledge
Pint

A real good news story!

"there still remain important matters of patent law at stake, and we are considering our options to get them addressed", but presumably not by banning forbidding all software patents. Microsoft can comfort themselves that, as with other patents, this one will expire in around 20 years.

Live by the sword, die by the sword.

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Radio lobby 'hides' 2m analogue receiver sales

Chris Cartledge
Stop

Criteria wrong!

Living in a large village, 10miles (16km) from the centre of Sheffield, there is no DAB radio here and no date for its availability. Apparently BBC DAB currently reaches less than 85% of the UK population and the target is only 90%. Switching off analogues services should surely not be an option until DAB coverage at least matches analogue provision..

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Intel Labs unveils PC power plans

Chris Cartledge
Boffin

PCs could be better now

Electrically efficient desktop PCs can be made now, but are not. The most clear evidence for this is to look at the UK site for energy saving electrical goods:

http://www.sust-it.net/energy_saving.php?id=20

The top six machines costing about £7 per year to run are all Apple Mac Minis which are proper office PCs with a Intel Core duo processor and dedicated graphics. In competition, other major suppliers offer Atom based machines which still cost more to run than the Mac mini. It costs over £12 to run the nearest rival PC based on on a decent processor, the Fujitsu Siemens ESPRIMO Q5030. There is no rocket science in the Apple approach, simply the use of processors that Intel designates for laptops, a 2.5" disk, an efficient power supply and good mechanical design.

Manufacturers are keen to to publicise their green credentials, but they need to be doing more to give consumers the choice of more efficient PCs. Consumers need to stop buying PCs solely on the basis of the most GHz and cores for the money.

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Symbian shares the source

Chris Cartledge
Headmaster

Lack of clear design architecture

To me, on the basis of some months of experience with a touchscreen Nokia 5530 only, the problem with Symbian is its lack of a coherent consistent user interface. However good the underlying operating system, and nice the hardware, Symbian devices cannot hope to challenge the iPhone, unless the user interface is sorted. Do any Symbian designers actually use the products? A few of simple failings with the 5530 which are nothing to do with the underlying platform are as follows:

* touch screen user interface with finger drag, covers a few functions like lists and browser, but not email, for example;

* touch screen UI removes cut&paste so you cannot copy from a web page, so far as | can tell;

* on screen text input, for example for texting, has no vertical scroll;

* the rebarbative flashing green and red bars though which you handle alarms and incoming calls are difficult and I still miss about a quarter of calls (down from about 90% when I got the phone);

* has anybody actually installed an app from the various unfriendly sites available?

* the dullness of supplied profiles - a choice of black and while with grey or black and white with red;

* lists are a particular issue with bouncing at the ends which makes selection of the bottom item (always Exit) slow;

* the software writers may understand the difference between Back, Close and Exit, but this user does not;

There are many more, many more annoyances, but I do not have the enthusiasm for Symbian to document the awfulness in more detail.

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Why can't Google be more like Microsoft?

Chris Cartledge
Alien

Times of London

The Times is is not exactly a neutral commentator on Google anything, being part of the Murdoch empire...

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Europe welcomes Dell's Mac Mini Zino HD

Chris Cartledge
Gates Horns

No welcome from me

At t £249 for the Atom based unit, it is expensive compared with the similarly specified HP Compaq Cq2200uk, which is now £199.99 from Comet. The OS is Windows XP Home with no Ubuntu option in the UK despite it being listed in the technical spec.

I am happy with my Cq2200uk on which I use Ubuntu (9.04 currently) , but the Atom 230 is now long in the tooth, and it disappointing that the is no dual core Atom 330 option ( all to do with Microsoft distorting the market with cheap XP licences, I guess).

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Canon Pixma MP560

Chris Cartledge
Boffin

Enery Star Compliant

It is also Energy Star compliant and Canon claim approximate power consumption on standby: 1.9W, when off: 0.5W and when copying: 14W.

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Brother DCP-375CW wireless multifunction inkjet printer

Chris Cartledge
Boffin

Blue Angel and Energy Star Compliant

Brother claims power consumption in sleep: <2.5W, standby: <3.5W, printing: <18W. Despite the awards, 2.5W sounds a lot to me for sleep.

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Western Digital WD TV Live

Chris Cartledge
Boffin

@Gronda

Gronda asks "What about the temperature? " This is yet another device powered by a brick which will always be on. If the brick is hot, then it is consuming a significant amount of electricity. But how much? WD do not seem to list power use anywhere.

How can El Reg recommend a device with unknown running costs?

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Altec Lansing Expressionist Plus v. Edifier E3350

Chris Cartledge
Boffin

Electricity consumption?

Neither manufacturer gives any power consumption figure for standby or typical operating.conditions nor makes any claim for electrical efficiency. Both devices are externally powered which is often a sign that electricity use is not well managed. ..

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Philips BDP3000 Blu-ray disc player

Chris Cartledge
Boffin

Electricity consumption

And Philips says it uses 25W operating and 0.5W on standby, so it costs just 50p per year to have it plugged in, and no more than £25 even if you use it 24*7.

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Lexmark C736dn workgroup colour laser printer

Chris Cartledge
Boffin

Electricity Consumption

This printer is is Energy Star compliant which is good!

Lexmark gives an Energy Star Typical Electricity Consumption (TEC) of 4.69kWh (units) per week. At a typical UK price of 12p per unit this gives an electricity cost of about £29 per year.

As I understand it, for a printer of this speed (35ppm), the TEC is based on printing over 18,000 monochrome pages per month. This is on the high side because Lexmark specifies a recommended page volume of 2500 to 10000 per month. Even if colour printing uses more electricity, consumption should in practice remain below £29. Many many would consider to be negligible when compared with the capital, paper and consumables costs.

I am unable to give cost for plugging it into the mains, because Lexmark do not specify standby power consumption.

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HP 3015d mono laser

Chris Cartledge
Boffin

Electricity Consumption

According to HP, this printer goes into sleep mode when the product has been inactive for 30 minutes, so a typical printer will spend most of the time in this mode. Sadly HP specifies no sleep mode power consumption - only : 780 watts (active), 14.5 watts (standy), 8.5 watts (powersave), 0.6 watts (off). Taking sleep and powersave to be the same, the printer will cost £8.50 per year at typical UK prices, just to be plugged in without any printing.. HP specifies typical electricity consumption at 3.267 kWh/Week which costs £20 per year.

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Dell 2145cn colour laser

Chris Cartledge
Boffin

Electricity cost

The running costs quoted are incomplete. In Powersave mode, Dell says that it uses "18W or less" so it will cost up to £18 per year just to have it plugged in.

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Nokia 5530 XpressMusic

Chris Cartledge
Unhappy

Robust?

This is far too kind a review! Issues for me include:

Phone back flimsy and rattles. I have secured mine with blutack.

The touch screen is very flexible and seems vunerable to damage. The sensitivity seems to vary across the screen.

The menu and phone buttons are far too close to the bottom of the phone for comfy use by my thumbs.

The phone is slow to switch between landscape and portrait and sometimes needs a joggle to make it change.

You loose the wifi signal if you hold it in your left hand in landscape.

S60 interfaceis not ergonomic in all sorts of ways. A simple example is that there is no simple way that I can see of setting a reminder a week in advance in Calender: you have to input the date. I cannot scroll text in this comment easily.

The browser is impressive but crashes from time to time.

The less said about Carphone Warehouse, who currently sell it exclusively, the better...

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HP OfficeJet 6500 Wireless all-in-one inkjet

Chris Cartledge
Boffin

Power consumption

There is no point in discussing running costs without including electricity use. Most printers are switched on for most of the time, but are inactive. The specification for this printer, dependent on the exact model, claims about 7 watts maximum on standby. If this is a typical figure, then it will cost just over £7 per year in electricity (on the basis of 24 hours per day at a typical UK price of 12p per kWh).

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How to set up your HDTV like a pro

Chris Cartledge

Internet tests

For those with an internet connection try:

http://www.lagom.nl/lcd-test/

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Panasonic Viera TX-P42G10 Freesat HD TV

Chris Cartledge
Boffin

Power consumption?

There is no point in mentioning the price if the cost of running it is ignored. Panasonic claim 200W, so if it were to be switched on 24*7, it would cost about £200 per year to run, with electricity costing a typical 11 pence per unit (kWh). More normal usage might be 4 hours per day, in which case it would cost £33 per year to run. Claimed standby current is only 0.3W, so a negligible 30 pence a year, if you cannot be bothered to switch it off at the mains.

Panasonic have no equivalent LCD device, but the running cost of a Freeview Panasonic 42" TV is nearer £20.

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The best memory config for a Core i7 CPU

Chris Cartledge
Heart

AMD

This is very worthwhile reporting!

It is little known that the only fully performant memory configuration for dual processor AMD Opterons has been exactly 8 DIMMS of identical density, 4 on each socket, at least according to my tests. Other configurations give poorer measured performance, which may or may not be reported by the BIOS.

I have only tested with an in house tool, Opteron versions up to Barcelona. Anybody concerned about memory performance should repeat the tests on more modern hardware.

I find it amazing that such basic information is not clearly documented and is also rarely tested and reported-...

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Samsung ML-1640

Chris Cartledge
Stop

Power consumption

Without the standby electricity use (most printers are idle most of the time), this does not give the give the total cost of ownership. Samsung does not see fit to list power consumption on its web site, but it is in the user guide and is quoted as follows:

Average operating mode: Less than 300 W

Ready mode: Less than 70 W

Sleep mode: Less than 6W

Power off mode: 0W

If this is right (and a journalist should surely check?), it is on 24*7, and it powers down from Operating to Ready in a few seconds and from Ready to Sleep in a few minutes, then this printer will cost about £6 a year to run in the UK. This is typical for a modern low volume laser printer, and although much lower than typical printers of two or three years ago, it still adds significantly to the TCO.

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HPC cluster maker sets x64 chips a-fighting

Chris Cartledge
Linux

Electricity use

Cooling capacity and electricity cost (and perhaps carbon targets) are major constraints for HPC. Here in the UK, electricity can be 50% of capital cost of an HPC system over a 4 year life. Worthwhile savings in electricity can be made by specifying low power processors (for example AMD HE processors) and other parts. Theoretical performance is clearly reduced due to lower clock speeds, but because memory speed remains the same, real world performance is less affected.

Bangs per unit (kWh) needs to become as important to HPC as mpg is for cars.

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Humax Foxsat-HDR Freesat HD digital video recorder

Chris Cartledge
Linux

Power consumpton

> Power consumption rises to a peak of 50W when recording programmes onto the hard disk, but drops to just 1W in standby mode.

Mine has a measured consumption of 20W (but not a nice load: 36VA), including powering the LNB (single in my case) , rising perhaps to 21 W when both playing and recording. Standby is less than a watt.

This is a wonderful device but with some oddities. For example, you cannot delete a file when recording: the options just disappear from the menu. The file system got screwed up once and I had to delete files to clear it. Otherwise it has been stable.

The documentation is poor. For example the manual describes a physical loop through for the second tuner when using a single LNB, but the setup put it in some sort of internal loop though (I think) which is not described in the manual.

It appears to be a Linux device, but there is no software declaration, unlike my new (Sony) TV.

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Intel dubs 2009 'The Year of 10Gb Ethernet'

Chris Cartledge
Go

FCAL Future?

But will it stop people wasting money on FCAL based storage?

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Hubble sniffs CO2 on far-flung 'hot Jupiter' planet

Chris Cartledge
Stop

Carbon Dioxide and Life?

Back in this solar system, Venus has an atmosphere rich in carbon dioxide, causing its surface temperature to be over 460 °C.

Not ideal for life as we know it...

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