* Posts by Mike 125

104 posts • joined 1 Jun 2010

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Plastic fiver: 28 years' work, saves acres of cotton... may have killed less than ONE cow*

Mike 125

Re: Not much of a chemist then?

@Lee D

>>because that money has to last 20-30 years in the field without any kind of maintenance.

Where did get those lifetimes? They are crazily optimistic.

How long does money last? That depends on the denomination of the note. A $1 bill lasts 18 months; $5 bill, two years; $10 bill, three years; $20 bill, four years; and $50 and $100 bills, nine years. Bills that get worn out from everyday use are taken out of circulation and replaced.

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Mike 125

Re: Not much of a chemist then?

@AC

>>I too wonder how long it takes for those loony eco-warriers to work out

You sound like a Daily Mail reader from, let's say, the 1980s. Things have moved on. Someone screwed up by not foreseeing this mess. Yes, they screwed up.

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Vegans furious as Bank of England admits ‘trace’ of animal fat in £5 notes

Mike 125

Re: why...

>>and similar SANE reasons...

And now back in the real world...

I can only hope that after they factored in the potential costs of cleaning up the PR+social media mess and probable reformulation, it was still worth the risk of starting with tallow.

That's sanity, but I doubt that's what happened.

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Mike 125

why...

>>there is a trace of tallow in the polymer pellets used in the base substrate of the polymer

2 questions:

1) Why tallow - is there no synthetic option?

2) Why didn't the people who decide these things foresee the inevitable fuss?

Maybe a page was missing from the requirements spec.

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Qualcomm now offering US$15k for security bugs

Mike 125

not hardware..?

The article:

"Qualcomm's been bitten by the bounty bug, signing on with HackerOne to offer up to US$15,000 for vulnerabilities in modems and processors."

The Qualcomm link:

"In order to be considered for a reward, submissions must correspond to certain types of software running on specific hardware."

Strictly it's not vulnerabilities in processors, although the boundaries are becoming increasingly blurred, what with microcode updates and other such distopian nightmares from the pits of hell.

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TalkTalk teen hacker pleads guilty as firm reveals £22m profit jump

Mike 125

>> to get away from mob justice from dicks like you.

Absolutely right. AC what a pillock.

Me, I'd give the teen a job, and mould him for my own nefarious purposes... And no, not that.

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What do you give a bear that wants to fork SSL? Whatever it wants!

Mike 125

>>Didn't the IETF bloke just say stop making up new protocols to do the same thing? Same goes for libraries.

No. The protocol is the abstract behaviour e.g.

RFC: 793 TRANSMISSION CONTROL PROTOCOL

Only one of those is required (plus multiple revisions!).

The 'library' is the implementation. And there can can be thousands of those, depending on detailed platform requirements.

Unfortunately, in the security sphere, both the protocol and the implementation matter, which is why it's hard.

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Tesco Bank limits online transactions after fraud hits thousands

Mike 125

Is this different?

Is this different in nature from what has gone before? This is a mass random ability to extract cash from a huge number of accounts. This is not some jerk clicking on a dodgy email. Is it a zero day on the 2 factor authentication system? Are all the affected accounts accessed by mobile?

The frustrating thing is that we will never be told the detail. Whistleblowers blow, stop sucking.

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Twitter trolls are destroying democracy, warn eggheads

Mike 125

old and sad

I'm old and sad enough to remember trolls destroying comp.lang.c, in the late 90s. Back then, it was a venerable, respected font of knowledge, before StackExchange, where old school, real computer science people hung out. The arrival of the trolls was quite shocking. The arguments against the experts, and against long established principles and 'truth' were disturbing. It was the sheer effort the trolls put into their attacks, which made it different and new.

Monty Python:

"Argument is an intellectual process. Contradiction is just the automatic gainsaying of anything the other person says."

"No it's not."

"Yes it is.”

etc.

But the trolls were not contradicting. They were arguing, but they were wrong. It was a good lesson in what was to come.

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Zilog reveals very, very distant heir to the Z80 empire

Mike 125

Re: Whilst I recharge my car....

That's one creeping feature too many: a few excess uS spent in the MM thread, and the PFC thread will cause a major puff of smoke! Ahhh... those far off days of 'proper engineering'...

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Londoners react with horror to Tube Chat initiative

Mike 125

>>I think you are missing the whole point.

No, you are.

Being forced to stand opposite some hippy cretin wearing a "Tube Chat?" badge would massively increase social anxiety.

(Back in the day, social anxiety was known as the desire to 'punch someone in the face and run the f'k away' when they got too close, or worse, attempted any form of social interaction.)

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Legend of Zelda cracked with 6502 assembly language glitch

Mike 125

Things have moved on.

>>6502 assembly language glitch...

>>...and in turn to overwrite memory used for other game functions, in effect "breaking" the game

These days, we use advanced, high level languages like C to do exactly the same thing...

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Audi works with Chinese technology companies to develop intelligent cars

Mike 125

Re: The world is changing

Absof'kinlutely. I worked on GSM mobiles, way back when Japan came to the UK just to get the application processor to talk to the DSP. The West now goes East for an order of magnitude higher level hardcore smarts. Wow. How it's all turned around.

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ABBA-solutely crapulous! Swedish router-maker won't patch gaping hole

Mike 125

wrong

ᗅᗺᗷᗅ, not ABBA.

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Samsung: Hackers can't pwn our NFC payment kit. No way, nuh-uh, not true (Well, OK, maybe)

Mike 125

Re: You can't argue with a working proof of concept video.....

@DougS

>>but sometimes doing things the right way gets compromised due to wanting to >>drive down cost...i.e. making the payment terminals cheaper.

Yes, and also compromised by inappropriate speed optimisations: an extra 13 digits to create a properly safe MAC, all going over NFC, could be seen as taking a few ms too many. Usability always trumps good security.

This is fun - it's a fair bet Apple use the same system.

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If you use ‘smart’ Bluetooth locks, you're asking to be burgled

Mike 125

ha ha

>>If you use ‘smart’ Bluetooth locks, you're asking to be burgled

It's funny because it's true.

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Osram's Lightify smart bulbs blow a security fuse – isn't anything code audited anymore?

Mike 125

Re: Why is it

>>it has TWO, read em, TWO functions. On and Off,

For a bit of romance, it's sometimes useful to set something in-between...

The anger can be focussed far more widely than IoT. I don't want to go all hippy, but since consumer culture began, we've been buying crap we don't need. This is just one more insane example.

Also, security is not done well on PCs. So why would we expect it to be done well on IoT, which has huge platform constraints?

This whole thing was inevitable, like the next financial crash.

/> Hippy mode off.

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414,949 D-Link cameras, IoT devices can be hijacked over the net

Mike 125

Re: Your wifi cam is not directly accessible from the internet

>>These devices (and I have some myself) are behind firewalls

And so is your computer, so that's ok then. What *can* everyone be worried about. Beats me.

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Magnetic, heat scanners to catch Tour de France electric motor cheats

Mike 125

I love Bluetooth

>>Bluetooth-operated motor

Add that to the list of ludicrous Bluetooth applications, along with the BT padlock and BT electric toothbrush.

Being bored one day, I used Amazon Customer Questions & Answers forum to ask if the toothbrush also has Ethernet. I was earnestly and with great sincerity informed "No, sorry, it does not."

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NASCAR team red-flagged by ransomware attack

Mike 125

TeslaCrypt

>>Leavine Family Racing (CSLFR) has admitted paying off ransomware runners after one of its main test computers got infected with Truecrypt malware.

That's TeslaCrypt, not Truecrypt.

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Holy Crap! Bloke finishes hand-built CPU project!

Mike 125

Re: Not the same thing

But Babbage dreamt of a mechanical same thing:

Wiki:

The Analytical Engine incorporated an arithmetic logic unit, control flow in the form of conditional branching and loops, and integrated memory, making it the first design for a general-purpose computer that could be described in modern terms as Turing-complete.[5][6] In other words, the logical structure of the Analytical Engine was essentially the same as that which has dominated computer design in the electronic era.[3]

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Mike 125

Re: Hydraulic valves, I trust?

Babbage been there, done that, (in theory).

https://plan28.org/

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Ransomware scum build weapon from JavaScript

Mike 125

Re: How exactly does this execute?

Create a .js file containing:

WSH.Echo("Hello world");

WSH.Quit();

and just click on it in Windows Explorer. The rest follows.

'Windows Script Host' execution environment is enabled by default because it lets people 'do stuff'.

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Chaps make working 6502 CPU by hand. Because why not?

Mike 125

Re: It's not that big...

>>takes up his entire living room!

...not to mention life.

>>just over 11 transistors per RAM bit

Discrete - that is seriously impressive.

Good Luck to all obsessive hobbyists - that's how the ball gets rolling.

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Siemens Healthcare struck by rebranding madness

Mike 125

is that PC..?

Can you say Boutiqueers? I don't think that's allowed these days - depending on where you stress the syllables.

Siemens Healthcare has long been a laughing stock- so I guess this insanity suits.

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I am Craig Wright, inventor of Craig Wright

Mike 125

Re: I'm Jamie Vardy

Bad. And btw I'm open to offers.

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Mike 125

I'm Jamie Vardy

and that's all anybody needs to know.

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Mike 125

Or someone's had *too* much coffee...

Or someone's had too *much* coffee...

I love these preludes to figuring stuff out...!

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Google broke its own cloud AGAIN, with TWO software bugs

Mike 125

How many ways...

>>Google says it has a “canary step” designed to catch messes like that described >>above. But the canary had a bug “

There's always another way of saying "Actually no, we don't really know what we're doing."

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Hey, tech industry, have you noticed Amazon in the rearview?

Mike 125

nailed

Agree. From start to finish, the buying process just works and even gets better. I now get free delivery in a couple of days on average, without even trying. They got the IT right, right from the start. How very, very, very, sadly, incredibly rare.

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Illegal drugs and dodgy pics? Nah. Half the dark web is perfectly legal

Mike 125

Re: Come on!

Ok smarty pants - so what does the sw actually do?

I always assumed 'dark' just means no DNS lookup. Is there more to it than that?

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Oops! Microsoft says its 'Bitcoin ban' was a bug, not a feature

Mike 125

§%$§&%/ !!

W.T.F. are these people doing? When was the last time they didn't screw up?

And why can't I walk into Currys and buy a laptop-to-go, with Linux, a reasonable GUI, LibreOffice and Firefox? What more does the high street shopper need? If I could, I would (except it wouldn't be Currys...!).

Why??

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Hijack wireless mice, keyboards, with $15 of kit and 15 lines of code

Mike 125

This is a 'mindset' thing...

It's hard to see how the guy in that video missed all that activity on his machine. Important guy, important call.

But it never occurred to me that my 15 quid wireless mouse would be crypto safe. People should shift to assuming danger, rather than assuming safety.

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Winning Underhand C Contest code silently tricks nuke inspectors

Mike 125

Re: horses for courses

@Tim7

>>type-safe languages with optimising overrides

If that's a thing, it's a nonsense thing if 'optimising overrides' overrides type-safety. The program fails on exactly this attribute. In any case, in such an application, there's no need for extreme optimisation, (unless I'm missing something). It's a data analysis tool, in no particular hurry.

>>blaming it on the language is completely wrong.

Indeed. I'm glad we agree. C's a great language - mine of choice.

>>Something of this seriousness require belts, braces and a seriously well >>hardened bolt through the navel.

Absolutely. And more to the point, it's not system code. It is without constraints on runtime or code-size.

>>the dick-head that didn’t make sure they were up to standard that needs a >>case of manslaughter against them.

Other than for this competition, only a dick-head would write such a critical application in C. (OK, it may well be a dick-head manager insisting.)

When there's a critical safety requirement and no platform or performance constraints, C is not appropriate. Hence the firing.

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Mike 125

horses for courses

It's a great entry, because the code itself is so benign. The problem would never be spotted through inspection. Tools would maybe spot the #include discrepancy, but it's doubtful. And anyway, build systems often hides differences such as which particular #include gets #included.

It's also a great example of why, in the real world, anyone found using C for such a 'correct-critical', 'non-time/size critical' application should be instantly fired. In the real world, loose typing has its place. This isn't it!

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'Dodgy Type-C USB cable fried my laptop!'

Mike 125

Oh, for a sensible cable...

There's no middle ground for cables. It's the race to the bottom versus diamond studded, single crystal idiocy. I'd pay a tenner for a demonstrably good quality, flexible USB3 cable. But there is no such product. Stupid capitalism, thinks it's so great...

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Why a detachable cabin probably won’t save your life in a plane crash

Mike 125

Please no....

>>Also, can we make it a thing that anyone self-described as an 'inventor' who comes up with a >>wholesale systemic change to a comoditised very-high-technology system should be ignored as a >>matter of course?

Definitely not. That would remove a very rich target for humorous ridicule at a stroke.

I too fancy car ejector seats, ideally steerable with collision avoidance, in case of low flying / crashing aircraft.

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Yahoo! Mail! Had! Nasty! XSS! Bug!

Mike 125

Real issues...

People love to slag Yahoo, but IMHO most of its problems now are caused by the ignorance and appalling hygiene of your average Yahoo user.

Let's not forget - it was a lot of people's first webmail account, back when 12345 was good enough. I always know when someone's account has succumbed: a strange 'Hi' arrives from someone not heard from in years. And on contact, they've often forgotten all about the account long ago. And I also know people who click on every f#king thing that arrives.

But yea, clearly there are real issues here too.

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Intel admits Skylakes can ... ... ... freeze in the middle of work

Mike 125

Re: BIOS?

@psyq

>>Unless you get access to Intel's private key...

This was the cry of the MiFare access card maker, until someone *got access to the private key*, (admittedly a whole different technology).

It's always the pitiful cry.

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Mike 125

BIOS?

I'm out of touch - the BIOS can now update CPU microcode? F'k me, is nothing sacred? Real security would appear to be an impossible dream with arrangements like this.

It seems that the CPU makers are jumping on the same ship the OS makers have been on for years: "We push out the crap, and the customers find the bugs for free."

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'Fairly bad core bug' crushed in Linux 4.4-rc5

Mike 125

oh dear

@ emouse and Voland

Ahh, it's so satisfying being a click-bait whinger, always first to click, never anything to add, just waiting to pounce, needing.... needing... that thrill of knowing you're first.

It's ok.

I know.

I feel your highs and your lows.

Somebody cares.

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Apple's Faulty Powers moment: iPad Pro slabs 'temporarily bricked' during recharge

Mike 125

Re: "temporarily bricked"?

Drywalled? Breezeblocked?

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Windows 10 is an antique (and you might be too) says Google man

Mike 125

Re: Can't resist this bandwagon..

@Dave 126

Goddamn it, you mean I gotta go redraw my Context Diagram *again*!

Ok, but he oddly tries to draw a distinction between how an OS *looks* and how it *works*, when actually, he's talking about the system in both cases.

Agreed, Twitts can't win.

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Mike 125

Can't resist this bandwagon..

- He's excited to 'try a new thing', but he's not sure why.

- He's always liked Microsoft's attempts to 'change the paradigm'.

- He thinks that a user interface defines how a computer *works*.

Confused people like Matias him are the reason IT, big and small, is in a mess. Put your suit on sir, and go sell something to... maybe a government department?

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Microsoft now awfully pushy with Windows 10 on Win 7, 8 PCs – Reg readers hit back

Mike 125

Technical Support Scam...

I fking hate Msoft.

I went to the link below and submitted a 'Technical Support Scam' report, which seems appropriate. I incorporated as many expletives as my sensitive nature would allow. Won't do any good of course, but it dissipates the anger.

https://support.microsoft.com/en-gb/getsupport?oaspworkflow=start_1.0.0.0&wfname=scamsurvey&locale=en-gb&ccsid=

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Here are the God-mode holes that gave TrueCrypt audit the slip

Mike 125

Re: Lateral thinking

>>spooks would prefer a less obvious yet incredibly simple approach of pick-pocketing the key while their targets are focused on improving the lock.

Yes. One thing that makes me wary of VeraCrypt is (from their site):

"TrueCrypt uses PBKDF2-RIPEMD160 with 1000 iterations whereas in VeraCrypt we use 327661."

That does not fill me with the confidence of knowing that VeraCrypt is even vaguely aware of

>>less obvious yet incredibly simple approach(es).

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11 MILLION VW cars used Dieselgate cheatware – what the clutch, Volkswagen?

Mike 125

Re: Sorry but how is this at all funny or appropriate?

@diodesign

>>Changed it,

Noooo, please don't. I for one come to the Reg. for (apart from great tech. analysis) its total political incorrectness and utter ignorance and insanity on issues like climate change!

>>having worked with children to whom all kind of nasty things had happened back in the 70's.

Oh, go p'ss up a f'kstick. As it happens, some of us *were* those kids, and we sure as hell don't need the help of dumb f'ck attitudes like this to get by:-

>>So the thumbs down is from someone who thinks violence to kids is OK?

Please Keep It Unreal, Reg.

As for VW, bring on Tesla - can't be soon enough.

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LTO issues mighty seventh-generation 15TB tape format

Mike 125

Great pic.

Didn't know they had Steam Punk back then. And I really gotta get me some of those pince nez.

The old guys are on the up in politics, too. It's a good time to be alive.

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Don't want to upgrade to Windows 10? You'll download it WHETHER YOU LIKE IT OR NOT

Mike 125

Don't ya just hate it when...

...your sandel-wearing, furry freak mates turn out to have been right all along. I've hated Linux for as long as I can remember. But maybe it's time to dive in. And certainly, if I was setting up a development environment at work, my recommendation would now be Linux.

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TCP is a wire-centric protocol being forced to cut the cord, painfully

Mike 125

Re: Surprise?

@Tom

Indeed. It never sounds good when people start blaming their performance issues on the core protocols. I suspect this is a very big part of his problem:

“In the kernel, for every new networking characteristic, someone adds more stuff – the data path becomes very complicated.”

And yet his solution is to add yet more "heuristics"?

Having said that - it's a nightmare area to be working in, given the market conditions.

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