* Posts by Trevor_Pott

5194 posts • joined 31 May 2010

New GCHQ spymaster: US tech giants are 'command and control networks for TERROR'

Trevor_Pott
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"at least one man argued that a lot of the internet is just plain wrong - obscene, fraudulent, seditious..., and it should be stopped."

I believe religion is just plain wrong. I'll give up the internet if we all outlaw religion. I think living in a world where religion is a crime but we don't have the internet is probably going to result in more peace than a world in which the internet is monitored but you can do fucking anything in the name of Jesus.

Oh, what's that? Religion is somehow "good", and the internet is "bad"? Who the fuck said you get to judge? My opinion's as valid as yours, or "that one man".

Put up or shut up, eh?

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Intel: A tiny video drone? Disguised as a BRACELET? Great! Take half a million dollars!

Trevor_Pott
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Re: flight time

"You get about 6 minutes flight time."

I rest my case.

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Trevor_Pott
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And they're using what to power the thing? Sarium Krellide? Because a LiPo battery would last about as long as it takes your average mammal to pee.

And if you're hanging off the side of a cliff, I recon they'll be a right bitch to retrieve.

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Russians hear Tim Cook is gay, pull dead Steve Jobs' enormous erection

Trevor_Pott
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Re: Someday

Tervor, I know you can't restrain yourself BUT, Many are sick and tired of the "in your face" attitudes of the pro bigotry or bigot people that can't seem to keep their PERSONAL proclivities to themselves. It's being arrogant, pushy, obnoxious, boasting, prideful (the sin) etc to constantly push your argument even when no one is really objecting except you can't see they aren't. People like you see a "skeleton in every closet" when all many of us conservatives have said is we don't want to be a part of it.

I believe the above statement has been modified to reflect the beliefs and values of the majority.

My name is Trevor, not Tervor.

Also, for the record: "prideful (the sin)" would seem to indicate you believe in a sky fairy. Probably the christian one. Your sky fairy doesn't exist. Your religion offends me. I request and require that you not only not practice it in front of me but that you refrain from pushing your religion on myself, or anyone else in my presence.

Your rights at the point where they interfere with the rights of others. It is my firm belief that attempts to "convert" others to your belief system is an infringement upon the rights of others. It is coercion to believe a lie that teaches hate.

Gayness isn't a choice. You are born gay. It is genetic. Your belief doesn't change the facts. Reality doesn't give a fuck what you believe. Someone being gay isn't a choice. They should not be restrained from discussing who and what they are. They should not be required to defend, hide or conceal who or what they are because it offends bigots who believe something other than reality.

Your religion is a choice. A highly offensive, hateful choice that leads to nothing other that bigotry and - dare I say it - evil. If you want to practice it behind closed doors, that's fine, but keep it the fuck away from good people, you monster.

You do not have the "religious right" to be a bigoted fuckbag. You have the right to believe whatever you want in private. If you want to have a parade about your religion, go right a head. Stand up a nightclub dedicated to people from your religion, cool. But you don't get to use it as an excuse for hate, or brainwashing, or attempting to restrict and restrain others.

Your religion is evil. Being gay is not. We have to put up with you by law, but make no mistake, bigots and their beliefs are not welcome in civilized society.

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Trevor_Pott
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Re: Someday

"Someday we will no longer have hateful bigots using slurs like "homophobe" but today is not that day."

Personally, I prefer to call homophobes "self-hating twatdangles who waste their lives dreaming sweet dreams of gargling an unlimited line of enormous sweaty cocks but who are too cowardly to unbridle their lust". Sadly, it's just that little bit too long for casual conversation.

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Trevor_Pott
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Re: Love and Hate

Hi. Individuals of all persuasions have the same rights as any other, from marriage to health care, from freedom of speech to the right to a fair trial. At least, here in Canada. It's in our constitution.

You can even be as much of a conservative fuckbag as you want...you just can't use you personal belief in a sky fairy, fear of things going into your arse or general douchebaggery to infringe upon the rights of others. Your rights end where they infringe upon the rights of others.

Also in our constitution.

Canada has it's problems, eh? But treading gays like unpeople isn't one of them.

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IPv6 web starts to look like the internet we know

Trevor_Pott
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Re: 20 .au IPv6 domains

The NSA and MPAA would love this plan. Every device would have an external address. Every IP would be a person. And privacy would be well and truly dead forever.

Can't see a single issue.

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Alca-Lu stems bleeding, squeezes costs

Trevor_Pott
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Re: Not sure there's light at the end of the tunnel yet

"For some reason ALU management has repeatedly failed to exploit this option, and it's not clear why. It could yield billions of dollars in revenue, and could clear the debts at a single stroke."

You don't fire nukes when others have them too.

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Microsoft now licensing Windows by the user, across multiple devices

Trevor_Pott
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Re: does this fix anything?

@Fuzz It's a half-assed fix. VDI licensing has been my number one issue with Microsoft for 6 years. I will examine this in great detail and put together an article. It's not what we wanted or needed. But it's a lot better than what we had.

Microsoft have, however, acknowledged that there is a problem. That's flabbergasting. They had fought tooth and nail against admitting there was an issue here since Vista came out.

...could we finally be making a dent?

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Windows 8 or nowt: Consumer Win 7 fans are OUT OF LUCK

Trevor_Pott
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Re: Bezo's Bozos,

There's a hell o fa lot more wrong with Windows 8 than "just a missing start menu". Not that 8.1U1.MicrosoftNamingSchemesAreAlmostWorseThanMicrosoftLicensing actually fixes that issue either.

But hey, pretend it was all no big deal. Very "on message". Next you'll dig up the whole "Vista was actually amazing, bu the users were too stupid to love it" line.

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Disney wins Mickey Mouse patent for torrent-excluding search engine

Trevor_Pott
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Disney patents internet search censorship

Attempts to have it made mandatory worldwide via super-secret international treaties to follow

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Trolls pop malformed heads above bridge to sling abuse at Tim Cook

Trevor_Pott
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Re: Terrorists!

If anyone wants to believe in a sky fairy, that's their business. "We" don't think that's really appropriate, or like it, or want our children to seriously consider it as an option, but we're not going to exterminate you for it.

That said, evangelism shouldn't be allowed. If children grow up feeling an overwhelming urge to believe in a sky fairy, they absolutely should be allowed to go forth and find out about sky fairies, pick one they like and believe in them.

But religious types should not be allowed to try to convert others. It's disgusting. It's immoral. It's wrong. I am not saying we should kill, or imprison people for being what they are, but I really don't think it's right for multi-billion-dollar corporations to exist whose sole purpose is to make innocent children believe in a religion.

Values and morality stem from critical thinking and a carefully considered rational approach to social dynamics grounded in logic. Teaching children that it's whatever some charismatic authority figure says it is will corrupt them and bring ruination to our society.

Something must be done!

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Trevor_Pott
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Re: Trolls

systemd was sent from a hell specially created to consume the last remnants of logic, rationality and long term software viability to make all of humanity suffer and weep in endless torment.

I mean, what were we talking about?

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Microsoft jolts awake, remembers it still makes Office for Mac

Trevor_Pott
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Amen. I'm sticking with Office 2011, thanks.

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Hungary PM ditches internet tax plans after mass protests

Trevor_Pott
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Re: Or ...

Or, don't use regressive taxes like VAT, but introduce a progressive tax that makes the wealthy contribute to society.

What's that? Conservative? Tax breaks for the rich so they will "reinvest?"

It's the 21st century. Give tax breaks to the rich and they buy robots. They don't create jobs.

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Desktop Linux users beware: the boss thinks you need to be managed

Trevor_Pott
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VDI Linux at what I am presuming at speeds over the WAN that can compete with PCoIP or RDP? It's like my birthday. I'm so happy. I might even cry.

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Trevor_Pott
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Sincerely, and with great happiness, THANK YOU, VMware.

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Apple CEO Tim Cook: My well-known gayness is 'a gift from GOD'

Trevor_Pott
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...I don't know about you, but I'm proud to like boobies. Boobies are good.

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Trevor_Pott
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Re: This thread is being pre-modded.

"Is it a fact that El Reg note a significant number of abusively homophobic postings when this kind of story is published?"

Yes. Or at least, so the subeds have told me. There are days, sir, when their depression and despair for the path of humanity leaps across instant messenger and takes form.

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Trevor_Pott
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Re: Who cares?

"I couldn't give a damn if someone is Lesbian, Gay, Bisexual, Transexual, Hetrosexual, white, black, coloured, male, female, disabled, non-disabled or what ever label people feel the need to apply to someone as long as they are not a complete ars*h0le and they do their job to a minimum standard"

Two items:

1) Disabilities cost more to accommodate. They may limit what a person can do or increase the costs of them being able to do so. Employer and employee need to be aware of these limits and costs. Surprises lead to anger, and that's bad for everyone.

2) Transgender individuals can cause a bit of a fracas around "what bathroom they use". This could be due to transphobia of other staff, union/muni/province/federal laws or simply an out-of-date corporate bylaw system. It is best to do the research to ensure both employer and employee know the rules and have in place a means of dealing with complaints.

So some care has to be given to the individual's differentiation from others. We are not interchangeable blocks.

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Trevor_Pott
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Re: There are no words...

"I am so disenfranchised I could not overcome my desire to post about my disenfranchisement with this news" would seem to convey the sentiment adequately.

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Trevor_Pott
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Re: Seems to have been an 'open scret'

"now he's officially out you may find use of the term 'Fruity Firm' comes with unfortunate implications"

...why? Is "fruity" actually considered perjorative? I thought it was one of those terms that the gay community had "owned". At least, the few gay friends I have make "fruit" jokes all the time, refer to company that cater to gays as "fruity" and love riffing on Apple as the "fruit" factory on about 12 different levels of meta.

I never can keep up with what terms are supposed to be offensive these days. It seems as soon as we collectively settle on either a slang term or an official term for a given group someone cries "that's offensive" and we have to go make up a new term.

The latest one to bite me being that apparently we can't refer to "people descended from those individuals who violently came across the land bridge in the {at least second} migration, murdered most of the peoples from the first migration (excepting the Innu) and populated the Americas" as "Natives" or "Native Canadians". It must be "First Nations", otherwise it's offensive. And then someone else spoke up and said "no! First Nations is offensive, we should be..."

I didn't hear the rest, it all devolved into shouting.

Does anyone know of an official list of current politically correct terms for various demographics, preferably with a per-country, or even per-administrative-region breakdown so that we can keep track of this all?

*sigh*

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Trevor_Pott
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Re: Good for him!

"I'm delighted he's free to do what he wants, but equally I have no wish to know about it."

I want even less to know what you want, and I care only enough to dislike you.

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Trevor_Pott
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Re: Good for him

Your religion offends me, sir.

I ask that you not practice it in front of me.

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Facebook OCP crowd to ogle MICROSOFT'S server-room SECRETS

Trevor_Pott
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Re: I'll save you some time...

MS are primarily a software mobile first, cloud first company that are desperately trying to get out of the business of supplying any software that doesn't come with a subscription license.

T,FTFY

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Trevor_Pott
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Thank you, Microsoft.

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Keep up with the fast-moving world of flash array storage

Trevor_Pott
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Re: Understand Your workloads first

When considering spinning rust even as a possibility you need to go beyond "modelling". You need to ask yourself "how gracefully does this degrade"? "What will happen if my requirements suddenly spike?" Most importantly of all: "how heavy is the weight dangling above my sensitive bits if performance should spike and the DRAM cache should start diverting requests to the disks"?

Flash starts looking very good, very quickly.

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Trevor_Pott
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Re: Cache

DRAM cache is never the solution to a disk array. Fucking. Never. Oh, life's good until you run out of bloody cache, then you're not going from DRAM to NAND, you're going from DRAM to crushing up flowers and smearing the walls with the results.

Disks are slow and horrible. They are a last resort, nothing more. Every time you have to read or write directly to disk you have failed. And if the only think between your application and those disks is DRAM, you are setting yourself up for failure at the moment of highest demand...right when you need it to just work more than you've ever needed it to do so before.

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Big Content outs piracy hotbeds: São Paulo, Beijing ... TORONTO?

Trevor_Pott
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Re: Someone beat me to markham.

Can't argue with that, I've gotta be a prime example!

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Trevor_Pott
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Re: Someone beat me to markham.

"you and I might not accept the TPP without a fight, but it sure as shit looks like Stephen Harper is buying it, lock, stock, barrel *and* ball gag."

Harper's time is up.

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Trevor_Pott
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"In the US, internet piracy is a criminal matter. Has been since the NET act. Don't know about Canada."

Civil matter in Canda. With the maximum combined fine an individual can pay for copyright infringement being $5000.

It's the proper balance. If you are caught committing copyright infringement you get a fine that hurts - and hurts a lot, for the poor - but not so much that it ruins your life.

But there is no "$150k per infringement" crap. And you don't pile infringement upon infringement to achieve millions of dollars worth of monies due. You cough up $5k, the artists at least get something out of the deal and the life of the copyright infringer isn't ruined.

And the content MAFIAA hate this. Thus the TPP demands.

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Trevor_Pott
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They're just bitter we have a sane and rational made in Canada copyright solution and won't bend over and take the US's TPP copyright demands with a smile and a thank you.

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Remember Internet2? It's now a software-defined metacloud

Trevor_Pott
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It's more than just VPN. It's layer 2 extensibility across links.

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Carders offer malware with the human touch to defeat fraud detection

Trevor_Pott
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Re: My golden rule since my card was cloned at a Texaco petrol station

"The wife" is similar to "the boss", except that if there is a conflict between "the boss" and "the wife" the wife wins.

To be more succinct: "my wife" would indicate that I own her, or at least that we're equals. "The wife' indicates that she owns me. And she does. I am her possession, she is in charge and I do not question this.

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Storage array giants can use Azure to evacuate their back ends

Trevor_Pott
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Well done, Microsoft!

An excellent feature, aimed at the right target market. Enterprises will benefit from this.

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Bad dog: Redmond's new IE tool KILLS POODLE with one shot

Trevor_Pott
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Re: Grumble, moan.

SSL = ancient. TLS = slightly less ancient and currently in use.

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Hate the BlackBerry Z10 and Passport? How about this dusty old flashback instead?

Trevor_Pott
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Hmm. This is the first phone that's seriously interested me in a while...

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Microsoft unwraps new auto data-protection in Office 365 tools

Trevor_Pott
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HA! Well, I've done weirder things while waiting for servers myself. Can't complain with that logic. :)

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Trevor_Pott
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...why did you do the math on that? I mean, just...you have too much time on your hands.

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Trevor_Pott
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No, my position is slightly more nuanced.

What Microsoft have built is good, provided it is very carefully marketed and positioned and what it can and can't do spelled out clearly at multiple points so that nobody is given false hope, intentionally or not. I'd go so far as to say that the word "prevention" probably shouldn't be used here. Maybe "data leak/loss resistance." Think "fire proof" versus "fire resistant".

This will mean lost sales as people who might have been bamboozled don't buy. It will also mean some others will buy anyways, and combine solutions.

None of that takes away from the solid technical work done. The problem to hand is a hard problem to solve. And, quite frankly, I honestly believe that Microsoft have done the hardest part of this in the creation of their existing technologies.

What remains is more political than technological. Zero-knowledge encryption of Azure + Office 365 can be implemented without too much fuss. They choose not to, nor to even discuss why. And if their government did turn around and tell them "you can't do that", then yes, I would say they should serious consider packing up and leaving.

I don't have a problem with the technology Microsoft is offering. I think it is good technology. But I absolutely have a problem with how it is generally marketed, how the PRs present it to journos, and how every bit of training information focuses on "look at all these features, wow!" but spend little (if any) time being clear about what it can't and won't do.

The issue here is highly political. The tech is a good start, but it is resistance-class, not prevention class. Overselling is likely to do way more harm than good.

And ultimately, it is half assed. The endgame solution required involves making some tough choices to stick up for the customer in the face of massive political pressure to do otherwise. Microsoft is out there putting hundreds of millions into trying to convince us that they're "the good guy", and that technologies like DLP "demonstrate their commitment to privacy and security".

If people start to believe that tripe - and judging by the commenters in this forum, more than a few do - then that is dangerous. And that's where the half-assedness of this whole thing absolutely becomes a real concern.

The code can be respect-worthy while the corporate positioning of the product - and for that matter, the company's overall stance across a line of products - is dangerous. And thus we have a very typical Microsoft situation in which the technology is praiseworthy but the solution (notably, how it is ultimately presented in virtually all official content on the subject) is half-assed.

I don't see any of the above as "steam rising". If anything, it fills me with a sens of...I don't know...defeat. Tired acceptance. Depression. A loss of faith in humanity, even. The sort of feeling of abject impotence and helplessness one feels when they learn that another umpteen billion dollars was squandered by politicians.

I don't have the zeal to be passionate about anything any more, sir. I have the outrage fatigue, and it's largely why I confine my thoughts on the matter to forums nobody cares about and nobody reads.

Donning the armour, saddling Rocinante and making another pass at the damned windmill just isn't in me anymore. I report what I see. I vent my thoughts into the feckless void of El Reg's forums where noone of consequence will see. That's all there is.

Crusades and causes are a game for the young.

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Trevor_Pott
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Whereas I think that trying to do this piecemeal is worse than not doing it at all. Address the whole of the issue or don't bother. Make people go elsewhere to other vendors that will address the whole of the issue.

But Microsoft's half-assed approach gives a false sense of security, especially when combined with aggressive marketing that is making their DLP seem like it far more than it is. If you have a half-assed solution, be up front about it. But they aren't, really. Not unless you're an uber-nerd and prepared to pour over every least bloody stitch of information on the topic.

So I accuse Microsoft - and others - of shoddy half measures, whilst trying to market as being adequate. It's not. Not by a long shot. And, like shitty antivirus vendors (oh, wait, Microsoft again!) that do things half-assedly, they do far more harm than good by giving a false sense of security.

Shit or get off the pot. But I'm sick of gigacorps half-assing this. It's too important to let them get away with it.

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Trevor_Pott
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No, I'm talking about DLP as it is being talked to me. DLP in conjunction with tagging at the OS level, mobile security, endpoint security etc. Whatever the term may have been used for, it is being expanded by Microsoft's own marketing droids to cover a more generic "who can access your data, and how".

This seems to be including new proposed offerings like "only allowing certain forms of content to be viewed inside DRMed, tracked online applications" etc. The thing is, if you are going to from "tagging and alerting things as they leave exchange" to "access monitoring and control across the entire data life cycle" (which is absolutely what I am being told is what this term is supposed to now encompass) then I don't think that you can simple "wish away" the threat of malicious actors MITMing (or PATRIOT acting) your data whilst on it's way to, or stored in, the cloud.

So: DLP is either very narrowly "transport rules in exchange" or it is "data lifecycle management" in it's totality. You don't get to pick an choose which aspects of data security and access control you cover just because some of them make you uncomfortable, or you find them inconvenient.

Since Microsoft seem to pushing "DLP" as "more than just exchange transport rules" then I say they've failed until they've addressed all aspects of data lifecycle management.

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Trevor_Pott
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Yes and no. DLP is technologically an expansion of Exchange transport rules...but ties into stuff baked into Windows Server 2012, InTune and EMM as well.

More to the point, the purpose is to allow enterprises to control who views their data, and under what circumstances. It has aimed to become far more than just "exchange transport rules". As such, we must look to solutions beyond exchange transport rules to solve the goal of DLP:

allowing companies (and ultimately, individuals) to control who can see their data, and under what circumstances. And that goes back to needing a "security first, privacy first" approach to things, from the start. No band-aids.

As for "US.gov will make it illegal not to have back doors"...oh well. If they want to footbullet themselves, go right ahead. Microsoft has the choice to keep their HQ in the US. As do all these other companies. They aren't standing up for our rights by rolling over and complying. Why should I trust my business to them, or hand them my money?

Oh, because "America, fuck yeah?" America: fuck off.

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Trevor_Pott
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DLP stuff is nice, but I still don't trust my data residing in the American cloud. When will Microsoft offer complete and total zero knowledge encryption such that they - but especially the NSA - cannot get at any of the data stored in Azure, Office 365, etc? And when will this be enabled as a standard option, available to everyone?

Will they encrypt my user data that's being streamed to them from Windows 8/8.1/10 as part of their integration into the OS? What about Onedrive? How do we lock down all that search data sent to Bing such that nobody I don't want can see it? When will that be the default option?

DLP is a great tool, and kudos to Microsoft for doing shedloads of excellent and very difficult work to advance the state of the art in this area. But what's needed is a true "security first, privacy first" approach that goes far - far - beyond what DLP can ever offer.

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Trevor_Pott
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Re: Hahahaha

Hi, Office files can generally be recovered after a crash in a manner similar to that discussed here. Hope that helps.

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'GCHQ's surveillance data gulp is BULKY and WARRANTLESS', human rights groups moan

Trevor_Pott
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Re: Raise your hand....

The ends justify the means, eh?

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Schneier, Diffie, ex-MI5 bod, privacy advocates team up on Code Red

Trevor_Pott
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Re: Time for the downvotes, I guess

Would my military or police suppress the citizens and back an autocratic state? No. But I'm Canadian. Would yours?

Ferguson.

America is rotten to the core. And I honestly believe your military, national guard and federal policing units would stand with the state, not the people. They've already been trained for decades in "us versus them". Your local Sheriff is just a Sheriff. His revolver and his shotgun mean nothing against the awesome power of an Apache helicopter.

Sorry man, you just live in the wrong country for "the people" to have a say. Probably for generations to come.

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Diablo boss on chipsets, ULLtraDIMM and the Netlist fracas

Trevor_Pott
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Re: NVDIMMS

"Battery backed" versus supercap is fairly irrelevant. It's an external power source.

And no, I didn't forget that flash exists on the module, but flash isn't the primary storage interface. It's the backup data retention space. There's just enough juice in the thing to dump the contents of RAM to flash. Well...you hope, anyways. There's actually been some issues with certain NVDIMM setups of these styles losing their supercaps over time (damned TiMn supercaps!) and thus not actually having the juice to fully write out the contents of the RAM before the clock strikes 12 and it turns back into a pumpkin.

NVDIMMs have a way wider use case set than MCS. NVDIMMs are used inside SSDs (well, sort of), RAID cards, modern high-RAM Hard Disks...anywhere where you might have RAM in use for high-speed storage, but require non-volatile storage if the lights go out.

MCS isn't that. MCS is a means of hijacking the DRAM bus to provide a jumped-up version of PCI-E storage. It isn't main system memory, or even main memory for a subcomponent (like a RAID card). It's secondary (or permanent) memory. Like a PCI-E or SATA SSD.

To be more concrete:

NVDIMMs are the sort of thing you put in your RAID card so that you can have 1GB or 2GB of fast DRAM cache on on your RAID card that accelerates your array. When the power goes out, the DRAM would dump it's contents to a flash backup. When the power comes back on, it would load that data from flash, then flush it back out to the disks.

MCS is more akin to the disks that would hang off that RAID card and serve as permanent storage.

If I were designing the ultimate in "bitching systems of the future", I would use NVDIMMs as my computer's main memory and MCS as permanent storage. I could run my databases in-memory without fear, and store my operating system, application, and long-term storage in the MCS modules.

...and now I want to go build a system like that. Hot damn that sounds sexy.

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Trevor_Pott
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Re: Dec 2 injunction

Sorry, but you are incorrect. Memory Channel Storage is presented to the system as storage. It is not presented as main system memory. Memory Channel Storage is used in a similar fashion to PCI-E storage, SATA storage or other forms of premenant storage.

NVDIMMs are presented to the system as memory. They are used by the system in the same fashion it would use volatile memory, however, it doesn't go *pffft* when the lights go out. NVDIMMs don't write to flash as the primary storage medium. It writes to RAM, then dumps that RAM into flash using an external power source when it detects a power-out event.

They serve different functions and operate in a different manner. The only similarities between the two are

A) Form factor; they both use DIMMs

B) When the power goes out, their contents end up are stored in flash

Under the hood, however, the differences far outweigh the similarities. One example: MCS can be huge compared to NVDIMMs. 400GB, 800GB or more per stick. NVDIMMs use flash as an "oh shit"-class backup medium for RAM, and thus are no bigger than the RAM they back up.

In truth, in many ways, I like the NVDIMM concept better. If only because it means you can use the things bloody forever without worrying about the write life of the flash. You will obsolete the system before the flash chips in an NVDIMM need to be worried about.

MCS? Not so much. As states in the interview, Diablo uses a bunch of consumer-level sells and "black magic" maths to wear level them. How long do they last, really? Given the high price and target (ultra-low-latency databases, etc) I have all sorts of questions about their applicability, survivability, etc. I have a list of technical testing questions a mile long before I'd ever put them into any of my systems.

Not so an NVDIMM. NVDIMMs are simple and straightforward. But htye are so because the operating principles are completely different, as is their ultimate applicability.

Putting RAM with a supercap on a PCB and giving it a SATA 3 interface is closer to being "exactly like an SSD" than MCS is to being "exactly like an NVDIMM". At least the "RAM + Supercap + SATA 3 interface" and the SSD can both only be used as permanent storage.

NVDIMMs are treated by a system more like regular RAM than they are like PCI-E or SATA storage. That's the advantage of NVDIMMs. It's why they're worth buying!

Now I could be wrong - $deity knows that happens often enough - but if that is so, please explain how. For my own erudition. How, other than in the most superficial fashion, is an NVDIMM anything like MCS at all?

Thanks in advance!

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