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* Posts by Trevor_Pott

4453 posts • joined 31 May 2010

Vulturization: 'Privacy' is fightin' words to cloud touters – they get angry

Trevor_Pott
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Re: Duration?

A fair comment. Does the player not show that on your end? Or did you download it and your MP3 player does not tell you?

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Expert view: What is the forecast for cloud backup?

Trevor_Pott
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Sounds like you have some great customers.

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Trevor_Pott
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Excellent point. It's been a long time since I've asked that. The answer always seems to be 'none'. Things like Dropbox have inflated people's expectations, even though they don't understand the complexity of the issues to hand...

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Trevor_Pott
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Have you ever actually met anyone who rotates the disks offsite?

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DON’T add me to your social network, I have NO IDEA who you are

Trevor_Pott
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Re: I wonder if today will be

I had to. Even before I finished the article. I adore Mr Dabbs' writing, and respect him an enormous amount...but alas, I am at heart an internet troll.

Sorry Dabbsy, I just couldn't control the troll.

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Judge could bin $325m wage-fixing settlement in Silicon Valley

Trevor_Pott
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Re: @Dan Paul

"People shouldn't be able to win the lottery from a lawsuit, without even having to pay a dollar for the ticket!"

Why not? Won't they "trickle down" that wealth? Or is that a comforting lie that only applies to existing wealthy people, and not to those who might become nouveau rich?

Those people were screwed over by the companies in question. The existing settlement will leave the companies in question with a net gain for having broken the law and screwed thousands of workers in a fashion that quite honestly could have cartel-class implications.

The companies involved deserve to have their metaphorical gonads crushed for this. They should be strung up and left for the buzzards as an example to future companies. Shareholders beware! Reign in the excesses of your board or your ill gotten gains will evaporate!

But of course, I don't expect that you would see it that way...

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How farsighted is Microsoft's Azure RemoteApp?

Trevor_Pott
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Re: effort [..] required to manage a fleet of Windows machines

The answer to "Need to run something that was coded for IE6/ActiveX ?" is always "kill yourself." :P

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Adobe Creative Cloud 2014: Progress and pain in the usual places

Trevor_Pott
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Re: I used to be a customer

O_o

o_O

O_O

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Trevor_Pott
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Re: I used to be a customer

Yes, it absolutely is the attitude we're all complaining about. You sounded like you were endorsing it.

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Trevor_Pott
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Re: I used to be a customer

"Adobe does not make its money from people who use the software casually or at semi-professionally; they make their money from professionals who work with the software everyday."

So fuck everyone else? They're irrelevant? On behalf of everyone else, fuck you too!

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Good god, where will the new storage experts come from?

Trevor_Pott
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I think you need to look up the concept of "sunk costs"...it's somewhat relevant to this conversation.

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Stopping IT price gouging would risk SOCIALIST DYSTOPIA!

Trevor_Pott
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Re: I agree

"The costs aren't raised by globalisation itself, only by cack-handed implementations of it being pushed by big global companies, who effectively want to be able to buy cheap stuff abroad themselves, while putting barriers for consumers to go buy cheap stuff abroad directly themselves. "

Which is my point. You're saying "rah rah globalisation" based on nothing more than idealism and ideology. I'm saying "in the real world, we didn't get ours." No amount of Tea Party doctrine will change that.

I was going to link to you a bunch of statistics that disprove the tripe you're spewing, especially in Canada, but I am just to exhausted to bother. Your comment has you praising globalization for the things you feel are good and finding any excuse on the planet to pawn off the negative effects.

I've done my pissing into the wind for this week. I'm not going to bay at the moon of a free market evangelist.

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Trevor_Pott
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Re: I agree

"Thanks to globalisation, the 'little guy' can live an extremely more comfortable life than would have been possible 20 years ago. The price of food is extremely low, a much lower percentage of people's budgets now than 30-50 years ago, the general cost:quality ratio of most things has gone down."

Bullshit. Life was far more comfortable and stress free 20 years ago. Food is a higher percentage of budgets than 30-50 years ago, and most of the creature comforts that first worlders enjoy have been bought with massive amounts of personal and governmental debt. Globalization hasn't provided the few benefits we do enjoy and it has driven up the cost of everything else.

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Trevor_Pott
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Re: I agree

"Free market and globalisation cut both ways."

Since when? Provide there examples of globalisation working out for the little guy*.

*If you say "American cloud providers", I shall hit you. They are unavailable to a "global "audience, unless you're quite happy with breaking local laws.

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Code Spaces goes titsup FOREVER after attacker NUKES its Amazon-hosted data

Trevor_Pott
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Re: @Jan 0

...but I like newts! I keep all sorts of lizards, and newts are cool!

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Trevor_Pott
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Re: @Jan 0

Aye, and it isn't limited to a geographic distribution. I use the terms "cuntweasel" and "cockferret" rather often with zero overtones of misandry or misogony. They rank along side "douchepopsicle" and "gonadgremlin" in my lexicon. I don't care if some person or another takes offense beyond the obvious "this is an epithet". If they read deep hatred for $identifiable_group into that then it is entirely because of their own personal hangups.

I'm strictly egalitarian. I hate everyone equally, regardless of gender, race or so forth. Bunch of gonadgremlins, the lot of 'em!

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Trevor_Pott
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Re: bummer...

That's what you get out of that. "OMG misogynist!"

*sigh*

This is why I hate humans.

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Oz trade minister: TPP will happen in 2015

Trevor_Pott
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There's more than just the IP that's controversial. It will lead to a dismantling of Canada’s supply management regimes for dairy, poultry and egg production, investor-state provisions that would allow foreign companies to sue out government over rules to protect the environment and procurement restrictions that prevent a "buy Canadian" strategy operating in our governments.

Michael Geist has more on his blog.

Basically, the TPP is bad for everyone except copyright maximalists and massive American global companies.

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FTC seeks DEFCON help to finger illegal robocallers

Trevor_Pott
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Sorry man, as much as I appreciate good hyperbole, that's a pretty serious thing you just said. You would honestly murder people for robocalling you? Honestly?

If you wouldn't, would you imprison them? For how long? At what expense to the taxpayer? Isn't a very stiff fine and a spectacular amount of enforced community service worth it? Fines against the individuals, not the corporations. Make robocalling something you can pierce the corporate veil for.

If they refuse to pay or do community service, then you throw them in jail for contempt. But robocalling shouldn't be a crime. It's a nuisance. Nothing more.

What's next? Can I jail a woman who wears such a skimpy outfit to work that I can't think all day? No? That's a violation of her rights? But how is that less of a nuisance than robocalling? What if I were to walk around in a speedo and let all my fatty rolls hang out, then dance and jiggle in front of your window all day? Ohhh, that one's okay to go to jail, is it?

What about someone who whistles on the bus? That's a nuisance. Can we jail them? There's an Anonymous Coward around here who has a severe mental illness that causes him to post a bunch of pro-microsoft marketing bullshit in virtually every single article. I would dearly love to throttle the bastard with my bare hands, he's that annoying. I consider him a nuisance, can we send him to jail too?

If we start declaring each and every action that can be (or is) a nuisance to be a criminal act, where does it stop? Where's the line between "crime" and "civil disorder" or even "civil disobedience" as relates the to exercise of our rights to assemble, protest, etc?

Is it entirely arbitrary? If not, who decides? You? Who's qualified to draw that line, hmm?

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Trevor_Pott
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"They should make it a criminal offense"

Really not. Crimes should be for major infractions of the law that cause significant harm or distress. They should not be "because it dun irritated me!" There's enough of THAT bullshit from the intellectual property maximalists. We don't need more.

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Trevor_Pott
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Re: The FTC should use simple crowd sourcing

So get the carriers involved. FFS, we're not talking rocket science. Dear AT&T/Verizon/Microsoft/etc. The call that I just received on my landline/cell voice/sip/etc was spam. Please log the call and pass that info back to whomever handed the call off to you. I am positive each call that occurs in a modern infrastructure has a GUID, and all you do is pass that GUID up the stack to the last telco that routed it.

Keep on going until you either find a telco that refuses to cooperate (in which case you treat them like a spam-hoster) or you find the line/URI that originated the call. Once enough spam reports are aggregated about that line/URI, report them to relevant body.

...why is this hard?

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Come off it, Moon, Earth. We KNOW you're 60 million years OLDER than we thought

Trevor_Pott
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Re: This could be winding down

I don't believe that my own position is "100% for certain right". I simply don't believe that until someone can prove their position 100% correct they should not be indoctrinating children with that position.

Teach, by all means. Inform and pass knowledge. But do not lie to a child and tell them something is true unless you can prove it is...at least to within such certainty as to be statistically irrelevant. If you can prove the existence of God, an afterlife and the literal truth of scripture to within 5 sigma, then by all means tell a child that's the truth.

If you can't, then by whatever shred of honour or decency you may have let the child make their own damned choice.

Anyways, I'll end there. Signing off...

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Trevor_Pott
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Re: Finally!

"So, in a nutshell, you just do not like religion."

Not true at all. I don't believe children should be indoctrinated into a religion. I'm perfectly okay with adults believing whatever they wish; they have the cognitive development to make that choice. (Well, most of them, anyways.)

"the human race has no way of determining with absolute certainty just what truth is"

Perfectly aware of this. Which is at the core of my disagreement with indoctrinating children. That said, while we can not be 100% positive that every single organized religion on Earth is a fabrication - proving a negative is impossible - we can be statistically sure enough that it makes no difference. They are all lies. Some more pleasant than others...but all lies.

" faith is not "accepting the word of another over your own judgement"; faith is simply taking the next logical step into the unknown based upon what I already know."

Wrong. Faith absolutely is one of two things: accepting the word of another over your own judgement, or choosing to believe in something that can't be proven (usually because it is the most comfortable alternative.) The next logical step into the unknown is to find out where the "known" ends and do more research. Faith is never the next logical step; it is what happens when you choose to cease asking questions.

"I must also congratulate you on the "forehead-slanted idiot" insult - that one struck me as quite inventive."

Thanks, but honesty is of prime importance to me, so I can't claim any sort of credit for that. It comes from a kids show called "Beasties." (A transformers cartoon.) One of the characters (Blackarachnia) encounters a fawning austrolopithicine. Disgusted, she says "ugh, get away from me kid, your forehead slopes."

As for the "overall tone" of my posts, this is always done with a purpose. The use of emotive phrases and mixed language (mixing gutter epithets with words that have more than four syllables) tends to cause the majority of individuals to become emotionally invested in the conversation.

Once they're committed, minor verbal probing will get them to reveal their positions and cause them to focus more on defense than dissembling. If they can do nothing but dissemble, you can be reasonably certain they have no knowledge worth mining.

If they respond emotively you know that they are speaking from a position of belief. Attack them. Sting them. Force them to go into a shell of false dignity and mad Google Scholar searching. Here they might not only turn up the odd useful tidbit of knowledge worth digesting, but you trigger in your opponent a form of introspection.

In approximately 10% of cases I've logged so far, this will actually lead to either completely redefining their belief system in the tread itself. Of these, about 90% land not too far from where they started, but about 10% of individuals land far afield. (I'd have to write some scripts to mine the data to see how many ended up close to the argued position and how many landed somewhere orthogonal to both, but I suspect the latter is ever so slightly more common.)

The trick is to categorise the opponent. Once you've isolated the basic elements of the individual you can tailor your prose to achieve maximum effect. So far, I've only got a sample size of about 5000 debates. Given the limited debate partner choice amongst the few sites I've conducted my research in, this isn't quite enough to determine a representative sample. I'm still refining classification categories.

With time, perhaps, I will gather enough data to be able to write a proper comment trolling bot. The autotroll 5000! Point it at the comments section of any website and watch the commenters go insane! It's a long way off, but man...there's money to made if I can get it right. :)

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Trevor_Pott
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Re: Finally!

"I submit to you that it is possible to present a religion to a child in a positive manner, one that does not fixate on negatives like Hell or demonize those who do not share such beliefs."

So? Even if you can present a religion to a child that isn't chalk full of psychologically damaging crap designed to keep the peasants in line so the priests can rule...you're still presenting the child with a carefully manufactured lie and indoctrinating them into believing that it is the truth. That is still abuse.

You are still placing them at a disadvantage compared to those who weren't raised in a lie, to say nothing of the potential psychological fallout should they ever find out the fairy tale isn't true. Nihilism spirals aren't fun.

Present all known possibilities to the individual and give them the tools to make rational, informed decisions. If they choose to believe a lie - or to believe in one possibility amongst many in situations where the truth isn't yet known - that absolutely must be their choice. Forcing it upon them through "one truth and only one truth" indoctrination is still abuse.

"Jesus was the antithesis of a douchebag, I submit to you the idea that he could use a whole new fanclub - one whose members actually try to live like him."

Oh, yeah, the world needs another Christian cult like it needs a nuclear war. Puh-lease. You're veering dangerously close to the sun of "my church knows the one true truth, and everyone else is an unbeliever!" Danger! Danger! Danger!

"But I must point out that Richard Dawkins is no mental health professional - he has an axe to grind." You mean he champions empirical truth and condemns organized lying? Well shit, he's a witch! Burn him!

"The article also comes close to conflating sexual abuse with the mental trauma you no doubt want me to notice."

I don't give a bent goat what you notice or not. I've spend several days building things from source and I'm bored out of my skull. I'm trolling you largely for my own personal amusement because I don't think for a second you're actually capable of considering the negative impact of religion.

Your little line about "conflating sexual abuse with mental trauma" is evidence of your bias. You quite obviously perceive mental trauma to be not as important as physical or sexual trauma. Somewhere, someone taught you that this was so. Probably repeatedly until you internalized it good and proper. Sex is bad! Sexual abuse, therefore is significantly worse that mental abuse! Based on nothing, of course, excepting your own moral judgement about how different kinds of abuse are "rated"...which is rooted in your belief system. Hence why this whole conversation was completely pointless several comments ago...but hey, I got my trolling on, so I'm quite happy.

"...religious instruction received in childhood often does stick around for life. But, outside of those cases where ham-handed assholes have done damage, is that necessarily a bad thing?"

Yes.

Religious indoctrination is the removal of the child's choice in what to believe and who they want to become. That is wrong, regardless of how "good" and "moral" and "right" you think your religion is. Those "ham handed" types teaching their kids racism or burning the heathens? They don't think to themselves "that's wrong, better teach it to my kids." They think to themselves "my beliefs are just, right and moral, I must pass them on to the next generation."

The individual you want to indoctrinate deserves the right to choose for themselves what to believe. What is right and what is wrong. They deserve, most of all, to be taught critical thinking so that they can identify truth from fabrication; to identify where the truth is genuinely unknown versus where manufactured controversy exists.

If they choose to make a leap of faith, that's up to them. under no circumstances should that faith be indoctrinated into them.

"We all need some sort of "lens" to view and make sense of the world around us and we largely get that from the people around us whether they be family, community, teachers or, in some cases, churchy types. This lens will be acquired long before the child reaches an age you consider appropriate for making informed choices, can't be helped thats just how life works. If the lens is not based on hatred, violence or negativity does it really matter where it comes from?"

Absolutely, yes it does. Critical thinking is what needs to be passed on, not doctrine. A moral compass doesn't require religion, and quite frankly doesn't benefit from religion at all. Doctrine and faith obscure the ability to question authority, question morality, question standing ethics and question extant social moors.

A child should be entirely free to believe that there is no "one true truth". That everything needs to be questioned, analyzed and confirmed. They need to know that people lie, and that as a consequence of this you cannot simply take what the parent/teacher/priest/politician/journalist/etc says at face value.

Faith of any sort is the instruction that it's entirely okay not to question. That something simply are, no matter what anyone says. Faith is about accepting the word of another over your own judgement. It is about accepting the authority of the lie over the truth, or - at the very least - accepting that the truth is unknowable/not worth knowing, and choosing to believe the comforting thing instead.

When the child is of age and they are ready to make an informed choice about faith, more power to them.

Until then, the "lens" they should be gifted is one of truthseeking.

Truthseeking is all the more critical as our population balloons. The percentage of charlatans per population unit likely hasn't changed much with time, but as the absolute population grows, so does the absolute number of charlatans. Worse, technology enhances their power and reach manyfold. Today's charlatan can do a lot more damage than those of yesteryear, and there are more of them.

So that child will grow up in a world where nearly all jobs are automated. Where competition for any job at all - let alone a good job - is rabid and fierce. Where charlatans of skill and knowledge are everywhere and where the truth is every more easily obscured beneath layers and layers of personal opinion, anecdote and beliefs.

Being taught that there is a "one true faith" is a weakness. It's a chink in the armour. Not only does it increase your attack surface (as you have so helpfully demonstrated) but it means you are trained from birth to accept a comforting lie as truth. It's a minor effort to find the hooks that drove into the psyche and exploit them.

"As for me being a self-important cockbag, look in the mirror - you're the shouty one. Seriously."

Funny, I don't feel particularly shouty. Bored, maybe. A little somolent. Perhaps eve a tinge malevolent with a dash of gleefully impish. Shouty would imply I'm either talking in all caps, or that I care enough about the topic to get worked up about it. Neither are true.

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Trevor_Pott
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Re: Trevor, Trevor, Trevor

I never said that children exposed only to one religion would not be able to exercise free will. I said that exposing a vulnerable child only to one belief system and repeating over and over that it is the "the One True Truth" is abusive and damaging. One example amongst many is discussed by Richard Dawkins here.

The reality of it is that once inculcated into a given belief paradigm, the overwhelming majority of individuals can't move too far afield from it. Train a child to believe that hell exists, and if they're bad they'll go there, that will be in the back of their mind for the rest of their life. It certainly goes beyond religion.

A good (no religious) example from my own life: if the house was not perfectly clean when my mother got home, there would be hell to pay. The sound of the garage door opening late at night caused completely autonomic fear, anxiety and panic. Fifteen years later, the sound of a garage door opening in the middle of the night is still enough to bring me out of a dead sleep, body flooded with ++ adrenaline.

Religions have a similar impact. They impart a sense not only of what is right and wrong (though it needs be noted that in no way are religions the only means by which right and wrong can be transmitted), but they impart concepts like eternal damnation, faith-based-lack-of-consequences (nothing you do matters, so long as you believe you'll get into heaven!), hatred for non-believers and so on and so forth.

Religion doesn't merely present hatred, fear and lies to children, it imprints it deep into their psyche as the truth. The majority of our species finds that decades later they still believe these things that they were indoctrinated to believe. Even after a lot of effort on the part of many individual to "unlearn" these subconscious beliefs they were so kindly "gifted" by their parents, it's still there.

Contrary to your callous disregard for the impact of childhood indoctrination, one does not simply wake up one day and decide they don't believe in $religion anymore, thank you very much. Even if they put real effort into it, it's twisted up into so many aspects of their understanding of the world that it may never be untangled.

That is the legacy of religious indoctrination. And by advocating for the right of the parent to indoctrinate their child that is what you are saying it is your right to do to the mind of an innocent.

Most children are absolutely not fully cognitively developed by 10 years old. High neuoplasticisty is observed up to an average of 16 years of age, with children still developing important core psychological concepts (like conservation) into their teens.

Just because a kid learns to talk back doesn't mean they're ready to be told hell is real and if they love the wrong person they'll spend eternity there, or that if you think about something really hard you can cure any disease, or that aligning your spirit properly will solve your schizophrenia.

A child asking hard questions doesn't mean they're immune to being indoctrinated. It doesn't mean the indoctrination that occurred prior to that point suddenly vanishes. It means only that they've entered one of the latter stages of psychological development; there's still a great deal of development yet to occur before they are fully adult. (Incidentally, it's a great time to introduce children to the concept of religion, along with multiple examples and let them ask hard questions. So long as you aren't holding up any one belief and saying "this is the one true belief" then it will indeed help them develop critical thinking.)

As for your BS about "knowing about only one religion has afflicted probably the majority of humans that have ever lived yet we still managed to come up with" is just that: BS. You can rape a person to within an inch of their life and they can still go on to cure cancer. Does that mean you didn't abuse them? Cause long-lasting psychological damage? Even put them at a disadvantage compared to their peers?

Lots of people have achieved great things with disabilities. Does that mean that if I poke out your eyes and sever your legs I'm not abusing you? What utter twaddle.

Mental and emotional abuse is still abuse.

Regarding your self-congratulatory claims of intellectual supremacy, I'm afraid I'm going to have to take a pass on that particular leap of faith.

Addendum: my calling you a goddamned idiot doesn't weaken my argument at all. Facts are facts and reality is objective. What you think or feel matters nothing to how the world plays out. An argument stands on it's own merits or it doesn't; attacking the individual (or bitching about attacking the individual) doesn't make a difference to the content of the argument, it's purely emotional byplay. It can affect acceptance of the truth, but does not change the substance of the truth itself.

To wit: I think you're a self-important cockbag who feels that the minds of children are property. As such, I will obtain whatever minor pleasure I can get from calling you a dunce. You don't have to like it. I rather hope you don't. And your tiredness (or not) with regards to the concept doesn't affect me one bit.

Nothing you've said has altered my initial impression of you, but you've manged to reinforce it repeatedly. Hence, I will enjoy continuing to needle, poke, jab and jibe until you trundle off to impose your belief system on another innocent.

Cheers!

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Trevor_Pott
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Re: Trevor, Trevor, Trevor

I never said all homeschooling is bad, you forehead-slanted idiot. I qualified it by saying very specifically that home schooling in order to indoctrinate your children with religion is bad. There are reasons why home schooling can be a good thing, but that - on the whole - it isn't engaged in for those reasons.

1. I have no issue with adults choosing a religion because they have reached the point where their brains are at their maximum development. They are not going to get any better at making decisions. I believe the right to choose your own fate is a fundamental human right. That means that at some point people have to have the right to choose.

Science tells us that we are no longer vulnerable to easy influence by authority figures around the age of 16, give or take two years, depending on the development of the individual. It's one of the reasons why the age of majority is generally accepted as 18(ish) in most countries.

Also: you again completely failed to actually read what I wrote, instead inserting your own inane gibberings. I said - quite specifically - that a spiritual belief was required for some individuals. As a matter of fact, we can even identify the gene sequences responsible for this requirement. It absolutely does not affect the entire population, it is present in approximately 25% of us.

Thus some of us have a need for some sort of spiritual belief to feel whole. The rest don't. Determining if that is true of you is your own personal journey.

Is any belief as good as the next? Yes. The bible isn't true, and none of the other scraps of parchment written by madmen wandering the desert are either. Morality isn't divine. Morality flows from pragmatism and a genetic predisposition to altruism that exists in approximately 85% of our species. (About 5% of our species are not pre-disposed to tribalism and sociopaths make up about 10% of the population.)

Literal interpretation of any sacred text is outright lunacy, which makes any religion as good as the next. Morality is asynchronous of religion: you learn your society's values regardless. That means that it doesn't matter what you believe, so long as you realize that those beliefs are limited by laws. If you want to change laws, you have to work within the system.

2. The reason that it is bad to tell a child what to believe is quite simple: humans aren't born fully formed and fully capable. We have a learning process wherein we are heavily influenced in our formative years by individuals in authority over us.

Telling a child repeatedly their whole life "this is what you must believe, this is the One True Faith" is not giving them a chance to choose a belief system. It is forcing your own upon them.

A life involving spirituality is not a net positive for all individuals. In fact, it's net positive for only about 25% of our species. All children should have the opportunity to decide for themselves A) whether they feel religion is net positive for them and B) which religion they would like to believe in.

What you, as the parent, believe doesn't matter because you don't matter. Not in the context of the rights of the child. Your desire to pass on your belief system is irrelevant. The right to choose comes before your desires.

And that choice must include the right to choose not to believe in a religion at all.

The separation between child and adult is all about cognitive development. If you use a position of power to tell a child what they should believe - especially if you isolate them from their society in order to reinforce it repeatedly over the course of decades - you're a monster. Pure and simple.

By all means teach children that religions exist. Teach them about as many as possible. Do not tell children that one - and only one - is somehow "fact".

Instead, teach them critical thinking and let them decide for themselves what is or isn't fact. Do not use your position of power on a developing mind to force them to develop a belief system. That is nothing more than child abuse, pure and simple.

By demanding the right to do so, you are demanding the right to abuse your child. Would baby jesus want that, do you think? Little baby jesus? Really? He wants you to take advantage of the children? Really?

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THREE'S A CLOUD! Microsoft veep says only Azure, Amazon, Google can do hyper space

Trevor_Pott
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Re: Marketing is news?

Exacloud, surely...

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Trevor_Pott
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Re: The correct order...

I challenge you on the technology bit. And the growth bit. Both crowns belong to Google.

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Irish court peels off gloves, hands Facebook PROBE request to ECJ

Trevor_Pott
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Re: Looking promising

"This man has a future."

One in the head and two in the chest?

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Adobe all smiles as beret bods spaff cash on non-cloud Creative Suite

Trevor_Pott
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Adobe

A pox on their house.

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CIA rendition jet was waiting in Europe to SNATCH SNOWDEN

Trevor_Pott
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Re: @Titus_Technophobe

"Iran? Or the permanent civil war between factions in various African states, all of which are commanded by various cannibalistic chieftains (some of those are also Muslim, and just as radical as their ME counterparts)? Oh and in some of these areas the status quo has been lasting for the last couple decades (Somalia anyone?) too, which isn't quite a short time frame either...."

Ah, so the root of your spite here actually is just "Muslims = bad". Carry on, citizen.

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Trevor_Pott
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Re: @Trevor_Pott

@Cool Koon

I'm perfectly okay with nations "spreading Western hate." Go for it. We need to be reminded on a regular basis that there's nothing "exceptional" about us, and that we aren't superior. For that matter, we need to be reminded that naked capitalism isn't the "best' form of government and that political and social development don't just suddenly stop because it is our collection of nations that is currently on the top of the heap.

Do I think theocracies are good? No. Do i think for a second that I - or anyone else in my nation - has a right to judge a system of government elected by it's people? No. Maybe theocracy is good for them, maybe it's not. But if it's what they want, then they need to find out for themselves if it works, or doesn't.

And maybe they'll invent something new. Democratic Socialist Theocracy. Freemarket Strong Arming. Flying Spaghetti Nationalist Capitlaism. Who knows. Not you and not me. And that's the point.

Free market capitalism has shitloads of problems that we brush under the rug. Yet apparently it's all good to tell others to be just like us? Why?

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Trevor_Pott
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Re: @Titus_Technophobe

Personally, I consider Japan to be in many ways "better" than most western nations. It has it's problems, but I believe they are less horrible than our problems. I rather like the Nordic countries, and consider them exemplars for the world. They're sort of Western...but yet...not. Their take on things is so different from that of Americans and Australians that they really can't be considered part of the same culture.

In addition, while India is besieged by various problems, I admire their democracy. Not comparing levels of corruption or "effectiveness"...but the lack of political apathy amongst their voters. The right to self determination means something there. More than it does in Canada or the USA.

As to the Syrian revolution, as you said it is ongoing. The people are sorting themselves out. But I see no reason whatsoever to believe that they will end up under a brutal dictatorship, as you posit above. Their issue is that Syria is a dozen+ tribes that all have to coexist and find a way to share power. They are currently trying to find that balance. It's messy, but they've got issues there to deal with that no Western nation does.

As to Iraq...Iraq wasn't part of the Arab Spring. Not even a little. The Arab Spring was the people rising up to overthrow repressive regimes and assert themselves. Iraq was invaded by the USA and a puppet government installed. "The people" had no say in anything there, so that's an invalid example.

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Trevor_Pott
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Re: @Titus_Technophobe

"If you are referring to Egypt in your last point above you could clarify that the elected ‘president’ was effectively booted out by the military, and the government has been described by some as a military junta."

And yet, after the election the junta-like activities seem to have ceased. They were imposing martial law after kicking out that cleric. They were suppressing dissent. Unless I'm terribly mistaken, a lot of that has eased up and they are slowly opening up, within reason, given that the religious whackos are still blowing things up periodically.

"Whilst it is certainly true that the western societies haven’t solved all the problems. I have traveled to a number of places that have made much less progress, have you?"

Yes, and I've traveled to places that have made more. Your point? Western civilization isn't "better".

"Fingers crossed this happens. But the evidence in the news suggests otherwise."

What evidence? Your own innate pessimism? Or your irrational belief that if reovlutions don't result in paradise after the first [short timeframe] they're a failure?

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People will happily run malware if paid ONE CENT – new study

Trevor_Pott
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Re: Double-edged sword this is

Alberta, Canada. And yes, if IT were to attempt to work-to-rule, they'd probably get slapped down by a judge. Overtime bans...what? No such thing!

IT workers here who manage to get into a union are few and far between...and they don't get into a union for IT workers. They either join the telecommunications workers union (the most hated union in our country) or the provincial/federal worker's union. And you can only join them if you work for specific companies.

Everywhere else, in the private sector, your boss has the option of listing you as an 'essential worker' in your contract. That makes you exempt from all labour standards, from overtime to number of hours worked in a row to whether or not you get lunch breaks.

Most people don't even realise it, but I've seen it used to devastating effect in the oil and gas industry, where finding IT techs willing to go out in the feild is rare. So once they have 'em, they work 'em almost to death. They're generally paid decently, but a well paid slave is still a slave.

So yeah, digital janitors get a pretty shitty ride. At least here...and from my understanding, in a lot of other jurisdictions around the world too.

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Trevor_Pott
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Re: Double-edged sword this is

"it also means that there will be work IT support types for a long time to come."

Digital Janitor doesn't pay well, and in a lot of jurisdictions they're classified as an "essential service worker" and not allowed to unionize or strike. Yeah. This is great news. We can collectively keep fighting fires for a fraction of a bent pittance instead of moving on to something that provides real value and along with it at least the illusion that we'll get more pay.

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Déjà spew: US would accept higher bills for less CO2 by two-to-one

Trevor_Pott
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Re: Bad poll?

They're building every kind of power plant they can. New coal plants in China, just by the by, are typically outfitted with as much technology as possible to control pollution. China's pollution problem isn't from new power plants, it's from two things:

1) Old power plants that haven't yet been retrofitted. (And China is retrofitting them, one at a time.) And more than any other issue:

2) Chinese homes burn coal is the least efficient and more polluting way possible for heat.

China is a polluted mess. But they honestly are working their asses off to solve it. They are building hydro at a record pace*. They are building nuke plants as fast as they possible can. They have deployed more renewables than anyone.

In short: they are building electrical generation as quickly as they can in part because of growing demand but primairily so that they can get those polluting coal-burning homes off of coal-based heat and onto electrical heating.

A lot of that has to do with air quality. A lot of that has to do with energy independence. But it also has to do with climate change. China is capping CO2 emissions. They are also going to aggressively lower those caps year on year. They don't suffer from "the Yankee politburo sayeth nyet" syndrome: this is The Plan and they are fucking dead serious about this.

You can even judge China's seriousness. We are past the midpoint of the first Five Year Plan in which climate change and CO2 were seriously addressed. All indications I've seen are that they are on target not only to meet the stated goals.

China is building low-carbon business and industrial (development zones) and low-carbon residential communities. Other than a couple of middle eastern nations, who's doing this in a planned, national fashion? China's even implemented cap-and-trade on CO2, for $deity's sake!

Why don't you take some time to China's National Climate Change Programme for yourself? Learn something for once instead of letting your biases and nationalism turn off your brain. Maybe if you stopped just believing anything the media tells you without question you'd see that a nation that made a bunch of mistakes is trying damned hard to undo them...and putting their "betters" (like the USA) to shame.

"There's no point in the USA curbing CO2 emissions because China won't" is outright bullshit. China could have said "there's no point in China curbing CO2 emissions because the US won't." Instead, they just went ahead and started working the problem. There's a reason China is the world's superpower and the US is in decline: they aren't an entire nation of whiny bitches.

*Your bullshit about "they'll crumble in 20 years" is nothing more than xenophobic tripe. If you had any evidence whatsoever that there was corruption in building those dams the Chinese would too. And the corrupt would be DEAD. Corruption is a capital crime in that country, and they execute a lot of people for it every year. Not just scapegoats. They've executed top officials for it. You really don't seem to understand that country at all.

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Trevor_Pott
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'Cortana-gate' ruins Satya Nadella's Microsoft honeymoon

Trevor_Pott
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I have a free idea for a new slogan and corporate direction for Microsoft...

"Customer first."

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Apple settles ebook price-fixing damages lawsuit with US states

Trevor_Pott
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Re: Careful with the Apple hating

It may be liable to get you downvoted, but only homonym misuse is libel to get you downvoted.

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Missiles-on-rooftops Brit spy Farr: UK gov can slurp your Facebook, Twitter ... What of it?

Trevor_Pott
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Re: I'd be more concerned

Abdel Hakim Belhaj, for one.

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Huawei WILL make a comeback to US market, policy wonk predicts

Trevor_Pott
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Re: I don't see why?

Hook sin Huawei gear? Hmm?

Prove it.

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HP faces down youthful tech upstarts: Don't judge us by our looks

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Re: HP in the cloud

"I've been thinking that HP can roll out a cloud-based VDI service for home users. "

Microsoft licensing.

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Microsoft in hunt for the practical qubit

Trevor_Pott
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Re: "whoever successfully builds a reliable, mass-producable qubit"

"Wow, Trevor. Usually I find your comments fairly reasonable, even if I don't agree with them; but you've really lost the plot on this one."

Only because you seem to believe that QC is only good for two different algorithms. I'm far less convinced.

"QC offers very little for the vast majority of mainframe workloads."

Absolutely agree.

"They're rarely CPU-bound in the first place."

Again, agree. That said, however, the few things that are CPU bound are typically great bit huge database work. A huge chunk of that i I/O bound, but even when you can get enough of the DB into fast enough memory you run into CPU issues. This is not only where I think QC can help, it's also one of the things x86 can't really do well. (Power, Itanic et al having largely evolved to deal with these problems while x86 kept on the general compute path.)

And the major barriers to replacing mainframes with an "ultra-resiliant x86 cluster" are perceived risk, decades of strange proprietary add-on software and obscure APIs, and customers' lack of knowledge about what they're actually running.

Again, agree. That said, a lot of customers are looking to rewrite and move off onto ultra-resiliant x86 clusters. While some of that is possible, a major barrier is the ability to move the great big databases off, while still retaining the performance.

Very few businesses are using mainframes for big-data processing. They may have terabyte databases, but they're not dealing with big-data loads.

An interesting assertion, and not my understanding at all. I am lead to believe that many businesses using mainframes are working with giganamous databases that they have to do a large number of searches against. Datasets are so large that the searches become a problem for x86. I'd be quite happy to be proven wrong on that.

And QC doesn't help with many big-data problems anyway. Grover's algorithm is optimal, and it runs in O(N1/2) time and O(lg N) space. So if a search would have taken an hour on a classical computer, it'd take a little under 8 minutes on a QC, all else being equal - and that's only if you have enough qubits. For large N, even lg N starts to become a problem if you're running a lot of simultaneous queries - and if you're not, why is QC useful for your application? - if the resource is scarce.

Where QC helps - and for that matter, mainframes too - is searching a large dataset quickly. Traffic simulation and logistics are both repeated to me as examples of workloads where, apparently, multi-squillion-dollar mainframes are required and x86 clusters just don't do what is needed.

As for what QC is supposed to do for "custom interconnects" I cannot guess.

I don't think QC will replace custom interconnects. I think A3Cube and like setups will commoditise high-speed, low-latency interconnects to the point that there's no longer a need for the custom stuff. Thus the margin will evaporate.

That means that the real money will shift to quantum interconnects as the demand for secure transmission grows. Will that be in-datacenter? Probably not. But in the networking world, I think the margins are going to move away from lashing together servers and towards quantum-secure comns. (Which, apparently, we can now do using mostly regular equipment? I need to investigate that more...)

Many of the potential customers in our market can't even start to disentangle the thousands of undocumented programs they have on their mainframes, in order to find a subset suitable for a trial migration. Even with the help of source-code application-suite analysis tools. And that's when they have source.

And yet they are trying. They are migrating. A trickle here, a trickle there...and this business is evaporating. What happens when the heavy lifting of the DBs (and their associated gobs of RAM) is no longer needed? When your "mainframe" can be stuffed into 2U + a 4U QC to run all that legacy stuff? I doubt you'll be getting the kind of money for it that you were getting when you could sell two whole racks to do the same job...and that's my point.

QCs on their own are not going to kill the mainframe. They're just one additional wound. Mainframes are dying the death of a thousand papercuts as technology in general makes them no longer relevant.

I just think that QCs ability to deal with big databses, fast factoring and - if my sources are correct, natural language - will take some away some of the remaining "you need a mainframe for this" workloads...hence stealing the margin.

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Trevor_Pott
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Re: Needs better explanation

Quantum effects of mammalian neurology is something that at the very least I know a group at the University of Alberta is working on. To listen to them talk about it, they've got folks around the world they're working with on the problem. I know the people involved and they don't do frivolous research. I also happen to know they aren't really anywhere near publishing.

Next time I sit down for beer with 'em, I'll poke more into the details.

As for qbits being used for natural language comprehension, I wish I could go into details, but it honestly does fall under "protecting a sources." I know that sounds like a cop out, but I am sworn to secrecy about the whole affair.

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Splash! Three times as much water as ALL of Earth's oceans found TRAPPED underground

Trevor_Pott
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Re: Re Christoph: Equilibrium?

Except that the flood myth shows up in populations that should not have been able to have contact with one another...and the variability is too wide. Not all flood myths involve someone surviving. Some are "wipe out, rebirth of all", etc.

It's far more likely that most primitive cultures had an encounter with a massive flood at one point or another, and that this became a basic part of our racial memory.

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IoT cup claims 'instant' identification of what's in it

Trevor_Pott
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Re: @jake

It's jake. He's too busy sipping his homebrewed beer made of the fermented tears of his enemies. All while he flies to work in his mahogany helicopter, from the deep-forest acreage that he build with his own two hands, out of the spare zeros and ones he saved by coding a Big Data financials database that makes trillions of dollars per second. Naturally he coded it on a Sinclair ZX Spectrum made out of things being better in the past.

Whatever you do, jake does better. Whatever you like, jake likes something better. Whatever you drink, eat, say, shit, piss, or breathe, jake does it better. And in the past, when men were men and women flew the choppers, everyone was better...but jake's all that's left, here to tell us all about how amazing he is.

...but he still doesn't get "humour". That's for lesser beings.

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Top Canadian court: Cops need warrant to get names from ISPs

Trevor_Pott
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Re: As to bullying ...

Canadian cops rarely "go to jail" for screwing up. Suspension with pay is more frequent, along with retraining. It's very - very - hard to get a Canadian cop canned.

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Trevor_Pott
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Re: alternative view courtesy of StateWatch...

"the ISPs have previously stated to ACPO that they need to retain data for about 5 minutes in order to complete the billing process, the metadata could then be archived to tape."

Um...no. There's a whole system we use here wherein we log in to the ISP's network to register our devices. We assign devices by MAC address to the system so that we can select between dynamic IPs and static IPs (assigned by DHCP as well). This prevents people from just tossing unlimited numbers of devices naked to the modem and hoovering up IPs. It also allows the ISP to assign combinations of dynamic and static IPs to the same line.

That's why they need to keep the IP --> device mapping around. It's literally integrated into how the entire infrastructure works.

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