* Posts by Trevor_Pott

5656 posts • joined 31 May 2010

Watch out Seagate: Here comes WD with a hybrid flash/disk drive launch

Trevor_Pott
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Re: Single Volume?

"SATA Express PCIe doesn't allow multiple volumes on one interface"?

Wrong, it does. And WD sells a unit like that today (though for SATA). This is a different unit aimed at a different segment.

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Re: Really, El Reg...

#JeSuisCharlie

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Hey look! Microsoft's workforce isn't all white men

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Re: Mythical

"a girl who is into tech is seen as an oddity. Hopefully this is changing but we need to keep the pressure on to truly change this"

Why? So they can have their spirits eroded by being the modern servitor class? Fantastico. I think you'll find they do far better at hard science than anything IT or engineering related. And - at least in Canada - they dominate such subjects today. Your biologist, geologist, etc are generally women. The IT nerds are simply those can take more beatings and poor morale for longer.

"The reason it gets less attention as an issue is because the fields where men are under-represented are generally lower-paid than the fields where women are under-represented so it seems more "unfair""

Most IT jobs aren't very well paid. But Nurses make pretty good money. (At least in Canada.) The upper range of the "best of the best" in IT is far higher than nurses, but the average salary (once you've lopped off the highest and lowest 5% from each field) absolutely is not.

Women have way more advantages getting into STEM than men do. I just honestly think they're smart enough to not bother...unless they have a real passion for one of the hard sciences. Why we would want anyone to go into IT or engineering is a complete mystery to me. That's a horrible thign to wish on someone.

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Re: Strange Minority

"plenty, until guided away from it at school age toward more "feminine" subjects"

Bullshit. Women are not guided towards more "feminine" subjects at all. They simply make better judgements about what they want to do for a living and realise that IT is a pretty shit way to make money.

As a general rule women don't make good drones. They're independent, they question authority. They work well collectively and the modern woman under no circumstances subordinates herself well. With those characteristics you'll have a miserable time in IT.

If you want to work in IT you need to be a good drone. Capable of solving problems on your own, absorbing knowledge on your own time, but also ready and willing to have every single person in the company - from the CEO to the janitor - walk all over you all day long. You need to be ready to have completely unreasonable stresses and demands put upon you as a matter of course and be required to be subordinate, passive and cater to the egos of everyone.

I know of no woman who would put up with that shit. They have had decades of having their own empowerment drilled into them and if they do choose IT they sure don't last long.

IT is for delta males. Those who have spent a lifetime learning that their position in the hierarchy is at the bottom. Since males are naturally (and here I mean genetically as well as culturally) far more driven to accept - even require - a hierarchical command structure then men who have been taught they are the deltas are far more likely to accept it.

The short version is this: with the exception of the massively specialised positions in our industry IT workers are the modern servitor class. Women have been taught their whole lives never to put themselves in that situation. SO when you do see women in It they tend to be very specialised and very, very good at their jobs.

Good fucking luck convincing women to sign up to be part of the servitor class willingly. I think they rather enjoy working anywhere else...and good on 'em for that.

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Re: If you think you aren't to blame for all of the world's problems..

Whoah. Check your privilege there, bro. There are so many other groups (Google "cis") that you forgot to cast aspersions on. You clearly don't even know enough about the trials of others to even know who to blame!

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Re: So?

"With perfect equal opportunities, the mix would be the same as the mix of eligible applicants."

This is IT. The % mix of elligable applicants is heavily skewed towards white and asian males. Do you honestly think that there are 50% women applying? Or 50% black people? Or whatever ethnicity it is that is supposed to "win" today?

All we have is the current mix. Nobody has posted the % mix of elligable applicants for the entire history of the company, thus allowing us to make rational judgements about not only the current mix of applicants, but the current mix at the time individuals were hired. Senior positions, for example, require senior people.

That your current applicant mix to the company's lowest ranks might have a given diversity formula has no bearing on how the senior leadership should look. By and large senior leadership in IT is white and male (or asian and male) because those are the guys that started the industry, and they're still around. So your most senior people are still going to reflect the imbalance of their times.

If your goal is a "proper" racial/ethnic/gender/lifestyle/whatever mix then you're just going to hamstring your company. The goal should be hiring the best qualified for the job, regardless of any other considerations. And anyone taking anything else into consideration (such as race/gender/etc) should be prosecuted to the fullest extent of the law.

Checks and balances should exist to ensure they can't take such things into account. That way no biases (either "positive" or "negative", depending on your point of view) can come into play. (In theory. There's always something.)

Of course, if equality isn't your goal, then by all means, string up white males.

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Ugly Microsoft code NUKED Bing and Yahoo! – report

Trevor_Pott
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Re: A code update:

One user or one trillion, the servers needed to index the internet, categorize it and them optimize it such that the most likely/popular searches are cached are many. Bing itself is probably tens of thousands of servers on the back end. Even if you only need a few hundred for the front end.

This is why there aren't eleventy squillion search engines out there. The barrier to entry is huge.

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Sony-blasting Lizard Squad suspects quizzed by UK and Finnish cops

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Re: Once upon a time....

What ethics and morality? Individualis taken to extremes? The demand to control women's vaginas and have every "potential" baby born, but then wash hands of any responsibility for them once they're squeezed out? Maybe we can teach them how waterboarding is okay, or how a great nation is a nation where teachers are told to carry guns to work as a means of protections.

Maybe we can teach about how if you record a song you deserve to have it copywritten forever so that your grandchild^10000 can live off the royalties and nobody can ever make a derivative work (or the work pass into popular culture) without your family making yet more money.

Shall we teach children that rape is what happens to you when you're bad? Seems a commenter above thought that was a great plan. Maybe we can teach them that nations should have massive unsustainable armies, and infrastructure and pork and so forth, but not the taxes to run it. Or that a wealth gap is good and that money will trickle down aaaaaaaany day now.

What should we teach our kids? And who should serve as examples and role models? I'm pretty confused, you see, because it seems to me that there are a lot of people who claim loudly to be "moral" that actually really awful people. So I want a different word for my ethics than the one they claim.

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Re: I always find it horrifying

"rape as part of the deterrence"

Is a fucking war crime.

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Stale pizza, backup BlackBerrys, payroll panic: Sony Pictures mega-hack

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Re: So...

"In my former workplace, it was "Buy your pizza yourself; call me in the morning when the server has been cleaned up, I have an important presentation at 09:00. Too hard? You have only got yourself to blame. Btw. why hasn't the problem with the occasional spam in my mailbox not been fixed yet?""

Get out of my head, Charles!

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NORKS? Pffft. Infosec bods BLAME disgruntled insiders for savage Sony hack

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Re: THe problem with the FBI...

"Anyone who says different is a pinko asswipe limey faggot"

Maybe, but if they want to fuck with us again we'll gladly burn their white house down one more time.

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Trevor_Pott
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Re: THe problem with the FBI...

"so that Obama could attack the norks?"

You really think he's that eager to lose another war? Or anyone else in his administration? What kind of gluttons for punishment do these yanks elect?

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El Reg tests portable breathalyzers: Getting drunk so you don't have to

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Everclear. This is a thing that we can buy here at Vulture North. 95% ethanol. There is a bottle of it in front of me. 750ml. That's 710ish (allowing for some evaporation) ml of ethanol. I have pop in various flavours to mix it with. There are juices.

But there is no rum.

Why is the rum gone? Oh, yes...I drank the rum. LONG LIVE THE NIGHT TIME! THE NIGHT TIME IT A{PPPPOIH8ohewwer--------++++++++CARRIER LOST

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Internet Explorer 12 to shed legacy cruft in bid to BEAT Chrome

Trevor_Pott
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Re: It's a mess

If anybody here has never worked with such a person then you have my envy probably are that person.

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Apple and Microsoft backed Rockstar flogs zombie Nortel patents for $900m

Trevor_Pott
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Bullshit of the highest order. Perhaps the greatest example is that high quality software is being produced in countries where you cannot get patents on software.

Innovation will occur regardless. All you're bitching about is the whether or not those already rich can get richer by trying to play for sympathy on the "small inventor in his basement" card. Which is a species that is already nearly extinct in IP-loving 'murica as it is.

Trick down only works when it's trickling down your pants. Otherwise it's just another Randian fallacy.

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Simple middle ground solution: all patents from insolvent companies are handed over to a special holding company that immediately makes them available on a FRAND basis to all comers. The revenue is then devoted (after operating costs) to a pool of money used for grants given to researchers or those looking to attend higher education. No corporate shenanigans allowed, but no abuse allowed either. It strongly encourages everyone to license via FRAND.

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Sony FINGERS DDoS attackers for ruining PlayStation's Xmas

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Re: Wrong side of somebody

forgive

Why? What possible incentive do I have to forgive them? What have they done to earn that forgiveness? Why would I forgive them when they keep compounding the error with further douchiness?

I can - and do - forgive some individuals and companies their failures. We're all human. But after a time a few isolated incidents form a pattern of behavior, and that I don't forgive. There's no rational reason to do so.

If you want forgiveness, earn it.

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Re: Wrong side of somebody

ALMOST A DECADE AGO and it wasn't like it was exactly an earth shatteringly fantastic Linux experience on it.

And? It's not like Sony have changed in that time. They still release an unlimited stream of proprietary formats and refuse to license their stuff reasonably (which results in anyone who buys into their proprietary crap getting screwed when there is no wide adoption and/or Sony jacks the price up.) Sony still are a member of the MAFIAA, urging copyright maximalism at every turn and actively working to prevent any sort of rational compromise.

I could go on and on. The point is: Sony isn't run by "good people". Or even "mediocre people". It's run by bad people. People who aren't satisfied with making good money, they're so greedy they have to put time, effort and money into desperately trying to control everything...and in the end it has not only earned them the ire of many a hacker, but it is is absolutely costing them their business, as customers have been leaving them in droves for years.

Weep for the innocent milled masses who work at Sony, but not for the death of the company, nor the unquestionably evil executives. Their unchecked greed and hubris are what led Sony to this. Compassion and sympathy for the body corporate are unwarranted.

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Devuan rebels hope to deliver Debian fork in 2015

Trevor_Pott
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Re: Trevor...

Everyone, Simon Hobson believes that it is unlikely bordering on impossible to make a Debian fork that is systemd free, so nobody hsould bother trying. He hath spoken.

/me donates another $25.

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@ John Sanders

Marcus Hamilton: Why do you keep fighting? You just signed away your role in the Shanshu. There's nothing in it for you anymore.

Angel: People like you, who don't care about anyone or anything, will never understand the people who do.

Marcus Hamilton: Yeah... but we won't care!

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Perfectly okay with my donation money going towards a laptop for someone who is working on delivering a systemd free Linux distro. That's why the money was sent in. Let's get 'er done.

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Uber apologises for Sydney siege surge pricing SNAFU

Trevor_Pott
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I don't get the issue with this either. Uber have an algorithm that decides to hike up the price to offer the service only to those of increased financial means when there are not enough drivers on the road. The user is advertised well in advance that this will happen, so if you don't like it you don't have to use it.

I don't get the issue with this either. Uber have an algorithm that decides to hike up the price to offer the service only to people from certain areas of the city when there are not enough drivers on the road. The user is advertised well in advance that this will happen, so if you don't like it you don't have to use it.

I don't get the issue with this either. Uber have an algorithm that decides to hike up the price to offer the service only to people who have certain advertising profiles detected from their phones when there are not enough drivers on the road. The user is advertised well in advance that this will happen, so if you don't like it you don't have to use it.

I don't get the issue with this either. Uber have an algorithm that decides to hike up the price to offer the service only to people with certain political search histories when there are not enough drivers on the road. The user is advertised well in advance that this will happen, so if you don't like it you don't have to use it.

I don't get the issue with this either. Uber have an algorithm that decides to hike up the price to offer the service only to white people when there are not enough drivers on the road. The user is advertised well in advance that this will happen, so if you don't like it you don't have to use it.

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Trevor_Pott
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Re: it's called supply and demand

"I for one haven't taken a taxi since I discovered Uber. I'd rather walk."

It's so nice that you have that option. Not all of us do. Also: it's so nice to see that you so blatantly support "rich people and those with means first" as opposed to any form of attempt to treat people as equal based on a shared basic humanity. Bank accounts uber alles. May your blade chip and shatter.

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Re: I'm not seeing the issue

Yeah! Fuck the poor! Woo! Rich people first! Fuck yeah, capitalism!

Ass.

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Microsoft patch mashes Office forms and macros

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Mobile first, cloud first

Customers, developers, partners and staff last.

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Microsoft shutters Office 365's free web site service

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Re: Sharepointless

I have one SMB in my stable that uses it to good effect as an intranet. But it's basically a place where one - and only one - person updates the info, for internal dissemination. A Wordpress site would be equally useful...but Sharepoint came free with SBS. :/

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ICANN: The TRUTH about that hacker attack on our DNS zone file database

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Re: El Reg uses two factor authentication?

There are people who value Sony? How odd.

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Armouring up online: Duncan Campbell's chief techie talks crypto with El Reg

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Re: a nice try....

"and the measures one deploys have to be proportionate to the probability and impact of the risk."

The impact of the risk is going to jail for something irrelevant or that you didn't even do because the government has a new automated witch hunt. And the probability increases with every day.

I'm sorry mate, but I can't agree with your take. You still seem to believe that anyone out there should consider themselves below some threshold where they shouldn't have to worry about state actors. I say you can't be more wrong. That whole argument is based on the faulty premise "if you have nothing to hide you have nothing to fear."

Well sorry to burst your bubble, but if you have nothing to hide you still have everything to fear. We've automated witch hunts int he 21st century. And nobody is safe. Not one single fucking person.

So your only hope of survival as a free/libre individual is to raise the barrier to running you to ground high enough that they target some other poor slob instead.

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Re: Why? Because you trust your government?

"if I told all my friends they have to learn and implement PGP if they want to email me the latest joke or get my latest musings about where to go for dinner, I'm pretty sure my mailbox will be suddenly barren"

You say that like it's a bad thing.

"As for data encryption, well I don't see that my personal data is worth it."

But each person places a different value on their data. Also: you're presuming in this statement that "the man" isn't simply on a fishing expedition looking for reasons to throw people into the fire.

As Cardinal Richelieu said: “give me six lines written by the hand of the most honest man, and I’ll find something in them to hang him by.”

Better safe than sorry, mate.

"I have firewalls and AV that have protected it up to now, if The Man wants to see it, not much I'll do will keep him from it for long."

That's a completely wrongheaded approach to this problem. You are absolutely correct in that you have no ability to keep a dedicated state-level actor out of your data. At the end of the day they can deploy physical assets to tap your data and at that point you're right fucked.

But the point here isn't to prevent the MIB from sneaking into your house while you're out. It's to raise the cost of fishing expeditions and automated searches for dissidence so high that they become non-feasible for state-level actors to engage in. Or, at least, that they go burn some other witch instead of you.

You're not going to stop 007. But you might stop the local council from abusing their access to meta-ECHELON and using the fact that you put out one too many bags of garbage to hit you up with a fine.

Or maybe you engaged in some "extreme" rumpy pumpy in front of a window with the blinds open. It's bad enough the local puritans in power could probably throw you in the brig for a lifetime. Why give them the power to slap you with an "internet pedo child molester" lifetime tatoo because you also happened to be streaming it to likeminded folks elsewhere?

I've accidentally been e-mailed XLS dumps containing the entire customer records database for a company, including tens of thousands of credit card numbers*. In how many jurisdictions could I be burned as the witch simply for being the recipient? I can think of three off the top of my head, and that's three too many!

By raising the bar for automated snooping by state actors I am raising the cost of automated witch hunts. As someone who qualifies as a witch to oh, so many groups, I'm very interested in keeping their costs as high as humanly possible.

*fortunately I was the only one who got this mail, and it never left the corporate firewall so we were able to deal with it internally, but still...

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Re: a nice try....

"It's massive overkill in almost any situation other than trying to protect the operations in your world-conquering volcanic lair."

Why? Because you trust your government? Because you honestly believe you're above suspicion?

Why should we share your level of naivete?

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HOLD IT! Last minute gifts for one's nerd minions

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Re: Burn, Baby! Burn!

I never got why that was something to "make fun of". Dude's ****ing built for an old fart. So he likes kibitzing about doing wildernessy things. As a Canadian, where the wilderness is a key part of our culture, I wish our politicians were that in tune with the average bloke. Far better than some yutz in a suit who goes everywhere by limo and has never fired a gun.

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Re: Burn, Baby! Burn!

It's such a cool picture. Josh Folland has one in his lab. It's huge and awesome.

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Thankee sir! And a Happy Holidays to you and all the readers as well. :)

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Google sues Mississippi Attorney General 'for doing MPAA's dirty work'

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Really? Seems to me that governments have institutionalized breaking labour unions but pour hundreds of billions into business freebies.

What's next, a claim that racism is over?

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"The emails *must* contain a treasture map because there *must* be bodies buried, because it's the MPAA, and they're mafia and they're always trying to break the internet, right?"

You're learning!

"But a $60n a year corporation sues the democratically-elected Attorney of the USA's and "progressives" cheer?"

Damn rights. Because - surprise, surprise - Google is actually a far less horrible option than the MPAA. You're a brand tribalist for the dark side Andrew: a standard bearer for asshats so shitty that in comparison Google look like the good guys.

Before you break out your patent penting trademarked "freetard" and attempt to label me an abolitionist, think again. Balance is the key between the opposites here. But if there is to be only one side, if an extreme must win because neither side will compromise, then I will stand with the freetards.

Copyright maximalists are the enemy. They are to be fought, no mater who that makes me allies with in the meantime. Once you have identified the enemy, you fight them without compassion, sympathy or mercy. War is hell: it's best over with quickly.

And make no mistake: this is war. And the copyright maximalists will lose.

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Re: Only in America

"Do you remember voting for Larry Page?"

Sure I do. Every single time I pay my Google Apps fee. Every single time I set another browser's homepage to Google.ca. Every single time I choose Hangouts over Skype.

Every.

Single.

Time.

Google is a choice, with just as narrow a set of shitty options as my vote.

May Google's lawsuit against this corrupt A.G. be the first amongst many as the entire world take advantage of the treasure trove of Sony's hack to bring the MPAA down a few pegs. That's not to say Google don't deserve a swift kick in groin as well, but I hate them a hell of a lot less than I hate copyright maximalists.

To be perfectly, crystal clear about how I feel: I really wish there was a god. Just so copyright maximalists could burn in hell for eternity. Very few things would benefit humanity more than legalizing the use of copyright maximalists for fuel.

Maybe once they're out of the way we can work on workable solutions. Until then, go Google! May the least shitty option win.

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FURY erupts on streets of Brussels over greedy USA's data-slurping appetite

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Re: Hate Machine

You're right, MyBackDoor...I do hate you.

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Re: Dirty

But think of the kids!

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Don't panic, US Navy has only deployed a ROBOT SHARK (but where are the lasers?)

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Re: LASERS DONT WORK UNDER WATER

Lasers work just fine underwater...provided you have a sufficiently large laser. Then you're simply turning the water into plasma and creating both a shockwave and cavitation weapon.

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Security SEE-SAW: $3 MEEELLION needed to fight a $100k hack

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Re: Not Surprising.

There are really two schools of thought on this.

The first is that a highly mobile attacker can harry the hillsides and strike at weak points, drawing gout the limited manpower that an entrenched static defended can spare and whitting them down over time through ambushes. The mobile attacker sets the tone of the engagement and chooses the time and place.

A well prepared defender, however, can whether a siege for years. By being static they can bring to bear far heavier and more powerful weaponry, making even approaching the fortress spectacularly costly. A well prepared defender has either alternative (underground) routes of ingress/egress and thus can bring in supplies to weather the siege or they have internal generation capacity that means so long as the attackers can be held at bay, they can live there indefinitely.

A mobile attack force has easy access to it's own supply lines easily, and could theoretically discover the emergency routes for the static defender. But the mobile force is vulnerable to cavalry sent out by the static defender to harry them behind their lines.

War is not so simple as to boil it down to "a mobile force will always beat a static defender." Ask the Germans in WWII what they thought of the British 17 pounder anti-tank installations!

War is a game of knowing your enemy, and customizing your tactics to suit. The side with the best intelligence wins. If I am defending a great big fat target I have two options: try to hit the attackers way before they get within firing range or try to make it so costly to get within firing range that they wouldn't dare try.

The first approach requires me to know how many of the attackers there are, what they're equipped with, where they are and where they are going. That's four points of data needed to successfully find and kill an attacker using a mobile force.

The second approach requires me only to know two things: how far can they shoot and how hard do those shots hit? If I know that then I can design my static defenses to shoot farther than them and I can make rational choices about "shoot more things to wipe them out before they get in range" or "invest in armour so that I can tank a few hits whilst I mow them down."

They'll change tactics and maybe even invent new weapons. As the defender, I have to know about that before their own soldiers do and be able to develop countermeasures before they can bring them to bear. I'd also be well advised to keep a light cavalry regiment on hot standby in case I happen actionable intelligence. Never underestimate the blow to morale that a successful cavalry raid can cause!

If what you are defending is a small target - man portable, say - then by all means splinter into a thousand different groups and dissappear into the hillsides. So long as you have a means of communicating you can coordinate counterattacks against any attacker and use guerrilla tactics to drive them out of your land.

But that's really the question, isn't it? What are you trying to defend? Purpose dictates options, and limits on options are limits on available strategies. Once you've picked your strategies, it comes down to the tactics of the individual units, thier ability to communicate...

...and the quality of the intelligence you've based your battle plan on.

Infosec has four parts: prevention, detection, mitigation and response.

It is impossible to prevent all attacks. It is impossible detect all attacks. It is impossible to mitigate damages from all attacks such that they require no response. Anything that makes it to the "requires response" layer will be huge, so have your response well rehearsed.

Prevention is a lock on a front door. It might keep a few people out, but it falls to a good swift kick. Detection lets you know when someone has kicked in the door and allows you to react. Mitigation would be the ability to reconfigure the hallways so that someone who has taken the time to kick down your front door is presented with a trove of easily stealable goods that look valuable but are, in fact, worthless.

Response comes into play when the fellow who has kicked in the door realizes that the hallways have changed, pulls out an exacto knife, and cuts through the drywall to get at the surprise on the other side. Here you could have anything from a 40lb rottweiler waiting to simply "having insurance" to deal with the theft.

Of course, if you'd had good intelligence that a skilled attacker was going to attempt a breach, you could save yourself some trouble by hiring a cop to watch the place while you're out during the window where the attack is supposed to take place. You could undertake inconvenient security measures for the period of high vulnerability, like having legitimate staff use the back door and/or increasing the number of honey pots you have to work through to get to the good stuff.

And of course, don't forget cavalry raids of your own: get a digital attacker to drop their payload on a honeypot system, then crawl back through the link and nuke the CNC servers. Preferably by figuring out where they physically live and having large men with automatic weapons bust down the doors with a warrant and cart the servers away for analysis.

Never simply rely on a large, sturdy-looking lock. By the same token, never assume that a fixed installation can't be adequately defended.

As the man in the original article said, the secret is to raise the cost to the point that the attacker won't want to play any more. If your guns can outshoot theirs, then they lose so many men getting into firing range that attempting to attack your castle is an exercise in insanity.

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Linux 'GRINCH' vuln is AWFUL. Except, er, maybe it isn't

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Re: Brought to you by...

"physical access is required"

*shrug* Give me physical access and I can just poke the system in the eye and reset the root password.

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Re: Brought to you by...

"No WindowsX issues, no bash problems. Nowt to see here."

I don't allow bash for any user and I don't even have X installed. They're servers. Why the hell install that crap? So, um...yeah. Nothing to see here...

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Google Tax part 94: EU's H-dot wavers over copyright levy

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"Is that working well for them, then?"

As a general rule, Yahoo News is less crap than Google....

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Re: Catastrophic?

"Why catastrophic? It means that instead of getting results from a wide array of sources, Spaniards have to go directly to the news sites they know to get their news."

Or they just use news.google.com and get news from "not Spain". There are a lot of Spanish speaking countries out there that are not Spain. Like the US, as one (fairly large) example.

There's no reason to assume that Spaniards are going direct to eh website of Ruper Murdoch's Spanish Inquisition directly any more now than they were before. Strikes me you use Google News specifically when you don't want the spoon-fed neural pablum, but actually want to find out what the hell's going on.

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Re: Hypocrites!

"There are definitely websites that are getting more traffic now that Google News has closed."

Yeah, non-Spanish news sites.

Mate, if you aren't on Google you don't exist.

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Fedora 21: Linux fans will LOVE it - after the install woes

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@AdamWill re: advertising

"Have you seen how much of it is about systemd? That would be 'none'. It's all hybrid cloud this and container that and devops the other. I mean, I just went to https://www.redhat.com/en and clicked around the marketing crap aimlessly for about 10 minutes and the word 'systemd' didn't appear once.

Oooh! I finally found it, on page 6 of https://www.redhat.com/en/files/resources/en-rhel-whats-new-in-rhel-712030417.pdf , which is six clicks from the front page, one unobtrusive link on https://www.redhat.com/en/technologies/linux-platforms/enterprise-linux . Prominent, this ain't."

Explain to me why Red Hat would spend much time advertising something that is not only controversial but a clear attempt to gain veto-class lock-in powers over the Linux ecosystem?

Even Microsoft isn't stupid enough to advertise the moves they make which fall into that category. That's the sort of thing you bury the lede on and then send out your "social media engagement team" to convince everyone that disagreement with the party line is nothing more than conspiracy theory. Three to five years later, you're welded into the pole position and you can't be removed.

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Trevor_Pott
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@DrXym

"And a sizable number are extremely favourable of it. "

So the sizable number of people who agree with us should kowtow to the sizable number of people who agree with you because...well, because what, exactly? You have a bigger stick?

"Which may explain why Fedora, Arch, Gentoo, RHEL, OpenSUSE, Debian and Ubuntu all support or are in the process of supporting it."

No, they're in the process of supporting it because nobody in the Linux world has the financial resources to fight Red Hat on this. Nobody. Red Hat has played this very well; so many components are already dependent on systemd that maintaining shims or creating alternatives is a massively financially burdensome project to undertake.

Worse, the various teams under Red Hat's control seem to be planning, one by one to "integrate" with some level of dependency upon systemd. So the number of projects that have to be worked around, shimed or outright replaced is going up.

If you want a GUI on your Linux distro at all, you're pretty much fucked already. And it won't be long before those looking for a server OS are going to have to clean fork GNU/Linux away from systemd/Linux in order to keep free of it.

Any distro that wants to be commercially viable does what Red Hat says and hopes Red Hat doesn't turn their eye upon them and try to put them out of business. And that's the end of it today; Red Hat controls too much. Nobody else has any real leverage.

Linux functioned because no one group ever accumulated too much power, so relying on eachother's good will was backed by some plainly pragmatic reasons why everyone had to cooperate. That's gone now, and with it both the presumption and any pretense of goodwill.

Commercial interests are all that matter int he systemd/Linux ecosystem.

"So what? Those are all interrelated things."

Do one thing and do it well. The reason being not only to avoid gigantic monolithic entities with 2M lines of code, but so that no one person or group gains lock-in class control of the ecosystem.

Well, shit...

"It's not the first time this sort of thing has happened in the world of Linux."

Yes, it is. Never before has an entity other than the kernel team held so much power that it amounts to a minimum of a veto, more realistically the final word on what will happen within the ecosystem. Through systemd's growing scope and lock-in, Red Hat holds that power They control Poettering and he controls systemd. Red Hat also control a number of other critical projects, many - most- of which are now or have announced plans to become reliant upon systemd.

Nobody has had this kind of power over the Linux community before. Not even the X team.

"if you don't like it, use a dist which does it the old way."

Which is what people are saying they will do, and advising others to do. So why get your panties in a bunch about it? People are allowed some semblance of choice and/or freedom, but only so long as they don't exercise it in public or attempt to make their case to others?

Man, I hope noone in your family every comes out of the closet. Your inability to accept that other people may value things that you don't - and may not value things that you do - would probably make that a pretty brutal affair.

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Trevor_Pott
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Re: systemd vs Play Services (was: play the ball not the player?)

"It doesn't really *benefit* RH to 'own' init (not that we do; even if you accept that Jude person's point that there are ~10 core contributors to systemd, half of those don't work for RH). That's not much of a selling point to any of our customers".

First off, systemd is more than init, even now...and there are publicly stated aims to take it a hell of a lot farther yet.

Secondly, Red Hat "owns" systemd in that they employ Poettering and Poettering is the individual driving that project. Anyone who gets in his way will be smacked down with extreme prejudice.

Thirdly, it absolutely does benefit Red Hat to make as much as possible within the Linux ecosystem completely dependent on something they control, as it gives them the ability to wield far more influence within the community than they could simply through the developers they employ. Control the frameworks and you control the ecosystem.

Lastly, you make the rediculous assumption that Red Hat only acts in the interests of it's customers. Just becuase something isn't what Red Hat's customers want doesn't mean it isn't in Red Hat's interests. Look to Microsoft for some great lessons in this: Microsoft regularly acts against the interests of it's customers, developers, partners and staff because it gives Microsoft leverage, the ability to create lock-in and/or dependance or allows them to move people away from less profitable models to more profitable ones.

Red Hat aren't the good guys any more.

More's the pity, as I really am not all that good at any of the other distributions. Walking away from Red Hat is meaning learning the nuances of Slackware (and possibly this new Debian fork) instead of relying on decades of Red Hat knowledge that has become so deeply integrated it's autonomic.

But there's more that matters in this world than commercial interests and I still care about more than maximizing my own revenue. Pity that's not a sentiment much shared any more.

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Sony hackers dump more hunks of stolen data, promise another 'Christmas gift'

Trevor_Pott
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@moiety

What/s wrong with beer? I encourage beer. Have a beer on me! -->

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India's heavy launch rocket passes flight test

Trevor_Pott
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Re: At last a British funded rocket takes off

"Or wa sit only the US, and others on its coat tails that could use a space programme for long term econopmic good?"

Wasn't the US basically just using the Nazi space program, having wiped out it's first incarnation and then run away with all it's staff...

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