* Posts by Trevor_Pott

6442 posts • joined 31 May 2010

We can give servers more memory, claims Diablo. Well, sort of

Trevor_Pott
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Holy hell

There are still Netlist shills.

Will you people let it go? You lost. Do you really need to drag your sorry, wrecked egos through the mud again, chasing after Diablo jumping up and down trying to lash out? FFS, just let Netlist crawl into a corner and die with whatever pathetic shreds of dignity it has left.

You hardcore Netlist believers are about as crazy as the two people who believe SCO's bullshit and try to convince the world of it. Find a new religion. Yeesh.

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Fancy 10 Gbps home broadband? Broadcom's built the guts of it

Trevor_Pott
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I'll eat a $30K install cost if they keep the bandwidth costs down to something sane. Unfortunately, they want thousands of dollars per month 10Mbit continuous use. Fucking madness.

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Re: WHY WHY WHY

WHY WHY WHY can't I buy a 10Mbit upload for less than $500 a month, or $5,000 a month is I want to actually use the bandwidth?

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Trevor_Pott
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Re: 10Gbs fibre to 4*1Gbs ethernet

The questions is more how to make a service like this pay.

Simple. You charge $250 a month for "access to" the 10Gbit fibre, with a "generous" "free" bandwidth allocation of 100GiB. Then you charge them $50/TB over the limit. If they complain, you have them rounded up as terrorists and thrown in jail.

Yes, I live in a country where protesting is illegal and can be classified as terrorism at the prime minister's whim.

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Sane people, I BEG you: Stop the software defined moronocalypse

Trevor_Pott
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Re: A better analogy

In Canada you get your license taken away for a minimum of 6 years, get a large fine and go to jail. Increasingly there are zero tolerance rules, especially if you have a GDL instead of a full license.

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So you want us to just turn off the internet and pretty much our entire manufacturing and power generating capacity, not to mention all of our tanks, jets, warships, satellites and our entire bloody society?

That'll go over well...

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Nutanix digs itself into a hole ... and refuses to drop the shovel

Trevor_Pott
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I'm sorry that I don't have a "valid, scientific definition", but I do have this. It's the closest I've come to trying to explain the marketing terms and the history surrounding them. I hope it helps.

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Trevor_Pott
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Bingo

Nail on the head. And this is why I feel that more than just synthetics are required for a full testing suite to be accurate for this space. Maybe you should be out there doing testing, eh?

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Trevor_Pott
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Re: A few points...

Including this comment, there are 30 comments on this board. ****11 are from Trevor**** WTF?

It's really not that hard to understand: The Register is my digital lawn. I've been a commenttard - and quite frankly, troll - about these parts for roughly a decade. That gold badge my posts sport? Only 10 of us have them.

In addition, I write for The Register, so I have even more reason to hang out on the forums. Add in the fact that storage and virtualization have been my areas of research and specialty for the past 3-ish years and, actually, it would be pretty odd if I weren't all over this like white on rice.

Now, normally, I'd make a few pithy comments and leave. Some people made replies worth replying to, so that ups my count a bit.

Now you, you seem to get angry if I post. I"d say I'm sorry you don't like me, but the truth of it is you're really quite being a dick, so I'm actually quite happy that I upset you. It's not like someone is forcing you to read the forums. Or The Register. Or to sit in front of the computer at all.

It's not like you are forced to acknowledge my existence or tolerate my opinions. You have infinite choices regarding how you might ignore me. You can shape and craft your own world so that no dissenting opinions enter your consciousness.

Hell, there are seven billion people on this planet: you can choose to shape your whole life such that you never encounter any opinion that you don't like. You choose to put yourself in situations where you are exposed to ideas and individuals who upset you.

And so, I'm going to keep posting. You don't intimidate me. You don't shame me. You don't make me feel guilty. But it's absolutely crystal clear that I have struck a nerve. And that means I should keep digging, because the more ardently someone wants me to not talk about something the more important is usually is that I do.

Cheers, and thanks for helping me set my research priorities for the next several months.

I'll be sure to be quite loud about broadcasting my results.

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Trevor_Pott
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Re: A few points...

If you deride someone by name then go on to attempt to deride others without listing their names it helps for clarity to either be explicit that you aren't continuing your derision of the first person or to clarify whom you are now deriding.

It's also generally considered good form to use your real name when you deride someone, otherwise you really do just come across as nothing more than a petty Anonymous Coward.

Also: this "message board"? It's my back yard. I'll do what I like on my own lawn mate. Go get your own.

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Re: Testing shmesting ..

Perhaps Trevor could do an article on the benchmarks in question, and how well what they tested reflected the sorts of things which customers actually cared about.

Well, I was going to. But both VMware and Nutanix have potentially disruptive offerings coming out in the near term. I think I'll wait until those land, then throw a month or two at it.

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Re: One for the weekend -

Ceph. Oh god. So many brokens. So much slow. So much potential. So terrible right now.

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Re: A few points...

1) Trevor, great feedback but this isn't about you. You have the benefit of writing a post on The Register any time you want so I don't understand why you would empty your laundry on a message board. Grow up.

Why would this be about me? Where did I say it was about me? In pretty much every single post in this thread I have stated explicitly that I am a nobody and that I both understand if vendors don't want me to test things and am entirely okay with that, so long as there are other, more important, and - most critically - credible independent testers who are allowed to do the testing.

I don't see how relating my experiences makes this "about me". It is simply providing more data.

If you average all the readers I have across all the places I write I have an audience of about 15 million. That may not be a lot, but it's enough that I could have been much louder and more dickish about this issue. Still, I felt that the discussion needed - and does need - to be had.

I know from experience that if I reply to a major article in The Register those comments will be read by relevant people at those companies. Social media teams are actually quite good these days. So I chose this method because of the limited scope of impact it would have while still getting my point across to the relevant people. It seems like an acceptable compromise.

2) About the test: VMmark (the test Storage Review uses) is a VERY GOOD measure of real world environments and is as close as you are going to get in a test environment. Those who say you cannot effectively test for real world results are spewing vendor FUD. You clearly haven't used VMmark.

Where did I say VMmark wasn't good? It's not the be-all and end-all of tests, but it sure is a great synthetic! I heartily approve of its use as one part of a larger suite of tools.

3) Nutanix response to the testing is abhorrent and they deserve all the backlash they get. It speaks about the company, their technology, their culture and yes, their employees. There is never a shortage of Nutanix employees talking badly about the competition and, like roaches, they disappear when the light is cast on them.

VMware is not remotely immune to talking smack about competitors...even when they aren't willing or able to fully back it up. The whole industry is a clusterfuck of egotism and douchebaggery.

Hence the need for independent testing.

P.S. If you're going to cast aspersions on someone have the genitals to use your real name.

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Trevor_Pott
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Re: E-mail reply from Chuck Hollis of VMware

Might it be so that because, in your own words, you are a nobody, that both Nutanix and VMware don't really want to spend valuable marketing $$'s on you performing tests that no sizeable crowd is ever going to read?

Absolutely. I 100% accept this as plausible, and I don't honestly take issue with either or both companies deciding that I am irrlevant.

I absolutely do take issue with them not working with the more important members of the independant testing community, and I haven't talked at all here about what they tell me about interacting with either company.

This is just my polite way of saying that you maybe should tone it down a little?

And as such I'm not basing my purchases on FUD from any website, or person but just test the stuff myself before any PO leaves my desk.

Where did I ask you to base anything you're doing on what I wrote here? I asked that you - and everyone else - test for yourselves. I asked that you ask hard questions. I am listing here my issues, just as others are starting to do, in the hopes that when it comes time for you to make purchasing decisions you take the time to remember these events and you to a more rigorous POC than maybe you otherwise would have done.

This isn't about my ego. Nobody with self-esteem as low as I have can really have much of an ego. This is honestly about just wanting to do well by others. I'm sorry you feel offended by that.

If I'd wanted to make a gigantic mess out of this I could have posted an article on The Register and put this in front of 9 million readers. As it is, less than 1% of The Register's readership uses the comments section.

By choosing to talk about this in the comments section of an article I know that the major players at both companies - as well as most of the independent testing community - will read, I am restricting the impact of my being shouty whilst still making my point to the right people.

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We'll have to disagree here. I don't believe VMware are going to be in the pole position, because I don't believe VMware have an awareness of the market required to make the cultural changes that will allow them to take that position. Nutanix, for all their flaws, are the dominant play by a country frigging mile. And they are not lax. You seem to have a real hate on for them, but there's nothing at all to indicate they will crumple up and die, as you seem to hope.

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Trevor_Pott
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E-mail reply from Chuck Hollis of VMware

Chuck Hollis of VMware has read this comment thread and sent me an e-mail. His opinion and views on the matter - and on my comments above - are valid and deserve to be included in this dicussion. I am reproducting the e-mail chain here.

Chuck Hollis to Trevor Pott

Hi Trevor

It was interesting to read your recent comments on The Register regarding the latest Nutanix snafu.

But I think you've completely mis-understood (and mis-represented) our stance on performance testing. We encourage it, not discourage it.

We've published oodles of our own data. We've published data from customers. We've encouraged StorageReview.com to publish. Etc. etc. etc. The more the merrier.

All we ask is a chance to review the configs and methodologies prior to publication -- which has been VMware's policy for many, many years. Lots of people are new to this testing thing.

We plan to release an easy-to-use testing tool (based on VDbench) to help make it easier for folks to test hyperconverged clusters with a variety of IO profiles. You, of course, are free to use it -- as will anyone else.

Or use your own tools. Have at it -- really!

However, we don't have much of a budget to send people free hardware. We're tapped out for the year, unfortunately, so you'd have to round up your own four-node config that conformed to the VMware VSAN HCL and design guidelines. Dell may be willing to play, or perhaps HP or similar.

Nor do we generally pay for reviews, as that's a slippery slope.

I hope you understand our position here, and can perhaps soften some of your comments to more accurately reflect reality?

Thanks!

-- Chuck

Trevor Pott to Chuck Hollis (reply)

While your take on this does not reflect my experiences with VMware in this regard. We appear to have dramatically different understandings of the meaning of "chance to review the configs and methodologies prior to publication". I view independent reviewing – especially of software solutions like VSAN – to be fair game if you test multiple options on the same hardware. Doubly so if the individual components are on the HCL.

VMware seems to disagree, and has insisted that individual components being supported isn't good enough: the whole of the thing must meet the desired qualities. Slower CPUs, for example, are apparently not okay.

That said, I don't have to agree with your take on this for it to be valid. I have my view and I have expressed it. It is entirely possible that my views or understanding is wrong, and I'm willing to admit that possibility.

I will publish your e-mail in the comments as it is entirely valid that you get the change to rebut what I have said, along with this response. The readers will decide.

For the record: I never wanted – and don't really want – extra hardware to do testing. I will absolutely test whatever hardware comes my way, but for the love of $deity I have 10x as much server widgetry as I could ever conceivably use. I've also not asked to be paid for reviews by you or by Nutanix. I've offered several times to do independent testing for free in order to help put this debate to rest.

What I want – all I've ever wanted – is the chance to test hardware, software and services that I think my readers or my clients (or preferably both) will care about. I want to dig to find the truth of the gear that real systems administrators use, because it is those sysadmins that I feel a kinsip with, and it is those sysadmins that I feel I serve.

Parting thoughts

It is worth discussing the issues surrounding vendor control over reviews via an exercise of their legal rights. I believe it is perfectly valid for VMware to want to review the configuration and methodology of a review of their software. I don't believe, however, that they should have the opportunity to deny things just because they won't show that software in the best possible light.

It is absolutely valid to test non-optimal configurations and report the results of that testing. In the real world, lots of people live outside pre-canned, certified solutions. HCLs exist for a reason: they are a recognition of this fact and a publicly visible list of not just entire servers that are certified, but individual components, for those who are colouring outside the lines a little.

I view VMware's VSAN team as spectacularly hard to work with in a way that the rest of VMware isn't, specifically because of the level of control they insist on having over reviews. VMware's VSAN team don't seem to view their efforts as an attempt at control, but as an attempt at quality assurance and review integrity.

If I am being honest, then I cannot say that I have the answer to which view is right. My views are deeply rooted in my own past as an SMB sysadmin, which is tied to a need to know how things work when you can't afford to pay top dollar (and high margins) for everything. I feel that is a world that needs to be quantified, and I spend most my year trying to answer those questions for other sysadmins.

VMware's views are influenced by their own needs, but I must admit their take is objectively no less valid. I think readers should read all of this. Not just this thread, but many of the other threads that are associated on various blogs across the virtualization blogosphere.

I am one voice with one set of experiences. There are other voices with other points of view. Decide for yourselves. Test for yourselves.

I look forward to using both VMware and Nutanix's testing tools in my future HCI testing just as soon as they become generally available.

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Trevor_Pott
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Re: Howard Marks?

Storage Howard Marks has a mightier beard than Weed Howard Marks.

Also a wizard hat. The wizard hat is important.

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Trevor_Pott
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In theory I agree, but there's two problems.

1) Where do you get the money for a "sizable budget"?

2) When reviewing technology products you are bound by the EULAs of those products - especially in the United States - which often state that you are not allowed to review that product without permission.

You don't own VMware's ESXi just because you bought a license. And they can come after you with a fist full of lawyers if they don't like what you write.

We all have to make compromises in order to review things. The compromise I choose to make is that I will sit on endless briefings and play politics and try to work with vendors to find testing regimens that both meet their requirements and that I, in my professional capacity, feel adequately represent the product.

I don't let vendors push me around on my reviews and water them down. If I find bad things, I report that.

Unfortunately, it also means that sometimes vendors exercise their right not to engage with me or to prevent me from publishing. So there are hardware and software items which I have reviewed which never got published. I don't like it, but that is a better choice than compromising my ethics and publishing cherry-picked reviews.

Now, I don't have the clout or pull of Storage Review, or Howard Marks or any of the other big names. I still have to fight and claw and politic. But there are people out there who absolutely do try their damnedest to be independent. Hans De Leneer's take on this is really worth reading, as he discusses this concept at further length.

The short version is: no, nobody is truly independent because our laws prevent such independence. Beyond that, the part where there are no independently wealthy people willing to spend a few million a year buying and testing equipment is a damper on absolute independence as well.

Within the constraints of those two issues, however, I (perhaps egotistically) like to think many of the reviewers available in the storage and virtualization space do a damned fine job of maintaining their objectivity.

I say the above not only as a reviewer and a writer, but as an editor for my own technology outfit who has had to go to the mattresses for one of my writers. That writer bought a device with his own cash, wrote a review that absolute panned the device, and the company freaked out. Fortunately, there was no EULA item that allowed a legal avenue of attack at the time. But there are few things that will make you sweat quite so much as having to play that game of chicken, I promise you.

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Trevor_Pott
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I'd be a bit obsessed with any company that was this much of a pain in the ass on a daily basis.

Except that's crazy. I can't think or be like that. I'd go mad in very short order.

There are a bunch of storage and virtualization companies that are decent to work with, but make no mistake most tech companies are horrible to work with. Working with tech companies is my job. No matter how dickish they are, it is my duty to my readers to suck it up and work with every vendor, regardless of my personal feelings.

No one is 100% objective, but it is my job to try as hard as I possibly can to be so. That means I can't allow myself to become "obsessed" with any company.

Though, following on from the previous thread and discussion, Nutanix is a big deal and you need to learn to deal with that. They are a huge company that is actually selling rather a lot of gear to a number of different clients. They will be around for a long time. And unlike many others they are more than their initial base product (hyperconvergence) and are putting a lot into R&D.

I know you want to dismiss them - and HCI in general - as irrelevant. Too bad. They're not. Nutanix may be a pain in the ass, but they're here to stay. Saying this isn't "obsession", it's objective assessment of the facts.

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Trevor_Pott
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Where is storage review - or any of us - going to get the money to buy a Nutanix node on the open market? Also, you do realize that VMware will sue you into oblivion if you publish test results that they don't approve of.

I tried to work with VMware. My lab is here. I built much of it in order to test Maxta and other HCI vendors. I tried to get permission from VMware to test VSAN. They didn't want me to test on VSAN unless I replicated their internal configurations exactly, including CPUs much faster than i could possibly afford.

I told VMware that I couldn't do that. Money was a very real issue. I was subsequently given a not-at-all-subtle warning against YOLOing testing on VSAN.

Now how am I, or Storage Review, or any of the other analysts supposed to afford to buy a Nutanix cluster? Or EVO:RAIL? Or SimpliVity? If the vendor doesn't play ball and send a unit in for testing we just can't do it. (Unless they are software-only. Most of us have or are building HCI-compatible labs that can do software-only solutions for multiple vendors.)

Nutanix and VMware are the HCI companies that are hard to work with regarding reviews and testing. The rest have proven to be amazing. (Though to be fair, Nutanix has a great relationship with Storage Review that they don't seem to have with many others, so go Storage Review!)

Make of that what you will.

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Trevor_Pott
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We’re committed to working with independent third-party evaluation labs like Storage Review to compare our solution against any hyperconverged product using comparable hardware and a comprehensive and representative testing methodology.

The current generation of methodologies does not adequately represent how hyperconverged solutions perform in real-world customer environments. We feel strongly that utilising outdated test tools and methodologies would not provide customers interested in hyperconverged solutions with relevant and indicative data.

As indicated by Lukas, we’re building an open, comprehensive test suite for this category that we feel will help customers better understand the performance of hyperconverged solutions. We’ll demonstrate it at the Nutanix booth at VMworld and will release it in September so anyone in the industry can use it.

In the meantime, we’ll continue talking to Storage Review and any other third parties about working together on a review that will benefit both the industry and customers evaluating hyperconverged solutions.

Bullshit. Bull fucking shit. Bullshit of the highest order. Liar, liar pants on goddamned fire.

Maybe you are building a test suite, but it sure isn't "open". Open would mean that you included the community in the development process and worked with other vendors in the space. I can absolutely believe you're cranking out a test suite that will make Nutanix look amazing, but is it going to test your weaknesses as well as your competitor's strengths?

Look, Nutanix, you've been a pain in the ass to even try to engage with to get reviews done, though that isn't to say I don't appreciate being allowed to use a cluster in your remote POC lab for a week to test some of my own workloads. It was a start, but given the vitriol of the debate with VMware, it isn't enough.

I realize I'm small potatoes, but I've been entirely willing to work with you to come up with a viable methodology that both you and VMware would agree to. I can get the rest of the industry to agree to play and you know it. I've even offered multiple times to do the testing (or rally the troops) for free. Ther are others who can do so as well.

Now, as stated above, I'm a completely irrelevant small fry here. There are bigger names with bigger followings who command more money than I. People like, oh, Storage Review. Or you could pick Howard Marks. Or The Other Scott Lowe. Or any of a dozen trusted, highly competent and capable analysts or vExperts who have reputations for independence.

You haven't done this.

Now, you're not alone in this. VMware are a bunch of knobbly ponces refusing to play ball here too, but the rest of the field is absolutely not giving independent testers the run around. SimpliVity, Maxta, Scale...frigging NodeWeaver for $deity's sake. You are being out-legitimized by an SMB HCI vendor who is just passing their 100th customer!

I don't care if you don't think I'm independant enough, or that guy is, or that other guy over there. Pick one. More than one, preferably. Let the community know about it. We'll all jump down Chuck Hollis' throat and make the bugger send his stuff to the same party. I'll work on the other vendors personally and we'll finally get both a standardized set of tests for HCI agreed upon by all vendors and a baseline we can all work from.

It was cute for a while that getting independent reviews was "tricky". New market. We get it. But you're a behemoth now, and HCI has moved from "product" to "feature". It's not new. It's not sexy. And it's time to quantify, compare and educate.

Nutanix, you and VMware are holding back the entire hyperconvergence space with your constant back and forth shitfighting and the bipartisan refusal to simply get this crap solved in an objective manner. There are bigger issues with HCI than performance. We need to address those and that takes a focus on education, not bickering.

Remove head from sphincter. Both of you. And let's please get on with the business of making storage, compute and networking better for everyone.

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I, for one, welcome the rise of the Infrastructure Endgame Machines

Trevor_Pott
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Re: Terminator

And? So? Why do you think that gets you a job?

Companies have hundreds of operations nerds today. Why does "customizing an IEM" or even "periodically updating the automation for legacy and paleo software" require hundreds of systems administrators going forward?

Once the infrastructure can largely take care of itself, the old software is automated, and developers are making the new software with automation built-in and control of the infrastructure that software runs on through APIs....why do they need more than 4 people to do what had ben done by hundreds?

Someone has to do maintenance and update runbooks. I absolutely, 100% agree. So that's 3 shifts of 8 hours a day and one extra body to cover in while you rotate the other three out for vacations and training.

That is what is under discussion here. The technologies that will allow going from 100 operations sysadmins to 4. It's the technology that is going to mean that instead of SMBs relying exclusively on VARs and MSPs handling IT as consultants until they get to about 50 seats you'll see SMBs be able to avoid hiring sysadmins until they are 250 or even 500 seats. The VARs and MSPs will eb able to handle many - many - more seats worth of servers across their customer base with far fewer administrators.

There will still be a need to have end user helpdesk support. That's seperate from IT operations. There will still be a need for developers - the number of devs will explode. There will be a massively growing need for security and compliance professionals.

But the days of getting paid to watch blinkenlights or create users in some wretched piece of paleo softtware are coming to a rapid end.

unless you are absolutely the best of the best of the best and you can do architecture work you're going to be shit out of luck as a systems administrator. And with so many sysadmins hitting hte market as redundant, the downwards wage pressure is going to be extreme. Those 4 guys kept around from a department of 100 are going to be paid peanuts.

If you think I'm wrong, then by all means, plow ahead.

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Re: Thanks for the info and intel for phishers and phormers of novel agents

IBM has evolved SoftLayer into their first IEM” …… rather than “IBM has evolved SoftLayer into the first IEM”, for the latter is surely one of those known unknown things

You are right, your version is clearly more precise to mine. Pint to you.

Such prognostications about the future of economies and financials is what the likes of Mark Carney and governments do all the time to fool themselves

Don't disagree. I believe that's covered in the preamble where I say, essentially, "so I realize that by making predictions in public I am setting myself up for future humiliation if (and maybe when) this all proves to be utter bollocks". I know I'm sticking my neck out.

That said, I think every now and again we need people to take that risk and talk about where things are going. This allows us to all have a think about things and then have discussions. Is the scenario presented possible? Is it likely? What are the implications? Do we like the scenario presented?

If we feel the prognosticator is right, how can we adapt to best take advantage of the changes discussed? If we like the changes discussed, how can we encourage the future to unfold in this manner? If we don't like those changes, how can we try to alter the outcome?

I have a visibility of IT as a whole that few people have. By and large, it's my job to get that visibility and I pay for it in endless briefings and presentations.

I am good at seeing patterns. Tracking thousands upon thousands of variables and assembling the jigsaw puzzle of possibility. This is what I see coalescing out of the spinning fragments of effort from dozens of organizations and thousands of engineers, all working separately but (unknowingly) towards similar goals.

There are a lot of unknowns - known or otherwise - but IT is actually a fairly predictable industry. It's run by nerds who rather like logic, after all. ;)

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This for one.

Here is another worth reading.

What I discussed in the article itself - and in associated articles - is more than "just a hyperconverged solution", which you seem focused on believing I'm talking about. It's more than just VMs. It's the ability to consume applications through an application store/virtual appliance library/etc.

Legacy applications may need care and feeding, but that whole style of application design is going away, and fast. Cloud native application development models are the norm amongst younger developers and there are rapidly becoming more of them than there are of us.

Developers are largely able to maintain infrastructure on their own. They are being trained to code in monitoring, make failure-tolerant applications, and interact with all infrastructure subsystems from disaster recovery and backup to storage.

Right now, today, and for the next five years or so, there is a lot of money to be made automating legacy software. But once that's automated, it's mostly done with. Entire teams of sysadmins and specialists can be wiped out and replaced with a single maintenance drone as the new applications are developed against infrastructure that is addressable by API.

Developers will blossom in the datacenter of the 2020s. Operations is already dead, it just hasn't accepted it yet.

Security will blossom in the datacenter of the 2020s, and if operations don't convert from their existing specialties to security, they'll be out of a job.

In large enough or niche companies there may be room for teams of operations admins. But in most companies - including most enterprises - the operations team circa 2025 will be a fraction the size ti is today. The developers will explode in size. The security teams will explode in size. The operations teams will consist of the proverbial "man and a dog".

And yes, the first IEMs will start rolling out by 2020. By 2025 enterprises will have finished reorganising their IT teams such that operations functionally no longer exists. By 2030 IEMs will be cheap enough for the SMB, and so much new software will exist that SMBs can run this stuff on their own, without nerds.

What I think you don't grok is that how applications are build has changed. It used to be that automation, high availability, backups, disaster recovery and so forth were all done by operations teams. This is increasingly not the case. New applications have this stuff built in, and this is the model of design being taught to new developers.

Tomorrow's applications won't need the sort of care and feeding that today's do. They will just need (relatively) stable APIs. We'll spend the next five years automating our legacy software, 5 years after that realizing that operations is not doing anything for the money we pay them and then it's "man and a dog" time.

Meanwhile, one at a time, those legacy applications will be replaced.

Operations is already dead. But feel free to bet your career on its continued viability if you so choose.

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Re: Who or what could ever be trusted that much?

Nail on the head.

I can tell you how the pieces are aligning. I can't tell you yet who will win, or whether open standards (read: OpenStack, most likely) will win. I suspect that if two proprietary IEMs appear that are mostly interoperable (where "interoperable" can be achieved with some minor conversion of automation/orchestration runbooks between the IEMs) then enterprises won't care. They only ever needed EMC and Netapp to play off one another, (or Oracle, DB2 and SQL)...why would they need more than two, possibly three IEMs?

Interesting few years ahead...

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Except that an SDI block I describe is more than just hyperconvergence, mate. Maybe you should read the article and the links.

There's more to what's under discussion than just a new way to do virtualization.

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Sorry, but I must disagree. The old specialties will go away as they are simply no longer needed. Technology is adding ease of use as a core competency, even at the infrastructure level. That is removing the need to have all these niche infrastructure specialties running about. You really just need capable developers. They can make competently designed infrastructure go.

The only other specialty most organizations will need is SecOps. Though I suspect most won't believe they need SecOps until breaches inevitably happen to them.

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Some of that is explained here. But most of it boils down to this: no matter how much packaged software exists there will always be the need for custom software that meets the very specific needs of a given company. Even if that "custom software" is little more than parsers or translation layers that take one set of data from one application and feed it into the next.

I'd go so far as to say that not only will demand for developers increase over the coming decade, but that they will become essential to larger small businesses and an unquestioned presence in all midmarket companies. Much like systems administrators had been for the past 15 years or so.

IEMs are really about doing away with the need for dedicated ops teams in all but the largest or most niche outfits. It is a lot harder to get rid of developers.

Operations teams keep the lights on. They build the digital edifice of the business, but it is the business that must occupy that edifice and make profits.

Developers are the business in a very real way. The code they create encapsulates the business logic. They automate mundane tasks. They replace entire departments with code. They can even - and this will become far more common far quicker than you think - program robots to do mundane physical tasks.

Once the building is built you don't need builders. You might keep a maintenance guy around, but how much better for most businesses to simply lease the building and let the landlord handle the maintenance? Or, if they own the building, hire a maintenance company to keep it ship-shape?

We are very rapidly approaching the point where operations simply won't be needed by most companies. I do not forsee a point in my lifetime where developers will face the same problem.

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Utopia may be just around the corner, but it seems like a mighty ugly pill...

Isn't it always?

All the work week be done on tablets and internet connectivity will be fast and reliable.

Internet connectivity is fast and reliable for a significant chunk of the parts of the world that have enough money to entire tech companies. 5 years from now it will be better. 10, 15? The first IEMs will start to emerge around 2020. They will probably start to make their way to the SMB space for the first time in 2025. They will be ubiquitous by 2030.

The pieces are all there for anyone willing to see.

Will compliance managers also be replaced by devops, I wonder...

SecOps, actually. I have a piece on that here.

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Re: mainframe

Plus ça change...

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Hacking Trump: Can we not label web vandalism as 'terrorism', please?

Trevor_Pott
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Re: TED talk

We're going to have to agree to disagree. I believe you are projecting your own personal beliefs and morals out and thinking "everyone" agrees with them. Maybe "everyone" your particular geo does, but yoru statements don't reflect measurements of changing opinions.

More to the point, your arguments are functionally moralistic. "The world should be allowed to pry into interpersonal relationship issues because sex is involved and one person in a relationship might have an issue with how the other person conducts their affairs." That's bullshit. Bullshit of the highest order. If ti was an argument about wearing sandals versus sneakers nobody would try to say that anyone else had a right to listen in.

And yes, I am not going to listen to you on this. You are arguing from a position of prejudice rooted in nothing more than an ardent affirmation of sterotypes and your belief that others share your views. I've actually done a fair amount of research into this topic - and recently - as part of some large studies I'm engaging in on cultural differences in western nations.

Your social mores here are absolutely not shared by everyone. More to the point those who don't share your views on this are not some extreme fringe minority, they are a substantial - though not yet majority - % of the population. Even in the United States.

As religious influence wanes, so does puritanism about sex. And as puritanism about sex wanes so does the belief that people outside your immediate relationships deserve to know who you are having sex with.

And you know what? That is the moral truth of things. Religion used sex to control populations for generations. It is not in any way moral to continue with this, or to try to keep sex and sexuality titillating and taboo.

So no, you won't be convincing me. Mostly because your arguments stem from a sense of morality that I simply don't share...and I have done enough research to know that there are millions of others across the western nations who feel as I do. My moral and ethical viewpoint on this is emphatically not uncommon.

It may not be the majority view (yet), but it is shared by enough people that it cannot be considered invalid. So I'll stick to my original affirmation: the nation has no business in the bedroom of its elected officials, nor does the nation have any business in the bedrooms of the people.

And I'll fight against any attempt to make (or keep) our society one of puritanical voyeurism. If you wish to think ill of me for that, you go right ahead.

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Re: TED talk

No, that's bollocks. In just about any functional marriage, each partner would be properly fucked off about the other cheating on them. Sure, you can find me exceptions - but those are very much outliers. Marriages are substantially always damaged when infidelity occurs.

Sorry, but nope. Marriages have moved past the bizarre religious ideals of monogamy for a great many people. Maybe not the majority, but a very significant number.

Run the numbers. Look at the *fraction* of marriages that are truly open. It's a statistical insignificance. Most marriages where there is infidelity end in divorce in a relatively short space of time. Whether that's healthy or not is for someone else to decide - but it is a fact.

I don't know where you're getting your numbers. They certainly don't line up with any I've seen. Now, infidelity is the most frequently listed reason for divorce, but it has been repeatedly noted in research surrounding divorce that most of those relationships were about done anyways, and the infidelity (or claims thereof, in many cases it's hard to verify) are used to deal with legal issues surrounding divorce and/or to milk the ex-spouse dry.

I am incredulous that you've written that. Look at the history of failed marriages - a vast proportion are due to infidelity. I cannot believe you are naive enough to believe that more than a handful would not care about an extra-marital affair; substantially all cuckolds/cuckqueens really do care, and I am frankly astonished that you could believe anything else.

Your inability to see beyond your own prejudices is your own problem, sir. I have actually researched this topic at quite some length. The number of marriages that don't fail after infidelity are actually quite high. The number of marriages in which infidelity is tacitly (if not openly) tolerated is also a lot higher than you seem to think.

What's more, when marriages do dissolve it is rare that it is anywhere near so simple as "X found out Y was cheating on them and divorce ensued". A) Usually there are all sorts of reasons why the infidelity occurred in the first place that boil down to "marriage in trouble". B) Infidelity is quite often tacitly (if not openly) tolerated until something else in the relationship goes rather wrong.

You seem to personally believe quite strongly in monogamy. That's fine, but I think you need to realize that not only has that not always been the case, people in our culture are a lot more diverse in their attitudes and approaches to marriage than you are portraying.

What's more, you still haven't laid out a rationale for why the fact that some individuals choose to be obsessed with monogamy gives them the right to care whether or not others are, or to pressure those others regarding their marital habits.

To be quite blunt about it, poking your nose into the bedchambers of others uninvited should be of itself illegal, no matter who the individuals in the bedchambers are.

You will not convince me otherwise.

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Trevor_Pott
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Re: TED talk

If we are going to live in a generally-monogamous society - as most, but not all, seem to claim to want - then sleeping with someone who is not your currently-designated partner is going to end up being cause for blackmail. That's the point about blackmail - it covers any topic you'd rather not come to light.

Except that the only reason for him not to want it to come to light is that his political opponents would use it against him in bullshit politics involving religious whackjobs and their backwards-ass beliefs. Dollars to doughnuts Hillary knew, didn't care, or had made her peace with it. The lady is exceptionally bright and knew what she was getting into when she married someone that ambitious.

For that matter, I'm pretty sure Hillary has played the field herself. She's had more than ample opportunity, and good on her if she did for living life.

So if the President sleeps with someone other than his wife, his family has a right to know? That will likely lead to difficulty in that family, so said President will probably not want them to know. And straightaway, you have a blackmail situation.

Yes, I think his family have a right to know. You know, a lot of marriages are open these days. And a lot of marriages are marriages of convenience. Especially those amongst people in positions of power. I think it's really narrow minded to think that spouses of those involved would be so "crushed" by the "betrayal" of sowing one's oats that the whole thing constitutes blackmail.

Adultery has been going on since the beforetime. And it's time we realised that monogamy just isn't what we're coded for. Some people want it. Fine. Bully for them. But those who live a life that's a bit wider in scope should be able to do so without it becoming political ammunition or cultural blackmail.

If the spouse (or the kids) have a problem with you sleeping around that's between you and them. it's no business of the public at large.

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Netzpolitik spy journo treason case stalls, chief prosecutor told to quit

Trevor_Pott
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Re: Needless surveillance is treason

What the fuck am I reading?

An accurate summation of the total body of Adam Smith's works. I wouldn't expect that you know them, as given your posting history you seem quite focused on the "selected works" that drive the very pro-market anti-liberal American-style conservatism. But the OP is not wrong.

Adam Smith did in fact warm ardently, stridently and often about the dangers of capitalism and tried to ensure that we build in safeguards against what he saw as inevitable issues and dangerous excesses. Too bad that part of Smith's teachings are so conveniently left out of the education systems of certain places. This willful ignorance has cost us all more than we'll likely ever be able to count.

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Boffins turned off by silicon switch to TILTING MAGNETS

Trevor_Pott
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Bunch of Tantalum in Canada with reserves proven out and environmental assessments done. Just need investors to make a hole in the ground and light up the refining facilities.

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Sysadmin jailed for a decade after slurping US military docs

Trevor_Pott
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but that doesn't mean that the NSA didn't have to work at it a bit.

Not nearly enough.

If they were able to crack it at all then it was insecure.

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Vision? Execution? Sadly, omission and confusion rule Gartner's virty quadrant

Trevor_Pott
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Re: In the market for two years

It's common knowledge that Nutanix biggest customer (US Dept of Defense) accounts for the majority of their sales.

Common knowledge is out of date.

And no, I can't cite my sources. Things told to me in confidence stay in confidence. And if you think I'm buying into the PR hype you don't know a damned thing about me.

I am PR hype's antiparticle.

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Re: In the market for two years

Curious that you think that. Nutanix is rapidly becoming a big player in the storage and virtualization space. I write about the storage and virtualization space.

Saying I talk about Nutanix too much is a bit like saying a writer covering Development brings up Github too often, or that someone covering consumer software talks about Dropbox too often.

So, okay, maybe you don't like Nutanix. Fine, fair enough. But they're going to be around for a long, long time, and they're going to be pretty important for a long, long time. You'd better get used to hearing about them.

Now, if your implication is that I somehow personally like Nutanix (or care about them/their success) you would be mistaken.

And for the record: while VSAN is moving in modest volume, EVO:RAIL is not selling at all. It's dead. Done. Finito. Put a stake in it, VMware fucked that one up good.

EVO:RACK has some chance of succeeding against the other traditional converged vendors, but EVO:RAIL is a great big red herring and a colossal failure.

Nutanix is not. There is demand. They're selling quite well. And they are, without question, the leader. SimpliVity is a (distant) number two.

You might not want to accept reality, but reality doesn't require your acknowledgement.

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Intel doubles its bounty for women and ethnic minorities

Trevor_Pott
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Re: Incentive, not enforcement

As for 'For now, sadly, it seems we simply have to accept that finding a way to tackle pervasive subconscious prejudice against women and visible minorities will have causalities.' would have resulted in no feminist movement etc as those groups would have just accepted the status quo and not prompted change.

*sigh*

Look: feminism - at least in the western sphere of influence - has already won the overt battles. I don't disagree at all that feminism needed to exist as a movement, rally the troops, march int eh streets and get all uppity in everyone's face. I applaud those women (and men) who sought change and fought viciously against some very entrenched power structures, many paying a heavy price along the way. I consider them to be brave, even heroes, and they should be role models for all of humanity.

That said, that part of the war is over. Legal equality is (for the most part) won. What remains now is "hearts and minds". It's a different kind of battle, and one that will take a different kind of approach.

You are confusing history with the present; past misdeeds, events and battles with the who and how and why of today. Sadly, that's very typical of the movement.

After a time, warriors know nothing but fighting. And rebels usually become just as bad as those they sought to displace.

It's time to work on reintegrating the warriors of feminism into the rest of society, and on working the "soft skills" portion of the equality angle. That's a longer, harder, more subtle battle.

One that can't be won with the twin blades of guilt and shame.

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Why should it matter if I have a genetic anomaly or not? Plenty of people don't, are large, and have no more realistic control over their weight than I do. Nice to see you doubling down on your prejudice though. Great to feel superior, isn't it?

Have a super day.

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Re: fat people are the only acceptable group to hate

Some of it is that we (humans) don't want to understand.

And that actually is a choice. And it's a choice that I don't have a lot of patience or compassion for. Ignorance is the precursor to prejudice, and prejudice presages douchebaggery.

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Thanks for making my point for me, mate. You don't actually know what you are talking about. Despite this but you are so completely and absolutely convinced you do.

There were people who were absolutely positive that black people were inferior, too. And they'd argue that point up and down, considering anyone who said a single thing different to be clinically insane.

As for "just shifting my behaviour", oh, yeah mate, I'll get right the fuck on that. Thanks for telling me something I haven't heard 100,000 times before. You've really managed to open my eyes. I'll have absolutely no problems losing weight no, there's no barriers in my way. It's nothing but a choice!

Maybe one of these days you'll actually learn about the lovely genetic anomaly I have. It's spectacularly rare. Not that it would matter to you. Because it's a choice.

Maybe one day you'll learn about the ins and outs of clinical depression, which by the way, if a hell of a lot more all-encompassing than a case of "the blues". Not that it would matter to you, because clearly that's a choice too.

Choices, choices. Just will yourself to be normal!

You are a walking stereotype. You are the ignorance I abhor and in your absolute certainty the prejudice that destroys both compassion and dignity.

That is a choice. There are many things you could be, and I am appalled at what you've chosen for yourself and those others around you.

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Re: Don't believe the hype.

One is subtle reverse discrimination one is overt. There are way better ways to go about this. If there is a finders fee for brains, it should not matter what those brains are wrapped in. If you want to encourage women in tech, you should work on feeding the pipeline (on one end) and addressing cultral issues in a sustainable fashion on the other.

A "boobs bounty" is just not cool.

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Trevor_Pott
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Re: Hypocritical

Sorry, but male - especially white male - privileged does exist. It's the part where we can go to a job interview and not thing "am I going to not get this job because of my gender or skin colour?" It's the part where we go through customs and don't have to thing to ourselves "am I going to get locked up for bullshit reasons?" It's the part where we don't get drugs planted on us during a stop and frisk, or tased to death for looking at a cop wrong when pulled over for speeding.

White privileged isn't a club card. It's not the stonecutters with a secret door to a room filled with wonders where the Illuminati plan the future. It's the ability to live our lives without having to think a hundred times a day if about our safety (physical or sexual). It's the ability to go days, weeks or months without thinking about whether we're being discriminated against.

Our privilege is that we don't have to put up with being dismissed out of hand because we can't possibly know what we're talking about, based on nothing more than gender or colour. That's white male privilege, and unless you're completely paranoid, you live it every day.

I agree with you 100% that class plays a far bigger role in today's society than race or gender. If this were a longer conversation I'd throw many other factors in there too. That's sort of what I've been getting at in these comments: this isn't a conversation that can only be had by discussing one dimension at a time.

Those of us who have it good need to learn how good we have it. And we all need to work on treating everyone equally, and with respect and dignity. Regardless of the group to which the person belongs.

That's the multi-dimensional thing. We're all part of a lot of different groups. So maybe we should stop begin dicks to identifiable groups so that, in the fullness of time, people will stop begin dicks to us.

Obey Wheaton's law: don't be a dick.

Really, there shouldn't need to be more to it than that.

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Trevor_Pott
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Re: fat people are the only acceptable group to hate

Fat people aren't the only acceptable group to hate; they're the easiest, and the least likely to be able to achieve any sort of equality any time soon.

The interesting part is that while you have successfully listed a series of identifiable groups who have been traditionally on the receiving end of prejudices most (if not all) actually have both a number of laws and fairly strong movements that are working on equality for them. I think it's worth disassociating those who have traditionally been subjects of discrimination but are winning the fight from those who have traditionally been subjects of discrimination and don't stand a prayer in the near or medium term.

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Trevor_Pott
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Re: Incentive, not enforcement

We all have problems, mate. In this case, some groups have won the right to have theirs considered important, that's all. Some of us haven't. Some of us may never. And some of us are vilified, marginalized and pilloried for things other people did.

The issue isn't nearly so black and white as you're painting it, nor is affirmative action objectively "moral". It might be moral, given the context of your other beliefs (and if you are unaware, or simply don't care about other issues affecting other groups). It might not be moral,, given the context of your other beliefs (especially those who strong believers in meritocracy).

It's clear that the old ways aren't the path forward. There does absolutely exist subconscious prejudices that many individuals engage in during the hiring process, even if they attempt to guard against it. That said, the constant march to homogenize corporate culture to be as politically correct as possible and pretend everyone is exactly the same does push out individuals in other groups who can't function in that sort of environment.

People are complicated. To advance some we need to restrict others. Telling everyone how we much behave and what we must believe pushes those who aren't normative to the fringes...even if they are decent, well meaning folk who don't want to discriminate against anyone.

But that is a difficult narrative, isn't it? It doesn't fit a simplistic blame model and it doesn't make for easy villains.

I hope future generations of newly marginalized groups succeed in wining their own rights to be heard in future generations. For now, sadly, it seems we simply have to accept that finding a way to tackle pervasive subconscious prejudice against women and visible minorities will have causalities.

How unintended you view those casualties to be depends on how cynical you are.

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Trevor_Pott
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Do you really, really think that a company will choose someone with lower qualifications for a job?

Yes.

Are they that stupid?

It's not stupid. It's cost/benefit. Optics matter. You don't need everyone to be a rock star. If they're competent "enough" then there can absolutely be greater value to the company in picking an individual with great optics over one that will deliver that extra few % of oomph.

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Trevor_Pott
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Pint

Re: Hypocritical

Thank you, Esme. I hope you one day understand just how much a single positive comment can mean to someone. Especially someone with self-esteem issues who feels they're fighting an uphill battle (in this case, for equality and men's issues.)

I can't explain how much it means. I lack that skill. But she can.

Cheers!

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SDN: It's living the dream – and just using what you've got

Trevor_Pott
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Re: SDN is not Openflow

Cisco's proprietary abortion made out of lock-in and shame doesn't count. I'd just like to make that clear.

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Sales veep, staff log-off from cluster-cache upstart PernixData

Trevor_Pott
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I wouldn't write them off entirely. They have great technology with multiple fairly easy routes for pivoting. I guarantee you that with minimal (we're talking a few months of code + QA) they could have an excellent new product line that would actually sell quite well.

The question is not one of capability. Pernix has a lot of very, very smart people working for it. The question isn't even one of money; the extant product is good enough to attract another round if they are willing to pivot.

The question of Pernix's continued existence rests entirely on how large and uncompromising the ego of the founders is. FVP is the "baby" of the founders. They are incredibly emotionally invested in it. They risked a great deal to see it brought to market.

Worse, Pernix hired expensive bodies and put their personal and professional reputations on the line defending it's validity...and in some cases they laid into - or allowed staff that work for them to lay into - other companies and even other individuals for daring to challenge the basic assumptions upon which the product was built. Anyone who asked questions, suggested that read only server side caching might be better, HCI might be better, that there could be economic or practical issues with Pernix's implementation...these people were publicly pilloried and ridiculed by some of the most powerful and prominent members of the virtualization community.

Members with some fairly direct ties to Pernix.

A pivot is technically possible. But a pivot is also a very public admission that Pernix were out of bounds in how they treated others and in the cocksure and aggressive attitude they espoused.

Some people can accept this. Either they're sociopaths and simply view the whole affair as "just business", pivot and move on...or they are decent human beings, apologize and move on. Either way, there are some clear paths forward that allow a pivot without there needing to be life-altering stress or compromise of personal dignity.

But for some people, this simply can't happen. The emotional investment into "their baby" is too great. A pivot simply can't be accepted, and they'll ride that thing right into the ground.

As a writer, I sympathize. Editors kill my babies all the time.

I don't know how the people in charge of Pernix will play this. A pivot absolutely is needed. There are obvious and non-obvious directions that could make them a stupid amount of money and grab a lot of market share while allowing them to retain and reuse a lot of good code.

Will they do it? That remains to be seen...

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