* Posts by Trevor_Pott

6828 posts • joined 31 May 2010

Scale Computing goes flashy mutant with its nodes

Trevor_Pott
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I am currently in the process of testing one of these clusters for a client. While a full review will appear later, the short version is: crafted from pure joy. Scale has created a better (for my use cases, anyways) approach to hybrid storage than anyone else I've played with so far. I can't wait to see the results of all the testing rounds.

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The 'new' Microsoft? I still wouldn't touch them with a barge pole

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Re: What!!!

Exchange is a hell of a lot more than just e-mail. And the fact that you are making a comparison between Exchange and Postfix tells me that you are choosing to ignore that very critical aspect.

Also: a single server with 2 mailboxes handling 10M+ emails a week is easy. A mail cluster that is geodistributed across the planet handling 1B+ emails a week across 250,000 mailboxes with ingress and egress clusters that stretch across continents is something else entirely.

Postfix is a goddamned child's toy compared to Exchange.

(Though Postfix is the mail server I most commonly deploy. It's a very well built child's toy.)

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Trevor_Pott
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Re: The lock in Question

systemd is more than a replacement for systemv. And that's the whole fucking problem.

That, and binary logs. Fuck binary logs.

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"You" aren't really an individual. You aren't a single layer of consciousness. Hell, "you" aren't even a collection of cells with the same DNA: you're mostly scaffolding that supports a diverse colony of different bacteria.

Your primary consciousness - the particular set of neural impulses that likes to believe it is the individual known as "you" - represents a tiny fraction of your body's total neural output. Your endocrine system has more active neurons going about operating in an automatic fashion than the neurons responsible for "higher thought".

Even then, your "higher thought" is massively influenced and regulated by non neural impulses (for example: hormone levels) many of which don't originate in your brain. Those non-neural signalling mechanisms are the result of the endocrine system, the spine, your non-brain internal organs as well as your bacterial and viral populations.

"You" are an emergent property of a vast electochemical system composed of numerous discrete entities. Remove any one and the whole can change in dramatically, or fail altogether.

The concept you have of yourself as an individual is nothing more than the flawed product of ego.

So now let's discuss grammar of corporations...

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Re: In plenty of good company

Many vendors aren't trustworthy. Microsoft is particularly untrustworthy because they repeatedly demonstrate that they don't care about trust.

Look, everyone screws up. Most vendors, when they do so, they work to rebuild trust. Microsoft hasn't, doesn't and for my money never will. So for me, they are the poster child for this discussion.

They are emphatically not the only vendor that needs keeping an eye on.

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Trevor_Pott
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Re: You're Wrong

1) You are wrong: http://www.theregister.co.uk/2016/04/25/microsoft_emails_end_to_massive_cloud_storage/ <-- So sorry the facts don't support you!

2) Where did I argue Oracle and SAP don't have vendor lock-in? Where did I argue that only Microsoft have vendor lockin? Making stuff up?

3) Again, you're just rolling out random vendors. Just because the other kids at school set people on fire just to watch them burn doesn't make it okay that you do so. It doesn't matter what Apple or Google or any other vendor do. They will be analysed on their own merits. What matters, when considering Microsoft, is what Microsoft does, how it does it, and who it ignores when it does so.

4) I appeal to morals because morals are important. If the individuals and businesses you have don't have morals they can't be trusted. That isn't emotional. That's rational, pragmatic and logical. You wouldn't trust Frank Underwood to do anything he said. Why would you trust Microsoft?

Reputation and integrity matter. A lot more than your factless yet slavish devotion. Reputation and integrity - also known as morals - are the diagnostic indicators of how likely the vendor in question is to screw you.

Microsoft doesn't believe in the importance of trust. Clearly that has now trickled down to its fanpeople.

Charming.

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Re: Seriously!

In the 2012 iteration? Files. I've found it a lot less butts than NTFS for large numbers of files.

The 2016 iteration has come a long way. Most notably in the advanced made for hosting VHDs. ReFS + Hyper-V is actually a decent combination. You know, if you use Hyper-V.

Also: Databases? They go in a VM. Preferably a Linux VM. ReFS should only really rear its head as a place to put files you need to share via SMB or as an underlying store for Hyper-V VMs.

Outside of that, Windows should really only be used inside VMs for legacy workloads that can't yet be migrated off. Those shouldn't be too complex or demanding. Some might be, I grant you, but most workloads can talk to files hosted on a network share or to a database hosted in another VM. Windows is for applications made by developers from the past. Nothing more.

Get your databases on a proper DB server and thus on a proper OS!

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Trevor_Pott
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Bullshit. Outright bullshit.

Microsoft didn't listen to the feedback provided during the Windows Insider program. Which you'd know if you had actually participated. There was lots and lots of feedback provided on how to make Windows 10 not suck and they ignored it all, producing the turd that we got stuck with.

Microsoft decided what Windows 8 was going to be and they shoved it down our throats. They failed to sell it, and only after a truly abysmal failure did they relent and put a start button on Windows 8.1.

When that didn't placate the masses they announced that Windows 10 would have a start menu, but proceeded to then butcher the start menu completely, even before the insider program took off. They then ignored what the Windows Insiders had to say about the start menu and did whatever the fuck they felt like, resulting in the festering shitpile that we ended up with.

Here now, a year after release, they are doing the next "milestone" version with yet another major tweak to their deranged bullshit "start menu" and they still haven't produced anything resembling a useful UI.

Microsoft has been told repeatedly what the people want. To wit: "Windows 7 with feature (not UI!) enhancements, no spying, and full control over our own operating system. And no subscription fee."

Microsoft just don't fucking care.

It's their way or...actually, it's just their way. They don't listen to anyone. Sometimes they pretend to, with great fanfare and much bullshit, but after all is said and done all that anyone gets is a series of blogs detailing exactly why they aren't listening to any of the feedback they oh so carefully collected and why they are going to do exactly what they planned on from the very beginning anyways.

Microsoft are utterly incapable of listening to their customers, their partners, their developer community or even their own staff. Your world is whatever a Microsoft VP decides it is and you will fucking like it.

Nice bunch of people to do business with. Really makes me feel they're trustworthy. Really makes me think of them as a platform and a vendor I'm ready to commit millions upon millions of dollars to in the long term.

Really, just a nice bunch of people.

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Re: Just a quibble

If you shoot at the king then you must kill the king. Do not uselessly fail a pole at them.

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Re: Seriously!

Uh...ReFS? Have you seen the version of ReFS available in Server 2016? It is not to be sneered at.

And patent trolling isn't a technological argument. It is a sociopolitical one.

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Trevor_Pott
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Re: What!!!

All these are pretty hard to replace, and are versatile, capable and at the cutting edge:

Azure Active Directory / Classic Active Directory

Azure Stack

Visual Studio

SQL server

Exchange <-- a miserable pig, but less of a horrifying cluster**** than any other mail server at enterprise scale!

Dynamics

----

Not exactly at the cutting edge of anything, but much beloved by me:

Windows XP

Windows 7

Server 2008 R2

Server 2012 R2 <-- Well, okay, the UI is ass covered in more ass, but much of the OS was good

Small Business Server (R.I.P old friend.)

Office 2003 and Office 2010 (With UBitMenu)

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Trevor_Pott
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Re: The lock in Question

My experiences with MS phone support have almost exclusively been transferred to the far east. Namely: every single time I want to exercise downgrade rights. That's two hours per bloody key, every time.

Similarly, Office 365 support is always front-ended by admittedly quite friendly folks with accents that I sadly have trouble understanding, and who seem to have trouble understanding me. We talk enough to exchange e-mails, and then things proceed forward, albeit very, very slowly. The same issues occur with MSDN and Microsoft Network support, especially when it is something like "your billing doesn't understand the fact that I am part of two separate organizations and my Action Pack won't let me renew". Etc.

The only time I can remember ever having gotten someone who spoke an English dialect from one of the Five Eyes countries was when I called in for LCS support, shortly after the acquisition.

MS support might eventually solve many of the problems presented to them, but I cannot say I've had good luck actually communicating with them, nor have they been particularly expeditious. That said, they're huge, and it could just be luck of the draw with me...

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Trevor_Pott
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Re: Insert comma here...

Missing comma I think

I think you're right. Have asked people with superpowers to correct. Hurrah and cheering!

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Trevor_Pott
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Optional

If I am parsing Past Trevor correctly it is closer to

"Unfortunately, as clients get close to the point in their business cycle when they buy new hardware and/or software, I am often asked to help them understand what Microsoft's products and services currently are, what the licensing is like and - most importantly - what Microsoft's plans are for the future.

This includes having to assess the risks of staying with Microsoft as well as moving away from Microsoft, for new and existing workloads. Bearing in mind factors that go beyond just immediate technological considerations, such as long term concerns regarding licensing models, service existence, data sovereignty, ability to run workloads locally, lock-in, likelihood to want to move away from Microsoft at the next refresh, and whether it is better to eat the costs of moving now or defer them until later."

They encourage me to write short, however. Sorry if it didn't parse quite right. That Past Trevor guy; not always the best at things...

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29 years of data shows no mobile phone brain cancer link

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Re: The El Reg article quotes from an article in 'The Conversation' ...

I was curious if there was any differentiation between digital and analog mobile phones, i.e. frequencies, wattage, etc.

Frequencies are different all over Australia both geocraphically and temporally. That said, from a physics standpoint both the frequencies in use (waaaaaaaaaaaay the heck lower than ionizing radiation) and the wattages in use (the most powerful might heat up your ear a little) are so close as to be irrelevant.

There is no mechanism by which the radiation emitted from a cell phone can cause cancer. Full stop.

Cell phones themselves may contain carcinogens, just like any plastic covered electronics, but I don't of too many people that go around eating their cell phones. And that isn't likely to give you brain cancer, per se.

I took a gander at the report itself and from I can see the epidemiology work is spot on. Unless you happen to be one of those people who are immune to scientific evidence in your decision-making, this really should put to bed the rank insanity that is the "non-ionizing radiation causes brain cancer" crusade.

Sadly, a significant portion of the population is immune to scientific evidence. Tragically, we do not yet posses the technology to ship them all to Mars.

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Windows 10 free upgrade offer ends on July 29th

Trevor_Pott
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Re: I have to run Windows 7

So what are you going to trust now?

Nothing. BSD maybe. But I wouldn't use BSD on an endpoint.

OS/X? Like Apple never jerked anyone around?

Getting punched in the gut is better than getting punched in the dick, so Apple's still a better choice than Microsoft.

Or Linux, because Linus has such immense respect for computer professionals.

Being ineffectively kicked in the shins is better than being punched in the dick, so Linux is a way better choice than Microsoft.

Just because other vendors abuse you doesn't mean you should voluntarily choose the abuser that spends their time punching you in the dick and telling you it's your own fault.

Walk away and preserve some semblance of dignity, eh?

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Trevor_Pott
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Re: People will do what they did before

You're only partly right. Most people absolutely get their operating system at the time of purchase. So when people buy a new endpoint:

Most will get an Android-based operating system.

Many will get an Apple operating system.

Some will get a Microsoft operating system.

Almost none will get a non-Android Linux operating system.

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When people buy a new server:

Most will get an Open Source hypervisor (Xen or KVM)

Many will get VMware as the hypervisor.

Some will get a Microsoft hypervisor.

Even fewer will get Linux on metal to run Oracle databases.

Very few will get a mainframe or run a metal OS for non-Oracle purposes.

---

Microsoft isn't top dog on servers or endpoints.

Thank Jibbers. It's about fucking time.

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US data suggests Windows 10 adoption in business is slowing

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Re: Not necessarily

"Don't forget, you don't get a forced upgrade screen for Windows Enterprse Edition either,"

Don't forget, you're an asshole if you think that's an acceptable "solution".

Cheers,

Someone who works with individuals and companies too small to Enterprise Edition/Microsoft would you like to spend 6 months arguing about your licensing "position"/PAY MORE NOW FOR A SUBSCRIPTION "Software Assurance" THAT YOU DON'T WANT OR NEED.

P.S. And they STILL don't let Enterprise Edition "customers" turn off spying. So paying them more STILL doesn't get you control over your own OS.

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You're only young but you're going to die: Farewell, all-flash startups

Trevor_Pott
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Re: Tintri

HAHAHAHAHAHA Netapp.

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Ford Googles self-drivers

Trevor_Pott
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Warning lights that a car is currently driven by a meatbag seem very sensible. After all, they're far worse drivers than robots.

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Trevor_Pott
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Good!

The day petrolheads are limited in their recklessness to racetracks and manual hiway reservations the better life is for the rest of us. Commutes will be safer, with the ability to get things done during the dead hours of travel and without having to be crammed into crowded public transit with a ****ing broom.

Bring on the door-to-door robots that remove the tedium of travel, I say!

And crucify the asshole recently found to be going 140kph through a school zone at 7:30am on a school day. It takes a human to achieve that level of douchebaggery.

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FBI ends second iPhone fight after someone, um, 'remembers' the PIN

Trevor_Pott
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Re: Well...

"The responsible Agency should keep an eye -now and then, depending of activity level- on anybody who is educated in Chemistry of Explosives, just in case."

That's ludicrous. Unless the person has done something suspicious they should absolutely not have their privacy invaded by the state. That is what the presumption of innocence is all about!

Getting an education is not suspicious, what the fuck horrible backwards-ass society do you live in?

I hope everyone who thinks like you moves to an island somewhere and dies of sheer stupidity.

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MIT launches campus lunch bug bounty

Trevor_Pott
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Please find bugs. Please do not do anything which may lead to finding bugs.

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Microsoft to hike certification exam prices

Trevor_Pott
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Re: And exactly what...

Depends on how they submit it and what their background looks like.

If someone submits a resume to me to be a virtual admin and they have 10 years of systems administration under their belt, a blog with some intelligent things, demonstrates they participate in user groups and a Twitter that's followed by half the vExperts, you know what...I'm probably going to hire that guy. Certification or no certification.

Who the person is matters way more than the letters they throw at you.

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Dell looking at higher debt mountain to buy EMC

Trevor_Pott
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Re: Gutted for Compellent

Gotta say I agree. Compellent is bloody brilliant. Can't say I'd like to see VNX replacing it any time soon...

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Stalled cloud growth, software flatlining, hated Lumias unsold... It's all fine, says Microsoft CEO

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Re: Bankruptcy?

Yes. Bankruptcy. For an entity Microsoft's size that would probably take 30-40 years to play out. But to presume that is simply can't is the province of faith and a determination not to learn from history.

Microsoft isn't going under tomorrow, but I said nothing of immediacy in any of my posts here.

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Trevor_Pott
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SCO hung around for a long time too. What's your point?

Yahoo. Sun. Novell. On and on. Netapp will take a long time to shrivel and die too, but ineptitude is caustic, contagious...and fatal.

The two ways to kill a company are to allow your customers to walk away from you or for you to walk away from your customers. Deciding that trust is irrelevant and that you will gladly dispense with it in order to meet arbitrary and irrelevant adoption metrics absolutely is walking away from your customers. Spending billions on a market segment and remaining less than a joke is your customers walking away from you.

Tick, tock. There's time left on that clock...

...but how much?

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Trevor_Pott
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I wonder what will come first: bankruptcy or a realization that obtaining and retaining the trust of your customers, partners, developers and staff is vital to the long term functioning of a business?

Oh, I forgot, they're Microsoft. They don't need trust. They abuse dominant market positions.

...but for how long, I wonder?

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Translated: BlackBerry CEO John Chen on cops-snooping-on-BBM

Trevor_Pott
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Re: So, what are YOU doing to protect yourself?

"You know for a fact if you heard that you were sitting on top of a dirty bomb you would want the FBI to find it any way possible."

Entirely untrue. I would rather that I and everyone I care about die than that my government or any of my government's allies circumvent the Universal Declaration of Human Rights or the national-level rights and freedoms documents of our nations.

Some things, you die for. The ideals of liberty, freedom and the universal application of the rule of law are among them. Nobody, not cops, governments nor corporations can ever be allowed to be above the law. And yes, if we have to lose a city or two every generation that is entirely, 100% worth it.

The price of freedom is eternal vigilance. Not against scary boogymen terrorists, but against authoritarians and fearmongers who crave power and use fear to obtain it, suppression of dissent to keep it.

Learn from the past. Je me souviens. Do not let the horrors of our ancestors be replayed so that you can have the illusion of security.

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Re: So, what are YOU doing to protect yourself?

The whole point of our entire economy is that we don't all have to be capable of everything. We perform labour and receive money in return. We exchange that money for goods and services performed by people with different specialties. In this context it is 100% rational to tell the companies we buy our technology from that we want a device that meets our needs. Privacy is one of those needs.

Why is privacy a requirement? Because "if you keep your nose clean, you'll be left alone" if a fucking lie. It is flat out not true.

If it were true, you wouldn't have Jean Charles de Menzes, or Tamir Rice, or the quite literally millions of unlawful infractions and outright murders committed - unpunished, unsanctioned and thus condoned - by the powers that be against completely innocent people.

"If you keep your nose clean, you'll be left alone"?

Tell that to Cameron Todd Willingham. Oh, you can't, they executed an innocent man.

Maybe you can tell Ricky Jackson that he really deserved all those terrifying years on death row for a crime he didn't commit.

It goes on and on and on and on. And you think that giving our governments panopticon powers to observe every single thing we do is going to improve matters? Do you not understand that today's warrant-required access is tomorrow's warrantless mass surveillance?

What, exactly, do you think our governments, who allow their police services to convict and murder the innocent almost always consequence free, are going to do once they have achieved total surveillance and legislated away the requirements for the presumption of innocence?

Think that's a bridge too far? Maybe you should look into the rights law enforcement has in the US to ignore 4th amendment for anyone 100 miles from a US border (80% of their population) and how this is increasingly being used. Maybe it's worth reading the TPP, TTIP and dozens of other treaties on the table, or concluded in the past 20 years to see how they are pushing their laws on the rest of the world.

Maybe it's worth looking at how we adopt not only their broken laws, but increasingly their completely insane law enforcement practices.

"If you keep your nose clean, you'll be left alone" is demonstrable bullshit. So is the idea that if we recognize that we should have no recourse excepting building our own privacy and security from the ground up.

The only choice is to fight the authoritarians and continue doing so for all of eternity. It is the cost of freedom. And it is a war cannot win, but absolutely cannot afford to lose. Those in power will use every means at their disposal to root out and crush dissent. Thus the means at their disposal must now and forever be limited, to ensure that dissent is always possible.

Our only path to victory lies through unity. Which is probably exactly why you advocate isolation. If so, that makes you a traitor.

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Saw-inspired horror slowly deletes your PC's files as you scramble to pay the ransom

Trevor_Pott
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Re: Without the in-your-face dramatics

It's not evil when corporations or governments do it.

Now back to work, prole!

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NZ Pastafarians joined in noodly wedlock

Trevor_Pott
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Re: Finally, a GOOD religion

First off, I'm a Crabstian, not a Pastafarian. Secondly, I most Rastas I know are not only chill with Pastafarianism, they'll don the colander and salt the water with the rest of us. And yes, I can be Crabstian and celebrate Pastafarian traditions with all mirth and ceremony just as the Rastas can do so. Pastafarians encourage such inclusion.

And if there are Rastas who truly have a problem with the term "Pastafarianism" I honestly and heartily encourage them to head on over to Venganza.org and raise the issue. There is a really good chance that the Pastafarians there will discuss the issue seriously and with sincere and honest consideration for the feelings of the Rastas and may well attempt to change the term to "Pastians" or somesuch.

The key here is that Pastafarianism, as a term, was never designed to "make fun of" Rastafarianism or Rastas in any way. And I am pretty sure that Rastas know that.

It's the angry white protestants who are getting all falsely upset on behalf of the Rastas - who are perfectly capable of raising issues on their own without white folk having to do it for them, if they actually happen to care about a topic - who are the xenophobes. It's all about deflection and poisoning the well, not about actually giving a damn about the Rastas, or peaceful coexistence.

Maybe, one day, when everyone can learn to stop taking themselves so goddamned seriously, we have have nice things.

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Trevor_Pott
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Re: Please be careful how you mock.

You don't get far with religious believers no matter what you do. They believe in something that cannot be proven. Logic and rationality are anathema to them.

If and when they are ready to engage with the rest of the world in a rational fashion, I'll be more than happy to engage with them. But I don't and won't respect irrational or inertia-based devotion to the illogical and unprovable.

Satire, at least, has a purpose. And I don't see anyone burning people alive in the name of Pastafarianism or even satire more generally. So off yonder, ho!

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Re: >something to tell the grandchildren

Mine was nerd themed. I'm a Crabstian and she's a nihlist. So far, we've outlasted a lot marriages of folk we know who did the full on evangelical protestant wedding thing.

Jibbers must be looking out for us.

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Trevor_Pott
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Re: >something to tell the grandchildren

My wedding was about why I and my wife said it was about. Just who the fuck do you think you are to tell me what "a" (meaning, in part my) wedding is about? Who the fuck are you to be dictating the meaning of something to 7.5 billion people?

Nobody. That's who.

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Re: Finally, a GOOD religion

Pastafarianism doesn't make fun of Rastafarianism at all. And I have yet to meet a Rasta who was even a little offended by Pastafarianism. Have you even met Rastas? I don't think they have a xenophobic bone in their body.

Now, Christians - more specifically evangelical Protestants - they have no problems about projecting their mindspiders onto others and using that strawman made out of wigglies to try to put down someone they don't like. Far be it from them to actually analyse their faith or the ridiculous lengths they go to in order to try to force that faith on others.

Nope, rely on tactics that try to pain skeptics as somehow terrible so that any skepticism they bring to the table is invalidated by this theoretically heinous act.

One which nobody - not even the whining Protestant casting aspersions - actually believes is horrible, nor that any offense was ever intended by anyone involved.

But hey, keep on truckin', mate. Preferably until you're way the fuck away from the internet so you can't spread your shite all over it.

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Re: Bunch of tosspots

"rather, it is because societies have tended to function reasonably well and flourish under Christianity"

Are you high? Please share.

Addendum: I loathe the societies Christianity built and would dearly - dearly - love the opportunity to build and live in one built by pastafarians. I believe with every fibre of my being it would be superior in damned near every way.

I bet we won't even burn anyone alive to create that society. Holy Meatballs, Batman!

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Re: Bunch of tosspots

Just because other individuals rationally but independently choose to do the same thing as you does not mean any of you are sheeple following a crowd. Now, believing what you are told to believe because it is what your parents believed and what you were raised to believe without questioning or examining the rationality or logic of that belief system, on the other hand, absolutely does make you a mindless drone.

Believe whatever you want to believe, but for the love of Jibbers Himself, arrive at that belief on your own using logic and reason instead of succumbing to the inertia of your upbringing.

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Intel bins ESXi in in-house private cloud revamp

Trevor_Pott
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Pint

Re: Soon to be 100% KVM across my entire install base.

6321 individual hosts and counting across 22 companies.

Multiple production environments.

*shrug*

But since you are entering with a closed mind further conversation seems irrelevant. So: beer.

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Soon to be 100% KVM across my entire install base.

We've all been telling VMware this would happen for ages. They didn't care. They still don't. Make of that what you will.

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Big Content seeks to ban Kickass Torrents from Australia

Trevor_Pott
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I don't suppose the relevant corporations have tried providing the same services that Kickass provides, but legally and for a fee? No?

Maybe that's worth a go. All your content in one place, easily searchable, downloadable and yours forever to play on any device you choose. Hell, I'd love to give a company like that my money.

No? Okay, Streisand effect and failing one more time it is then.

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US congresscritter's iPhone hacked (with, er, the cell networks' help)

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Re: within the grasp of powerful crime gangs and government agents

Yes and no. If you're talking Russia, I doubt it. But the USA? Yeah, there's a difference.

When you work for a crime gang or a pervasively corrupt government you tend to know you're not the good guy. Unfortunately governments exist where the higher ups are corrupt, but the day-to-day joes are largely decent people. This means that the majority of those working for these sorts of governments honestly thin they're the good guys.

There are a handful of governments (mostly Nordic) where corruption is actually a rather rare phenomenon, and thus it is legitimate for the minions to think they're probably working for the good guys, but there sure aren't a lot of those governments out there.

So yeah, there's some difference between a crime gang a government, if only in how they recruit.

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Hey, tech industry, have you noticed Amazon in the rearview?

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Pint

(beer)

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Re: Careful...

Let me try to be perfectly clear about this:

You're fucked. IT is fucked. Steel workers are fucked. Programers are fucked. Robot makers and butlers, cahiers and pop stars. You're all fucked. We're all fucked.

We have reached a point where we not only automate one industry's worth of jobs out of existence, but we are automating them all out of existence. At the same time, we're giving more and more power, rights and protection to capital owners while massively cutting into the rights of free speech, assembly, protest, and to organize concerning labour issues.

Despite multiple trials demonstrating that basic income programs are not only viable but shockingly efficient we are globally descending into a hyperconservative mindset that is not only xenophobic and bigoted it is greedy, grasping and violently objects to the idea of "giving handouts". So the one thing that could allow our civilizations to cope with the loss of jobs and the flood of ultra-cheap basic goods is something that is completely off the table in most nations.

So: we're fucked. There aren't going to be jobs for any but the elite, unless you happen to be willing to work for less than robots. Now, in some cases, people will indeed work for less than robots, but they will eek out a shitty, horrible existence.

Having been indoctrinated for generations never to raise our voices to those in power, the owners of capital will live high on the fruits of robotic labour, and the rest of us will slowly descend into the squalor of subsistence or barely-above-subsistence living.

This will take 50 years to play out, but the seeds of it are visible everywhere. There are no "go work this job, you'll be safe, secure and make fuckloads" jobs. For anyone. Anywhere.

You want a solution? Agitate for social change. Get the peasants revolting. Work towards a more equitable society. Convince your nation to implement social services reforms including basic income.

Unless and until we all do that, we're collectively fucked, and our children are multitudinously omnifucked.

That's the truth of the matter. If you don't like it, well, sorry. I don't lie to people if I can avoid it.

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Re: Careful...

Where did I say "fallacy"?

I say study what the luddites did and didn't do, as they have been through this already. The luddites - not the so-called fallacy - are the lesson.

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Trevor_Pott
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Re: Nice Rant

These vendors can adapt or they can die. There are no other choices.

You either enable IT to become as easy to work with as Amazon, or IT won't be there for long. And in order to enable IT to be as easy as Amazon you need to be able to meet IT's needs quickly, efficiently and in real time. You also need to provide them with hardware, software and services that enable IT to deliver a self-service approach to their internal customers.

That's the way the world is now. Cope.

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Trevor_Pott
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Re: Nice Rant

Yes.

And?

In case you hadn't noticed, virtually all sectors are facing this issue across all of society. This is the 4th industrial revolution. At present, nobody has any solutions to the problem.

Next.

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Trevor_Pott
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Re: Careful...

Ask the luddites. They faced this same issue. Maybe you can learn from history.

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Trevor_Pott
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Re: Nice Rant

They don't.

Next?

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Defence in depth: Don't let your firm's security become a boondoggle

Trevor_Pott
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Re: Therein lies ruin

There are so many layers to how wrong you are that the air around you has flavours.

Please never practice anything related to IT. In this or any other reality, anywhere in any of the multiverses.

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