* Posts by Trevor_Pott

6175 posts • joined 31 May 2010

ROBOT SEEDS to be scattered into upper atmosphere of JUPITER: NASA scheme

Trevor_Pott
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Re: I could be wrong ...

Which is a wonderful lie you tell yourself so that you can go on living a wasteful, energy intensive life as inexpensively as possible without any guilt, feelings of remorse or need to think about the world we are leaving for future generations.

Yeah, you're awesome. Fuck reality, you da goddamned man! Da goddamned man!

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Don't you just hate it when reality doesn't support your selfish worldview?

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Sysadmins: Your great power brings the chance to RUIN security

Trevor_Pott
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Again with the "IT must not only be technical experts, they must be sales and marketing experts without any additional training, pay, etc."

Fuck IT. There's way easier work that pays the same (or better) out there. Turn a wrench and make some oil come out of the ground. You're only expected to do one job. Unless you want to upcertify to get your WHIMIS or EMT or something...but then you get extra pay. The expectation that IT will be all things to all people is utter bullshit.

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Red Hat bolts the stable with RHEL 6.7

Trevor_Pott
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Re: Just started testing CentOS 7

A multi-billion dollar company could easily maintain grub-legacy. For that matter, it could preserve the concept that "every config must be editable as a flat text file" thusly producing a sane and rational distro. None of this neo-registry bull that's all the rage.

Red Hat is perfectly happy to throw its weight around in order to try to own new markets, or become relevant in markets where it dropped the ball. It's not remotely so interested at throwing its weight around to help ensure important packages in Linux adhere to concepts like flat text files or "doing one thing and doing it well".

Red Hat has let the inmates run the asylum and the result is the first Red Hat distribution in my entire career that I flat out refuse to work with.

Still, Red Hat gave 20 years of solid awesome. It was probably insane of me to think that this would continue indefinitely (or at least for the duration of the rest of my career). I'm sad about the steaming pile that Red Hat has become, but I don't have the will to fight.

Red Hat's resources are billions of times my own. The mad hatters that want to ruin Linux in order to build their own little empires of ego and hubris are more charismatic, wealthier and better connected than I. If I leveraged every single connection I have, called in every favour I am owed, used every last penny I could beg, borrow or steal my discontent would register upon Red Hat not at all.

So, to put things fairly bluntly: fuck 'em.

There are alternatives. I am investigating them. I can do literally nothing to even get Red Hat's attention, but if I throw the full force of my capabilities towards helping some of the alternatives succeed maybe I can help a truly open, community-focused and user-oriented distribution grow.

When life hands you OpenOffice by Oracle, you make LIbreOffice. I hope enough other people agree that this needs to occur that, combined, we can make it happen.

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Trevor_Pott
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Re: Just started testing CentOS 7

Gone are the days of just editing grub.conf by hand sadly, which was simple and very obvious

Not just grub; RedHat seem to be keen on doing away with this all over. Which is batshit fucking bananas crazy.

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The green salamander is OUT: Cisco gives up on Invicta flash arrays

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Re: oh...

...why, for the love of Jibbers, why?

Buy Tintri. Or Pure. Actually, do they have enough money for Pure?

Fuck it. Buy SimpliVity. They're already close buddies anyways. At least then they'd be buying the future (hyperconvergence) instead of the past (arrays). Besides, Cisco's customers don't mind proprietary bits, so the accelerator card shouldn't bother them.

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Jeep hackers broke DMCA, says EFF, and that's stupid

Trevor_Pott
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Re: Nobody looks at the upside...

Or you could learn to chill the fuck out and take a breather. A few seconds extra between this set of lights and the next won't change your life.

When asshats honk at me because I'm a little bit slow out of the gate on a set of lights - usually because some pedestrian looks like they are considering YOLOing across the street - I drive extra slow, just for them. I will continue to do so.

Traffic sucks everywhere. Plan accordingly.

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VMware sprawls across the data centre to post 'solid' Q2 results

Trevor_Pott
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Pillory the overly expensive licensing, lack of innovation and bizarre bundling (EVO:RAIL, hullo!) all you want, but VSAN is slouch. vSphere 6 is a solid release and VSAN has been a solid storage solution. Good tech, well tested, well supported.

Now, if only anyone other than the elites could afford it, and there were sane, smooth progressions from one tier of licensing to another. Ah well, that's what competition is for, no?

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Huawei and DataCore spawn a beautiful hyper-converged system

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I'm not saying storage gateways aren't cool, but they aren't hyperconvergence. They're storage gateways.

And yes, arrays are legacy.

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Canucks: Hey, Big Dog Telcos. Share that fiber with the little guys, eh?

Trevor_Pott
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Re: Canadian Telecoms were, historically, two damn great whales and a bunch of minnows

The CRTC stood by and refused to allow Bell Canada to disconnect the service. Great support from a government body.

Ah, back in the days when our government served us. Now it's been captured by the intustries it proposes to regulate. And our choices for leader are between a religious control freak crazy man, a traitor and coward, and a flip-flopping liar.

Woo!

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Re: "The vast empty space up north is irrelevant, except to those few people that live there."

*looks south*

Don't see no border.

*looks north*

Don't see no people.

Doesn't matter anyways. CRTC rulings that benefit the people will be overturned.

I don't care. Just get me affordable fibre. But not here, no. On the island, please. I aim to head there in about 10 years, which is about the timeframe for a fibre rollout.

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Storage slump? Dunno what you're talking about, beams EMC

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Re: Slump or a time of transition?

They may be, Vaughn. But they'll go through a slump here right soon as the legacy arrays struggle to catch attention, especially at the eye-watering prices they are charging. Heck, people are even willing to buy from you over at Pure at your prices rather than EMC, and they do it in a big way! And you guys charge $virgins!

But hyperconvergence is coming. It's driving down costs. Datacenter convergence is already emerging, driving down costs further. Software defined infrastructure plays are being researched and endgame machines are being assembled.

Worse, companies are managing to build just fine arrays on commodity hardware. Those afraid of the future and wishing to cling to arrays are increasingly able to find tried and tested arrays for a fraction the cost of EMC. That's bad for them.

That said, unlike NetApp, EMC seems to understand the above. Or, at least, some people at EMC understand the above and haven't been fired yet. The really ambitious, aggressive people that could see change was coming all left for Pure ages ago. The ambitious but not aggressive people that could see change was coming left EMC to form their own startups. And the ambitious but socially gregarious people that could see change was coming came from all over to join Solidfire.

That still leaves a huge collection of very technically talented, albeit not overly ambitious people at EMC that see change is occurring and have more than enough talent to drive innovation internally. Nobody at EMC seems to be interested in purging them, so EMC won't head down Netapp's path.

The $64B question is: will EMC tap those unambitious, but technically talented individuals who can see the changes required by soliciting their opinions and then listening to them? This is the "good management" question. The ambitious people all left. Ambition is required to raise one's head above the parapet and volunteer opinions.

EMC will, or it won't. If it doesn't, it will have to rely on acquisitions to see it through. Again: it isn't NetApp here. Sometimes the acquisitions go okay with EMC. Unfortunately, that's only "sometimes". And EMC probably doesn't have too many chances to play "marry the sweetheart" before its star starts permanently fading.

So who will be around to compete with it? Netapp? Pure? Solidfire? Tintri? Nutanix? SimpliVity? Coho?

There are dozens upon dozens of storage, CI, HCI, DCI and IEM companies out there now, beavering away in stealth or evolving organically from other concerns. There isn't room for them all.

It isn't just tech that will pick the winners. Good tech is part of the story. You need a company where the sales, marketing and evangelist roles are populated by people whom you don't want to blend and then pour into the sewer. You need prices that companies can afford. You need continual development to not only meet the challenges of this refresh, but the next and the next after that.

I, for one, am curious to see whom the people that actually matter - the customers - pick to survive.

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Adobe names ex Microsoft and Oracle bod as cloudy pipe CTO

Trevor_Pott
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How much effort does it take to fire all the vile, sociopathic, money-grubbing executives and their hellions in the licensing department directly into the sun and burn everything, everywhere that contains even a single line of Adobe source code? That is the only thing that is required for Adobe. Ever.

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The roots go deep: Kill Adobe Flash, kill it everywhere, bod says

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http://www.theregister.co.uk/2012/09/03/java_cleanup/

http://www.theregister.co.uk/2012/08/30/i_hate_java/

FFS, how many times do I have to write "Java is a piece of shit stop using it unless there's a gun to your head making you do so"?

There is no need for Java in the browser. Many/most people aren't installing it anymore. Bloody everyone is still installing flash. The drum needs banging until we treat the bug ridden piece of shit that is as being at least as toxic as the bug ridden piece of shit that is Java.

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America's tweaks to weapons trade pact 'will make web less secure'

Trevor_Pott
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Re: I doubt it's accidental

Whereas I don't believe that front line staff not giving a damn is an accident or a mistake. I believe that those services are designed to be demoralizing and are purposefully staffed with the bottom of the barrel. I believe that most government services - but especially American ones are purposefully sabotaged.

Some times they do it for malicious intent: rooting out political dissidents, putting "the proles" in their place, etc. But just as often such things are led to ruin purposefully because having a given service degenerate suits the political machinations of someone fairly high up the food chain.

This could be because they covet the budget for their own projects/district/etc. It could be out of spite towards an enemy who supported something they didn't like and is not in charge of that department. It could be any of a number of things.

In my experience however - and, increasingly, as we are learning through all sorts of leaks about all sorts of departments - failure in government and the failure of government are not accidents. Nor is incremental (and protracted!) government overreach.

This is all by design. Petty, hateful, spiteful, covetous, vengeful, prideful, megalomaniacal and yes, even terrified, design.

Governmental degeneracy isn't the result of millions upon millions of individual and coincidental acts of apathy and incompetence. It is the result of purposeful sabotage and thwarting by a mere few thousand near the top.

Hanlon's razon just doesn't apply to government. At least as I see it. Not ever.

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Trevor_Pott
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Re: I doubt it's accidental

It's not just DHS. It's that every time someone is pooh-poohed for "tinfoil hatting" about the US governments ignoble intentions - typically using the premise of Hanlon's razor in order to attempt to silence the cynic - the tinfoil hatter is actually proved right.

I submit to you sir that this is can no longer be considered coincidence: it is design.

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Trevor_Pott
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Re: I doubt it's accidental

Hanlon's Razor does not apply to the US government or it's military industrial complex. Ever.

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Caringo insists its software is more than a Swarm in a tea cup

Trevor_Pott
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Have played with swarm. It's actually quite nice. Decent object store and fairly easy to use. If object storage is your thing, you kinda ask for too much more.

That said, I really hope object storage is never my thing. I do so hate writing code...

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The Register's resident space boffin: All you need to know about the Pluto mission

Trevor_Pott
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Re: Re :- "Meeting a cold dwarf hasn't put off NASA one bit"

Actually, it's entirely possible there is no internal activity and the "new" surface is entirely due to atmospheric evaporation and deposition.

And Pluto is a dwarf.

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Your poster guide: A fascinating glimpse into North Korea's 'internet'

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Re: Kim Kardashian?

Legit, naturally. Now, are you going to drink that kanar, or am I going to have to come over there and drink it for you?

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When is a market not a market? When it's SDN or NFV, says Gartner

Trevor_Pott
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This from the company that conflates hypervisors and containers. Few things in this world are more arbitrary than Gartner.

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STARS SNUFFED in massive galactic whodunit

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Re: @Mr Pott

The simple fact is that dark matter doesn't have to exist for galaxies to rotate the way they do and not tear themselves apart. There are other ways this could work - specifically that our laws and theories describing gravity are not accurate.

If you say MOND we can't be friends.

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Re: @Mr Pott

Why don't I get you lot a beer instead?

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Re: @Mr Pott

at one point in some undetermined future, the Universe will attain a point of equilibrium and stop expanding

That's one of many interpretations of the data, yes. It seems to be one that more and more scientists are moving towards. A handful think that space - like some sort of elastic - will "snap back" and that whole "big crunch" thing will actually happen.

Others (who are now considered traditionalists, ha!) think space will keep expanding forever, with the force of expansion eventually accelerating past the speed of light (there is a difference between acceleration-driven speed and local timeframe speed which makes this compatible with relativity). At some ????? after this occurs expansion would be so fast that large structures like galaxies, and then stars, planets and even atoms couldn't hold themselves together (the Big Rip).

The former (that the universe will unfold to a maximum extent or eventually collapse) view is held by people who - not to put too fine a point on it - think mcuh of string theory is a whole bunch of hooey. Not that it's all bollocks, mind you, but quite a bit of it. (Brane extrusion is still likely the best reason for our universe to have come into being in the first place.)

The latter people - those who think the universe will continue forever - seem to think the universe will continue expanding forever because that is what it is busy doing now. That the universe changed it mind about how fast it was unfolding in the past seems to be no reason to believe things could ever change again and off they go trying to use maths to prove it. Thus string theory gets more and more silly as they try to beat maths into submission to make it agree.

Basically there are two camps that matter:

1) New space is constantly being created as part of the expansion of the universe and that as a function of this creation there is dark energy. The universe will always create new space (because that's what what it does) and thus the universe is doomed.

2) All the space in the universe was already there to start with, it was just compressed, and the universe is not unfolding to its current size. (Actually, some believe the universe is a multi-dimensional hologram, but let's not get into that as it doesn't really change anything.)

Critical to the debate is the almost anthropic belief of camp 1): that this is the only universe and that it is special. The second group believe that the universe is pedestrian. there are many and instead of being infinite they are popping up all over like sun umbrellas being opened on a beach.

For the universe to expand forever, it basically has to be special. Otherwise it would eventually interact with another universe. Some of us - myself included - believe that the fact symmetry breaking occurred and that expansion changed speeds indicated that our universe has already interacted with other universes (possibly via extra universal forces we don't know - and can't know - anything about.)

Personally, I fall into the latter camp for the simple reason that every time we've thought something about where we lived was "special" we were ultimately proven wrong. There's nothing special about where we live and there's nothing special about us, either.

Thins then changes a "fundamental truth" about what many of us were taught in school: the universe is not infinite. It's just really, really, mind-bogglingly big.

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Trevor_Pott
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Re: Mere mortals, they are not.

For the life of me I cannot imagine that Dark Matter exists.

Don't see why not. You read about things like pentaquarks here on El Reg on a regular basis. Why is it so hard to conceive of non-baryonic matter made up of a different collection of subatomic particles that result in matter with different properties? We're not talking magic. Just think of dark matter sort of like Linux systems to a Windows admin: same basic building blocks, but being used in a completely different fashion.

I'm convinced that it is gaseous particles, or maybe even small asteroids that orbit galaxies and make up for the "missing matter"

Nope. These would emit light that we could see.

After all, we can hardly spot asteroids in our very own Kuiper Belt

Actually, we're reasonably good at this, given the limitations of the technology to hand. Talk to @plutokiller about how many he's found just in the past few years.

The reason we have trouble is that it's a big ass sky and we have a small ass budget. The primary tool we use for asteroid hunting (Hubble) was never designed for the task. It's slow to turn (shit at tracking anything close by) and has terrible resolution (so kinda crap at focusing on things smaller than stars).

If you wanted to build a modern high end telescope and give it the ability to turn quickly and see in infrared (think an upjumped WISE) you's spot all sorts of awesome stuff. In fact, WISE mark one did see a huge chunk of stuff and we're still picking apart the data from it.

And spotting them in the next solar system is simply impossible

That would be because of the giant ball of fusion that happens to be drowning out the rocks and other things. We can, as a matter of fact, see the interstellar medium and we do have to compensate for it when observing.

Also: the entire mass of a solar system is a mere fraction of the mass of the star. When we calculate what the mass of galaxies "should" be, that's typically included. The problem is that the missing mass is orders of magnitude larger than simply "a bunch of missing planets and asteroids circling the stars".

Questions you didn't ask:

What about rogue planets and brown dwarves?

Glad you asked. This is a growing area of research but the short version is that we can usually actually see these. These live out between the stars so they - believe it or not - count as "galactic dust" as far as we're concerned. They are visible (in aggregate) along with the interstellar medium of the galaxy.

What's more, unless our calculations about solar system formation are wildly off - to the point that we'd need to rewrite physics - there simply can't be enough rogues out there to make up the difference.

I still don't understand what Dark Energy is, though.

Oooooohkay. This is the hard one. Let me try to do this. Apologies for inevitably getting some or all of it wrong.

In the beginning there was nothing, which exploded. And by nothing, of course, I mean everything, but compressed into the most impressive singularity of all time.

Except this wouldn't be a singularity as you understand it. It was "a bunch of baryonic matter shoved into a ball so densely that photons can't escape". Matter didn't exist. Space didn't exist. Not, really, anyways.

But then, all of a sudden, and for no good reason at all, space exploded.

For simplicity's sake I want you to picture the universe as a great big flat circle squished into an impossibly small ball. If you were to unfold that circle and flatten out you would have The Universe in its final, fully extended form. This is The Universe's eventual goal. It was scrunched up so tightly that it is seeking to stretch out a little and get rid of the cramp.

Now, each cubic meter of space to expend energy in order to unfold. This energy comes in the form of two completely different types of energy.

The first type of energy was all released right at the beginning of the universe. The initial collapse of the fundamental singularity caused its emission. At the initial instant of emission it was simply an incomprehensible amount of raw energy occupying an infinitesimal amount of primordial space. This energy would eventually become all matter - dark and baryonic - that we know today.

But the universe was intent on unfolding beyond that mere initial plank space. It continued to expand and as it did so it emitted the second type of energy: dark energy. So far as we can tell, dark energy doesn't interact with the energy that makes up mass in any meaningful way.

In any case, as the universe continued to expand somewhere around 1 usec after the big bang baryogenesis started to occur. The fundamental particles as we understand them formed.

For reasons we don't understand - but which probably mean that either dark energy or dark matter does interact with regular energy on some level - symmetry breaking occurred and the current form of baryonic matter (not baryonic anti-matter) coalesced as the (currently) densest concentrations of energy.

The universe kept right on expanding and that baryonic matter eventually cooled enough that protons and electrons could form atoms and the rest you know from there.

The two odd pieces are symmetry breaking - discussed above - and the variation in universe expansion rates. The initial inflation seems to make perfect sense. The universe sought to unfold and began doing so expeditiously. It then slowed it's expansion for a time and then sped up again.

Some like to think that the gravity of the early universe (it was denser then) slowed the initial expansion. Once past some critical threshold, however, the universe's tendency towards expansion overcame gravity and expansion started accelerating.

The problems with this are A) there's no reason to assume gravity has any sort of effect whatsoever on the universe's desire to expand and B) the universe isn't increasing it's rate of expansion exponentially. (As would be expected if it had overcome some critical threshold.)

The nearest anyone can figure is that the universe is expanding because it damned well wants to, but that it has to expend (or release, like a coiled spring) energy to do so.

I hope that explains things. I am sorry if it doesn't.

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What's dying on the vine and rhymes with IBM?

Trevor_Pott
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Of all the tech companies, I'm slowly coming 'round to be quite positive regarding IBM. Maybe they don't win, but they certainly have a different vision than other companies and are putting both research dollars and a very painful transition period towards what they see as the next generation of computing.

There never was a future for IBM in the low-margin world. They just don't have a corporate culture that can compete in the race to the bottom of shifting tin, cranking out management software or even providing services. There are too many competitors in all of these markets now.

IBM's going other places. Doing things at large scale with computers that only Google seem to be interested in trying for. Win or lose, good luck to 'em! I hope the turnaround shakes lose some of the internal bureaucracy and ends up with a leaner organization focused on competent individuals and not endless managers.

Probably not, but it's worth hoping, sometimes...

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North Korea's Red Star Linux inserts sneaky serial content tracker

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Is it really a joke if typed whilst sobbing?

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Dwarfworld PLUTO may not have a real DOG on it - but it does have a TAIL

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Re: Astroid with 90 million tons of platinum..

If we'd snagged it we'd be finding all sorts of interesting new uses for platinum. The price wouldn't tank entirely, but it might go down by half. Which is fine. Asteroid mining is viable to even a quarter of current prices. You can also control the price of platinum by varying the return rate.

Also: why return it all? Platinum is really useful in space, and that asteroid will have lots of Silicon. Make high-value parts (like highly efficient solar panels) in-situ instead of lifting them from Earth. Platinum helps with all sorts of high-tech gadgets and given the density is kind of expensive to drag out of our gravity well.

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Server storage slips on robes, grabs scythe, stalks legacy SANs

Trevor_Pott
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Re: You forgot a player

I am always available to my hyperconverged brethren when needed. Give me a ping and I'll prove what help I can.

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Trevor_Pott
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Oh there's some debate here. So Gartner (and some internal EMC projectsions) say that hyperconverged solutions will have 51% of the market by 2018. I disagree and think it's going to be 2020. The wikibon people seem to be somewhere in the middle.

What nobody seems to understand when they do these calculations is that - with the exception of NetApp - array vendors will adapt. EMC is already doing so. Tintri is doing so. Others are slowly trying, at least, for change.

With the exception of Nutanix, hyperconverged vendors are still in startup mode. They don't have the R&D capacity to really go toe to toe with someone like Dell. Array vendors will start to add value by acquiring new startups (like copy data management experts) and raising the bar for enterprise storage functionality. This will force hyperconverged players into a feature way they may well not win.

The end result will be a thinning of the herd on both sides. I ultimately think that hyperconverged vendors will win, but I am expecting a rally by array vendors around the end of 2016 that will buy them a couple of years before arrays are finally reduced to a niche.

The war is already over, but arrays will fight to the last man to keep their margins. And they'll ultimately lose.

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Re: You forgot a player

Gridstore's cool, but has a few problems

1) Next to no sales. Who has ever seen a Gridstore in the wild? Half the storage analysts I talk to are convinced they're functionally a myth. I'm not entirely sure they're really more than trolling myself.

2) Nutanix does Hyper-V. And they do it damned well. SimpliVity, Maxta and many, many others will be there very soon. (I expect by end of year for most of them.)

3) Marketing. Gridstore's budget for marketing and community engagement appears to be the square root of negative fleventy. This goes back to "who has ever seen a Gridstore box in the wild?" These things aren't in front of the kinds of people who to talks at user groups or Spicecorps or what-have-you. Gridstore has virtually no mindshare amongst the technorati, so even people who know about it tend to forget when it comes crunch time and they have to choose a solution. This leads us to...

4) Really terrible channel support. Gridstore may have a channel strategy. If so, I haven't been able to detect it. If they do have someone out there kicking the channel in the ASCII then those channel monkies aren't doing their job. (See: 3.) They aren't pushing Gridstore as a solution when customers come to call and this is hurting them.

I can't comment much on price - I seem to recall vaguely that it was actually not bad - or functionality - the last time I saw a demo it seemed to do what was required in a reasonable enough fashion - but the fact that I can't summon that information immediately and it is essentially my job to know this stuff just reinforced how ineffective Gridstore has been at remaining "sticky" with mindshare.

By all accounts Gridstore seems a good product, but the company that sells that product is about to get absolutely pwned by the fist of a dozen angry gods as they all turn their eyes from KVM to Hyper-V. Everyone has an ESXi hyperconverged solution. They're all finishing up with KVM/Openstack. Hyper-V is next. After that: Xen.

Gridstore doesn't seem ready to go to war. They don't seem to even understand what is about to happen to them, let alone be remotely ready for it. Too bad, really. They seemed like nice folks.

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Ditching political Elop makes for a more Nadella Microsoft

Trevor_Pott
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Re: ageist

A) Age is relevant here, especially as correlated with experience, the type and quality of education during their formative years, the culture under which individuals were raised, etc.

B) "Old fart" is not an "ageist" term, unless you are unbelievably oversensitive. It is a term of endearment. It categorizes individuals by age, yes, but it also implies a fondness for the group in general.

If I'd wanted to be ageist I could have chosen any number of other descriptors. Ancient cranks. Hoary gits. Creaky bastards. Grumpy greybeards. So on and so forth.

Now, as to the acceptability of agism, that's another story. On an individual level I don't think it's fair to be prejudiced against anyone. Black, white, short, tall, fat, skinny, old, young, you name it...everyone deserves to be considered individually.

That said, I have negative sympathy for old people as a group.

The few members of "the best generation" that are still around, I have no issue with. But my parents' generation? The boomers? Fuck 'em.

Boomers ruined our planet and created trillions upon trillions of dollars in debt in virtually every other nation. They collectively lived easy lives of low unemployment, easy access to jobs, capital, material goods and resources and left my generation and those who come after us with the bill.

Collectively, boomers are selfish, myopic and in denial about the damage they have done.

Give me an old person and I will do my level best to judge them individually, just as I would anyone else. But I don't have any room in my heart for treat them - as a group - with deference or even respect. I have no room in my heart to treat boomers as a group as though they deserve a goddamned thing.

All of that said, I do rather like "old farts". Technocodgers with decades of experience and a certain cynisim about hype and trends. I've no issue with them, and I use the term they use for themselves: "old farts".

Though, I fully intend to convert thtem all to "technocodger" by the end of the year. Just you wait and see...

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I cannae dae it, cap'n! Why I had to quit the madness of frontline IT

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Re: @AC

If Trevor were to write about this stuff, two things would happen.

1. He'd get sued for breach of contract (the NDA is a contract).

Actually, some of the stuff that's out there might well never make the light of day. It's so very deeply hush hush that sometimes companies get bought up just to keep the tech from competitors. And most of it is damned good. I'd be far more worried about well paid character assassins basically ruining my life than any legal consequences. There are ways to perfectly legally ruin a man's life. I'd rather not attract that sort of attention.

2. He's get excluded from this sort of information in the future.

Which is why I comply. By being one of the few who comply, I get to have input in early stage products and help design go-to-market approaches such that there is at least a chance this technology will be made available to my people (the SMBs) at a price they can afford. I then usually have a shot at getting a launch exclusive review.

In fact, he's probably on shaky ground even admitting that he's subject to an NDA, if they're worded like any of the ones I've been subject to in the past.

This is really the weird part. Yes and no. I probably would get in deep cacapoopoo for letting on which companies I was talking to in the context of this conversation. But general innuendo that "I know people who know people who know things"? That actually works out rather well for the startups in question.

People who need the kind of tech we're discussing (or next gen storage tech, or next gen SDN tech, etc) e-mail me. I pass that info on to the startups and their folks do background checks and maybe reach out, get an early customer.

The world of stealth startups is weird.

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Trevor_Pott
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Re: @ Trevor

If you've seen this top secret stuff then write about it in detail, you're a journalist after all, otherwise it is just another fisherman's story. Without proof, it is meaningless drivel

You're absolutely correct. You either trust me that I have seen this stuff, or you don't. It you do then you can trust that when I am allowed to write about it, I will. If you don't, then none of it matters, does it?

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You've tested the cloud – now get ready and take a bigger step

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Network connectivity is one of the major barriers. Just how do you know which part of the web is causing a problem? How do you test and manage response times and latencies, especially if your audience now includes users on mobile devices?

www.thousandeyes.com. Solved.

Is Azure, Amazon or one of the hundreds of different cloud providers offering the right platform for your particular application?

Nope. Not unless you're A) American, B) picking a public provider in your jurisdiction or C) building a private cloud.

“To burst into the cloud sounds like a great vision but how do you actually do it? How do you implement it? How do you set it up to be flexible? You need clever bits of software and people who can manage that software,”

Not really. The software is relatively commonplace and the skills for it are mundane. You just have to be prepared to spend. And spend and spend and spend. People with those skills are smart, and they won't be treated like crap. Companies with that software charge a lot. And you need great reliable internet connectivity and your ISP is going to take it out of your genitals. With prejudice.

Sounds easy? Maybe not, but if you plan your transition to a hybrid cloud setup correctly you will retain control over your IT. You get to choose how you customise your environment for your workloads.

No, your ISP does. They control the pipe and you do exactly as they say. Same with your hypervisor/management tools vendor. And your tin shifter. And your storage overlords. And - above all else - your government, who may well demand that any company large enough to be seriously looking at hybrid cloud computing build in back doors to allow the spooks to pwn us all in the information so that they can nose out political dissidents.

You are not in control. Everyone else is in control. You just give them money and hope they leave you alone long enough to retire. Even if you're a Fortune 1000 company.

So design your networks with that in mind. If your duty of care - and your legal obligations - run towards the protection of your customers'/employees' data, then you absolutely must treat your ISP, your vendors and your government as hostile agents who are just as likely to try to cause compromise as any outside hacker. They'll use different means, but you need to be prepared to defend against them nonetheless.

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Ad slingers beware! Google raises Red Screen of malware Dearth

Trevor_Pott
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Re: Ads in the Pot meet Kettle world.

Can we trust Google

Probably not. But more than we can trust most governments. Absolutely more than we can trust almost any other company in the tech industry and probably more than we can trust any other fortune 2000 company.

Google are awful, thieving, sociopathic kleptocrats, but of the options available to the hoi polloi they're still the fuckwits likely to do the least amount of damage.

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ARM servers look to have legs as OVH boots up Cavium cloud

Trevor_Pott
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Want.

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India reveals plan to fix poverty by doing ANYTHING-as-a-service

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India also has big bump in its demographic bell curve, as more than half the population is under 35. That smartphone-toting generation is just the kind of demographic to stir up strife if under-employed.

Part of the problem is to stop having so many goddamned children.

*sigh*

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Mozilla loses patience with Flash over Hacking Team, BLOCKS it

Trevor_Pott
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Re: The best bit is....

Flash insecurity does not go up from those nasty guys to regular otherwise properly secured websites that happen to be using flash

Yes it does. Infected ad networks are, in fact, a thing.

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Trevor_Pott
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Re: The best bit is....

If a major news site stopped supporting flash, the ad houses would fall into line.

You're funny.

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Why the USS NetApp is a doomed ship

Trevor_Pott
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Re: Seems like an article set up for bashing NetApp, but...

How can you not be sure who I am referring to when you wrote what I was referencing. I am not twisting your words like you are with me. Your writing has no real spec.

You make an educated guess and then you verify. It's how grown up learn things.

How can you not be sure who I am referring to when you wrote what I was referencing. I am not twisting your words like you are with me.

If it walks like a duck and quacks like a duck, clearly it's a pony. Clearly.

Maybe you cannot be direct and because of this you believe everyone has ulterior motives.

Not everyone. Just the people who are so overwhelmed with rage that they feel the need to comment. Commenters make up less than 1% of the readership, and among them most aren't quite so angrily tart as you've proven to be. So when you get to fractions of a single percent of pure internet rage, yeah, I start asking some questions.

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Trevor_Pott
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Re: Seems like an article set up for bashing NetApp, but...

You think I work or have worked for NetApp

No, I think you're affiliated with Netapp because of your "Clearly NetApp is not superior over all things and any sane person knows this," attitude. It's the sort of thing NetApp has been very careful to ensure is the only view allowed internally.

Why can't you just do your job and go into the specific details of how storage requirements are changing and where specific NetApp portfolio (not my) gaps exist?

Who says that's my job? You? And how do you know I'm not putting together such a piece already?

Why is this your motivation and not what is really going on in the data center?

Because there's usually an interesting reason why the smell of bullshit is stronger in some places. Besides, what people are doing in the datacenter today is not really all that relevant. They're doing that with stuff they've already bought. What matters is what people will be doing in their datacenters tomorrow, as that drive innovation, competition and - most importantly - sales.

Are you sure all of those people work at NetApp? Not saying they do not but you think I do when I do not.

Not sure to whom you're referring, but yes, I am absolutely positive that some of my sources work at NetApp. As for you, if you don't work at NetApp what rational reason would you have to be so frothing? Why should I assume anything other than a fairly direct association?

Now, being an anonymous commenter on the internet you're fairly useless for analysis or quoting purposes, but as far as "frothing commenter in a comment thread" it's fairly safe to presume affiliation or insanity. It's not polity to presume insanity, so I choose to presume affiliation.

but you had to write a passive aggressive article under the guise of analysis?

Reading comprehension is important to all people at all times. The article is tagged "comment", not analysis.

Anything else you would like to vomit on the carpet? Or are we done here?

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Infosec bigwigs rally against US cyber export control rule

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Re: if only

That is going to depend entirely on whether or not we kick out that nutjob Harper while still managing to keep the traitorous coward Trudeau from office. If either wingus or dingus get in charge, we're pretty much screwed.

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Trevor_Pott
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Re: if only

Who says it's alcohol. The US is drunk on it's own overinflated sense of exceptionalism!

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Trevor_Pott
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Go home, USA, you're drunk.

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OCP supporters hit back over testing claims – but there's dissent in the ranks

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Re: Cole is Delusional

For guest pieces, content is more important than style and form.

As for not being technical in nature, I agree (to a limited extent). That said, there's still a lot of research. We're treading ground that vendors have to walk, so how do they do it, and why? What corners do they cut? What lessons have they learned? Can OCP implement the difficult stuff and leave the easy stuff as a todo for buyers?

And if OCP doesn't move downmarket beyond Facebook-class deployments, what's the relevance? There are only a handful of Facebook-class entities that will ever exist at any one time, and I'm not remotely sure that systems integrators have the capability to take up the slack.

If they do, what's in it for them? What's the business case for them to do so? Will it help save them in the face of the public cloud, or just draw out an inevitable painful death?

At the same time, large vendors are moving towards massive "black-box" vertically integrated endgame machines. Is OCP - and for that matter systems integrators - relevant in the fact of that sort of market shift?

As developers cut their teeth on cloud tech (private, public and hybrid) first, is OCP still relevant? Will regular enterprises even be able to field sysadmin teams and developers who code to anything other than the black-box style clouds?

And these are just the questions off the top of my head.

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Trevor_Pott
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Re: Cole is Delusional

"why not run it by" I mean could El Reg run an opinion piece?

Well, of course El Reg can. It becomes a question of who is qualified to write it. If you wanted to write something I could get you in touch with the relevant people to see about a guest piece.

As for myself, the truth is that I don't know enough about all the nooks and crannies of this just yet to open my big mouth in print. There's a lot of research to be done and many opinions and views to gather before I weigh in.

OCP is a different world from the one I normally inhabit. Perhaps more to the point VMworld is a month and a half on fire and the vendors are on fire and their content is on fire and I'm on fire and everything's on fire and air travel is hell. I'm full up for the next while and don't have time to learn a whole new world until after the big game. (I just learned OpenStack and am putting my free time to SDN/NFV at the moment.)

I think the problems presented are deep and complex. They deserve a full research and analysis treatment. Ideally, I'd like to see the OCP become much more important and central to the how we all procure IT, and I fear that going off half-cocked writing about it could do far more harm than good.

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Trevor_Pott
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Re: Cole is Delusional

I grok the liability argument, I really do...but I think centralized testing is core and critical to economies of scale. There has to be a balance between "certifying everything works together" and "meh, I hope it all goes to plan".

I think that balance rests on testing for established standards. E.G. meeting JEDEC standards for your memory channels/traces/controllers/etc.

In a perfect world I envision the OCP as essentially becoming the "reference implementation" of various hardware standards. If your RAM doesn't work in an OCP box then chances are you screwed up and didn't meet spec because OCP verified that their widgetry meets the published specs.

The other side of it is that if the testing is to be left up to the customer than I think those folks behind OCP should open source testing tools relevant to all elements as well as procedures for using them/expected results for the tests. This would let any tom dick and harry assemble OCP gear, select parts from various suppliers and verify it all works to plan before ordering it by the datacenter load.

If OCP is to be just some plans for someone to (apparently badly) put together some motherboards then what's the point? It becomes something you can't trust to do the job and ultimately doesn't drive down the costs, because instead of centralising the costs of testing, verification and R&D those costs have to now be replicated by each and every company implementing OCP systems!

Lots of companies don't feel the need for the liability portion of the equation to be taken by the vendor. And, to be frank, that's a huge part of the cost. But making sure that at least basic quality is dealt with and that testing R&D is central and open is essential.

The OCP doesn't have to be "a cheap Tier 1" vendor. We have Supermicro for that. But OCP should also be more than a PR exercise or a way to offload hardware engineering on "the community". The community will contribute back if there is a great base to start from. That starts at verifying standards compliance and making available the ecosystem of testing tools and procedures required for companies to do testing in house.

At least, that's my take on it. I understand entirely that others may well see it differently.

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Micron re-furtles its data centre SSD offering

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The M500DCs have served me very, very well. Looking forward to using the 510s for new deployments, as they look like a solid upgrade. Keep 'er steady, Micron!

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Proxyham Wi-Fi relay SUPPRESSED. CONSPIRACY, yowl tinfoilers

Trevor_Pott
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"Graham finds – and so does Vulture South – the idea that the FBI would hit the roof about simple and basic technology “implausible”."

You're talking about an organization led by a cryptography denier. Sorry, but <i.any</i> level of stupidity is plausible for them.

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