* Posts by Trevor_Pott

5635 posts • joined 31 May 2010

Microsoft comes right out and says backup software is dead

Trevor_Pott
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Re: All your data subject to US courts?

"As a corporate, you can take steps to make that very difficult on Microsoft's cloud if you want to . You can use Azure RMS and 'bring your own keys', and set them so that they can't be accessed from the USA:"

And this costs what? What's the entry price? Is it available to the mass market? Has the code been inspected so we're sure it's free of backdoors? Is it randomly audited? By whom? Who pays for the audits? Who checks the credentials of the auditors? Where is the chain of trust in the bullshit you're peddling, and how universal in applicability is it to market?

I see sales and handwaving. And your links don't answer the hard questions.

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"You keep the latest copies locally too on your Microsoft StorSimple device. You only need a full download if you loose the whole site. At which point you would be failing over to your DR site anyway."

Which costs what? There are way - way - more SMBs out there than enterprises. And how do we know we can trust Microsoft with our encryption keys? Or what's on that Storsimple device? Has it been audited? How do we know there aren't backdoors? Or backdoors in the cloud?

How can we ever trust an American cloud provider? And for that matter, why should most companies consider this as a solution, given the entry level price?, Especially if you want proper security? (Assuming such a thing is allowed to even exist.)

Lots of talk and marketing and sales going on here, AC. Not a hell of a lot of hard, tangible proof that this is applicable, trustworthy and safe to the mass market. Especially the non-American mass market.

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"Of course, back in the day we had service bureaus offering utility computing, and they did a nice tidy bit of business before mostly being run off by people who thought every firm could do a good job of managing its own IT. Just like every firm does a great job of generating its own power, running its own transportation infrastructure, providing its own physical security, running its own custodial service..."

I have better uptime than amazon. And I build my shit out of the IT equivalent of used coconuts and duct tape. I have better security than megaliths like Sony, or Anthem, or...

...wait, why, exactly is it a great idea for me to hand my data - and with it, my business, livelihood and the ability to pay myself and my staff - over to an outsourcer?

And even if I did think cloud computing was a great plan - and I do, for certain workloads - why the metric donkey fuck would I have all my bits of digital precious over to Americans, of all people?

I mean, yes, the Brits and the Aussies have far more deplorable privacy policies - and hey, Canada is a member of five eyes and all that - but if I'm going to get my data stolen, why not get it stolen by my own government? At least then it's up to my own courts in my own nation to sort out liability, not some byzantine backroom international horror.

American cloud providers can't be trusted. Ever. Maybe no cloud providers can. But if that's the so, then the case for keeping your data managed by a supply chain of companies that are answerable only to your own legal jurisdiction is made all the stronger by that reality, not weaker.

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"With Microsoft's cloud backups you control the encryption keys on site - and it uses AES256 encryption:"

No I can't. I'm an SMB. I don't have $virgins to give Microsoft for special consideration. Even if I did, there's no guarantee that Microsoft or the NSA haven't backdoored some aspect of the solution. Microsoft is an American cloud provider. As such, they flat out cannot be trusted.

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Euro ministers ditch plan to ban roaming charges

Trevor_Pott
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Re: I smell lobbyists

"Bureaucrats unsurprisingly see more legislation as the solution to every problem. It usually isn't."

Free market capitalism is almost never the solution to anything either. Regulated markets are. Free market capitalism is a dangerous religion, nothing more. It should be treated like any other cult.

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EU annoys industry and activists with net neutrality proposal

Trevor_Pott
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Re: The problem is the infrastructure

The solution to which, of course, is to drop taxes on the rich, abandon the poor and have everything run by private corporations! Oh, and don't forget to drop taxes on the rich. It's really important. And zero taxes for corporations!

That's the only way to solve debt problems. An upside-down piece of candy corn in a wig made of used medical gauze told me so.

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Re: QoS issues..

Badly thought out neutrality regulation is neutrality regulation that favours companies at the expense of the population. Amending legislation a year or two down the road with something that allows QoS for emergency services would be a simple sell and easily done.

Regaining civil liberties (like equality, privacy and so forth), once lost, is nearly impossible.

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'Hi, I'm from Microsoft and I am GOING TO KILL YOU'

Trevor_Pott
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Re: I recently got one of these..

I have a nice British lady's voice say "this call is being recorded" for every phone call I'm part of. Then it actually records the call. Very. Angry. Scammers.

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Australia threatens to pull buckets of astronomy funding

Trevor_Pott
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Re: Are you saying...

If you're in Australia all you get is one viewpoint but two parties espousing it!

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Re: Thus continues...

Better "everyone must have prizes" than "god did it because foreigners will kill you and take your jobs".

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Storm in a K-Cup: My SHAME over the eco-monster I created, says coffee pod inventor

Trevor_Pott
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Re: He's right.

"Real men drink tea"

Hipsters aren't men.

Coffee. Black. Strong enough to kill a horse!

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Neuralytix report: Cleversafe fumes over classification

Trevor_Pott
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Re: Report only covered appliances

Thanks for that, Adrian. I was starting to wonder about the lack of Caringo, given that my experiences with it showed it to be a fairly simple and reasonably capable product.

...which may be the nicest thing I've ever said about any object storage product, ever. :/

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To InfiniFlash and beyond: SanDisk wheels out Big Data box

Trevor_Pott
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Want.

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Huawei preps to drop mobile & wearables lovebombs on U.S.

Trevor_Pott
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Re: Chinese Concerns

Hunh. Wonder why i associated it with Israel. Must have gotten them all mixed up with another company.

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Re: Chinese Concerns

Um, wasn't the spyware in question Israeli?

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Pebble Time Steel ready in May. Plus: Now you can strap on sensors, GPS ... Geiger counter

Trevor_Pott
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Re: battry risks

Lots of people fall off buildings on purpose and are just fine. It's that part where you do it accidentally that's bad. If you are base jumping and know what you're doing, it usually works out just fine.

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HP Services engineer dispatch tool 'broken', say engineers

Trevor_Pott
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Re: Is it just me...

Laserjet III? The II was way better. Still have a few IIs in service!

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US court rubber-stamps dragnet metadata surveillance (again)

Trevor_Pott
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Re: You best hope they don't really stop any time soon

If the fellow in question honestly believes the tripe he's peddling, do you really think his vocabulary or vocal comprehension are in an upper percentile?

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Re: You best hope they don't really stop any time soon

Proof, ot GTFO, you fearmongering fuckpopsicle.

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Bad movie: Hackers can raid networks with burnt Blu-Rays

Trevor_Pott
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Re: Simple this,

"Piece of software that should be buried alongside Atari 2600 ET carts!"

Ars Technica dug those up.

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Lenovo: We SWEAR we're done with bloatware, adware and scumware

Trevor_Pott
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Bullshit. Drivers can only be disseminated through windows update if they've gone through the amazingly long validation process. This typically means drivers that are ages behind...and Microsoft won't qualify all driver types to begin with.

Next, Lenovo can't submit drivers to Microsoft for validation: the manufacturers must do this. Do you think Ricoh have the money and resources to validate every driver release for their smart card reader? Do you honestly expect nVidia, AMD and Intel to slow their GPU driver releases to Microsoft speeds?

And how, exactly, do you download all those Windows updates without network or wifi drivers? Or are you saying that we should all be limited to network devices that ship with Windows? No upgraded units until the next version? And how, exactly, does the "next version" theory work with the new Windows release scheme?

And yes, the "extra keys" need software. The function keys and non-keyboard keys don't all work with Windows 8 or Windows 10.

Sorry, mate, but you haven't a clue what you're on about.

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If I'm being fair to Lenovo here, most of the Lenovo applications that are actually written by Lenovo are useful and even nessesary. Plus, they do have to load up third party drivers, etc. So what your Lenovo will probably look like is:

Windows 10

Intel/AMD/nVidia/etc software that comes with their drivers

Lenovo support tools to help Lenovo keep your drivers up to date, and allow them to remote your PC if you give them the code

Lenovo tool to make special keypresses (such as turn on/off keyboard backlight, tweak monitor brightness, etc) not only work, but show an icon on the screen when you push the button.

I will be following this up over time and seeing just what they mean by all of this.

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FCC says cities should be free to run decent ISPs. And Republicans can't stand it

Trevor_Pott
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How is it a "threat to the free market" or otherwise interfering with the free market if what is occurring is the removal of regulations that restricted how many different entities could compete? I simply don't understand.

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Intel, Apple and Cisco crossed off Chinese Gov's kit list

Trevor_Pott
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Re: One possibility we're not considering....

Why does China "snooping" on my network affect me? I don't do business in China. I don't plan to go to China. For the most part, I just don't care about China or it's antics at all.

But US/UK/Oz snooping does affect me. I go to these places. If they detect me believing the wrong thing, or supporting the wrong political party, or thinking things that are "antisocial" or "radical" this can affect my ability to travel and to do business.

I'm not fond of any country snooping on civilians, but if we have to choose who sees our dirty laundry, I'm going to pick the governments that won't be in a position to taser me to death. But hey, to each their own...

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Storage modernisation reality check

Trevor_Pott
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Re: Moving Target

Don't forget "it is believable that the company is trustworthy enough to stick to the given plan". Most companies just lie outright now*, so trust is hard to come by. If you need modern features, go with a startup that can supply them, and looks like there's a reasonable chance they'll still be around at the end of the refresh cycle. Don't sit around and wait for dinosaurs to notice the local space rock population, late alone care about it.

*There are no consequences for them to do this, so why not?

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Give us a week to GUT Superfish, begs Lenovo CTO

Trevor_Pott
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Re: I still dont get it.

Yeah, I gotta say you're full of shit. Lenovo basically has the lowest prices amongst the various tin shifters for everything. When you really get to comparing like for like, Lenovo have dropped the margins to damned near nothing...and they paid for it.

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FalconStor blows clouds into FreeStor software rewrite

Trevor_Pott
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Re: Son of IPStor?

From the lengthy briefing I got on the matter, that's not my impression at all. It looks like there was a great deal of R&D to go into this and that it is basically a new product.

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There's more than one way to back up your data

Trevor_Pott
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Re: MPIO?

Which is usually when you combine MPIO with other protocols. Like link aggregation. MPIO + LACP can mean "more speed", even with multiple switches...but that's LACP/LA that is providing the speed, not MPIO per se.

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Re: MPIO?

That's a fair enough statement...but why would you configure MPIO without multiple switches? The ability to support multiple paths through mutiple switches is pretty much the selling feature of MPIO...

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Nutanix to release 'community version' of its secret software sauce

Trevor_Pott
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That VMware marketing...I see you like it more than marketing from others. Carry on.

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How good a techie are you? Objective about yourself and your skills?

Trevor_Pott
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Re: Degree qualifications

"If raising awareness is helpful, demonstrating that there is real reason for hope is even more important."

...goddamn it.

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Re: Trevor, sign it. Because it's not just your skills that matter.

He's not particularly Anonymous. If he is who I think he is - and there's only one candidate given both the style of the prose and the details discussed - he's also 100x the everything I'll ever be. That particular AC is faster, stronger, smarter, better, in way better shape, with way better contacts, less ADD, a keener mind and an ability to learn things quicker than I'll ever have. Oh, and he's got dashing good looks to boot.

Oh, he had a rough spot there for a while. He had some dark times...but 12 years ago we started from the same point. He was always the better at everything, and he always manged to leverage his contacts to achieve his goals more completely.

It's easy to maintain confidence when you're a genius Superman with an innate knack for code, automation and politics alike.

I agree the mandarins run everything. If I've created a life for myself in writing, he's build one for himself in running the mandarins that run everything. And frankly, that's good and fine. I'd be glad to be counted amongst such fine professionals as would be like him, though I've no right to play remotely in the same ballpark, it would be an honour.

But who rules the roost? And what will they make of me? Are they the "elite" like our fellow Christian Berger? Filled with disdain for the diseconomied and believers in One True Path, whatever that path may be? Or are they believers in a careful and methodical consideration based on requirements and available resources?

I am a product as much of my writing now as my systems administration. I swim in a world of marketing and sales, of angry commenttards and vicious emails. If I don't buy into Docker, the public cloud, the NSA watching us all the time, Cisco, EMC, VMware, Microsoft, open source everything and $deity knows what else I'm a failure's failure and the hoards upon hoards will see to it that I am vanquished.

But somewhere, some part of me never changed. I grew, I evolved, my skills changed...but the me at the center didn't. I care about what's right. About helping others. About the truth. About the needs of the many, even when they have no resources and are just trying to compete in a hostile world filled with monsters that want to drive them out of business, depress their wages or replace them with robots.

I don't do "belief". This makes me a good choice for writing for The Register, because shit disturbing, asking pointed question and so forth is the actual job. But it's a really difficult thing when you are a systems administrator. Sysadmins who ask too many questions are kicked out. Sysadmins are supposed to be subservient; they are not to rock the boat.

Yet I look at the Sony debacle. What if they had had what I consider to be a real sysadmin? Someone who takes the ethics of truth and the needs of the many to heart, and never stops questioning, never stops pushing? Would Sony have been hacked if they had a hardass in charge who constantly pushed for improvement? For security? For "the right thing" over "the convenient thing"?

This is where our Superman AC and I diverged in chronology. I pushed and pushed and pushed and fought and clawed and bit and screamed for 8 years. I built wonders out of nothing. Spun gold from cobwebs and worked myself right up to my grave. He kept going.

After 8 years of expending my heart upon the battlefield I couldn't do it. I said "yes sir" and "thank you sir" and "as you wish sir" and just did what I was told. Occasionally, I mustered enough energy to fight back...but those periods became more and more infrequent, and they carried less passion each time.

Our Superman AC, however...he beat the system. He scored victory after victory, win after win. He managed to drive agreements and compromises and evolve networks beyond the need for him. It has caused me doubt for some time now.

Did I have the harder battle to fight, or is he just that much better at playing the game? I wonder frequently. And if I went back to dip my oar into systems administration again full time...could I do it with the passion I once had? With the steadfast zeal for maintaining my ethics?

How much of our successes was about believing in the cause of those we worked for? How much about ability, and courage and drive?

I'm good at fixing computers, damn it. Good enough to take on our Superman AC and win almost half the time, and he's the best I've ever seen...and I've met the tops of the tops from startups, the fortune 500 and a government. Despite a few grousing naysayers who want to troll me in the comments, I know my skillset. Like our Superman AC, if you handed me a ship like Sony I have the technical ability to not only right it, but to rebuild it better than it was before.

But would I be able to play the politics game? Would I be able to bob and weave and compromise and blackmail to get what needs to be done, done? Could i put in the hours, and the worry, the sweat and the tears? Or is that spent; and I am nothing more than some technical skills and the ability to make pretty words come together in a sometimes useful marriage?

To me, an Engineer isn't just someone who builds a bridge, it's someone who makes damned sure that the process of building that bridge will be as safe as possible and that the final result will stand the test of time and not cost lives. To me, a Doctor is someone someone who not just practices medicine, but puts the well being of others above all else. And a professional sysadmin should, in theory, have the same dedication to doing things as right as they know how...no matter how many or few resources they have left.

I guess that's what it really boils down to. A tired old soldier staring at his sword, wondering if he's got enough left for one last campaign. And hell, I'm only 32. This industry really can suck.

Anyways, that's enough rambling for now...

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Trevor_Pott
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Re: @Trevor: @Aspie ac

Stonehenge is a really neat example of human ingenuity. That said, I'm still far more awed by nature. It is amazing what plate tectonics can do, and I really like the part where some of our atmosphere freezes out periodically and falls to the ground.

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Trevor_Pott
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Re: @Trevor: @Aspie ac

You should! There is a rather stunning collection of large pointy rocks to the west of us that I feel are typically worth exploring.

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Re: @Aspie ac

'tis not my thread, sir. I'm just a commenttard here, no different from any of you. Cheers, and beers should we ever cross paths, eh?

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Re: Degree qualifications

"what makes you think that doing so will change who you are and the way you act?"

Confident, cocky, lazy, dead. I am self aware enough to know that I am as susceptible to this as anyone else. More, perhaps, thanks to the severe ADD. Thus why I think and wonder and worry. Non productive perhaps...but finding an immediate resolution to the problem was not really the point.

This is what is going on in my life. It's hard. It's insecure. It'd filled with questions and worries and pondering. And maybe by talking about it someone else will feel a little less alone. That's why I wrote it.

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Re: I have no idea what qualification Trevor is aiming for

Thanks for making my entire point in one comment...and for demonstrating why I have qualms about associating myself some people.

Maybe one day you'll serve your time in places of little-to-no budget and try to meet expectations of enterprise-class IT with budgets 1/15th the size. For 15 years I've actually managed to do so. And, quite frankly, I have better uptime than Amazon.

How would you do in the same circumstances? Would it be right to judge you as "not very good at IT" because you didn't manage to create budget from nothing? And how do your biases and your experiences slot in over it all?

But ah, that old chestnut rears its ugly head again: the propensity to extrapolate from one's own experience and narrow area of expertise and assume that it applies to everyone. Having served companies of all sizes, I know better...but my personal experience is that the overwhelming majority of IT practitioners don't.

So what is the gauge of a professional? That they simply refuse to work anywhere without a big enough budget? They they tell companies that can't reasonably afford Cisco + EMC + Oracle + Microsoft that they should go out of business because buying anything else is crap?

You're quite willing to wield the sword of judgement regarding competence in our industry, so please, do tell. And no mealy-mouthed weasel words about "a certain know how". Set some standards by which others (and yourself) should be judged. And then explain how you deal with the millions of businesses that will fall outside those standards?

Because that, right there, is the core of it all. For me. For our industry. For our society as we become ever more reliant on technology.

If I am "naive enough to follow a sales droid" - and I would like to introduce you to many a broken sales droid that I have wrecked with my aggressive questioning, as well as several CEOs, CTOs, project mangers, etc - then what the metric flouncing hell is an appropriate level of skepticism? I've earned a reputation amongst PRs for being someone that you absolutely must have the most technical people available on the call, and that is "naive enough to follow a sales droid"?

So I am not sure entirely what world you're aiming to create here. We're all supposed to be skeptical of sales droids to the point that you go beyond making CxOs of some of the world's most powerful companies crack and go off script. Yet at the same time, we are supposed to buy the "right" things, even if we can't afford them. Otherwise, we're bad at IT.

Of course, it could be that I'm misinterpreting your comment. I cannot deny the possibility. That said, I will retain my reservations and skepticism about your ability to objectively assess competence. Or, for that matter, just about anyone else's who doesn't work in the particular slice of a feild that the person they're judging works in.

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Re: Trevor, sign it. Because it's not just your skills that matter.

"Also, find a non-IT hobby to focus on occasionally"

I grow lemon trees from seed. Currently, I have 8 of them growing by my desk. Lee. Mon. Tree. LEMON TREE! I like them. They give me a happy.

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Re: Montreal?

Better than Calgary and their sportsball teams!

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Re: Unqualified

I haven't fully updated this: http://www.trevorpott.com/thelab/

Add in a Tintri T-850 that I am currently testing. It's on loan for a year. So that's my home network. Minus a few minor things like the WNDR3700 v2 (/w OpenWRT), dlink switches and some other odds and ends. There are some things I can ping that I can't physically locate so I can't quite tell you what they are...

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Re: Why?

To be clear, I loathe calculus. I don't give a bent damn what the integral of Cos(Sin(yomamma)) is, nor am I likely to. I grok what a derivative is. I grok what an integral is. I grok trig enough that a brief conversation with Google will bring it all back...but I don't want to memorize all this crap by rote.

I'm not fond of programming, but I do it when required. I've written entire middleware packages. (Originally in VB.net/ASP and then in PHP.) I don't mind PHP so much, but I loathe Java. I can cope with C family languages, but far prefer Python, Perl, etc. That said, I'd rather pay a dedicated coder than sit there and write a bunch of this crap.

Especially when we get talking about the kind of time it takes me to write assembler and bitbask ports in order to speak to sensors, displays, etc. Boring as a boring thing with a side order of "why the hell am I doing this?"

In over 15 years of "making computers go", I've never had to use calculus. Not once. I've written industrial sensor nets for strain gauges, built cellular/wifi backhaul dirigibles, 5000+ node render farms, and spend a lifetime rebuilding desktop hardware into servers that last 10+ years. Not once was the rote memorization of calculus useful. Not once.

Algebra? Hell yes. I use it a hundred times a day. More, even. What's more, it exactly the kind of maths that my brain loves. But fuck calculus. 1100100112.

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Re: Degree qualifications

"unless there is a bureaucrat somewhere in US Customs & Immigration charged with calling overseas schools and verifying degree status"

They're called "customs and border patrol". And they absolutely do check. Every single fucking one. EVERY. SINGLE. ONE. They have no faces, no souls, no compassion, no humanity. They are not people. They are the rigid, emotionless, paranoid application of the most conservative and proscriptive laws. They protect America from security threats and those who seek to exploit her economically for the gain of anyone who is not America. And they have a chip on their shoulder about Canadians eleventy squillion miles wide.

If you want to go to America to spend lots of money gambling in Vegas, no problem. But $deity fucking help you if you want to nip down to Seattle to have coffee with a friend. That's CLEARLY trying to have a business meeting within registering it with the border patrol's computers, and so what are you up to and why are you trying to hide it?

And regardless of anything, I'm in the system as being an IT contractor. Even when I go as a journalist to a conference I get grilled. Am I meeting a client? Do I know I am not allowed? If I lie to them then I will be barred from entry and that goes on my record! I won't get in for at least 5 years! Etc.

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Because border patrol are not rational, and what you need to cross the border is whatever they say it is. Questioning that will lead to you being "denied entry", which means you aren't getting back in for at least 5 years.

You obey. You never question. Or else. I have been warned. And I am sick of the dark room with the overly bright lights.

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Why does the NSA's boss care so much about backdoors when he can just steal all our encryption keys?

Trevor_Pott
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Re: What a scary (looking) man.

Yes, but the baron had newphews, and this one reminds me of Feyd-Rautha Harkonnen.

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Re: What a scary (looking) man.

I think he looks like a Harkonnen, personally.

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Superfish: Lenovo? More like Lolnono – until they get real on privacy

Trevor_Pott
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Outrage can strike a fatal blow. This is not one of those times. The incident simply isn't that critical, the people who understand the implications are few, the issue was dealt with quickly (Sept 2014 to January 2015 is the shipping time period). The issue was resolved before the general public found out, and Lenovo is still the low cost provider.

The outrage is already fading as we head through the weekend. By the next news cycle it will be gone, save for the most extreme elements of the fringe.

Where this will impact Lenovo is corporate sales. Yes, this issue was directed at the consumer sales, but the only people who understand it are nerds. Nerds who - in many cases - have a voice (or control of) corporate purchasing. These nerds will hold the security breach against Lenovo as an indication of ineptitude and/or bad faith, and that could weigh against them when competing against close competitors.

Could.

Lenovo can - should they chose to - mitigate the reputation damage. The long term process of rebuiliding trust is possible, because the trust that needs to be rebuilt is not amonst the hoi polloi, but amongst nerds. Nerds can (for the most part) be reasoned with. Show them real progress and you'll win them back.

But the general public will not hew towards a more a long term reputation issue here. They simply don't understand it. They know only enough to be outraged by something, but not really what. So they are venting. Beating their fists against the chest of the body corporate and when they're done, they'll slink back to wherever it is they came from. Someone else will do something stupid next week and off they go.

But those corporate sales, governed by now-cautious nerds? That needs to be addressed if Lenovo is to survive. And that means long term solutions, not heads on platters as a pointless salve for the embittered masses.

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At this point, I have to believe you are purposefully misreading or misrepresenting what I've said. I did not say reputation damage wasn't long term. I said outrage was. And that firing people in an attempt to stem outrage never works, and it doesn't help rebuilt the reputation damage either.

The solution to reputation damage issues is deep and sincere process changes, transparency and external auditing. Unfortunately, you can't seem to separate temporary outrage (I want my head on a platter, damn it!) from long term reputation damage. They absolutely are two different things.

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Re: Checked out Yoga 2

Being a Yoga 2 (not a 3) it could have sat in the channel for some time before you bought it. So it's possible that despite buying in October, the unit shipped in August, or even earlier.

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Re: Simple solution

Except for the part where I'm 4 for 4 on "laptops that dies just after the 1 year mark" with Lenovo. That's Acer levels of bad. So I'm looking elsewhere. I have a desktop/luggable that needs replacing and a disintegrated Lenovo X230 ultraportable that probably could still do the job (and has two years worth of warantee left), but which has a disintegrated plastic casing that Lenovo says is "normal wear and tear" and refuses to address.

So I could buy some plastic bits online one piece at a time for about $400, (wasting about two hours to find the bits) and then spend 4 hours replacing them myself, or I could find an ultraportable from a company that will ship me something serviceable.

The problem is, I can't seem to find an ultraportable that has both 16GB of RAM and a keybaord that is designed properly. Ctrl in the bottom left - FN/Ctrl are BIOS flippable on Thinkpads - and Delete in the top right. And that means both a delete and a backspace key. You hear me, apple?

So at the moment, I'm searching. In an ideal world the 16GB of RAM wouldn't drive the cost of the notebook up 5x the cost of buying SODIMMs and shoving them into a 4GB or 8GB model. Similarly, I'd love to have at least 240GB of SSD - preferably 480GB - without the vendor trying to charge me 3x the retail cost of an SSD to have it in there.

As soon as I find proper replacements for my ultraportable and my desktop/luggable, Lenovo is kicked to the curb. The hardware is falling apart and, despite my belief that they didn't have ill intentions regarding this Superfish thing...they handled it really poorly, and I see no signs that anyone other than their social media team has intentions of doing what needs to be done to repair trust.

So. Sony's out. (Fuck you, Sony!) Lenovo's out. Acer's HAHAHAHAHAHAHAHA out. That's really starting to narrow the feild...

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Trevor_Pott
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I don't think I missed that. I did mention that Lenovo's response was "loathsome". I know you want someone's head on a pike (god damn it, you're angry, and your emotions need to be validated!) but all of that only lasts a few months at best.

The long term lack of trust will outlive the demand for heads on platters, and that is what needs to be addressed. History has taught us that heads on platters don't actually do anything to salve the anger, nor do they address the long term requirement for rebuilding of trust.

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