* Posts by Trevor_Pott

5973 posts • joined 31 May 2010

It's all Uber! France ends its love affair with ride-sharing app

Trevor_Pott
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Re: Worried about their safety !!!!!

"licenses are payable to the government for £XX,XXXX.XX"

Not everyone uses a medallion system. In fact, globally, they're kind of rare. So no, in most jurisdictions it doesn't cost tens or hundreds of thousands to license a taxi. It costs you a commercial driver's license, commercial insurance and then you have to pay for inspections every X months at a licensed facility.

But hey, keep assuming that every single jurisdiction and every single economic influencer is the same everywhere. You'll go far that way.

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Trevor_Pott
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Re: It is all a bit of a mess @ Trevor

Hitchhiking is illegal because it presents a public danger. Too many idiots trying to hitch on crowded 110 kph motorways, city ring roads, or during rush hour in the middle of the city. It caused accidents which in turn caused a lot of loss of life.

In Alberta we aren't as strict as our neighbours in British Columbia. But Alberta is (mostly) prairie and BC is (mostly) mountains. The highways are 100 kph in most parts of BC and if some dumb twat is pulled over on some bend where there's no shoulder (or on on of the tunnels) then the semi that's 500m behind him just might not be able to stop in time and very well might slam into him. Killing the idiot pulled over and his intended passenger.

In Alberta we don't have as many blind spots, but we absolutely do have "near, at or beyond" capacity major highways. When I say highway understand that I am not talking about "oh, it's a jaunty 30 minutes from some bedroom community to London." I'm talking about "it's 4 hours from Edmonton to Calgary" or "it's 6 hours from Edmonton to Ft Mac." I know truckers and riggers (usually parents going home to see thier kids) that do the whole 13.5 hour haul from Ft Mac to Lethbridge in a day, stopping only in Edmonton and Calgary for gas and to take a piss. this isn't rare, this is our whole goddamned province.

In Alberta, half the drivers are half asleep. They're driving along these great big long stretches of road at 120kph in the slow lane and 140kph in the fast lane on hiways that are 110kph limit. With the exception of "provincial NIMBY day" every three months (which is announced in the papers ahead of time) the cops don't pull anyone over for speeding, they flick on their lights and barrel down the hiway at 160kph to get to the next donut shop.

If you pull over on the side of the road you are dead.

If you go the speed limit (or lower) in the slow lane you'll be run off the road.

If you go the speed limit (or lower) in the fast lane, you'll be run over.

if you have a car problem on the highway, you drive it into the ditch and call the tow truck. We've got nearly 100% cell coverage so you just don't take the risk. The ditches are gentle slope and that's where non-functional cars belong.

Saskatchewan is twice as bad again, because it's even farther between major settlements and it's longer and straighter and flatter.

The cities aren't much better. A family of four might have 5 cars and an RV. One for each adult and teenager, plus a "hauler" (old pickup or candy van) and the RV. Everyone drives everywhere. Edmonton is a city of about a million people with a metro area the same size as London. the city proper - which is about half the size of Greater London, geographically - is functionally bumper-to-bumper traffic at 40kph for 6 hours a day, and not bumper-to-bumper at 70kph the rest of the day.

You don't pull over on the side of the road without backing up traffic for kilometers, potentially getting a ticket and at least getting scalding hot coffee thrown at you by motorists pulling around you.

Now, if you want to pull in to a gas station or something and pick up folk there, nobody is going to hassle you. If you find a roadside turnout or a rest stop (the provinces build rest stops so that people who are so exhausted they are willing to admit they're too tired to drive can park and sleep in their car about every 100km or so) then hey, go ahead and pick up hitchhikers.

But the whole notion of "stick your thumb out on the side of the highway and catch a ride" really only applies on the lightly used rural highways or in the smaller, not crazy-busy-filled-with-angry-bees towns.

Suggestions like "why doesn't everyone just drive slower" are going to be met with derision and laughter. Our provinces are huge, and they are sparsely populated. Our cities are spectacularly low density. There is no such thing as "living without a vehicle" here unless you happen to be willing to confine yourself to one of the "major" cities for almost your whole life. Even then, expect to take at least 1hr to get anywhere, probably 2 or 3, depending on if your journey is all bus or if you can shave some off but taking the LRT.

People get impatient after 30 minutes. Try driving for 4, 6 or 13.5 hours where there is nothing to see. It's just farms and cows and farms and canola and farms and canola and some more cows. The mind wanders. You go loopy. Everyone drives faster than they should.

BC is prettier, but after a while all mountains look alike and the need to get to civilization just so you can pee takes over. Maybe you're a good and courteous driver. Maybe him and her and them all are. But they won't all be. They won't all be awake, or not needing to pee, or paying attention, or courteous or whatever.

So that's hitchhiking here. It's dangerous. Hell, driving period is dangerous. But we've designed our infrastructure and laws to mostly accept the realities of things rather than trying to force our massively diverse populations (a significant % of people in all three provinces weren't born in those provinces, etc) to come to heel.

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Trevor_Pott
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Re: It is all a bit of a mess

"It seems to me that Uber is basically a form of organised hitch-hiking "

Hitchhiking is illegal in many parts of the province in my province and both neighboring ones. So that still rules out Uber.

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Trevor_Pott
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Re: Worried about their safety !!!!!

Bingo. Same here in Edmonton. Local council sets "maximum" rates (to which all cab companies align) and those rates must be displayed. This comes in the form of a sticker on the window. Cabs are calibrated regularly, inspected regularly, and all the drivers must have a commercial license and insurance. I believe - but am not 100% sure - that criminal records checks are enforced for cabbies too.

There is no medallion system here. Cab companies can field as many cabs as they want, but there is a limit to what's practicable. Anyone can start a cab company, but you'll be ruthlessly driven out of the market or bought by one of the big three if you try. (Though that was "the big two" 15 years ago...so entering the market is in fact possible.)

All the Taxi companies here have apps. In fact, the biggest one, which has several sub-"brands", has one for each brand. (Not ideal, I know.) They're all made by the same developer. *sigh*

Uber and Lyft are easier to use in that you can sit there and stare at your mobile and tap your feet and wait for the cab to arrive. But in every other way the local council-regulated taxies are better, sfare and more predictable.

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Nutanix vs VMware blog war descends into 'he said, she said' farce

Trevor_Pott
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Re: It should be about ....

"understanding the workload and suggesting/doing some "real world" like tests is part of doing the job right"

Wrong. It should be part of doing the job "right", but IT isn't a profession. There is no professional association and anyone can practice IT without needing to be government by a body with an ethics board. Thus "right" becomes less about "should" and instead becomes "whatever pays the mortgage with the least amount of effort".

:(

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Trevor_Pott
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Re: It should be about ....

The issue with "acceptable performance" is that it's hard to qualify with synthetics. You need to dupe actual workloads and then replay a day's worth of real world work on them. Personally, I like replay at 1.5x speed in order to allow for growth calculations, but that takes a lot of time and research beforehand to fully understand the workloads before testing.

I test with synthetics, but I find them almost meaningless. I far prefer to take the workloads I've babied every single day for the past 11 years and run them on $infrastucture. I know those workloads inside and out and i know how they respond to different types of kit. I can get a better feel for "good enough" or not using those workloads than any of the synthetics I run.

But that's me, and that's my workloads. Someone else is going to have a different mix. I think it's important we get as many different testers testing their real world mixes as possible so that we have a deep pool of knowledge available.

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Trevor_Pott
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Mushroom

Re: Nothing to Lose

"Advertise my services"? To whom, precisely? Maxta? Maxta have me on speed dial. SimpliVIty? They know where to find me if they want me. Same for pretty much anyone else. I don't have to advertise. There aren't a lot of people writing technical content and there seems to be an unlimited demand for it.

If you think that my offering to settle the performance dispute for free is somehow "advertising" you're quite frankly insane. Do you have any idea - and idea at all - what it takes to do a full review on a hyperconverged solution? That's weeks of work, and VMware versus Nutanix is at least two units.

Maybe - maybe - I sell enough articles to make up my time, but not likely. And, to be entirely blunt about it, I could make a hell of a lot more money by basically rolling my face around on the keyboard and "writing what I know" instead of spending the time doing hard research.

Helping wingus and dingus grow up and stop cluttering everyone's twitter and news feeds doesn't really pay dividends except possibly as a portfolio item to say "here, look, I did this". But I have a Tintri review cooking, a SimpliVity one yet to write, I have a Scale versus Nodeweaver danceoff that's waiting and $diety knows what else. I have enough reviews that I could write until December and not need to look for more stuff to do.

That said, I want to see the end to this. Spy versus spy here is embarrassing, and it's clouding the issues. I end up taking a dozen calls a week now from people looking for the straight dirt on hyperconverged solutions, and half of them are trying to cut through the VMware versus Nutanix noise. Settling even one part of this loony tunes bullshit factory would earn me precious, precious hours of sleep.

As for the rest...

I don't know that Maxta have anything to lose by by open. You're probably correct in that Kiran and his lot are in a better position by being open than closed. But I can't agree with you on SimpliVity, or really, any of the others.

SimpliVity isn't the fastest of the lot. Full stop. They are the most consistent - that would be the accelerator card doing it's job - but they aren't the fastest. This is because Simplivity lays its blocks down on a RAID of magnetics and doesn't really cache to SSD quite as effectively as they should.

SimpliVity is absolutely open about this. They have no problems letting me - or anyone else - review the toys and publish the real world results. That buys them no real hoo-rah points except showing customers that they are honest and honourable. Which actually does count for a lot with some people.

Scale Computing? Scale doesn't even have flash! They certainly don't see benefit from letting me test their stuff. Yet Scale sent me some nodes, as well as to numerous other "thought leaders" and we've all had a right good go at them. We broadly agree on the pros and cons and so a picture of just what Scale is like from top to bottom has emerged.

That picture is not one that says Scale is the fastest, or the best priced, or the, well...best anything really. (Except possibly best support.) Scale has very specific tradeoffs and it seems rather a lot of companies are perfectly willing to accept those...and they're happy knowing right up front what the tradeoffs are.

On and on. Yottabyte, Nodeweaver, Tintri, Tegile, Nexenta, you name a storage company and - with a few childish exceptions - they're all open, helpful and friendly. Seems they understand that trust is hard to earn and easy to lose.

So here's an idea, mate: why don't you climb down off your high horse and learn a thing or two? The world is quite obviously far more complex than you imagine. Not to mention your terrible reading comprehension.

When you can conceive that people's motivations in the world extend beyond advertising and marketing and thwarting one's rivals maybe you'll be ready to play with adults. Maybe you'll even be person enough to use your real name, instead of lobbing accusations from behind the veil of an anonymous coward.

Until then, kindly get bent.

Thank you.

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Trevor_Pott
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Kiran: I totally agree. Maxta, Scale Computing and SimpliVity have been entirely open and helpful hyperconverged companies. You've all been upfront about things and, in my opinion, earned your customers' trust.

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Trevor_Pott
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What really chaps my ASCII about this is that the whole "just get things tested" has been brought up over and over and over and over. I have personally told Chuck Hollis and multiple people at Nutanix that I'm 100% ready and willing to do the testing for free if they'll just get the gear in front of me, and they'll relax their ridiculous "you can't publish your results" bullshit.

I've told both parties "hey guys, I'm willing to work with you to ensure that the configurations are identical, down to the firmware revisions of each component and each configuration". I've offered to work with both sides to ensure that testing regimens meet their standards and that they can see the results before I publish.

I have also told them that I will include both my own standard suite of "real world" tests - actual VMs replaying mixed workloads ranging from e-mail to database work to financials packages to VDI, all on one cluster - and I would even put the units in actual production environments for a few weeks to get a more "beyond the numbers" feel.

Beyond some initial talks that were a "well, maybe that could be a good idea, I suppose" both sides have largely gone dark on the topic of independent testing. But oh, the hatorade-fueled blog wars continue. It makes me ill. We - professionals of all stripes in this industry - should be better than this. We should be working to educated customers and better the experience for everyone. Not slinging FUD and muddying the waters.

So I'll say it again, Nutanix and VMware: put up or shut up. This childish back and forth has you both losing credibility by the day.

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Migrating from WS2003 to *nix in a month? It ain't happening, folks

Trevor_Pott
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Re: Thank you Trevor for injecting some reality into the debate.

*shrug* I still have 12 Server 2003 --> 2008 Migrations to do this week. No big. Company has the 2008 licences siting around, and from experience, I'm 100% positive I can do each server in abou t 45 minutes.

Build parallel VM, install apps, migrate settings, change name on old VM to $name_old, change name on new VM to $name. Reboot, let DNS sort things out over night and Bob's your uncle.

Lots of Windows --> Windows migrations are just that easy.

All the Windows --> Linux stuff is done for this round. I think I've topped 250 servers this year.

I've done maaaaaybe 100 2003 --> 2012 R2 and another 20 2003 --> 2008. Over the past 5 years most 2003 upgrades have gone to CentOS for me, but most of that has been web servers or NFV.

Only a handful on Win32 apps ever made it to Linux. Win32 apps will persist for decades, I think, dragging Windows along, zombie-like for ages.

That's going to be a real pain when MS decides to go Midori. :/

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Another day, ANOTHER Windows 10 build for us Insiders

Trevor_Pott
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"El Reg readers will know what an ISO file is, but the average member of the public will not."

Windows Insiders should.

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Wanna go all Gandalf – YOU SHALL NOT PASS – on Windows 10?

Trevor_Pott
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Re: another solution

Why would I use Windows Enterprise? It costs way more than Pro and requires a subscription. The subscription gets me nothing of any benefit and the total cost delta is insane. XP gave us 14 good years. 7 will give us 11 great years. In what universe is there value in buying Windows Enterprise?

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Trevor_Pott
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Re: It's a conspiracy

Trust is earned, and Microsoft have done absolutely nothing to earn it.

In addition, real Windows administrators with actual experience in the field will remember many an instance of Windows downloading and installing updates despite both GPOs and local settings telling the damned thing not to. This causes all sorts of havoc when it reboots with a program running that doesn't autosave what it's doing, as so many older programs are prone to.

But sure, we're all crazy conspiracy theorists.

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Looking forward to getting Windows 10 the day it ships? Yeah, about that...

Trevor_Pott
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Re: Be the first in your street to own Windows 10!

I betaed Windows 10 and all I got was an arrow to the knee.

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Trevor_Pott
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"Smaller footprint than its predecessors"

About time.

"faster start-up and shutdown"

Who cares? Everyone has SSDs, and we only reboot once a month when updates force us to.

"enhanced security:

Only if application developers take advantage of it. In the meantime, Microsoft is making us all give up privacy in order to get this possible security.

"allows you to run Universal apps"

This is not a positive thing.

"and brings you into the 21st Century."

Funny, I've many an operating system that is 21st Century-enabled. Why is this Microsoft's first?

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VMware, Microsoft in virtualised Exchange blog battle

Trevor_Pott
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Re: Shark jumped

" the .NET framework (which underpins much of Exchange nowadays) allocates memory and CPU threads ineffectively"

Which is a fucking joke. Especially considering the hardware that's available today.

"But hey, the software's architects, the support teams who troubleshoot this stuff day in and day out, and the guys who have deployed that system for multiple millions of users - they don't know what they're talking about. But some VMware guy - I guess he must be an _expert_."

Yeah, you know, "some VMware guy" very well might be the expert here. Microsoft and it's developers and systems administrators don't need to care about money, or efficiency. They don't pay for the software licenses and they don't seem to give a bent damn about making the most use out of the hardware or datacenter space.

Put simply: Microsoft's priorities are clearly not the same priorities as actual businesses. So yes, I don't believe Microsoft are the experts here.

Here's an idea: cut Microsoft in half. Azure Public Cloud to be it's own thing, and "them who sell software" to be another. Now let's give it a year and see what the Azure teams have to say about the software after they start having to pay for it, and they start having to sustain and grow only on the backs of their own profits.

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Trevor_Pott
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Re: Shark jumped

"When having "only" 24 processors and 96 Gb of RAM is an "itsy bitsy"

Expanding from www.theregister.co.uk/2015/03/27/supermicro_twin_server_review/

I can cram 18 cores per socket by two sockets by two threads for a total of 72 threads with 1TB per node. That's all in 1U, or 2 in 2U, 4 in 4U, etc. (I haven't seen any of the 1/2U units do 1TB RAM quite yet.)

24 threads and 96GB of RAM is a joke. A joke. Especially with NVMe SSDs out and I/O able to meet pretty much any demand you can throw at it.

I'm not enough of an exchange admin to weigh in on the VMware versus Microsoft view here, but I will say that on this one thing - limiting exchange to such low core/RAM counts - Microsoft doesn't serve it's customers well. Even cheap-o Supermicro systems can spank those specs today, so there wasn't a heck of a lot of future proofing built in to Exchange 2013.

Which may be what Microsoft wanted. Who knows?

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With Hobbit and LoTR in the can, Trolls no longer welcome in New Zealand

Trevor_Pott
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Hitler disliked the clergy, not the religion. He sought to reduce the influence of organised religions on society so that he could increase the power of the state. Things get muddled beyond that.

There are plenty of historical revisionists who try to paint Hitler as rabidly anti-christian, but precious little proof. They take his desire to see the christian influence on state matters broken as some sort of evidence that he was planning a purge. But Hitler was above all pragmatic. He didn't seem to care overmuch what people believed so long as they obeyed.

More interestingly, Hitler made constant references to "the almighty" and "the creator". So much so that a great many scholars feel that they went beyond mere pandering to the masses and that he, himself actually believed in a deity. This is typically believed to be the god of Abraham as his mother was Christian and he never seemed to talk about deities plural, only singular.

As for the rest, why people kill absolutely matters. It's what allows us to learn from the atrocities and prevent them in the future. There were no major killings in the past 125 years that can be attributed to killings in the name of atheism. Atheists do not kill others in order to eliminate religious beliefs.

But oh, the hundreds of millions that have been killed in the past 125 years in the name of religion, ethnic hatred or other forms of bigotry and intolerance! Funny how you'd have everyone simply ignore that so you can preach your own bigotry and intolerance.

And yes, atheists are soulless. So are you, by the way. Because souls don't exist. Being soulless, however, is not cognate with being immoral. This can be proven quite simply: there is no god (or gods) so all morality is godless. Whether you are taught your morality through the institution of a church or you come to your morality through some other means, no deity has any part in it because deities do not exist. Cut and dried.

The result of that, of course, is that we must accept that some people are pretty horrible, regardless of their upbringing. Atheist, christian, buddhist, shinto, worshiper of the almighty Kermit the Frog, it doesn't matter. Some people are genetically beyond redemption. Others are genetically on the fence and environmentally sent down the wrong path, and some are perfectly normal then broken by events and ultimately end up beyond hope.

So are there atheists who have done bad things? Sure! But they tend to do those bad things in the name of power or politics. Without a deity to hide behind the part where they're fucking loony tunes and evil as a bag of rancid wiener juice is pretty obvious from the beginning.

But theists are another story. For thousands of years they have bamboozled empire after empire into giving them special dispensation. They swindle and hoodwink billions into belief in something that doesn't exist. Hell, they can't even agree amongst themselves what does and doesn't exist. It's all lies upon bullshit upon scams from top to bottom.

So when one emerges from amidst the theocratic cesspool of irrationality and starts agitating for extra special layers of hatred and bigotry it's pretty hard to separate them from the rest, at least initially. And once you know for sure that you've got bona-fide fucksticks running about, they hide behind the "religious tolerance" laws and cause untold pain and suffering without anyone who is allowed to stop them.

Sometimes it's just harassment and bigoted trolling like Westboro Baptist Church. More often it's really fucked up beyond all accounting shit like Scientology. But every now and again you get an Inquisition or Crusade or Jihad. Then you have Chechnya or Sudan or the entire middle east forever and ever amen.

Religion is nothing but bigotry and hatred protected by law. It's about having everyone obey an unelected set of leaders who tell everyone what to think, believe and do and socially excluding, shunning, excommunicating or even killing those who refuse to bend their will to the crazy trying to use figments of everyone's imagination to obtain power over the masses.

There are lots of shitty reasons people to shitty things to eachother. Almost all of them are about someone's desire for power over others, and the milled masses being too afraid to say "no". But it is damned rare that someone kills is the name of atheism while killing in the name of theism happens all day, every single fucking day.

Religion is a problem. Perhaps the biggest problem humanity has ever faced. We need to grow out of this infancy, and quickly.

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Trevor_Pott
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Hitler was a Christian. To my knowledge none of those individuals killed people for being religious. Oh, they committed terrible crimes, but not in the name of "atheism".

The crimes that have been committed in the name of theism, however, are insane. And that's just in the bast year or so. If you want to tally one notch against the other for the past 125 some odd years, I think you'll struggle to find a handful of notches for the "killed in the name of atheism" stick and you'll run out of sticks upon which to notch the "killed in the name of theism".

Next to theism racial/ethnic intolerance is probably the biggest single reason for humans to murder eachoether. After that would be economic strife.

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‘Clandestines' prompt British border blockade in France

Trevor_Pott
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Re: @Destroy All Monsters

It's also worth pointing out that the French resistance refined the concept of a resistance movement into a fine science. Their concept of breaking into individual cells, where no one member can reveal more than one other cell worked well. They took what others had done, tweaked it and reworked it and came out with a resistance movement that was highly effective and crucial to winning the war.

Perhaps more to the point, French civilians - including women, who were not considered combat-ready individuals during WWII - fought and died in the resistance. The French government surrendered to save it's people, but the French people fought for their homes and and repeatedly risked everything to help all of Europe.

Add in groups like the Maquis and I think you'll find the French weren't faint of heart during the war.

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The blessing and the curse of Big Data

Trevor_Pott
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Re: "Data" versus "Big Data"

I accept that to you, personally the narrow definition you've espoused is what you, personally consider Big Data. That said, there are thousands of fairly influential people in our industry who disagree with you.

You are essentially arguing semantics about a marketing term that was long ago coopted. It's like trying to say "cloud" means "X and exactly X". That's bunkum. Cloud - like Big Data, Software Defined Storage or any number of other marketing terms - means essentially nothing. Like it or not, "Big Data" has become a catch all term that encompasses everything from analytic to automation to novel data mining.

I recognize that you have an emotional attachment to a specific definition of Big Data which has, as you put it, "captured your imagination". But I must humbly submit that what you are talking about isn't Big Data. It is data science.

Data science is a discipline related to but not limited to some aspects of Big Data. Similarly, not all things which fall under the moniker Big Data are relevant to data science. The buzzwords have evolved. The marketing people took over Big Data ages ago.

And no, you can't fight it. You can't be a definition hipster. You can't single handedly change what everyone is going to mean when they use a term. The tide of marketing in tech is simply too powerful. It will defeat your preferred definition of Big Data as surely as it defeated me with cloud.

So use a new term. Until that one gets coopted. Then choose a new term. And another. And another, and another, and another.

Welcome to the terminology rat race. Life sucks and then some fish eat you.

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Trevor_Pott
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"Data" versus "Big Data"

The difference between "data" and "Big Data" is not cut and dried. Most agree it's a matter of scale, but where the line begins and ends varies wildly. This is, I think, a key point.

What seems like merely "data" to one organization that is good at systems integration can seem like "Big Data" to another. And a Big Data dataset, once tamed and understood and become "data" within a single refresh cycle. (Especially if you can bring GPUs and NVMe SSDs to bear on the problem!)

The issues that plague Big Data are identical to the issues that plague traditional systems integration and "data": you need to know what you want from your data before you go forth and create systems to achieve it. Merely collecting all data points under the sun is worthless. You need a goal in mind. You do not simply store bits and bytes on hadoop and *poof*, your company is magically saving money.

Information captured without purpose provides no benefit. Regardless of the size or scale of the data in question, and the purpose of that data is just as often automation as analytics. Indeed, anyone who thinks Big Data stops at providing the raw resource for human-readable analytics has failed to learn from history! Once we've managed to turn large quantities of unstructured data into something a human can understand from an anayltics standpoint we can then start acting on that information in an automated fashion.

Big Data inevitably becomes "just data". No matter the size of the dataset, it inevitably drives automation.

Now, I'm happy to argue the point with anyone willing to put forth an exacting definition of the difference between "data" and "Big Data" that doesn't rely on the underlying technologies used. (Just because you use Hadoop doesn't mean it's Big Data, etc.) And that definition should be one you're willing to put your real names to, and one most practitioners in the field would get behind. Oh, and make the definition one that will forever separate Big Data from data...even as the march of technology moves on and terabyte or even petabyte datasets become commonplace and easy to plow through.

Lacking such a concrete definition I'm going back to my original one: the difference between "data" and "Big Data" is in the eye of the beholder, and the questions about how to use both categories of data to benefit a business are usually the same.

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The Great Windows Server 2003 migration: Where do we go from here?

Trevor_Pott
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You are going to let your companies run without security updates for a year? Good luck!

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Ditching political Elop makes for a more Nadella Microsoft

Trevor_Pott
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Re: Interesting article Trevor

I don't personally believe the mobile division will be annihilated entirely, but it will be restructured and made to come to heel.

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Who wants a classic ThinkPad with whizzy new hardware? Lenovo would just love to know

Trevor_Pott
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Re: I'm gonna get flamed for this...

"Regarding tweeking the thinkpad ... no. Not unless they sorted out that FN+CTRL mess. There was an unofficial BIOS for the thinkpad to swap them, "

This is an OFFICIAL feature of all modern Thinkpad BIOSes for several years now.

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Trevor_Pott
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Re: @Gritzwally Philbin, re Thinkpads.

Ah the nipple mouse. I always disable the trackpad on my Thinkpads. Nipple mouse is the only way to go.

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Trevor_Pott
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"Since you are all so keen on the ThinkPad, what is the biggest appeal?"

Standard layout keyboards. Sometimes they swap the Ctrl and FN keys (bastards!) but they put an option in the BIOS to swap them.

Understand me here: standard layout keyboards. All the buttons. Delete and backspace. Page up, Page down and so forth! No goddamned "macro" keys on the left side. No stupid "clever" rearrangements of things that make going from your M.C. Escher notebood of fuckwittery to a real desktop a mental gear change that requires hours of retwigging your muscle memory.

Standard. Layout. Keyboards.

Also: the part where I can get both an extended life battery AND a battery that clamps on the bottom and uses the expansion port is fucking amazing. I have a 13" notebook that is perfectly portable, weight-wise, and gives me 22 hours of compute off battery.

Oh, and the power plugs are a decent size, and they are properly soldered to the keyboard so that they take abuse. The notebooks aren't designed to disintegrate in 1 year.

If Lenovo would make the things out of something other than horrifically shittastic plastic that shatters at the slightest provocation, they'd be perfect.

An Aluminimum Thinkpad would be amazing. World-endingly, the-end-is-night class holy WTF amazing.

But yeah, thems the reasons.

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Trevor_Pott
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Re: ThinkLight

I use the Thinkpad light to read papers in the dark and the lit up keyboard on my Thinkpad to see the keys in the dark. Proper Thinkpads have both. HURRAY!

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Hi-res audio folk to introduce new rules and weed out impure noises

Trevor_Pott
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Re: Monty....

"Its like owning a mechanical watch. Sure I have a phone that syncs to a time source so its accurate enough, but to think about what it takes to design and build a watch with 500 moving parts and fits on your wrist? Now that's a combination of art and function that I can appreciate.

Is there something wrong in striving to do the best you can do or have we become a society of where 'good enough' is the best we can do?"

The best timekeeping device would be the digital one that regularly synchronizes to the NTP pool, possibly with a backup to plug time from GPS signals. The mechanical timekeeping device, while nostalgic, is not better in any way.

You are confusing "better" with "requires more effort". Very protestant of you.

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Beyond the Grave: US Navy pays peanuts for Windows XP support

Trevor_Pott
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Re: "in the context of"

Get an XP boxed retail license off ebay.

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WikiLeaks spaffs files showing NSA spied on French presidents

Trevor_Pott
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Re: I'd be more suprised if they DIDN'T spy on us

"and didn't expect anyone to care"

Rightly so. What business does anyone have knowing whom he sleeps with? That's between him and the people he sleeps with.

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It begins: Time Warner Cable first ISP accused of breaking America's net neutrality rules

Trevor_Pott
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Re: I SWEAR, some of you guys just don't GET this!!!!

" His company (Commercial Network Services) has a service which customers of TWC want to access."

Really? Because that's not what I get. My understanding is that very, very few customers of TWC want to access CNS and that CNS is mostly looking for free transit between the IXes, and possibly to a tiny handful of customers for the camera thing. If I'm wrong, please, do link me to the where. It's one of those issues that totally could go either way, it really depends on the details.

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Trevor_Pott
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Re: Yes

"Net Neutrality was all about getting a free ride."

No, jackass, Net Neutrality is about not being allowed to discriminate based on source or destination, only by content type or by capacity.

Let's use a practical example:

It is okay for an ISP to prioritize VoIP traffic so long as they prioritize all VoIP traffic. As a general rule we can all agree that VoIP has realtime requirements, and it even carries with it safety and security concerns in that it is a means to dial 911.

It is emphatically not okay for a company to prioritize only it's own VoIP traffic or - even worse - to degrade traffic from VoIP offerings other than it's own.

QoS is okay - even necessary, in the real world - but it must be neutral. Providers don't get to prioritize their services just because they own the pipes.

Another example: a provider could exempt a class of traffic from bandwidth metering, so long as they exempt all traffic in that class, not merely the traffic that they provide themselves. For a practical example: an ISP could exempt all video traffic from metering, but they could not exempt only their own video offering and yet have Netflix or Youtube count against bandwidth consumption.

That's not about a "free ride" in any way shape or form. That's about preventing monopolies and duopolies from leveraging dominance in one area (bandwidth provisioning or "being a dumb pipe") in order to gain dominance in another (voice or video provisioning, as two examples.)

Now, there are certainly people who will push for extreme forms of Net Neutrality, were even neutral QoS is not allowed. They're idiots. They're also a fairly minor fringe faction.

Net Neutrality is about ensuring that everyone has equal access to providers of content. Nobody gets to play favourites. If an ISP wants to offer over the top services they have to compete fairly for customers, they can't leverage pipe ownership. It isn't about free anything.

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Trevor_Pott
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Re: "Peer"?

"I can't imagine YouTube's upstream bandwidth requirement being within an order of magnitude of the downstream..."

Now, but every ISP on Earth's subscribers want access to Youtube. Explain to me what about the camera stream/HFT supplier's network appeals to any but a tiny, tiny subset of any ISP's subscribers?

Peering doesn't have to be about equal amounts of traffic in either direction, it can simply be that it makes rational business sense to freely interconnect due to subscriber demand. I don't see how there is massive subscriber demand for the complainant's services, or that the complainant is offering anything that puts them on remotely equal footing. They seem - at least at first glance - to just want cheap bandwidth for lashing together equipment they have at different IXes.

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Trevor_Pott
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Re: And this is why we cannot have nice things!

I don't understand what's "not having nice things" here. This doesn't sound like the complainant wants to actually "peer", it sounds like they want cheap low latency bandwidth without paying for it. Peering is separate from transit. Peering requires both networks have something the other wants.

Two ISPs peer because those two ISPs have subscribers that want to talk to eachother. An ISP might peer with Netflix because all of the customers of that ISP want access to Netflix. In this case, as described by the author, it sounds like a company that strings up stuff for the likes of high frequency traders wants really high speed, low latency access between major internet exchange points without having to pay for it...and without there being anything on the HFT networks that the ISP in question might actually care about.

I.E. There simply is not rational reason to "peer" here, as oppsoed to simply charging for a dark fibre strand. How is that preventing us from having nice things?

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Flushed with success: No bog standard Canadian goldfish these

Trevor_Pott
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Re: And how many people realise goldfish can easily live to 20+ years if looked after?

A 50gal and a 200gal. They do just fine in both. There's nothing in either tank that really gets the red tail's Irish up. The 50 gal has an angelfish, a bristlenose, a cloud of raspies and a whole mess of cories. The 200 gal has the red tail, a bunch of bristlenose and an unlimited pile of cories. (I like catfish. They're cute.)

The sharks just shark around. For the one in the big tank there's literally nothing that bothers her. Everything's albino except her and a couple of cories she probably never sees. (Though she will chase away anything that tries to park in her jar.)

In the small tank, the shark periodically chases a cory or tries to mess with the pleco, but the pleco is 1.5x her size and the cories are 5x as fast as her. So other than occasionally trolling something she can't bully for more than a few seconds she spends her time shooing cories from her jar and helicoptering upside down being a shark.

Right at the moment, she's busy chasing a massive bronze cory that's about 0.75x her size who has decided to turn around and chase her right back. None of them seem overly stressed by the arrangement.

Now, I have been toying with the idea of putting another jar in the downstairs tank and putting both sharks in one tank for a while. It would take some monitoring. 200 gal might be enough, but they're territorial. If it works, however, then I can get another shark for upstairs. Carpmouth! Nam nam nam nam nam nam nam...

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Trevor_Pott
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Re: And how many people realise goldfish can easily live to 20+ years if looked after?

"Only those who realise that a goldfish needs a LOT of space"

Hence why I don't have goldfish in my tanks. They take up WAY too many fish-inches. For my carp fixation, I keep a red-tailed shark in each tank. Watch that carpmouth go!

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Trevor_Pott
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Where's walleye?

Good question. Used to be I could pull walleye out of almost any lake in Alberta that was legal limit in size with about 1/2 hr, a fishing rod and a canoe. Now they're almost impossible to find, and when they are found they're far under limit. But damn, they were good eating.

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Trevor_Pott
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Re: The problem is...

"9/10 times they have a swim bladder issue and can be "resurrected" by simply cleaning the tank out for a change and treating it."

Actually, swim bladder issues can creep up in perfectly clean tanks. Goldfish are just inbred mutants that fall over at the slightest provocation. Also: they have a tendency towards constipation that can cause the same issues. 95% of the time you can solve "floaty goldfiish" by feeding the thing a few shelled, boiled peas.

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Trevor_Pott
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Re: I thought they have Herons in Alberta

Alberta has more waterfoul than just about any place on earth. That's why it's scary these things are being found in the wild. The rate at which they are breeding must be pretty exceptional, since carp are favoured delicacies for many of the honking winged atrocities that darken our skies.

It's also not just Alberta. There's a lot of lakes on the island that have this problem too, including the one I eventually want to retire to. :(

Whatever happened to lakes full of perch and walleye? Ah, for the halcyon days of yore...

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SPICEWORKS FAIL: Are we ready for ‘social’ network administration?

Trevor_Pott
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After the news article went up and the original thread filled with a few other upset folks, yes. The real issue, however, is that this wasn't broadcast immediately via e-mail. Lastpass suffers a breach and I know about it via e-mail before it's made known to the press.

In the case of the Spiceworks breach, I was informed, then went to bed, woke up, had breakfast, coffee and then wrote the article. And there still was no e-mail from Spiceworks by this point!

I did not jump down Spiceworks' throat on this immediately. I'm sure my editors would have preferred it, but I had been up for 32 consecutive hours and couldn't write a thing without at least 8 hours sleep.

Spiceworks had been given time to do the right thing and to come up with a proper response. They failed. Miserably.

That Spiceworks chose to be a little more transparent after the issue was published and then broadcast over every social media channel available is closing the barn door after the horse frelled off, nothing more.

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Trevor_Pott
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Re: If it's not on your network ...

"Where do you store your money, under your pillow?"

RAIDed across multiple banks as tax free savings accounts and RRSPs as well as precious metals in safe deposit boxes so that no one bank failure can take out my retirement. Doesn't everyone?

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Version 0.1 super-stars built the universe – and they lived all the way over there, boffins point

Trevor_Pott
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Re: God is bigger than the Bible

"just pointing out the obvious - that humans have always found God in the Unknown."

It's called "god of the gaps".

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Vapourware no more: Let's Encrypt announces first cert dates

Trevor_Pott
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"so far no-one seems to have solved the underlying trust issue"

I thought some of the new blockchain-based technologies were the best we had on solving the trust issue.

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Hacked US OPM boss: We'll fix our IT security – just give us $21 million

Trevor_Pott
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Re: " they would require a far bigger effort and systems in a really miserable state"

"Too old to be secured ? What kind of cop-out is that ? You can always add a firewall in front of it, no ?"

Yeah, but you can't add two factor authentication or various other features. "Secured" may have a meaning here based in legislation or regulation that means something different to you and I.

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How swearing at your coworker via WhatsApp could cost you $68,000

Trevor_Pott
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Re: Freedom of Speech....

"So you are going to send profanities to someone for the sake of it?"

Fuck all y'all.

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News website deserves a slap for its hate-filled commentards, say 'ooman rights beaks

Trevor_Pott
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"sometimes comments here can get a bit feisty but nowhere near the level implied by the article"

Yo mama's data is so unstructured CERN can't write visualizations for it!

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Deutsche Telekom, Huawei: Let's rain on Amazon’s euro cloud together

Trevor_Pott
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Re: What choice in network kit?

We have evidence for the NSA backdoors in Cisco Kit. Meanwhile, GCHQ has cleared Huawei as backdoor free.

I'm buying Huawei.

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Cortana threatens to blow away ESC key

Trevor_Pott
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In Lenovo systems this is somethign you can change in the BIOS.

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Trevor_Pott
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nope.gif

Cortana, please send all my searches to the US of NSA to be datamined.

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