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* Posts by Trevor_Pott

4245 posts • joined 31 May 2010

Snowden defends mega spy blab: 'Public affairs have to be known by the public'

Trevor_Pott
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"Of course he does, once he has served his jail term for treason etc"

He's not the one that should be in jail for treason. start with Bush the lesser, Obama, Alexander, Clapper and work your way down.

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Surprise! NSA's first ever 'transparency' 'report' is anything but

Trevor_Pott
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Re: Aren't you guys forgetting something ?

"It's National Security, man. They don't need a warrant"

Got the problem in one.

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Trevor_Pott
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Re: The Question Is

If the legal authorities for my jurisdiction came to fetch me, I would go with them peaceably...or at worst, I would sit on the floor and make the bastards carry my fat ass everywhere they wanted me to be.

If authorities from another jurisdiction attempt to remove me by force against my will, I will fight them to the bitter end. I can't understand why that would be different for anyone else?

My local plod have the right to detain or arrest me, and to force me to comply with the use of force. They absolutely will use such force, if they deem it necessary. (They usually do.) If I am murdered by a local police officer for "resisting arrest", it won't even make the paper. It's just business as usual. If I want to change the system, the only real chance I have is to take those police to court for harassment and brutality.

If, however, $nation sends a spook after me, two things are going to occur. A) I will be made dead, and there is zero possibility of not being made dead. B) If the fact of someone who is not an authorized local plod murdering me gets out, then there is a chance - however slim - that my country will investigate my murder and relations with the offending nation in question.

That, to me, says that "if someone who does not identify themselves as a legitimate legal authority for your current jurisdiction attempts to harm or abduct you, then you fight back with everything you have. Make damned sure that video and audio of the incident are being streamed to as many different servers in as many different nations as is possible, from as many devices as possible. Ensure that you specify in your will how to access those recordings...or better yet, set up a spook canary that will automatically release the info upon your death."

Paranoid? Sure. And unless you record everything 24/7, the evil spook boogeyman that comes to get you will probably off you before you even know they're there. That doesn't stop me from setting the damned thing up...if only because it's the only thing that I - as a prole - can do. If the social stigma for my minor act of defiance is to labelled a tinfoil hatter...so be it.

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Trevor_Pott
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Re: Can't wait

You get free speech. In case you missed it, your government rescinded it. Even talking about a "right" to free speech makes you a terrorist. Now turn yourself in, prole.

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Web moguls ask YOU to stump up big money to STOP big money from winning in Washington

Trevor_Pott
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Re: If you could buy elections Ross Perot would have won

Why the downvotes? Because billions of dollars every campaign cycle goes into hiring the best minds on earth that are versed in the most up-to-date research regarding group psychology and metasociodynamics. Hundreds of billions is spent each year by advertising companies on the same minds, and on research into the fields in question.

If you believe "people won't vote for individuals whose message they don't like" then you're an uninformed rube. Yes, they goddamned well will. We know enough about manipulating individuals and groups that we absolutely can make that happen. In addition, it has been proven empirically that knowledge of these tactics doesn't reduce their effectiveness.

What's more, you are entirely expecting that the people running for office are going to tell the truth. There's nothing to force them to. So they can all send a different, targeted message at each group. On balance, those with the most money (and who hire the best brains in the relevant disciplines) will win.

Getting people to vote for you has fuck all to do with laying out an honest platform and then sticking to it if you are elected. It has everything to do with lies, damned lies and statistics. And...the bigger the group size, the more effective these tactics are.

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Google mulls splashing MEEELLIONS on laying fat pipe in watery depths

Trevor_Pott
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So then Google writes a bigger cheque and gets C&W to lay more fibre. Simples. That's sort of what the Google does.

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Fearful of the drone-filled skies? Get some protection

Trevor_Pott
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Re: Fe Fi Fo FUD, I smell the snake oil

I should also point out that my government absolutely has been thinking about this, and does give fucks about privacy.

Where UAVs are used for commercial aims, their use would be covered by the Personal Information Protection Electronic Documents Act (PIPEDA), and subject to the same requirements as with any other data collection practice. It is a common misconception that a company does not require permission to take an individual’s photograph in a public place.87 The privacy protections in PIPEDA are there to ensure that people know when their image is being captured for commercial reasons – whether by photograph or video - and what it will be used for. PIPEDA requires consent as a general rule, subject to only limited and specific exceptions. Collection and use of personal information can only be for purposes that a reasonable person would consider appropriate in the circumstances and there should be a consideration for employing a less privacy-invasive means of obtaining the information.

If cameras on drones are governed by the same rules as surveillance cameras under PIPEDA, then flying your drone over my property in order to surveil me in my own yard absolutely is an invasion of my privacy. Just as I would be well within my rights to remove a surveillance camera discovered on my property (and surrender it to the legal authorities of my jurisdiction, should I be asked to return it), so to would I be within my rights to remove a flying camera that was surveilling me on my own property.

Now, you want to sit outside my property and point a camera at me? Then I am entirely within my rights to whip out some triangulation gear, track down who is controlling that drone and sue you for invasion of privacy. And I will win. Just like you cannot place a surveillance camera on your own building and point it at my back yard or bedroom, you cannot hover a drone just outside the property line and surveil me.

Your drone just flying by and accidentally waves onto my property as it's doing wide area shots or taking pictures of crowds? That's not an invasion of privacy and I likely have no legal recourse to seize the drone, though I do have a potential case for trespassing, if I can track down who is flying it.

Also of note: you can't go taking pictures of those crowds unless you post notice that you are going to. That's part of privacy law here. Even if you have a surveillance camera on your own property, you need to post notices.

Thus, if you have a drone looking at me for any reason, in any place and have not posted adequate notice such that I may find out who it is that is operating that drone, you are in violation of the law. At least if you use the drone for anything even remotely commercial. Recreational use is a lot more iffy...but I'd be entirely pleased to be the first bloke to take that one to the Supreme court.

Short version: you don't get to point a camera at me, even in a public place, unless you post a warning about it. You don't get to point a camera onto my property without asking, and if you place a camera on my property you're violating criminal - not just civil - law, and I have the right to remove (but not destroy) the camera, and to only surrender it to the authorities.

So no, I don't get to shoot your drone down. But cross my property line with it, I do get to net the damned thing and only give it back when the cops are at your side. At which point you will have told me who you are, and I will press charges.

Thanks,

--A citizen with a reasonable expectation of privacy in his own home and behind his own fence.

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Trevor_Pott
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Re: Fe Fi Fo FUD, I smell the snake oil

Hover your multirotor over my private property and take pictures of me and mine and I promise you sir, you won't be getting back. If you choose to then come onto my property uninvited and demand it back without a warrant then expect that I will treat you as a hostile trespasser on my property.

Inside the bounds of my own fence, and inside my own home I absolutely have a reasonable expectation of privacy, one I will defend against all comers to the very last of my ability.

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Warrantless snooping on American man was LEGAL in terrorism case, rules US judge

Trevor_Pott
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Re: Only a lawyer

What are you on about? Hitler wasn't a terrorist, at least not by modern definitions in which "terrorist" = "non-government entity that uses terror to achieve it's aims". Hitler was the duly elected leader of his nation. He did not seize power through a coup. He did not run his nation with a junta. He was democratically elected to office.

It's really important you understand that. The Nazis did not come out of nowhere and were suddenly in power. There was over a decade of bubbling, roiling, downright toxic social strife in Germany during which the Nazis went from fractional percentage of votes to running the place. This strife included clashes in the streets by the supporters of different political parties, with deaths during riots occurring on all sides.

Germany was a shambles and the Nazi party build a massive grassroots support system, which Hitler used to come to power. Once in power, he consolidated that power.

Hitler was a monster, and he utilized terror to achieve his aims, but he was the legitimate leader of a nation-state exercising power he obtained through the democratic process. It doesn't make what he did right, but if you want to include Hitler amongst "terrorists" then you have to open the door to the ruling administrations of all nation-states.

The Nazi rise to power's closest modern-day western equivalent is the Tea Party. Massively funded, relying on propaganda to drive a grassroots movement based on lies, xenophobia and fear of losing one's job. The difference is that enough people supported the Nazis to hand them the country. The Tea Party never made it that far.

Now, did Hitler's Nazi Germany use terror to achieve it's aims? Absolutely. But if we are going to include the legitimate governing body of a nation-state in the definition of terrorism then I demand that you include the United States of America. There are at least 10 different administrations that have used terror to achieve their aims, not the least of which were Truman, Nixon, Bush the lesser and Obama.

Your moral absolutism doesn't work when your chosen pillars of morality are also guilty of using the tools of terror.

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Trevor_Pott
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Re: Only a lawyer

You miss the point entirely. Whether the cause is just or not, the individual still deserves rights.

That said, this conversation is over because you have quite adequately demonstrated that your rationale for justifying the abject removal of rights is that you are prejudiced against Muslims. There's zero point in continuing past that point, because racists can't be reasoned with.

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Trevor_Pott
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Re: Now THAT is what surveillance is for

You can't enforce the law by breaking the law.

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Trevor_Pott
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Re: Only a lawyer

And? What makes your definition special? What makes your worldview the One True Worldview? The whole purpose of a trial is to allow all evidence to be presented and only then have a judgement passed.

Governments label all sorts of people terrorists, including those fighting asymmetrical battles against an occupying force that has invaded their nation and those who are struggling for independence for their piece of a nation from a larger entity that demands they not be allowed autonomy.

Labeling someone a "terrorist" should not remove their rights. There are causes i would become a "terrorist" for. A foreign nation invading my country, for example. The Maquis of the French rebellion during World War II were "terrorists" by pretty much any modern definition. Should they be hanged and damned, to the last of them, because the occupying Nazi government termed them "terrorists?"

What about the Chechnyans, fighting for freedom from Russia? Or the Taliban, fighting to drive out an occupying army? What about the Indian resistance to the British Empire? The Cypriot resistance to the same? The USA's war of independence was waged by terrorists rebelling against the legitimate government of the era.

Which causes are just, and who are you to judge? Using the label "terrorist" is no justification for disengaging one's brain, or for stripping someone of their rights.

I personally agree that someone who tried to blow up innocent people at a tree lighting ceremony is employing methods that are outside the bounds of acceptability. But I absolutely do not agree that the mere fact this individual is accused of such a crime means that due process should get thrown out the window. Or that the accused should be stripped of his rights. I also don't presume to judge his cause...only the methods he allegedly used.

If mere accusation is enough to remove our rights, then I submit to you sir that we have no rights.

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Trevor_Pott
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Re: Now THAT is what surveillance is for

Which is all just one long winded way of saying "they had probable cause which should have been good enough for a warrant, but believed themselves above the law and didn't get one." I think the plod in question should be thrown in jail right alongside the wannabe bomber.

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Trevor_Pott
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Re: Only a lawyer

One man's terrorist is another man's freedom fighter.

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Retiring Reg hack explains how bass playing = tech reporting

Trevor_Pott
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Re: Ska

If you think Ska was hard to find in the 80s, try finding a Dixieland/Big Band Jazz band - a real one - in the 90s. There was a resurgence here in Canada in the late 00s, thank $deity, but still...few and far between.

That said, I like Ska. It's good music. There needs to more people playing in this world.

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Trevor_Pott
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Re: Bass Players, Blues and writing

"loves Dubstep"

We can't ever be friends.

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Microsoft to let customers know where Office 365 is going

Trevor_Pott
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Re: Office 365...

Would you prefer a RIbbon? If so, kindly set yourself on fire. It'll improve the aesthetics of the forums. And the world.

As for your disliking French words...nique ta mere!

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VMware versus Nutanix: With Dell charging in, it's time to end the war

Trevor_Pott
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Re: What have I been missing?

75% of the infighting has been vBloggers of high status. Of that, almost all of it has been pro-VMware vBloggers pissing in the general direction of Nutanix. VMware also has internal propaganda on how to squish Nutanix, some of which was on their partner website...which was noted with some humour to me by folks at Nutanix as they are themselves partners and were able to see it. VMware banned Nutanix (and other direct competitors) from PEX.

The list goes on.

Some of the infractions are petty. Some (like the PEX incident) are what I would consider major. The grownups are not running this, the egos are. It's sad. It's ridiculous, and I've lost a lot of respect for people I once basically worshiped.

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Trevor_Pott
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Re: i think

Gotta say man, I think you have a really outdated view of Supermicro. They make quality gear, especially their Twin and Microcloud lines. Features like "working remote management, Advanced ECC [and] Chipkill" absolutely are part of Supermicro's offerings, and from my own first hand experience work damn well. (For storage servers, I'm rather fond of the ability to RAID 1 my RAM. But that's just because I'm paranoid.)

Supermicro also has a services arm. Nascent, but there. They are a very different company today than they were 10 years ago; writing them off is not wise...indeed, Nutanix currently use Supermicro exclusively to provide the servers for their offerings and those things have more than proven themselves in the feild running tier 1 workloads for many of the world's biggest enterprises.

As for the FUD...lots of people throw rocks at Del, it's true. The difference between throwing rocks at Dell and throwing rocks at a startup is one of resources and experience. Dell has a proper research organization. Throw poo at them and they will do the heavy lifting to get real world numbers that provide empirical evidence that you're an idiot.

To smear a startup all you need is FUD. To smear Dell you need proper reproducible science.

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What is it with cloud computing? Engage VM, disengage brain?

Trevor_Pott
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Re: Trevor, could we have that in PDF ?

The readers' wish is my consideration. But this is an easy one. I'll get my team to make you a whitepaper, sirs.

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Trevor_Pott
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Re: It'll calm down eventually.

Two flaws in that argument.

1) VC-backed companies are an infinitesimal percentage of total companies.

2) A lot of VCs aren't that stupid.

It also depends where you are. Angel? A round? Cloud makes sense...you don't know how long that company is going to be around, and what matters more is the sprint towards the next round of funding. Big capital acquisitions are frowned upon. But B round forward, VCs seem to care less.

So you're right; sometimes the decision comes down from the VCs, or management, or whomever. In those cases I weep for the people involved. But - in theory at least - eventually consultants and analysts and those who write for the magazines these types of people read will obtain clue, and the pendulum will swing back around again. I hope.

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Trevor_Pott
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Re: It'll calm down eventually.

But what (one market-speak is filtered out) does SimpliVity offer? Is it really that much more than what VMware provide with their vSAN product?

SimpliVity is more than VSAN + hardware, honest! Backups, DR, WAN acceleration and cloud gateway are the big ones. I'd argue monitoring as well, if you've ever played around with their management software. They're adding more bits to the convergence stack even now.

Is this more than VMware can deliver, if you went with all VMware products? NO. (Well, WAN acceleration is something I don't think VMware does.) So add in a bunch more SKUs to the stack than just "hypervisor + vSAN" to at least include vSphere Data Protection Advanced and VMware Disaster Recovery Manger. vCOPS should probably be in there to get closer to apples to apples...though vCOPS is more functional than the monitoring and analytics available in the SimpliVity management software.

Again: is SimpliVity commanding a $virgins premium on top of that? Youbetcha. MARVIN will too...at first. But the prices on these hyperconverged stacks are going to drop. And fast.

Edit: replied with added info in this comment before I saw your edit. Cheers! Have a beer!

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Trevor_Pott
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Re: It'll calm down eventually.

Okay. you have to spin up more DBs. You need a fraction the number of DBs as you do webservers, and you we figured out how to provide hardware that could run a highly demanding database in a virtualised environment ages ago. Any converged vendor can provide you something for that. Nutanix does a great job. Or any old big bunch of CPU power and fast storage you want.

There's nothing magical about scaling, especially when the hard parts of the infrastructure can be purchased pre-canned. Nerding over infrastructure is oiling buggy whips.

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Trevor_Pott
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Re: It'll calm down eventually.

Short answer? No.

Long answer: SimpliVity is the first, not the last. Don't be so temporally limited!

Look, when deduplication first came out, it cost $virgins. Now it's a tickbox feature. SimpliVity is $virgins today. 5 years from now, that sort of hyper convergence will be available from every vendor out there for a minor premium. 10 years from now, it'll be down to SMB pricing.

This is the way our industry works.

Also, do remember that SimpliVity isn't Nutanix. It's not just Hypervisor + server SAN + hardware. SimpliVity includes backup, DR, WAN acceleration and a bunch of other stuff too.

So, when you look at the cost, you can't just add up the cost of the hardware. Throw in the cost of the software as well as the cost of configuring it, support for however long they're pledging it and so on and so forth. For some companies, it is worth it to go SimpliVity, even today...though for most, that isn't yet true.

So...what's the value? For some companies - especially those doing greenfeild - they might be able to run infrastructure that might have taken 5 ops guys with just 1. Spend the salaries for the ops guys on dev, or security, or app integration.

How much is that worth? 200% premium over the raw software+hardware? 100%? 50%? 25%? Everyone will answer differently. But the premium charged will shrink, and shrink dramatically over the next 5 years as competition heats up in this space.

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Trevor_Pott
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Re: It'll calm down eventually.

Content Delivery Network.

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Trevor_Pott
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You can prove that public cloud computing provides savings for all use cases? Or even the majority of use cases? Please. Share. I have a number of clients for whom I've run the numbers and have found the public cloud to be as high as 50x the cost of on premises IT. I would love to see exactly how it is that my calculations are so very decidedly wrong.

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Trevor_Pott
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Re: It'll calm down eventually.

" If you're a startup looking for a way to instantly spin up 20,000 web servers serving monetized cat video streams[1], there's no way to economically do that even in a colocation scenario."

I am afraid I must agree and disagree at the same time. If you need it right now, this instant, public cloud computing is the only way to go. Very few organizations do. What they need instead is both "soon" and "without having to worry about the infrastructure part of the equation."

SimpliVity will give you all the infrastructure you need as part of a pre-configured out of box experience and the only lag is shipping from A to B. Receive, unpack, plug in, private cloud.

This is the future of IT. Not installing System-Center-I-Hate-You-In-The-Face edition and configuring for a month. Not manually configuring 50,000 different nerd knobs. Unpack, plug in, go.

SimpliVity is the first provider. Not the last. VMware's MARVIN will be the second. Dozens more will follow. Mark my words.

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Trevor_Pott
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Re: Wow :-)

Barkeep, a pint for the lad!

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You are ALL Americans now: Europeans offered same rights as US folks in data slurp leaks

Trevor_Pott
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Re: some musty old parchment from late 1700s

Not that I disagree with most of what you said...but do take into account that said musty old parchment was written so long ago that many of the extant codified human rights are simply absent. Even were the land governed to the letter and the spirit of the laws it contains, it would still be a terrifyingly backwards and primitive nation.

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Trevor_Pott
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Re: Human rights are non-negotiable

I, for one, am glad that Canada has both a constitution and a charter of rights and freedoms that, combined, make up the supreme law of the land. I'd prefer it if the charter were kept more up-to-date with the UN-approved document, but it's better than the only thing at the top of the pile being some musty old parchment from late 1700s.

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Trevor_Pott
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Re: Human rights are non-negotiable

Canada? Australia? New Zealand? Japan? South Korea? Fat lot of fucking good it does to be a US "ally". Obviously you only matter if you're large enough that refusing to play ball makes a commercial difference to USian corporate interests.

Fuck you, Eric Holder, and the corrupt government you represent. Even if you and the rest of the United States of Assholes are incapable of granting basic human rights to all human beings, regardless of nation...the fact that you can't even treat your closest allies with dignity and respect makes you contemptuous.

A pox on you, and all your houses. Bastards.

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If you like slipping your hand into Puppets, look for these certified types

Trevor_Pott
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Re: The future of Sysadmining.

Why is that a bad thing? Why should systems administrators have to know how infrastructure works, if the infrastructure is cheap enough to be disposable and there are things that easily configure it? Ideological purity?

Look, the point of IT is to make money. Your switch and your storage array don't make money. The applications they support do. If you can reduce the cost of managing and maintaining those switches, storage arrays, operating systems and so forth then you make more money from the use of the applications in question. If you are more efficient than your competitors, you win. That's business.

I could build you a car from scratch right up to the point that we stopped using carburetors. After fuel injection came in, I can't build you a car anymore, or even fix it. But I can still drive one. I've been driving one for a decade or more and I'll be driving for decades to come. The inability to repair all aspects of the car doesn't prevent me from using it and gaining value from it.

Systems administrators no longer need to know the sorted details of their disk arrays or how to futz with a switches command line. If push comes to shove on that, they can always bust out the manual, and that's available online. And we all have many ways of getting online.

I learned Cisco switches back in the early Catalyst 2600 days. Have I played with a Nexus from the command line level? No. Could I work it out after only a few minutes? Yes! The internet is full of knowledge and I only need to grok the basics before I'm off to the races.

Meanwhile, could I get 15 years of productivity out of that Nexus without ever dropping to it's command line? With Puppet, you're goddamned rights I could.

So on the one hand, I can orchestrate a delicate ballet of hundreds of thousands of devices using a tool called Puppet. I can be a highly efficient administrator that provides a good return on investment for my employer, but I fail in some ideologically "pure" fashion because I am not infinitely familiar with the details of how every single device works.

On the other hand, I could learn every single detail of every single device I use and configure each and every one of them from the lowest level interface available, with zero orchestration across the entire estate. I will likely need 5x as many administrators to run that estate. I don't provide efficient IT services for my employer, but I meet an arbitrary "pureness" of philosophy.

If you view the second option as the desirable one, you are bad at business.

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Trevor_Pott
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Re: Missed it by one letter!

Mahna Mahna.

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Trevor_Pott
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Re: The future of Sysadmining.

Puppet. GUI. Wha?

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Should you entrust your systems management to the cloud?

Trevor_Pott
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if your not a fan

If you're not a fan. Auuuugh!

Also: what, what, in the butt.

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Enterprise giant Dell climbs in bed with upstart Nutanix: But what does it MEAN?

Trevor_Pott
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Re: Good for Nutanix, Bad for Dell

As usual, Nate Amsden's vision is clear on this. HP have Storevirtual. That's why the rumors about buying SimpliVity never made sense. Dell has nothing like it. Server SANs are going to be an important part of the future storage mix. Dell needs to be able to play there, but they want to do it without a lot of risk.

I see this is absolutely fantastic for Dell, with a huge amount of pros and virtually no cons. I can't see why you believe otherwise. The next generation of these units, as shipped by Dell will be build all on Dell hardware. But short of buying Maxta, where would they get the software?

If they did buy Maxta, they'd have to convince the world to care about Maxta, when there's Nutanix, SimpliVity and ScaleIO as established names and VMware's VSAN as the up-and-coming software-only solution to watch.

With Nutanix, Dell gets a pre-canned winner, with a proven track record and a massive established customer base. Nutanix has cleared the minefield. They have name-brand recognition all on their own. All Dell has to do is get it validated on their hardware configs, train their sales staff and sell the thing.

*poof* Dell has an answer to the converged space that is the equal of anything anyone else has, overnight...and you can be damned they're getting decent margins.

This Silicon Valley obsession with being the only player, owning the complete vertical stack and edging out all competitors is both tedious and pointless. The goal is to make as much money as possible with as little risk as possible. This is an absolutely excellent way to do exactly that for Dell.

Do you believe dell a "failure" because they don't write their own desktop operating system to go in all their nodes? What about their own hypervisor, or their own server OS? Why are they using x86 chips sourced from Intel when they could get an ARM license and build their own fabs. Wouldn't that guarantee them ever copper squeezed out of every sale?

The pittance of margin they give up to Nutanix to license their software is barely worth mentioning. It's a cost of doing business...a business Dell couldn't even be in if they didn't get Nutanix's IP, or buy Maxta.

Addendum: We need to draw a line between "converged" and "hyper-converged". To by "hyper-converged" you need not only storage and compute together, you need backup, WAN acceleration and so much more. VSAN on it's own isn't hyper-converged, neither are Nutanix, ScaleIO or Maxta. Only SimpliVity is shipping out of the box, ready to go with all of that today.

VMware's stack as a whole, when married to some other software EMC has and put on Supermicro servers to make MARVIN will be. Nutanix + Dell's various software offerings also will be. Neither solution is "there" yet. Even ScaleIO doesn't ship as a "hyper-converged" offering just yet, though I expect it to in short order. As for Maxta...give me a couple of months...

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Canada to Google: You can't have your borderless cake and eat it too

Trevor_Pott
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It couldn't possibly be because two different court systems came to two different decisions about whether or not trade secrets were violated, eh? And if they did, obviously the USA's judgement should supersede that of Canada's.

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Vulturization: 'Privacy' is fightin' words to cloud touters – they get angry

Trevor_Pott
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Aye sir, I do indeed have someone looking into that for me. I'll post back here once that's taken care of.

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Trevor_Pott
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Re: Duration?

A fair comment. Does the player not show that on your end? Or did you download it and your MP3 player does not tell you?

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Sony CEO forced to shush shareholder heckling at fiery AGM

Trevor_Pott
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Re: Sony's AGM

You say that like it's a bad thing. I think someone should have.

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Trevor_Pott
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Re: Root kit

Amen. Burn, Sony, burn. And take all your bullshit proprietary formats will you when you die.

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Good god, where will the new storage experts come from?

Trevor_Pott
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Re: Outsourcing megatrends and overseas futures

If the money were good enough, I would. But it would have to be damned good money. There's a reason I'm switching to writing, and away from systems adminsitration. I think you've largely nailed it.

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Expert view: What is the forecast for cloud backup?

Trevor_Pott
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Sounds like you have some great customers.

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Trevor_Pott
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Excellent point. It's been a long time since I've asked that. The answer always seems to be 'none'. Things like Dropbox have inflated people's expectations, even though they don't understand the complexity of the issues to hand...

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Trevor_Pott
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Have you ever actually met anyone who rotates the disks offsite?

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DON’T add me to your social network, I have NO IDEA who you are

Trevor_Pott
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Re: I wonder if today will be

I had to. Even before I finished the article. I adore Mr Dabbs' writing, and respect him an enormous amount...but alas, I am at heart an internet troll.

Sorry Dabbsy, I just couldn't control the troll.

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Judge could bin $325m wage-fixing settlement in Silicon Valley

Trevor_Pott
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Re: @Dan Paul

"People shouldn't be able to win the lottery from a lawsuit, without even having to pay a dollar for the ticket!"

Why not? Won't they "trickle down" that wealth? Or is that a comforting lie that only applies to existing wealthy people, and not to those who might become nouveau rich?

Those people were screwed over by the companies in question. The existing settlement will leave the companies in question with a net gain for having broken the law and screwed thousands of workers in a fashion that quite honestly could have cartel-class implications.

The companies involved deserve to have their metaphorical gonads crushed for this. They should be strung up and left for the buzzards as an example to future companies. Shareholders beware! Reign in the excesses of your board or your ill gotten gains will evaporate!

But of course, I don't expect that you would see it that way...

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How farsighted is Microsoft's Azure RemoteApp?

Trevor_Pott
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Re: effort [..] required to manage a fleet of Windows machines

The answer to "Need to run something that was coded for IE6/ActiveX ?" is always "kill yourself." :P

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Adobe Creative Cloud 2014: Progress and pain in the usual places

Trevor_Pott
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Re: I used to be a customer

O_o

o_O

O_O

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