* Posts by Trevor_Pott

5493 posts • joined 31 May 2010

vSphere 6.0 is BADASS. Not that I've played with it or anything. Ahem

Trevor_Pott
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Re: VDI for small company

All part of the service!

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Trevor_Pott
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Re: You call this an improved client? You are having a laugh, Trev.

VMware's management tools are way - way - better than the competition. Way better.

As for Docker taking over...

http://www.theregister.co.uk/2014/12/02/docker_part_3_containers_versus_hypervisors/

http://www.theregister.co.uk/2014/12/04/docker_part_4_prognostication_microsoft_and_the_red_wedding/

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Trevor_Pott
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Re: You call this an improved client? You are having a laugh, Trev.

Spoken like someone who hasn't had to actually use the various management tools on offer for a living.

VMware is entirely worth the money. And then some.

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Trevor_Pott
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Re: It's become too expensive

Okay, here I need proof that VSAN is slower on the same hardware than storage spaces. The past 6 months of testing tell me a dramatically different story than you just did.

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Trevor_Pott
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Re: VDI for small company

Hi Porco Rosso, the first question we have to answer is "what do you mean by VDI?" If you just want your users to log into something over RDP, grab a desktop and have a Windows computing experience, you don't need to give every user a VM to do that. You can probably get away with one (I would normally argue two, just for paranoia's sake) Windows Server instances done up with Remote Desktop Services.

For small deployments, I use RDS where I can, because the licensing on "real" VDI is fearful. You can use Liquidware Labs's UEM software to do most of the "really neat VDI stuff" that you would want without even having to buy the expensive VDI licenses. This includes migrating resources between VMs and physical systems, including application settings for applications that don't migrate. It's complicated topic, but - as luck would have it - Liquidware recently commissioned me to write a whitepaper on the topic, which you can find here: http://info.liquidwarelabs.com/Whitepaper_UEMFormLandingPage.html

If I were to design your environment blindly (and without more information it's pretty blind!) I'd say "go buy a VMware Essentials or Essentials Plus kit (depending on which features you feel you need), get Windows Datacenter licenses for all the servers you need and use Veeam to back it all up."

VMware Essentials is cheap cheap cheap, like $500 for 3 servers. But you don't get HA or any of the other really nice toys for that. That's okay, but all you really care about is the fact that it gives you access to the backup APIs. The chances that you need HA for 10 users is pretty small. Hardware doesn't fail that often, and - to be perfectly blunt - you'll run a business just fine off of a single physical server (which runs multiple virtual workloads) and using Veeam to back that up to something like an ioSafe (http://www.theregister.co.uk/2013/12/02/setting_the_iosafe_214_on_fire/) NAS.

This gives you full disaster proof storage. It gives you expandability (you can add nodes to your cluster as you grow,) and you can fit a lot of workloads on a single modern server. But the server a Windows Datacenter license so you can have as many Windows VMs as you want.

Virtualise two copies of Windows Server for Remote Desktop Services and spin up a third to act as an RDS gateway. This way your users will be load balanced between the two VMs, and you can take one down for maintenance while only affecting half your users. Or, since it's datacenter, spin up 10 server VMs, one for each user! (Don't forget you still need 10 RDS CALs, no matter how you spin this.)

You can then put all your remaining (server) workloads in either Windows or Linux VMs as you see fit. If you plan on going past one server to start, look at hyperconverged solutions in order to be able to get away from SAN or NAS complexity for such a small deployment. Just take the local disks on you nodes and lash them together into a single storage pool. There's a list of the big players in the article. E-mail me if you need introductions to any of them.

Your biggest single expense should be the Windows license. A single server is cheap, and a two disk IOsafe with enough storage to back up your workloads is cheap too. VMware Essentials is cheap, and you don't need essentials plus with one server in play. Veeam for a single server should be free.

*Poof*. SMB setup for 10 users on a single server with recovery time objectives and recovery point objectives that should be compatible with your typical 10-man shop. If that doesn't seem like it would work for you, please give me more info, and I can suggest alternatives.

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Trevor_Pott
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Re: Shiny object.....squirrel!

"I'd rather see them reduce the overhead and improve their cpu scheduling so I can drive higher utilization levels in a more balanced fashion"

What workloads are you running - and with what configs - that you can't flatten a VMware node if you want? I'm intensely curious, as I spend all day long comparing metal to virtualised systems and there's not a hell of a lot of overhead with VMware for most workloads.

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Trevor_Pott
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Re: woe betide the un-v'ed

Um....do any of these meet your needs?

http://www.theregister.co.uk/2013/03/12/vmware_enterprise_review/

http://www.theregister.co.uk/2011/11/16/virtualisation_licences/

http://www.theregister.co.uk/2010/06/16/virtual_management/

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Trevor_Pott
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Re: Update Manager

Yeah, in the GUI section. VUM has "it's own client", which is basically a version of the C# client with the plugin installed. No real change there. It's a bandaid, not a fix.

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Nutanix is out in front - but can it stay ahead of the burgeoning pack?

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Short version? Yes. Nutanix can make IPO if they want, and if nobody offers them a big enough bag of cash in the meantime. Those talks are continual, ongoing and multi-party, I am sure.

The thing to bear in mind is that Nutanix is neither stupid nor a one-trick pony. They are perfectly aware that their market is begin commoditised, and they have no intention of getting trapped playing the same game VMware has been playing for years. VMware has been trying to deny the commoditisation of the hypervisor while casting about desperately for something - anything - to lock everyone in to their specific hypervisor.

Nutnaix will admit - privately, if not publicly - that hyperconvergence is already a commodity. Their goal is to ride the wave at the top to see how much hay they can make until everyone else realizes that competitors like Maxta, Scale Yottabye and so forth exist, and then plowing that money into both brand building (name recognition!) and R&D. They have secret squirrel projects of their own to address tomorrow's problems, even as they are building out their sales for to sell the stuff that answers today's problems.

So far, so good. That's what you expect a company that isn't yet a lumbering monopoly in their field to do. Nutanix will shed market share as other competitors gain traction, but the market for hyperconvergence itself is growing at such a rate that they simply don't care. Let 1o other companies duke it out to be the Android of hyeprconvergence. As far they are concerned they're the iPhone of that market, and they'll dine on that for the better part of the next decade.

The losers here are the array vendors. Just look at EMC's numbers to grok that. "New storage" is growing rapidly. "Old storage" not so much. So there's plenty of money for the hyperconverged companies to gobble up. Who ends up with what slice of the pie is, when all is said and done, irrelevant.

It's irrelevant because the hyperconverged wars are over almost as soon as they began. This market has so many players it's been commoditised even before all the entrants are spun up. So the question isn't "who gets what slice of the pie" or even "who gets the high margin bit of the pie", but "who has a solution for to do five years from now where there's no more margin in hyperconvergence to be had at all?"

And to know that, you need to know what they're up to behind the scenes...and most of these folks are increasingly tight lipped about that...

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NASA: Give us JUST 0.5% of the federal budget and we'll take you to MARS and EUROPA

Trevor_Pott
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Re: Ted Cruz

He's a fuck of a lot more crazy than being a climate change denier, although that's pretty fucking crazy. He's pretty anti science up and down the whole of the spectrum, and touts god as the cause and reason for most things. He has demanded evolution not be taught and so on and so forth. He is fucking batshit looney tunes insane with added sky fairy. Lock 'im up, and then melt the key down for use in deep core drilling.

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Trevor_Pott
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Re: Ted Cruz

It's Ted Cruz. I don't know if you're aware, but he's completely fucking batshit insane. Full bore ultra-right wing anti-science whack job with added Jesus.

NASA's fucked.

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Anthem, America's second biggest health insurer, HACKED: Millions hit by breach

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Re: cornz 1

Facebook is more valuable than Portugal, isn't it? So I fully expect American megacorporations to have the resources of a nation state and be able to defend themselves. When you're as big as Anthem, you don't get excuses.

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Intel silicon photonics modules can't take the heat of the HPC kitchen

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Imagine: a 64 node cluster running all NVMe or MCS flash drives with 1TB/node with 18 cores (2 sockets) per node and all the bits internal to the node lashed together at 1Tbit interconnect. Then lash the nodes in the cluster together with 100Gbit interconnects.

That's a hell of a minecraft cluster.

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Who's come to fix your broadband? It may be a Fed in disguise. Without a search warrant

Trevor_Pott
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You ask for some hardlines and some computer equipment. Someone thinks this is "suspicious". Then you get checked up and raided? Wut?

What happened to "innocent unless proven guilty?" Surely there has to be some pretty legitimate grounds for suspicion before you lie your way into someone's home (rented or not!). Using lies to get in to someone's home to see if they are doing anything that might be illegal enough to investigate sounds a lot like fishing to me. Hmm...

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Extra detailed Big Iron coverage, LIVE TODAY at The Platform

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Really, anything with TPM in it is good. Been one of my favourite tech journos for quite some time. Asks the hard questions; we need more like that.

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How Pivotal cracked the one-billion-dollar code

Trevor_Pott
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Re: Open Source Business Models

A billion dollar "price tag" (corporate valuation) is far different from a billion dollar run rate, which is what Red Hat surpassed.

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The Pirate Bay clambers back online after cop raid sunk site for 7 weeks

Trevor_Pott
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Re: And so

Who pirates music anymore? The music producer caved, and we can find anything we want for dirt cheap and DRM free all over the internet from legit sources?

Pirating is for TV, textbooks and sometimes movies. You know, those mediums where the copyright holders have refused to provide what's requested in a form that isn't a massive burden to their legitimate users and where the copyright holders insist on not only charging exorbitant amounts, but want you to keep rebuying over and over and over?

Give the people what they want in a format they want to consume, at a price they can afford and holy fucking shit it turns out that you can compete successfully against "free".

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Snowden reveals LEVITATION technique of Canada’s spies

Trevor_Pott
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Re: I hate to say I told you so...

The difference is that here the lawsuit is already well into the late planning stages, the funding exists to see it through all the way to the Supreme Court, and the judges tend to be highly sympathetic to the people, not the spooks. In the fullness of time, CES (formerly CESC) will pay for their indiscretions. Canada isn't the USA. Here, at least, the wheels of justice still turn. They turn slowly, but they still do turn.

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Trevor_Pott
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Re: What wasn't said...

"Did anyone ever think that wasn't the case?"

The 99.995% of internet users who aren't highly qualified IT professionals. Even most IT professionals don't have the faintest clue as to the extent of possible surveillance.

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Trevor_Pott
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Re: What people are downloading is really not the government's business

A) We are. Please go to www.openmedia.ca for the latest in Candian civil liberties battles, with a particular emphasis on fighting for digital rights.

B) Please try www.sync.com. The data is encrypted in flight and at rest. The company is Canadian and the data is stored in Canada. The company cannot access the data it stores, even if it wants to.

If you have further concerns please, I strongly encourage you to support Openmedia. They are are only current organised means of fighting this nonsense, and they work closely with those organizations (such as various First Nations bands) who have even more power in the courts than we do when it comes to bringing our government to heel.

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Trevor_Pott
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Re: Blame Canada

We're sorry.

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Let's be clear, everyone: DON'T BLOCK Wi-Fi, DUH – FCC official ruling

Trevor_Pott
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"But why would you use a personal wifi hotspot anyway? To run that you would need 3G or 4G in the first place so why carry two devices. Why not use a device with 3G/4G in the first place?"

Because I'm Canadian and I go to the USA for conferences. which means picking up a bruner SIM and stuffing it into a hotspot device so that I - and my team - have data wherever we go. That leaves us able to use voice for roaming (which costs virtually nothing) and avoid paying $mortgage for data roaming.

Do you have any idea what data roaming is when you take a Canadian SIM into the USA? Even the faintest clue? Now tell me you're going to run a team of technology journalists posting near-live multimedia from conferences off roaming data charges.

Egads, man!

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Australian spookhaus ASIO could retain private data FOREVER

Trevor_Pott
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Re: Odd

Why should an intelligence agency retain data on people that have not been determined to be a threat? We are supposed to be innocent unless proven guilty.

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Google reveals where AT&T, Comcast, Time Warner Cable will next offer Gbps broadband

Trevor_Pott
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Re: UK

I'd pay $250 a month for gigabit internet. No questions. Currently I am paying $100 a month for 25 down/5 up. $250 a month for gigabit wouldn't even be a question. Hell yes. Google's $70 a month or the UK's $100 a month? Sign me up eleventy years ago!

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'Boozed up' US drone spook CRASHED UFO into US White House

Trevor_Pott
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Re: Not all there

Yeah, that could happen. For 0.5 seconds before a secret service agent threw a net on the bugger. And then the people who already want to kill US politicians might want to kill them that little bit more. Um...oh well?

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Trevor_Pott
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Re: For the Nth time

"only they strip out the camera and replace it with a vial of vx gas (or something else along those lines)"

Except that the Parrot AR can lift less than a pound. What is your vial made out of that you can get enough gas in there to do real harm when released outside in the open air? How did you get the gas in there and then transport it without killing yourselves in the process if your container is that light?

I have been thinking about this for the better part of a day and I can't come up with something that's under a lb that could reliably do enough damage to be freaking out about.

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Trevor_Pott
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Re: Not all there

Please explain exactly how you propose to make a Parrot AR drone into a weapon with the singular exception of "flying it into the rotors of a chopper"? It has a lift capacity of approximate the square root of fuck all.

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Trevor_Pott
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Re: I can imagine...

Please explain how you plan on picking up drones without either microwaving the local wildlife or a computer the size of iceland.

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What gets the internet REALLY excited? Kittens? No. EXPLODING Kittens

Trevor_Pott
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Re: Tesla

Actually, I've studied the life and times of Tesla rather extensively. He has quite a few concrete achievements. Many of which Edison flat out stole. Just because other people like something (or someone) doesn't mean you have to hate it. Mind you, if you haven't learned that by now, you probably never will.

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Trevor_Pott
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I don't know that christmas was "invented". It sort of accreted from a bunch of different holidays/celebrations/festivals/religious rites into one thing. Saturnalia comes to mind as one component, but not remotely the only one. A lot of celtic traditions got wrapped up in it, and I am sure that Hanukkah had more than a little influence on the creation of christmas, given that christianity derives from Judaism.

And, ultimately, which christmas are we talking about? Observation rites for this particular bit of religiosity vary massively around the world. Even if we set aside people who are in fact celebrating other faiths (or have no faith to celebrate) at that time of year, christians the world over are massively diverse. The variety of rites, rituals and amount of religious involvement (and what form that religious involvement takes) isn't consistent even within individual cities, let alone nations or across the scale of the world.

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Trevor_Pott
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Re: You crack me up, Mr. Pott

Someone is whinging about me on the internets? Hunh. As I don't see their post it must me one of the few people I have on ignore. In that case, for the record: smoochie boochies, whomever you are.

And exploding kittens for everyone.

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Trevor_Pott
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Re: 14nd place?

I am pretty sure that when I wrote the original article it was somethong like 22nd place. Then I did some math for the latest numbers before submitting and just swapped out the 22 for 14.

Now I think we should leave it because 14nd is amazing and hilarious.

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Switch it off and on again: How peers failed to sneak Snoopers' Charter into terror bill

Trevor_Pott
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Re: Experts?

"I would argue that anyone who does not have at least one degree that required differential equations and linear algebra is not educated."

Fairy snuff. But I can implement virtually every component necessary to create the modern internet, design the networks at macro and micro levels and even write code that makes it all go, if required. And I ain't got me no degree.

Challenge your mathematician grad to do that. Fuck, I challenge most Comp Sci graduates to create a boot floppy and update a BIOS, especially if they have to attach the floppy first!

White collar folks shouldn't be making all the decisions, eh? Some of us blue collar types have visibility they don't.

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Want to win Microsoft's cloudy love? Just spend $500

Trevor_Pott
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Re: <sigh>

Americans. *sigh* Privacy is such an inconvenience, eh?

If the cloud provider has a US attack surface great than "none", it's not a cloud provider that anyone should consider using. Oh, what's that? Microsoft is trying very hard to kill it's own channel, even as it asks them to pay over $1700 just to get in the doors of their own conference? Yep! You don't own the customer relationship anymore, MSPs! You're just sales people with really shitty commission rates peddling Microsoft's cloud software and shouldering all the risk while receiving no benefits, no loyalty and no long term prospects of survival!

Amazing!

Cloud first, Mobile fist. Customers, Partners, Developers, Staff and - most especially - privacy last.

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IBM details PowerPC microserver aimed at square kilometre array

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Dear IBM research team

Damn fine work. Carry on.

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VDI is heading for a minor DAAS-aster

Trevor_Pott
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Re: Do you have to choose?

Agreed! This is just more of the same Gartner "the cloud will conquer all" bollocks. DaaS is just one more tool in the toolbox. It will emphatically not kill of VDI.

--Submitted using my crappy Canadian DSL that doesn't do video from an American DaaS provider worth a damn, even when that provider is using the amazing nVidia GRID cards for acceleration.

--Submitted from the VDI instance in my home lab that *is* using GRID cards and provides an experience that wrecks DaaS, and that DaaS won't be able to touch for the next 15 years.

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Five years of Sun software under Oracle: Were the critics right?

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Open Office. No mention? Que?

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Charlotte, NC thinks it has won the Google Fiber lottery

Trevor_Pott
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Re: Hmmm... can we re-think the goodness of Google fibre?

Funny, digital tools marketed as "privacy enhancing" sell well here. And I am constantly having people ask me how to set up _blank_ "so that other people can't access it".

People WANT privacy. They just don't want COMPLICATED privacy. What they REALLY want is Gmail and Skype, but completely private. Alas...

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Trevor_Pott
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Re: Hmmm... can we re-think the goodness of Google fibre?

Canada, for one. Canada is part of five eyes - and thus participates in some questionable things - but we have some very strict regulations on what the hoi polloi police can get up to.

Now, not that the cops haven't tried pushing through some truly egregious crap. $deity knows, they've given it a go, as have some very strident members of the conservative government. That said, the Supreme Court has slapped most of that shit right down, and the stuff that was brewing in the bill stages got at least one prominent cabinet member sent to rural northern Manitoba in order to get his ass out of the spotlight, after the massive backlash his rampaging ineptitude caused.

I also happen to know that at least three of our telecoms companies don't want to be snooping on traffic. They'd rather actually pay for infrastructure than open the can of worms that comes with having that level of DPI or even "metadata retention" capability. Canadian privacy law is pretty damned strict, and that's a live wire they just flat out don't want to touch.

Are there forces within Canada that want to strip up of our privacy? Absolutely. Count the Prime Minister and his cabinet chief among them! Hell, the biggest reason they're so eager to fasttrack the TPP is the pat where they can get through privacy-defeating crap as part of an international treaty that they'd never pass as laws.

But I really do question whether or not it would stand in court. Unlike the US, we don't elect our judges. They aren't bought and paid for. They aren't beholden to anyone, they don't need to seek reelection. And they don't seem to have any problem slapping down the government in whole or in part.

So I wonder how far this anti-privacy thing will go here. Will we fall like the US has, like the UK is doing? Or will we hold fast and retain some semblance of democracy; a nation where the government belongs to the people and the people have the privacy to organize to ensure it stays that way?

Time will tell...but I know which side I'll be on.

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Trevor_Pott
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Re: Hmmm... can we re-think the goodness of Google fibre?

Name one telecoms, software, hardware or internet company in the USA that wouldn't do the same (or worse) than Google when it comes to sniffing all the traffic on the wire. You're the product, and you pay for the privilege. Welcome to the post-privacy era.

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Official: Whiteboxer Super Micro is a $2bn server company

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Re: a mere 20 years...

"Have you run other brands on the same condition and seen them shut down or fail otherwise?"

Yes, as a matter of fact I have. That's my job, eh? To do that sort of testing. And -a s a rule - Supermicro holds up better. There are exceptions (some models from Dell seem particularly overdesigned) but overall Supermicro seems to handle the thermals better.

Look, testing systems (in many cases to destruction) is my job. In fact, it has largely become the only part of systems administration I still consistently do. The rest of it has become automated or I have simply walked away from as I have lost interest.

But companies, be they customers looking to find the right server to put in extreme situations or vendors looking to have their gear tested pay me to test hardware, software and services. It means I get to play with a pretty wide variety of stuff.

At the end of the day, Supermicro make damn good gear. It's better today than it was a year ago, and I see no reason to believe it won't continue on that trend. They've set themselves apart from others by focusing less on how to "monetise" their existing customer base with needless add-ons or licensing sub-components of their firmware and keep on with the "build good kit and sell it cheap".

Here's hoping that seeing them move to $2B/year and beyond causes the other vendors to sit up, take notice and start getting competitive again.

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Trevor_Pott
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Re: a mere 20 years...

"That's just rubbish."

I CAN'T HEAR YOU, THE HP'S ON. WHAT?

""Motherboard, Chassis, Power supplies and Super Barebone products: Supermicro provides a three-year warranty for labor and one-year warranty for parts."

Seems to depend on the product. I was looking at servers, Twins and blade systems. Seems their "parts only" stuff, like mobos only get the one year warranty. Gotta admit, I haven't bought "just parts" in some time.

"Where did you get this nugget of information? SOME SM servers are designed like that. And in specific configurations (couldn't find the specifics on SM website though). Most Supermicro rack servers seem to be operating at max 35°C like the competition."

From their product managers. Though they aren't warranted for operation beyond standard temps, most of their lineup is actually designed to handle far higher temps than advertised. And yes, I believe them when they say it. Why? They've been nothing but honest and up front with me for years, about the benefits and the drawbacks of everything I've asked about.

What's more, I've been able to have their standard servers run at 45Cish temps for prolonged periods in testing.

"Dell, HP and IBM (Lenovo?) all have some server configurations for 45 C operation and SM has a couple models with designation for 47 C inlet temp."

Yep, with all manufacturers, only some systems are warranted for high temp environments. The difference I've found is that you can consistently push Supermicro's gear far past the advertised temperatures for rather long periods of time.

That said, Supermicro doesn't have any of the really exotic stuff. look here for a discussion of why I think that HP's liquid cooled blades might well be the bee's knees.

Liking Supermicro doesn't mean I don't like other manufacturers. (Though Dells are louder AND TURNING ON THE HP MEANS I CAN'T HEAR YOU!) As a general rule of thumb I find the following applies:

1) Supermicro is the default vendor. The price is right!

2) Supermicro is the vendor you choose if you need to install servers in warm or really cramped places (or in the same room as people.)

3) Dell if the vendor you choose if you're a rack monkey and/or see yourself frequently moving things around on racks. Dell rail kits = godlike.

4) HP is the vendor you choose if you need something exotic or bizzare. Beware you'll have to license every freaking feature and you'll get nickled and dimed to death.

5) Lenovo/IBM is what you buy when you just need to shut up people who are stuck 20 years in the past and/or your distie doesn't sell Supermicro.

6) Supermicro has nice starter switches, Dell has much better switches, and HP can make your whole universe into a dynamic routing table made out of sex and awesome.

7) They all use the exact same company to provide global support to rural areas, so ask them pointed questions about part availability and distribution.

8) When trying to talk to sales, Supermicro will be honest and tell you everything you want to know. Dell will be honest and tell you what they can (on the record) but have to switch to "off the record" to tell you the rest. HP will just try to sell you more things every time you ask a question, so never call them unless it's an emergency and you have the ability to blackmail the salesguy. Lenovo is yet an unknown.

9) HP's phone-in tech support are amazing, but I wish turnover wasn't so high. Dell tech support are not at HP levels, but you can form longstanding relationships with them, as they don't go anywhere. Supermicro's tech support isn't really anywhere near so good, it's still largely reliant on the channel. (Mind you, they don't support a lot of software other than their BMC directly, so...) Lenovo is an unknown.

No one vendor comes out ahead of all others. They each have their niches...and clearly I'm not the only one to recognize that Supermicro are worth the time, or they wouldn't be kicking ass like they are.

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Trevor_Pott
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Re: a mere 20 years...

Your experience is inaccurate. I have several different models of Supermicro spanning (at least!) the past 6 generations of equipment, from simple motherboards to pizza box 1U servers to Fat Twins and everything in between. (Though, sadly, I do not have a Storage Bridge Bay to call my own.)

There are no "constant rev fans" in any of these units. The Supermicro servers and the switches throttle down to sounding about half as loud as my Dells and a quarter as loud as those "I CAN'T HEAR YOU, I HAVE THE HP ON! WHAT? I SAID I HAVE THE HP ON! NO, I...LISTEN, LET ME CALL YOU BACK, I HAVE TO MOVE TO ANOTHER ROOM!"

I have dozens of Supermicro servers in service that are 6 years old. I have over a dozen Supermicro servers still in service that are 10 years old. Supermicro offers a standard 3 years parts and labour warantee on everything (on year cross shipment) with the ability to get into more complex deals if you want things like 4 hours enterprise support. In addition, Supermicro is one of the only manufacturers I know of which sells at least some models with 5 year warranties.

Supermicro servers are generally designed to be able to run hot - hotter than those provided by other manufacturers - so they throttle down thier fans unless they go over their designed thermals. They are, however, also designed to operate in higher temperature environments than other manufacturers. So when you aren't running at room temperature, but instead are at 35C or higher, then they'll sound like jet engines as they ramp up their cooling. But in all, I think you'll find Supermicro servers (and switches) able to withstand much higher ambient temperatures than the competition It's one of their selling features.

Supermicro has had exactly two consistent issues over the years:

1) They use cheap components for "the little things", including internal cable guides and the little tabs used to remove sleds. They are (slowly) addressing this.

2) Their rail kits have been truly awful. The latest rail kits I've gotten with the new Intel v3 servers are much better. They're no Dell rail kits - not even close - but they're light years ahead of the bendable Chenbro-style fenfen that they had before.

Supermicro is all grown up. And they don't even need to charge you a license to be able to use the IPKVM in their baseband management controller.

Holy crap.

A tin supplier that isn't crap. That sound you hear is horsement heralding an apocalypse.

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Should Google play carriers at their own game? There's never been a better time

Trevor_Pott
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Note the "€" in your post. That is different from the United States of privacy invasion. You'll note that such things in the US are rare, and getting rarer. And it's worse in Canada!

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Trevor_Pott
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"There is too much competition in this space for Google to accomplish anything meaningful."

Unless Google launch an all-data Internet of Things MVNO focused on the ability to bind multiple devices together under a single account and share data between them instead of having a bunch of individual packages.

That is something Google could do that would disrupt everyone.

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Trevor_Pott
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Re: Wifi calling / Wifi first

"Do you really want to let them know who you call/text, and when, and where you are at all times?"

A) I use Android, so they already know all that.

B) It's not Google that are the problem, it's the NSA.

Really, what's Google going to do? Advertise at me? The NSA can put a note in my file that gets me barred from the country which means I can't go to conferences and that leads to a dramatic loss of revenue. Google is an annoyance, not a threat. The spooks are a threat.

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Trevor_Pott
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Re: why would anyone want to be an operator these days?

"Start Chrome, you are asked to "sign in to Google". Start IE, you are not asked to "sign in to Microsoft". Google is the only browser publisher that wants to know who you are from the outset."

So all those tax breaks, monopoly guarantees and taxpayer funded infrastructure that was gifted them count for nothing? The telcos were handed their goddamned businesses on a plate - and still are, when you look at tax breaks and protectionism against competition - but somehow it's the telcos you see as "taking the risks?"

Nyet!

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Welcome to Spartan, Microsoft's persuasive argument for... Chrome

Trevor_Pott
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Re: But it's Google... @Tevor_Pott

ChromeOS, yes. Android...no. But ChromeOS *IS* just Google's web services wrapped in a bundle. So it makes perfect sense you'd have to log in. Android doesn't require me to have a Google account attached unless I want to use Google services...but I can gleefully use non-Google services. Cyanogenmod, Kindle Fire, etc...lots of Android stuff that doesn't require Google.

And both of those are different again from a full-bore Windows OS, which is designed not for mobile, not for cloud services, but for workstation services. To be an enterprise OS. For fixed or semi-mobile (notebook) systems.

Sorry mate, but Microsoft is more insidious. If only because they are "as bad as Google", but put billions of dollars into smearing Google and telling the world "love us because we're not creepy like them." Except they are. Especially if you happen to be a French journalist using Hotmail...

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Trevor_Pott
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Re: But it's Google...

"Start Chrome, you are asked to "sign in to Google". Start IE, you are not asked to "sign in to Microsoft". Google is the only browser publisher that wants to know who you are from the outset."

Microsoft asks you to sign in to their public cloud based authentication system to get in to the goddamned operating system. And they've started tying core system functions to that public cloud identity, too! Not to mention they stream every search you make on your local computer/local network to Bing.

Sorry mate, but Microsoft is far more insidious and in to tracking your every move than Google.

Edit: yes, you don't have to sign in to Microsoft's public cloud account to use the OS...but you certainly don't have to sign into chrome to use it either. Both, however, require you to hand over your privacy in order to make all the features work as intended, not just a subset. The difference is that Google wants you to sign into specific services (such as a browser, or IM client) whereas Microsoft wants your privacy just for the OS itself.

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NSA gunning for Google, wants cop-spotting dropped from Waze app

Trevor_Pott
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Re: strange...(Bias indeed, misinformed bias)

"You are a criminal when you commit a crime."

Everyone breaks the law at least three times a day. Our laws are structured like that. We're all criminals. It's just a question of whether or not we've irritated someone in power enough for them to put effort into finding out what they can nail us for.

What is the point in trying obeying the law when the law cannot reasonably be obeyed? Rome had this problem, you know. Their laws were too many and too complex that - eventually - people just stopped caring. This is where the USA is today. It's not about whether or not you break the law, it's about whether or not you obey your "betters".

And that's a really shitty way to run a society.

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