* Posts by Trevor_Pott

5195 posts • joined 31 May 2010

Apple and Samsung STILL in bitchfight over banning ancient mobes

Trevor_Pott
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Re: I wish ...

I remember "IBM" stores in my local mall when I was a teen...

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Trevor_Pott
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Re: And of course there is always this from Boy Wonder...

"Stealing ideas is perfectly legal.

Stealing registered design dress, patents, trademarks is not."

Unless you're Apple. Then you can steal registered design, dress, patents AND trademarks and get away with it. By presidential decree, even. Sorry, buddy, but Apple are fucking clownshoes, just like Samsung.

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Trevor_Pott
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Re: I wish ...

"Maybe Samsung copies them, but Apple do not make the best products. That's like saying that The Register has the best words - absolutely meaningless."

Twatdangle.

That'll be you eating your hat, then.

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Trevor_Pott
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Re: I wish ...

"64bit processor - workable fingerprint sensor - soon to be seen on a Samsung near here."

64 bit ARM CPUs will be standard on almost every ARM device within the next two years. There is nothing about that which is "copying" Apple. It's a natural evolution of the market which was not started by Apple, but instead by a little company called ARM. Samsung's expertise will be needed to make sure those 64 bit CPUs get designed properly for a production process and then produced. Apple are the ones willing to take the market risk and put them in phones first. That is all.

As for fingerprint sensors, Apple arent' the first with a fingerprint-enabled mobile device, they won't be the last. They may be one of the few I can make work by swiping my penis on it, however. The fingerprint readers in my Windows, ChromeOS and Linux notebooks all seem to be able to tell when I am trying to swipe something that's not a finger. I suspect authentication-by-penis will be a feature Samsung don't copy.

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Trevor_Pott
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Re: I wish ...

"Apple do make the best products - Samsung copy them."

Having used products from both companies: you're full of shit. Apple sometimes make a better physical casing. Samsung almost always have a better UI with more features, better multitasking and greater user freedom. Not to mention little things, like user swappable storage and batteries.

Samsung make the better products. Apple sue them in terror. Blackbeery makes better widgets than both of them, but they fucked up so hard in the past that noone will give them a chance on what they've got to market today.

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Trevor_Pott
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Re: I wish ...

"While your example is correct, i do not think there are many other mobile phone manufacturer that have their own retail outlets selling their phones. This might be true for every tech company other than Sony and Apple, and Sony probably were first because the Ginza store has been there forever."

So your statement is that "because it involves a mobile device" it is somehow a different idea worthy of protection for being "unique".

Get the fuck off my planet.

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Trevor_Pott
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Re: I wish ...

"Competing is not copying."

Actually, yes it is. Competing is copying but offering products at a lower price. Competing can also be copying but with a twist so as to offer a slightly different product/service/experience such that people can choose between different realizations of the same concept and thus have the market decide which is best.

Competing is absolutely, 100% copying someone else's idea and doing it differently so that the market can decide which is better.

One vendor per market is called "a monopoly" and is the exact fucking opposite of competition.

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Unmanned, autonomous ROBOT TRUCK CONVOY 'drives though town'

Trevor_Pott
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Commuting sucks.

Where's my goddamned Johnny Cab?

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Snowden: Canadian spooks used free airport WiFi to track travellers

Trevor_Pott
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Re: Sir

None of which has anything to do with the courts, their officers, or the RCMP. And if you think for a second the RCMP would hesitate to lock away any of those bastards, you're an idiot. The Tories threw the RCMP under the bus in the name of public opinion by launching investigations into RCMP corruption and misbehaviour. The RCMP would love nothing more than the return the favour.

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Trevor_Pott
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Re: @Trevor_Pott, @MachDiamond

The USA is a secular nation with no official religion. 76% of the US is christian with only 51% being protestant. Generally it is only a small subsection of protestants that are completely fucking whacko.

If I gaze at these statistics with a cynical eye I don't think that the % of Americans that are batshit-bananas Revelationists is not that much higher than in most other countries. 20-30% of most countries seems to be peopled with such individuals, the only thing that changes is the document or charismatic authority they worship. The politically correct term for these folks is usually "the conservative base".

This isn't about being a born-again christian. I know lots of born again Christians who haven't taken the express train to crazy town. This is about Revelationists and their dogmatic hatred of their Islamic counterparts.

For all that I take issue with religion in general, the believers willing to say "convert or die" are actually a minority of the population. And if we're going to profile nutjobs from one culture we should profile from them all.

...especially in secular nations like Canada and the USA.

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Trevor_Pott
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Re: I have a left Ear yet understand the need for my Right

Any time, sir. I'm always open to beverages and socialization with people of insight and cognitive capability. Even the ones with whom I disagree. Unhindered discourse is one of the liberties that we defend in "free societies", if celebrating that happens to involve a proper lager or three, who I am to say no?

Cheers.

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Trevor_Pott
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Re: Easy option

So the price of internet access is acceptance of total surveillance? This seems okay to you? Get the fuck out of my country.

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Trevor_Pott
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"If a murder has been committed and the detectives take casts of footprints in the area (yours happening to be amongst them), is your privacy being infringed?"

In your scenario the investigators have probably cause to gather evidence based on an event that has already happened. The difference between that and spying on everyone all the time is that the difference between investigating an incident looking for clues and monitoring everything proactively in case there is an incident. Put more simply:

Total surveillance obliterates the presumption of innocence. Investigation of a crime scene does not. The presumption of innocence is a far more important social concept than the illusion of security provided by turning my nation into a police state.

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Trevor_Pott
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Re: I have a left Ear yet understand the need for my Right

I do take a pragmatic view. Security is an illusion. You are never safe If I want to kill your ass, I will. Any sufficiently motivated individual with enough time to plan can accomplish it. Fuck, man, I can personally build something like a dozen weapons of mass destruction using items I can purchase without being ticking up the radar from various hardware and chemical stores and/or have lying around the house. There's nothing special about me or my knowledge, and I - despite this knowledge - haven't the desire to go a-murdering.

Despite literally tens of millions of people around the world having this kind of knowledge, you are not dead, your civilization is not in ruins. How do you reconcile this with the need for the panopticon?

There will always be some nutjobs - read: chaotic evil - who just want to watch the world burn. There will always be people willing to sacrifice their own lives or freedom to accomplish their goals. Stopping them is usually impossible, or requires the sacrifice of so much liberty that the civilization becomes a police state.

The deaths of the few are an acceptable price to pay for the liberty of the many. Even if those deaths include me or my loved ones. It is a sacrifice each and every one of us would willingly make. It is the price of freedom.

I do not advocate anarchy. We have laws and many of those laws need to be enforced. (Way - way - more should be repealed for a huge number of reasons.)

Simultaneously, I cannot countenance the centralization of such overwhelming power and the lack of any meaningful controls to it's use. The ability of the people who get to decide what is legal and what is not to track all people at all times and then send men with guns out to force the populace to comply must never be allowed in a civilized society. EVER.

We're not talking here about targeted surveillance. We're talking about mass surveillance of such scope as to know every sorted detail about every single individual's actions, their beliefs, their affiliations, their network of friends, family, contacts...

First they came for the Socialists, and I did not speak out-- Because I was not a Socialist.

Then they came for the Trade Unionists, and I did not speak out-- Because I was not a Trade Unionist.

Then they came for the Jews, and I did not speak out-- Because I was not a Jew.

Then they came for me--and there was no one left to speak for me.

Lest we forget. Je me souviens. If the cost of the liberty of my nation is my life, I offer it willingly.

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Trevor_Pott
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Re: Sir

Our courts have a history of reigning in the government when they step too far out of line. I expect no different here...though it will take years to wind it's way through to the Supreme Court.

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Trevor_Pott
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@MachDiamond

Explain to please me how someone in traditional Muslim dress with a banner/sign/scarf/whatever saying "God is great" in their native tongue is bad.

Please also explain how it is any different from someone in jeans, cowboy boots, a cowboy hat and a t-shirt that says "praise Jesus"?

Both at first glance look like flagrant adherents of dangerous religious sects that have been responsible for untold suffering and misery throughout human history. Both would seem to match the stereotype of dress assigned to bigoted individuals who have no moral qualms about invading other nations to kill civilians on flimsy pretenses that amount to "convert or die." Both are people I'd avoid and consider to be equally radical, dangerous and a threat to the ethical and moral future of a civilized nation.

I say if we're going to profile against one type, we should profile against both.

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Trevor_Pott
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if the Canadian "spooks" were to prevent even one incident a year as a result of 10 years spying on free open networks then i would still consider it an unacceptable violation of the liberty of Canadian citizens.

Liberty is never an acceptable price to pay for security. Let alone the illusion of security.

Also: while we're talking, are you interesting in purchasing a rock that keeps away tigers?

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Trevor_Pott
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Because if Harper doesn't obey the spirit of a ruling he'll find himself in front of the Supreme Court judge one more time, and they do not take kindly in this country to repeat offenders. If he tries to outright break the law, the mounties will throw his ass in jail.

The wheels of justice turn slowly, but - at least in this country - they do still turn. And that sonofabitch absolutely runs the risk of jail. Not only for this debacle, but for several others as well. Unlike the USA, our governments are not immune to the powers of the court. Not yet. With luck, not ever.

Though our courts do take rather a long time, they eventually reach the right decision. Now, if you'll excuse me, I have to plan a stagette for a friend of mine and her soon-to-be-wife. An event made possible by the supreme court pissing on the government's agenda.

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Trevor_Pott
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And the challenges have already been filed. There are more yet to come. Given the history of the Supreme Court in backing the people (not the government) in these sorts of things, I expect CSEC will not be happy about the verdict

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Trevor_Pott
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This breaks our laws.

Feet will be held to the fire. I cannot wait for this to be brought in front of a judge. Lawsuit funding has already begun.

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EU warns United States: SHAPE UP on data protection OR ELSE

Trevor_Pott
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Re: Once again, the elephant in the room ..

"you have to be brave and emotionally strong enough to stick your neck out to help protect others. It takes a special kind of person."

Agree entirely, however, that's not why many police officers sign up. Far - far - too many sign up simply because it gives them power over others. The desire of which virtually assures that they will abuse it the instant they have it.

An additional item for you to consider: police exist to uphold the law, however, the law has little to do with morality or ethics. That something is legal does not make it right. That something is illegal does not make it wrong.

That exists for one reason and one reason only: to ensure those in power remain in power. It has fuck all to do with "the common good" and hasn't for a very long time.

If you are sworn to uphold laws that are designed in such a way that any average person attempting to be a good citizen and going about their day breaks several of htem on any given day then you are an instrument of oppression.

Police are trained to uphold the law without interpretation, compassion or judgement. If that law no longer protects "the people" then it is not "the people" that the police serve.

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Microsoft builds admin tool to spare Office 365 sellers' blushes

Trevor_Pott
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Coat

"So Microsoft have finally invented a reseller interface."

While at the same time obliterating margins for resellers and redesigning all aspects of their software to remove the need for resellers altogether.

Mine's the one with the SPLA to the nuts.

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Trevor_Pott
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Re: A Simple solution?

Hi Frank ly, as a Microsoft reseller I would like to jump here.

While I agree with your premise that if a company is "pushing" a product they should dogfood it internally, there are two issues with your statement.

1) Office 365 is vast. Just because it's down for one company does not mean it's down for another. Even users within the same company will not (usually) experience outages at the same time.

2) That some of us are supporting customers using Office 365 does not mean we are "pushing" Office 365 to our customers.

Personally, I would rather be peeled than use Office 365. Unfortunately, some of my clients request/require/demand that it be supported. Some come with Office 365 when the customer is acquired.

That said, the new upgrades sound promising. They almost sound like they'll make administering office 365 for my client base easier. Which only makes we wonder what else Microsoft is going to change in order to fuck this up as they have proven is essentially inevitable.

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Gene boffins: Yes, you. Staring at the screen. You're a NEANDERTHAL

Trevor_Pott
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Re: Define "Aryans"

Well, I lack a better term than "Aryans". Let me define it for you as I understand the term. For me, "Aryan" would be a people of indo-european descent whose meets the following criteria:

1) Mostly stayed in Europe/Middle East after the Indian/European split

2) Did not do much in the way of mixing with the mongols when they were a-invading

3) Did not do much in the way of mixing with the moors when they were a-invading

4) No mixing with East or South Asian peoples after about 10,000 BCE

5) No mixing pretty much at any point with Polynesians or Aborigine peoples

That doesn't leave a hell of a lot of people. Celts/Gauls (Hallstatt and La Tène) pre-moor invasion would seem to qualify as they would have been the most isolated Indo-European peoples.

Germanic tribes and Nordic countries are probably a safe bet. Slavic nations I'm a little unsure about, as their populations saw a lot of mixing with mongolians not too far back. Alexander the Great also did a rather good job of muddying the waters on this, what with sewing his seed to and fro.

More scientifically, it's a neat way of packaging up populations dominated by Y haplogroups R1a, R1b I1, I2a, I2b, N1c, N1b, and N1c without much in the way of genetic influence from the surrounding Y haplogroups Cx, Ex, Fx, Gx, and Jx. (The other haplogroups, to my knowledge, never really having "bordered" the "Aryans" so the genetic mixing being even less frequent and likely.)

Right up until the end of the neolithic gene flow didn't seem to happen that fast. Humans were still speciating. natural selection was still "a thing". Since the end of the neolithic we seem to have mostly stopped evolving gross phenotypic variations due to hybridisation. Genetic variance seems to be largely down to mutation and selection-by-disease. (As opposed to climate, scarcity, etc.)

Some of that is probably down to "the neolithic wasn't all that long go", so populations that defined the end of that era remained mostly relevant. Some of that, however, really is down to increased gene flow since then. We got better at moving around the world. We spread our genes.

Unfortunately, we don't really have good terms for a lot of these end-neolithic populations. Relying on haplogroups is inaccurate, as neither mtDNA or Y-chromosome groups accurate reflect population grouping (and the associated genetic isolation). Similarly, using cultural or linguistic terms (such as indo-european or indo-iranian) is equally inaccurate.

For example, the closest mtDNA groups are R, I and W-descendant populations, but these don't neatly overlap with Y haplogroups R1a, R1b I1, I2a, I2b, N1c, N1b, and N1c. if you researching both groups however, you start to get a rough idea of the populations in question and the genetic trait clustering in question.

Despite this, modern humans did experience a period of relative genetic stagnation some time between Y chromosome Adam and Babylon. It created distinct populations each with their own genetic clusterings.

Most interestingly, while individuals that are part of the population I was discussing as "Aryan" are more likely to have lactose tolerance than non-Aryans, it really can't be used to define the population as the evolution of lactose tolerance was only about 6000 years ago. That's well after the neolithic and into the point where we started roaming around the earth a lot more frequently.

That said, Lactose tolerance as well as the "resistance to the plague/HIV" genes would help you narrow things a little, as both of those are far more likely to occur amongst the "Aryan" populations. (Though many "Aryans" would not have them, and our gene spread has brought them to other groups."

Speciation and taxonomy are imprecise.

Use of the term "Aryan" is thus not an attempt at sparking any hatred, but simply a lack of anything more precise. It is the most accurate term I know of to represent the specific population (and associated cluster of genetic traits) that I was thinking of in my previous comment. Alternative (less angry-making) terminology suggestions are welcomed.

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Trevor_Pott
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Re: Define extinction

Well, at the end of the day, Hitler was right.

"Aryans" are "different" than humans. At this point we're not talking enough to be a species-level difference...but selective breeding across a not-very-many number of generations would probably be able to accomplish a distinct speciation between Aryans and Humans.

I don't agree with the Nazi concept of placing a value judgement on "us" versus "them". Who gets to decide which (sub)(sub)species is better? On what basis? Why does one have to be "better" in the first place? This sort of racial disharmony I don't understand at all.

But from a purely scientific standpoint, there is a difference between "Aryans" - or at least a significant subset of them - and pure-strain humans.

"Aryans" are far more likely to contain certain genes. Lactose tolerance, pale skin, that one that conferred immunity to the plague and now confers immunity to HIV. Similarly, pure-strain humans are more likely to have things like sickle-cell anemia. (These are just the ones I can think of off the top of my head.)

Asians (but not all, apparently) might also be broken into a third sub-subspecies, as they have Denisovan DNA. What advantages did that confer to them? What disadvantages?

Hitler chose to view these genetic deltas as something that had ethical or moral implications. The race he identified with - "Aryans" - was "better" than others. Why, I honestly don't know. I never understood that type of thinking...but the fact that some people in our history - and our present - choose to think like this absolutely should not prevent us from thinking about human speciation, subspeciation or the real-world implications of genetic trait propagation.

A great example here is the immunity to HIV. "Pure" Africans don't seem to have it. So far as I know we've only detected it in a few Europeans. There's a really good chance that this particular mutation is in fact some remnant Neandertal DNA. If so, we should start testing Asians for it to see where the branching point was.

This mutation is rare; Europeans only seem to have it in any number because it was related to plague immunity and a lot of those without it died off. Maybe there would be long-term species-level benefits in encouraging those with the trait to seek mates amongst populations where it is not present. It wouldn't solve problems today, but it might make a difference 100 generations from now, offering those populations a greater chance of survival, thus potentially preserving a more diverse human gene pool after $deity only knows what the next plague will be.

Like Hitler, I think studying populations to determine origins and amount of genetic mixing is important. Unlike Hitler, I don't think it's important so that we can keep these populations "pure". I think it's important so that we can encourage strategic genetic mixing so as to create the broadest possible genetic diversity in the hopes of ultimately having a species more capable of coping with unknown future bottleneck events.

"Pure" matters, because "pure" generally means "less likely to adapt." Hybrid vigor, man. Embrace the future!

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Boffins build electronic tongue that can distinguish between BEERS

Trevor_Pott
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@Pascal Monett

You are certifiably insane. The only people who know how to make good beer are Canadian microbreweries. No one else can come close to them for quality or diversity.

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Troll-hunting cases SPIKED in 2012... but remain high

Trevor_Pott
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@ Sir Spoon

Your father was a hamster and your mother smelt of elderberries! And yes, I'll repeat that to the plod too.

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Microsoft veep Satya Nadella now frontrunner in race for CEO spot

Trevor_Pott
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"Isn't the most charismatic of leaders?" What?!> Please, spend some time a room with the man. Lack of charisma is emphatically not his problem. In fact, other than being shackled by Ballmer and Gates on the board, I don't see him having all htat many problems at all. Nadella would make a hell of a CEO for Microsoft. I really hope he gets the gig.

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Lenovo reveals convertible Chromebook

Trevor_Pott
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Re: Good to have choice

Why does every market have to be "huge" to be relevant?

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UK picks Open Document Format for all government files

Trevor_Pott
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Re: Important change

">>"Speaking as someone who actually works on a library that tries to read and write OOXML I can tell you that OOXML still is not very nice: it is overly verbose and inconsistent."

And compared to the original version? ;)"

Twice zero is still zero.

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Trevor_Pott
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Re: Important change

"Office 2013 is really, really good"

If you ignore the UI, which is awful. And the spydrive integration. And the part where Microsoft tried to make it impossible to buy a non-subscription version. And the rage-inducing defaults like "smart quotes" and "adding space at the end of a paragraph instead of letting people mange using carriage returns." Oh, and the massive history attached to the vendor of said product that includes a whole lot of "not listening to customers" and "telling end users to **** off."

Other than all of that - and a few more nits here and there - it's middling to passable, yep.

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Give hackers your data, says former RSA man

Trevor_Pott
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Re: what happens when you inadvertently provide that file in response to an NSL

That's a good question. I suspect you would get a demand for the unhoneypotted passwords followed by a conviction if you refuse to comply.

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Hello Moto: Lenovo grabs Motorola biz for $3bn. But Google's KEEPING the patents

Trevor_Pott
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Re: Not $9B

Good insights, AC. I didn't remember a lot of that. :) +20 internets to you.

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Trevor_Pott
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Google is keeping $9B+ worth of patents from this deal.

That's a lot of suing.

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Hot naked Asian racks in Cali: El Reg snaps Open Compute servers for all

Trevor_Pott
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They are cheap to the point of "disposable".

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MP 'shocked' at failures 'at the top' of the BBC over epic DMI tech fail

Trevor_Pott
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I prefer "snowball's chance in a neutron star."

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Management tools lead VMware through $5bn annual revenue barrier

Trevor_Pott
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Oracle are sweating their existing customers with high licencing fees and you can only do that for so long when there are good alternatives....

VMWare are sweating their existing customers with high licencing fees and you can only do that for so long when there are good alternatives....

That this is interchangeable makes me sad.

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Google patents ROBO-TAXIS to ferry punters into advertiser's shops, restaurants, etc for free

Trevor_Pott
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I want a robo car. Time spend commuting could be better used for anything else. I could get work done instead of wasting time on travel. Driving is an inconvenience that happens to be slightly less inconvenient than mass transit. I'd pay good money to own a robo car.

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Teeny, tiny state machine could BREATHE NEW LIFE into Moore's Law

Trevor_Pott
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Re: "...the non-profit military contractor..."

"but perhaps the author thinks that the FAA, IRS, VA, federal courts and medicaid/medicare are all DoD"

In the US? I wouldn't reject the notion out of hand...

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Internet giants, US gov agree to loosen secrecy of private info slurps

Trevor_Pott
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NSA hope entire world is stupid enough to ignore restrictions and trust them because of reports that reveal nothing. The response that pops immediately to mind is "THERE ARE FOUR LIGHTS".

Honestly, it gets harder and harder not to mentally envision Gen. Alexander as Gul Madred, James Clapper as Enabran Tain and the NSA as some unholy combination of the Obsidian order and Central Command. At least they aren't likely to be using neural solvents to obtain information...yet. So we should be grateful for that, right?

...right?

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Snowden speaks: NSA spies create 'databases of ruin' on innocent folks

Trevor_Pott
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Re: @Trevor_Pot

Rome fell. The US will too. We should start planning for it be buying and investing at home. It gets easier every day. As the US moves more and more towards "cultural exports" and "intellectual property" - all cloudy and subscription-based, natch - I lose more and more incentive to buy things from them.

I'll purchase tangible goods, thanks, and consume my culture from Canadians.

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Trevor_Pott
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Re: @Trevor_Pot

@Skelband: can't disagree with anything you said, but the solution here isn't anarchy. It's controlled revolution.

All laws barring the absolute basics (don't rape, don't murder, don't otherwise deprive people of their fundamental human rights) need to have maximum time horizons. When they hit that horizon they should be brought up for review with severe prejudice towards trowing old laws out. Similarly, all quangos and government organizations should be completely dismantled on a regular basis and their design redone from the ground up with completely new staff and leadership.

Recommendations on which law to keep, which quangos/departments to keep and what the details and structure of both will be should be made by independent committees who will prepare reports based on evidence and science. Legislators who choose not to accept a committee recommendation regarding law/quango/departmental review should have to give a public rationale. If the rationale is inadequate then it should be within the power of the citizenry to get X signatures and trigger an election.

The solution to corruption is to change politicians and civil servants out regularly. Don't let power concentrate. Ensure the people have the ability to hold the elected and the unelected within their government to task.

We also need to get rid of this untenable situation where there are so many laws on the books that any given citizen is breaking several of them every single day no matter how hard they try to be decent folks. The law has become a club used to beat the innocent - and especially the poor - down.

Don't even get me started on the statistics of the US prison population, arrest ratios, conviction ratios the "war on drugs" or the sheer lunacy that is the privatization of prisons to form an "industry" around persecution and incarceration.

Governments are required...but like diapers, they need to be changed frequently and we always need to be on guard for that telltale smell.

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Trevor_Pott
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@Scott Holland

"But, in no small measure, because of his humility, belief in freedom, and dedication to the principles of the Declaration of Independence and the Constitution, Americans still enjoy more freedom and more protection FROM the government than most in the world. But those protections have been steadily eroded over the decades. Snowden helped to reveal just how much."

And that's the bit that Titus Technophobe can't understand. That freedom is not "safety form terrorists." Freedom is the right to be free of government interference.

I was born a citizen of Canada. I never swore any oath of loyalty or pledged my fealty, industry or liberty to her government. I am forced to obey because if I don't obey men with guns with drag me away to prison. If I resist being dragged away, they'll kill me. Obey or die. Those are my choices.

I absolutely never pledged my loyalty, fealty, industry or liberty to the United States of America. I have said that I am not an enemy of her people or her government on forms when I cross the border, and I believe that to be an entirely truthful statement.

But neither am I a loyal servant or even an ally. I am, in fact, entirely disinterested in what happens to the USA or her people excepting where their self-immolation can and does affect my home.

I am not an anarchist, nor am I a right libertarian. I believe governments have a place - and important place - and that a social democracy is preferable to the street gangs of anarchy, feudalism, capitalism, socialism, communism, fascism, and most other forms of government.

But i also believe that the role of a government is to govern. Not to rule. That people should be free to pursue their own aims and desires so long as those aims and desires aren't deleterious to society as a whole.

We wouldn't give an atom bomb to a civilian. There is no purpose for such a device that is not deleterious to society as a whole and the risk is far too great that it would fall into the hands of someone who would actually use it - accidentally or otherwise.

Similarly, we cannot give a panopticon to a government. There is no purpose for such a device that is not deleterious to society as a whole and the the risk is far too great that it would be misused - accidentally or otherwise.

The founding fathers weren't the greatest people. In fact, in a lot of ways, it seems they were pretty awful people...but their lessons have been build upon. We've learned a few things - in blood - that reinforce what those founding fathers sought to teach...and more besides.

The purpose of freedom is to ensure that governments remain afraid of their people and never seek to rule them again. That's the bit that matters.

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Trevor_Pott
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Re: @Trevor_Pot

Dragnet surveillance has indeed impacted my personal liberty. The fact that you, personally, "don't believe we've given up any liberty since 1960" doesn't mean a goddamned thing. I've seen abuses of power first hand. I've had some of those abuses directed at me, personally. Others that have affected the lives of people I care about.

Absolute power corrupts absolutely.

I believe this is a fundamental truth of human nature.

You deny it.

Dragnet surveillance is too much power. No argument I might mount, no evidence I present would ever convince you of that, however, because no matter what evidence, no matter what history, no matter which incidents are ever brought to your attention you shrug them off by simply reasserting your personal belief.

You are like a door-to-door christian arguing their faith in God. "You can't prove that God doesn't exist so he exists." No matter how much evidence piles up against it, because the evidence isn't iron clad and absolute that person will believe steadfastly in God.

You alternate between claiming the ends justify the means and that nobody of import is affected. You are quite liberal with personal attacks in your haughty dismissive sarcasm but decry any attempt to call you on your own personal douchebaggery.

I believe in innocent unless proven guilty. I really do. But there are two issues I have with applying this precept to the NSA. The first is that corporations and government organizations are not people. They should not be granted "human rights" and they they must be held to a higher standard than individuals.

The second is that we don't need to let the western world become Nazi Germany before we act. We need to see that there is a risk of it occurring, see how it can occur, look for the first signs that power is being abused and then act to reign things in.

Abuses of power are occurring, and have been for quite some time. The the real problem is that the sheer scale and cope of what's possible today completely dwarfs anything that was possible in the 60s, 70s, 80s or 90s. ECHELON has got nothing on PRISM, and today's programs make PRISM look like a child's toy.

Our technology is racing ahead of our ethics. Our ability to cope with the social changes incurred by the accumulation and centralization of such power is far, far less than our ability to generate new technologies and new means of concentrating even more power.

I've been in the room with the overly bright lights a few too many times. I am not a man who has any plans or desires to harm others, to steal someone's job or even to do something so mundane as dodge taxes. Yet I have been to that room too often. I don't like that room, sir. I am not fond of my trips there.

Absolute power corrupts absolutely, and all that it takes for evil men to win is for good men to do nothing. We teach this to our children for a reason. It is a true shame these were lessons you've never learned.

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Trevor_Pott
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Re: @Trevor_Pott - @Trevor_Pott

@RobHib thanks for restoring my faith in humanity. It's nice to know that someone else has learned from history. As for age...I'm 31. I've no idea what the rest of this lot are...but I grew up within a stone's throw of a military base. It played a role in shaping my beliefs. It still does.

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French drug dealers regretfully announce 'temporary closure'

Trevor_Pott
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Re: And who says criminals don't have a ...

Legality and ethics rarely overlap.

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Thanks for suggesting eBay should flog PayPal. It's not happening, CEO tells Carl Icahn

Trevor_Pott
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Re: activist?

It must really bother you, AC, to know that there actually exist people in this world who care about more than just themselves. The real question is...why?

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Trevor_Pott
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Re: activist?

@JDX

Oh, aye, all activists are bad. The status quo is good! The rich need to get richer. The poor need to get poorer. Screw the environment, the future, children, old people, minorities, men, women, the infirm, the insane and any other group that isn't currently making out like a bandit.

Individuals need to have less control over their lives (unless they're part of the 1%) and governments need to keep pissing away money spying on their own citizens in preparation to put down the inevitable revolt.

I guess that all makes perfect sense...if you're part of the 1%. Me, I'm not. So I'll loudly disagree with you. Not all activists - or causes - are good...but a fair number are. Seems to me "activist" only has a bad name as a category amongst those who butter their bread at the expense of others.

Now lobbyist on the other hand, that leaves a sour taste. Probably because of the acidity of all that money wrecking the atmosphere...

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Verizon's transparency report shows more than 320,000 US data slurping orders

Trevor_Pott
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And how many non-customers (I.E. foreign civilians such as myself) were monitored? Hmm?

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