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* Posts by Trevor_Pott

4451 posts • joined 31 May 2010

Hey, how'd that guy get to be a BAZILLIONAIRE?

Trevor_Pott
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Brisk pace? Or merely a pretty face?

Most evidence says a significant chunk of our personalities are more strongly influenced by genetic factors than environmental ones. Humans experience evolution at between 112 and 160 mutations per generation. That's not particularly high, and most of the mutations we retain seem to be related to our immune systems.

People are the same, mostly, as they have been for thousands of years. Every now and again someone exceptional arises...but by definition exceptional individuals are not the norm.

I think the bigger issue you need wordy about is the finite capacity of the human mind. We are in a world where no one brain can know all there is to know about VMware, let alone "the IT industry as a whole". To say nothing of the impossibility of a modern Leonardoesque polymath. Even the greatest among us will never be expert-level in virtually all fields of human endeavour. Never again.

So it is then that variations are smoothed over time. The relevance of the one meets the requirement for the many. No islands amongst today's man, and that makes for smoother - if less interesting - evolution of technology.

A man in his basement is a myth buried in legends of history. Today you need a CERN or at least venture capital. The future is less about discovery and more about profit;. Profit is incremental for Change is Risk and Risk is ostracised. Mutations and deviants move to the edge and are defunded. Without resources - and the knowledge of the many - the genius of The One is left to wither and die.

It is the era of "social"! I don't like how they talk, let's be a thought influencer and smother them. "If you have the facts on your side, pound the facts. If you have the law on your side, pound the law. If you have neither on your side, pound the table."

Never Address the technical questions! Cry bully and let slip the tweets of war! The good of the customer?

It is what I say it is. Look at the Social Influence; for Obviously this is what now determines Right. Not Correct, mind you – that concept is outmoded and from a past where merit, ethics and engineering principles mattered – but Right. What's good for Me is all that matters. ME. Mine. People I like. Customers like me, like mine, markets that I choose to deify.

This then is the hypocrisy of the one - "I disagree with their message!" – wielding their own influence and message as a weapon in and of itself. This is your future; it is IT for all your efforts should be for the future glory of me! Even those who hold such in contempt fall prey from time to time; the deck is stacked, this is pervasive and all around you.

The meritocracy is dead. It is a game of thrones now. Influence is purchased. Honesty means aught. Hewlett and Packard are dead. All glory to the hyprnozuckerberg

…bitch.

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Trevor_Pott
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Re: So what about vFRC?

I have played with it some and will be doing a more thorough review when my ESXi 5.5 licences come in. I believe that I even discussed the "but it's free" issue in the article.

The Cole's Notes? Proximal is easier to use, easier to administer, is more feature rich and (anecdotally) has far better read caching algorithms. This last has to be more thoroughly verified, but the "word on the street" from the kinds of customers that can - and do - test these sorts of things at scale is that Proximal's focus on read cache has paid off in that regard.

The future for Proximal Data in the face of vFRC is pretty simple: be the better mousetrap. Innovate faster, provide the better offering, work more closely with customers and work cross-platform. VMware might get to "good enough" one day, but in my opinion - and really, that's all you can go on until you've worked with vFRC's interface and design philosophy yourself - it's a long way from that just yet.

By the time VMware gets to "good enough" Proximal Data will have moved on to new features. Minimal risk write caching as one example. There's more that I can't exactly go into. I think Proximal is worth the money today, and I'm a stingy bastard who works with broke SMBs who never have budget.

Given what I know of the company - and the bright people working for it - I think that it will most likely still be worth the money several years from now. But you don't have to take my word for it. Go to the website and <a href='http://www.proximaldata.com/product/try_us_program.php">download the trial</a>. Put it side by side with VMware's offering.

That's part of the beauty of virtualisation, no? The ability to try this sort of stuff before you buy. Of course, I'm of the belief that if you try it you'll likely choose "buy"...but I'm an infrastructure nerd and I find this all quite fascinating and cool.

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Trevor_Pott
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Re: my company

***warning, largely anecdotal evidence***

In my testing, the answer is yes. Now, I don't have a Nimbus or Violin costs-more-than-Monaco all-flash SAN. In fact, I have a RAID 5 of 8 Kingston Hyper-X 240GB SSDs. You'll note in the review that this array is perfectly capable of flattening a 10GbE link. Which is what I'm using, because of "too poor for infiniband or 40GbE".

I am also capable of absolutely flattening that 10GbE link while doing things like "testing 10GbE swtiches" or "trying to make Hyper-V do something strange." I test things. It's kind of my job.

Still, Not being made of money, I have to run my actual production VMs on the same hardware. So I use Proximal Data's Autocache with the 480GB Intel 520 SSDs inside my Fat Twin and Eris 3 nodes. The result looks a lot like the theoretical model I laid out in an earlier article, with the exception that one of the Eris 3 nodes has a Micron 1.4TB PCI-E SSD for Autocache, another has a 120GB Intel 520 SSD and there are some Synologies in play.

Long story short, when I am busy making the "SAN" cry, the Autocache-enabled nodes still bloody work. Sure, they do yeoman's work when accelerating a really slow setup (like a RAID 1 of 2x 7200 RPM SATA drives) or a mid-range setup (bigger Synology diskstations), but the truly surprising bit is that they actually provide worthwhile and noticeable improvement to the VMs that are stored on the SSD array.

Now, I'll admit, outside of latency-sensitive setups you don't notice host-cache at all when the SAN isn't congested. Why would you? But flatten the link and the difference is night and day.

It's a danger too. It gets to the point that you just sort of forget you're using it. Then one day, the SSD fails in the server and everything reverts to pre-cached speeds...it's painful. I promise you, you'll get the SSD swapped and cache turned back on in a right hurry.

...but at least the thing keeps on working through that. That's the part that ultimately won me over.

I never would have thought that it would be a more efficient use of the SSDs available to me use them as host cache instead of just lashing them together into another RAID and doing more high-sped central storage. Up until about two months ago, that had been my plan.

Now? Now that looks like a great deal of hassle for no huge advantage over what I'm getting from the host cache. So yeah, it works. Even if your central storage is made of fast.

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Trevor_Pott
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Re: Why would you cache writes locally?

It's all about proximity. With hybrid SANs - and I make extensive use of them myself in my own datacenters, not to mention I am a fan of Tintri - you are still hauling all that data across the network. That's latency. It's also another bottleneck. It's more to wire up (if you want more bandwidth), more cost, more to manage...

Local read cache is local. Practically zero latency, minimal network impact. Put it in and it goes faster. It's also something where you can spot accelerate or deploy en masse, according to your needs. Great big fast SANs are bloody expensive. They are even more expensive if you need things like high availability, replication, etc. They like to charge you all the more for the goodies and two hybrids is a pretty penny past two traditionals.

Read caching is cheap, it's easy, it's non disruptive. It's an easy option when your alternative is massively expensive SANs. This is why I think read caches are a great mass market play; they fit really well into those businesses that are of a size where "a new SAN" is a massive investment that takes a lot of consideration and months upon months of fighting for budget. Perfect for the SMBs and midmarket.

Now, if you want to argue "why put a write cache into the local hosts (thus creating another tier of storage that has to be maintained, etc", well, there's no way I can answer that for you. I work with Proximal. They do read cache. Anything I could say (positive or negative) about the write cache stuff would be open to accusations of bias. I can only recommend that you talk up Pernix and/or Flashsoft and ask your questions directly. They are going to be the ones who can give you the most well thought out response.

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Trevor_Pott
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Re: Something to Separate the Men from the Boys in the Spaces where Words Control Worlds

People haven't changed overmuch throughout our recorded history. Cultures change. The tools we have change...but we are mostly the same. (Evolution of minor things like lactose tolerance and resistance to various diseases put to one side.)

I see no sign of the singularity. The closest I have seen so far as some of the Deep Data Analytics and simulation startups like Cloudphysics who want to move from reactive analytics into Muchos Big Time predictive analytics. Still, they are a ways away and their scope of addressable technologies is narrow. (There are only so many PhDs in the world who know enough about this stuff to code the Really Good Stuff.)

It is as it was. The tools change. The people stay the same. Mostly. Adjust your models for the power of individual personalities where required but realise that weather != climate and that short term local variations are smoothed out with time.

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Trevor_Pott
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Microsoft has built flash caching into Storage Spaces for Server 2012 R2. Until I get a good JBOD cluster setup going, I'll not know how it fares in the real world.

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Space boffins boycott Kepler 'scope talks after US bans Chinese guests

Trevor_Pott
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Re: Just move it.

The Tories don't control all provinces. Many would be happy to have such a conference. In fact, the Alberta Tories differ quite a bit from the federal Tories. I'm positive that a conference like this would receive strongly positive support here in Edmonton.

Canadian politics is complicated. It's best not to think of Harper's goons as the Conservative party - as the actual provincial versions are quite a bit less batshit bananas - but more as "the Reform party" (from whence their leadership derive) or "that one step away from the precipice of the Wild Rose Party" (to where all the more radical whackjobs that Harper won't tolerate flee.)

Fear not the Tories. The SCoC will keep them in line. Fear the Wild Rose Party; if those fuckers get hold of the Tar Sands they can do damage on a planetary scale. (For all the bitching about the tar sands that greens like to do it could be far - far - worse. Personally, I'd prefer that they actually allow Bruce Power to install some fission generation capacity, but that's another rant altogether...)

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Trevor_Pott
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Re: Just move it.

Canada's a nice country for such things...

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Brazil's anti-NSA prez urged to SNATCH keys to the internet from America

Trevor_Pott
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@James Micallef

You say:

"That responsibility rests on the shoulders of the people who elected their governments and who refuse to organise - and to speak out en masse - to change it for the better."

as if it were something really easy to do, while you have already pointed out yourself that the whole system is rigged against this happening. So I can't blame (and therefore I can't hate) that majority of people for the misdeeds done by the US on the world stage.

Hating a group of people in the US is completely different from "hating America" and that is NOT pedantry.

I never once said it was easy. I said it was necessary. And I can - and do - hate every single cowardly one of them that doesn't get off their asses and do something about it. Yes, the system is rigged against them. Yes, they have a fuck of a lot of work to do to make up for the immense amount they've let slide. Yes, we too in our own nations have to be vigilant lest we become the US (or the UK).

But that's the price of freedom, goddamn it. You pay in vigilance. You pay in coppers and you pay in blood. Americans - as a whole - aren't willing to pay in any of those currencies and are dooming the rest of us along with their ignorant, lazy selves.

There are a handful of Americans who care. They fight and struggle to keep a flame burning against the darkness. People like the EFF, Snowden, Schwartz, and so forth. They are the tragically few exceptions that prove the rule.

It's sophistry of the Fox News kind to point to a statistically insignificant number of exceptions and say "see, you can't [insert generalisation]!" It's right up there with "if we pick the highest temperature year in recent times (1998) as the beginning of our misguided chart you don't see global warming occuring!" It's a cherry picking statistics in the vain attempt to manufacture a worldview that conforms more closely to that which you wish to be true.

I'd love it if there were enough exceptions to the rule that I could look at America and say "that's mostly good people, let down by a few bad apples." It's not. Not even close. It's a whole fuck of a lot of terrible people - indeed, most of the world's terrible people immigrate there to make their fortunes - with a carefully cultivated herd of violently apathetic people.

And frankly, all that is required for evil to win is for "good men" to do nothing. So those apathetics, nihilists, and self-focused insular types that prefer to pretend the Bad Stuff isn't happening, isn't their fault, they have no power over it or it isn't their responsibility? Fuck 'em. Every last one. I hold them all equally as responsible as bastards actively working to screw the hoi polloi over.

The power of a king is determined by the forces of his army. That army is made up of people, each and every one of whom make a choice to serve. After 2 million years of evolution for homo sapiens, 200,000 years of modern humans and over 8000 years of recorded history I expect each and every last fucking one of them to have learned that lesson.

And yes, I hold it against them if they haven't. It is the single most basic, repeated lesson in our history as a species and failing to learn it reflects a lack of curiosity and a lack of personal responsibility for learning about the world (and one's place in it) that I consider criminal.

End of.

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Trevor_Pott
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Re: @James Micallef

Also: for the record, moving past research into what the majority of planetary citizens feel and directly to me, personally...

...this is every single thing that is wrong with America in one neat little bow.

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Trevor_Pott
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@James Micallef

Oh look, it's someone attempting to use pedantry to distract from a peerfectly clear meaning that everyone else in the thread is capable of understanding and working with.

So sorry you don't like what I have to so, but too bad. I'm learning from the Americans and thus give zero fucks about such niggly little verbal rules. Word Police.

As for speaking for the vast majority o the world, I've done my research on this. Just because you lurve 'Murikkka (fuck yeah!) doesn't place your views in alignment with those who feel the jackboots of the xenophobes at their collar...which is most of the world, just so's you know.

Hating America is pretty simple: those who hate it want it to fall. The government to collapse, the institutions that make up it's military, it's political infrastructure, it's very "way of life" to be erased and reformed. Critically, we want it reformed in such a way as it keeps it's goddamned nose out of our business.

In a perfect world, America would experience a bloodless revolution wherein it's governmental system was replaced with an actual democracy (not a republic) that saw proportional representation with electoral districts drawn by independent committee (and thus immune to gerrymandering), outlaws money in politics (by providing a fixed amount of funding for any candidate who made the minimum number of signatures) was strongly multi-party, had a minimalist military, universal (health care/primary education/post-secondary education/emergency services/environmental protection/pension/employment insurance) at a minimum!

Now, certainly, there are many out there - particularly amongst the extremist Muslims - who would not be fond of seeing their old nemesis reforms into something that provides education to women and doesn't push Sharia law, but you can't please everyone.

The key here, however, is the desire to reform America such that it would catch them up with the better parts of the western world and allow them to serve as a beacon for others once more. Combined with a new found culture of "staying the fuck out of the business of other nations" I think it could go from "'Merikkkuh" (fuck yeah!) to a grown up member of the international community that the rest of us can respect and work with.

What it is today is a bully. A bully with a number of highly evident mental problems that is trying to beat the entire world to be just like it using any and every club it can find. America is dangerous, and that responsibility isn't borne merely by the government, or by one political party or even by some shadowy organization.

That responsibility rests on the shoulders of the people who elected their governments and who refuse to organise - and to speak out en masse - to change it for the better.

Maybe you love the Ayn Randian direction of 'Merikkkuh and it's increasingly disconnected sheeple. Maybe you like their interventionist policies and their exceptionalism. That puts you in the minority. The rest of the world - and all evidence points to "the overwhelming majority of the world -doesn't. Nor do they have any intention of allowing themselves to be converted in their crusades.

If they want to ruin their own country, fine. But they absolutely need to give up the weapons and the economic clubs to beat other nations with before they do. That, or we need to take it from them. A massive international economic and military wall around that black hole of a country so that it can implode on it's own, without harming others.

Hating America is a rational response to a nationalistic, overreaching superpower that isn't anywhere near the beacon of civilization it believes itself to be yet is attempting to force the rest of the world to emulate. It is the international version of a "schoolyard bully"'s club and it needs to be treated the same. Isolate, contain, retrain.

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Trevor_Pott
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@Velker Hettt

It does indeed make a difference which side of the US government's weapons you're on. I'm still pretty pissed that the USA murdered some friends of mine. In fact, most of my country is still pretty bitter about the casual brutality and absolute lack of remorse the USA has shown about this (and similar) incidents.

Canada isn't an American ally. We're a hostage. It is incidents like the above that serve to remind us of such. And they wonder why we hate them so...

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@DrTechnical

Very few try coming to the USA for a better life. A few million, all told. Most are trying to get into Canada (while we have our problems, we aren't anywhere near as fucked up as the USA). Many of those who do move to the US hate it anyways. Many of those who live in the US hate it too.

I realize there are some who are misguided enough to try to move to the USA "for a better life," but the shine typically fades quite quickly upon arrival. Besides, not everyone is intelligent enough - or worldly enough - to realize how bad the place really is. America dumps billions into propaganda. Some people give up their entire lives to move there only to realize that they were sold a completely bullshit bill of goods. The really rare ones go there and like it.

If your alternative is being ethnically cleansed, American probably looks pretty good. If, however, you have the means and the capability to choose where to live, there is no rational reason on this earth to choose the United States over many of the alternatives.

There is a difference between people fleeing for their lives willing to accept any port in a storm and people who have options making a choice.

In my experience those who move to the US by choice when there are other options available are either massively ideologically deluded (Ayn Rand ermagerd!) or they are sociopaths who believe that they have the ability to simply squish enough little people to make up for the massive deficits of US society. (If they are sociopaths, they're probably right; the modern USA is designed entirely to reward them.)

Also: the USA has "given" me nothing. The USA has economically plundered my nation and used the barely concealed hint of violence to keep us in line. When the time comes for it to do good on an international stage it waits until everyone else has committed - and millions have died - before i decides to step in and take all the credit.

The rest of the time it's trying to either intervene in internal affairs of sovereign nations of club brown people over the head to steal their oil. What about a well-armed group of bandits is admirable? Why should I thank them? Why should I praise them?

They are bandits. Thugs to stand up against. Not leaders to admire.

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Trevor_Pott
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@MondoMan

It is indeed my choice and for many damned good reasons I choose Canada. Way - way - better than the US of A.

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'Hating America is a crime'

Then there are ~6.7 Billion criminals out of a population of ~7 Billion. At that point it's not so much a "crime" as it is "something a small - and very deluded - chunk of society deeply wishes were a crime, but will never be."

America is an unfortunate artefact in human history. One I sincerely hope will be quickly forgotten.

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Oracle brass past and present tapped for Microsoft CEO - report

Trevor_Pott
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Re: Doug or Kevin their only hope.

Kevin Turner? Please. He has been one of the guiltiest offenders of using metrics to justify descisions rather than informing them. Turner has no plan to turn Microsoft around excpeting "educate the customer." That's rediculous on two levels; 1) you are telling the customer to adapt to your business model (instead of vice versa) 2) Microsoft's marketing people are terrible.

Turner is the path to the dark side, same as Elop.

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Trevor_Pott
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Nadella nay not have experience running a complete major tech company...but he also doesn't have experience running one into the ground, or pissing away the majority of a client base.

Of all the candidates on offer so far, Nadella is the only one whose installation would restore trust in Microsoft for me. Server and Tools are the good guys of MS. The rest of these CEOs are either corporate pillagers, ultra-high-end niche pillagers or who have failed miserably (repeatedly,) at targeting the consumer. Nadella is the only "make the best widget for the largest number of people at a reasonable price" exec of the bunch.

Everyone else at Microsoft seems to believe in Microsoft's manifest destiny. They espouse "metrics," but only as a means to justify decisions already made. Nadella uses metrics to guide descisions yet to be made, but also factors in actually talking to customers.

If you aren't going to install Nadella - and with him a demonstrable commitment to growing the compay, establishing and then preserving a technological leadership - then forgo the pretense and simply hire Ichann. At least he'll make the asset stripping and milking the husk for Wall Street's pleasure quick and relatively painless.

Whatever you do, don't put in some enterprise crony. Everyone in this business targets the enterprise almost exclusively. There's only so much room there, and Microsoft isn't well poised to win a competition for enterprise devices and services against the likes of Oracle, HP, IBM or Dell.

Stick with the mass market. Make good software, devices and services that are easy to use and at a price that the majority of individuals and businesses are willing to pay. There is no future for Microsoft excepting that. So far, there's only one CEO I've seen who could deliver it.

Which means, all told, we'll probably get Elop. *sigh*

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WD Sentinel DS 6100: What does a disk-peddler know about servers?

Trevor_Pott
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Re: VMware Compliant?

VMware compliant....as in VAAI or SMI supported by Windows Essentials? Or do you want me to try installing VMware on the device itself?

Pretty sure I have a USB stick with ESXi 5.1 around here somewhere....

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Trevor_Pott
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Re: Noise and power consumption levels would definately be nice...

The thing ships with a 200W PSU, but seems to consistently idle around 50. Doesn't seem to get much above 100W when going flat out like a lizard drinking.

I think that actually beats my purpose built home server/HTPC, damn it!

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Re: Noise and power consumption levels would definately be nice...

Noise is basically none. Power was low enough that I even forgot it was relevant. When I get home, I'll kill-a-watt it.

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Trevor_Pott
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Do you want a photo of it other than in bits? I thought "in bits" was more interesting.

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Trevor_Pott
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Re: So...

Only gets noisy if you flatten it. By "noisy" I mean "less noisy than my Alienware MX18 playing games."

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Microsoft watches iPads flood into world's offices: Right, remote desktop clients. It's time

Trevor_Pott
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@Pascal Monett

I, however, am the one doing the reselling. And Microsoft can go eat a bag of 10,000 wiggling, severed dicks. My costs keep going up and up and up while the rewards go down.

Raising prices isn't doing me or my customers a damned iota of good. CentOS and RHEL, however, most certainly are.

Peace, and long live Openstack.

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Trevor_Pott
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Oh, look, it's Microsoft's paid Anonymous FUD coward. Hey, didn't expect you to be in here trying desperately to get us "on message." Not at all.

So, how's tricks? The new marketing shakeup treating you right? I hear the budgets got reorganised something fierce and the community engagement efforts were cut by more than half. How'd you keep the gig, anyways? I wouldn't have thought The Regster's comments section was important enough to dedicate meat to in these "tough economic times" (OH GODS MAKE THE QUARTERLY REVENUES BETTER OR WE LOSE OUR JOBS).

I'm curious about the details of your work with Microsoft. (Or is it Waggner Edstrom?) Do you run multiple sites? Are you a deep web specialist or do you do social media as well? How many forums are in your personal stable, or do you handle it as a team?

I notice that you take weekends off; is that because of the recent cuts, or was your division always had that limitation? So many questions!

Hope you're having a great day!

--Trevor

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Canuck truck stuck in muck

Trevor_Pott
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Need to remember to buy UofC team many beers for being awesome about helping others. Proper Canucks, them. Odd, for folk from Calgary...

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Re: CANUCK TRUCK STUCK IN MUCK

Someone order a Jack-shaped douche canoe? Looks like your in LUCK!

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London plod plonks, er, pull request on EasyDNS

Trevor_Pott
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Re: nice to see

Mark is damned good people. Proud to share a country with the man. There's a reason I've used his DNS services for over 15 years and I'm not about to stop now. Not only is he absolutely a stand up kind of guy, EasyDNS proactive nameservers make them a leader in DNS innovation. I'd not have thought that there could actually be innovation in DNS...but the man has the patents to prove it.

All 'round, good bloke, good company, great service...and he's Canadian! What more could you ask?

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Hollywood: How do we secure high-def 4K content? Easy. Just BRAND the pirates

Trevor_Pott
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@Robert Helpmann??

You can rent RED cameras. We almost rented one for the NAS we're setting on fire, but went with a cheaper one instead. The cost difference wasn't that much, but we we'll be lucky if the Special Projects Bureau pays our costs as is.

A RED is probably overkill for the web anyways. *shrug* In the meantime, I have to go produce new content. By setting a NAS on fire.

Fuck you, hollywood.

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@Khaptain Re: @Trevor_Pott RE: "I hope they all get cholera."

fry_narrow_eyes.jpg

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Re: To be honest

4K has absolutely nothing to do with increased quality. The reason for it is to give them another "differentiators". Anyone can do HD nowadays; hell, lots of people are producing top-quality content using RED cameras without having anything to do with the major players. 4K is something you can only do if you are well funded. Even if you had 4K cameras, the file sizes are enormous, and the higher the resolution the better your makup/costumes/props/etc have to be. Today, 4K needs major studios to be done right.

More to the point, they get to use 4K as a means to both attempt to ram through restrictive copyright measures and argue for another round of copyright maximalist legislation. They'll even use it to try to crush the competition (independent content producers) and go after copyright infringers in order to extend and then preserve their monopoly on content.

I'd wish them luck with that - the genie of content competition is not going back in the bottle - but the major content companies are the epitome of what's wrong with our society. So instead of wishing them luck, I hope they all get cholera.

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I'll buy content only when A) it's content I want to watch and B) it's reasonably priced. Otherwise, there's plenty of free content out there. Like just reading The Register instead of watching a movie.

This isn't 1986. TV and movies aren't competing against a limited selection of books and the terribly dry newspaper. They're competing against Reddit, Steam and an entire universe of new content. If they make this too onerous - or expensive - then they are signing their own content-protected death warrants.

If you don't let me run it on any device I want, when I want, where I want and for whatever reason I want then fuck you, because I've got better things to do than to fund the retirement of a bunch of geriatric douche canoes that can't grok their own irrelevance.

Now, if you'll excuse me, Tabletop and House of Cards are on. What's that? They're always on, you say?

That's king of my point, right there, innit?

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Bad for Bezos: Amazon's German workers threaten pre-Christmas strike

Trevor_Pott
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@That awful puppy

I agree that balance is a must. That said, people innately reject balance. Since we live in an era where one must choose an extreme if they aren't going to be completely marginalized, I choose the workers over the wankers.

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Re: @Casaloco

In a perfect world society would find a balance between worker power and employer power. Society seems to have no interest in "balance" of any sort.

Give the two possibilities - employers with all the power leading to a Victorian distopia or workers with all the power leading to slower economic growth as people stop become "lazy" and stop killing themselves for the sake of their jobs - I vote "worker power."

I fundamentally disagree with the notion that our businesses/economies/what-have-you need to be perpetually growing. I'm satisfied with establishing a "good enough" level of income and productivity that meets the needs of the workers to have a good life. Maybe some other nation that flogs their children and burns their old people for fuel will become more technologically advanced or own more aircraft carriers.

Oh well.

This is the 21st fucking century. We have the technology to be lazy. I say we use it for the workers.

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@Casaloco

"German labour laws put ALL the power in the hands of the workers."

Good.

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New Terminator-style 'bots can self-assemble, leap, climb and SWARM

Trevor_Pott
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Re: Not Terminator

No neutronium just means you can't get human-form replicators. (Which need such gods-awful amounts of power to create in the first place that I am entirely unsure Earth can generate that and deliver it all to one place.) You can still get the bugs. Those creepy, evil bugs.

Frankly, I always felt they were the single worst Sci-Fi enemy of all time. The human form replicators could be (sort of) reasoned with. The Pegasus replicators had some bizzare glitch where they actually constructed their ships and cities from regular materials (instead of blocks), making them vulnerable. Even the Borg always had the possibly of eventually negotiating a compromise.

Not the replicator bugs. Those things were relentless. They had one purpose and one purpose only: make more bugs. You were nothing more than raw materials to them. They would consume whole planets and convert them all into bug-blocks.

Terrifying, terrifying stuff. "Grey goo" given form and the ability to spray acid onto your face.

I'm going to give that a great big "nope" and run the hell away.

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FlexPod upsets VCE in converged storage block-building test - analysts

Trevor_Pott
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Screw 'em both. Get Nutanix or Simplivity.

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Web Daddy Berners-Lee DRMs HTML5 into 2016

Trevor_Pott
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Re: EFF should rename itself "Anti Copyright"

Bullshit. The EFF have been going nuts over the NSA spying stuff. See here as one example. There are lawsuits in play, too.

Just because you, personally, haven't read about it in your daily dozen doesn't mean that the EFF aren't a great organization that actually stands up for individual liberties. They are easily one of the world's top civil liberties organisations, and I'm so sorry (read: eat a dick) that their work opposes the "rights" of middle-man monopolistic douchenozzles to screw joe everyman out of yet another bag of bent coppers.

In short: EFF #1. If you'd like to help uphold individual civil liberties in the digital age, why don't you donate now? It take only a moment, and you can rest easy knowing that you've actually done some good for the world.

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GitHub wipes hand across bloodied face, stumbles from brutal DDoS beating

Trevor_Pott
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@Paul Crawford

So you are the model for the entire internet? The suggestion was made in a "well just do this and you're fine" manner. You may have minimal IP changes - and apparently "automated" manual entry that relies on developers knowing how to work the thing (rare in my experience) - and can simply "ignore IPv6" so evidently that's everyone sewn up then.

Also, let's totally ignore the fact that if you're a cloud vendor doing things properly you'll have alliances with upstream telcos to have DDoSes blocked upstream of you - where your systems can feedback into theirs to block IPs and so forth - so that traffic can continue to flow. There are even some bandwidth/hosting providers that specialize in this. Github chose not to avail themselves of this, while providing a hosted service and that is the real issue here, not that companies are using a hosted service in the first place.

"I think I've got something that probably works for my situation (though it's never had to withstand a concerted attempt to attack it) thus everyone who doesn't do it exactly like me and/or trusts a hosted provider is a moron" is arrogance of the first order.

Maybe your solution works for you. For now. Congratulations. It also doesn't take into account the needs of others nor has it come under serious attack. To advance that as a cure-all whilst poo-poohing hosted services on principle is to sell snake oil and claim it's a panacea.

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Trevor_Pott
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Re: Not even a small developer would trust it for private, internal code

Developers, Developers, Developers, Developers.

Developers, Developers, Developers, Developers.

Developers, Developers, Developers, Developers.

MICROSOFT IS GOOD, BUY MICROSOFT.

Developers, Developers, Developers, Developers.

Developers, Developers, Developers, Developers.

Developers, Developers, Developers, Developers.

Developers, Developers, Developers, Developers.

BELIEVE IN MICROSOFT. MICROSOFT IS GOOD.

Developers, Developers, Developers, Developers.

Developers, Developers, Developers, Developers.

Developers, Developers, Developers, Developers.

Developers, Developers, Developers, Developers.

MICROSOFT IS GOOD. MICROSOFT HAS NO PROBLEMS.

Developers, Developers, Developers, Developers.

Developers, Developers, Developers, Developers.

Developers, Developers, Developers, Developers.

Developers, Developers, Developers, Developers.

THE LICENSING IS APPROPRIATE AND NOT GOUGING AT ALL. MICROSOFT IS GOOD.

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Trevor_Pott
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@Frumious Bandersnatch

Pfft. It was "grandpas" that built most of this Internet of yours ...

Yeah, and a right pile of badly engineered shit it is, too. "Forward thinking" you old folks were not.

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Trevor_Pott
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Re: Not even a small developer would trust it for private, internal code

"No, but you could have a firewall list that only allows the IP addresses of your developers to gain access."

Pain in the ASCII when everyone's on these dynamic IPs handed out by telcos and/or IPv6 which appears to mean "completely random IP addresses depending on location that often change faster than the DNS TTLs for most dynamic services. If you have a dynamic service that supports AAAA, of course."

But hey, sure, Dunning Kruger the problem. Woo.

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Cambridge withdraws from World Solar Challenge

Trevor_Pott
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@Steve Davies 3

Wait...are you talking about Jags? Because here in Edmonton Jaguars are well known (infamous) for being vehicles you have to keep a complete set of tools and diagnostic equipment in the trunk. The damned things are always breaking down, the parts are hideously expensive and the "computer" systems on board were crafted from the raw, elemental madness at the centre of the universe.

"Well made cars?"

Bollocks.

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Larry Ellison hands back $575m from Oracle's Pillar slurp

Trevor_Pott
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Closer to 20%, I'd guess. Still a far cry from the ~33% that I pay...

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Trevor_Pott
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Depends, how much of that $500M would he actually have gotten to keep? After taxes, not nearly $500M. Depending on how the numbers get worked out, it might not have nearly been so big a hit as you might think. (It can alter how much of various other monies get taxes at what rates, etc.)

Balance that against legal costs and the opportunity cost of wasting his time on this when he could be earning his millions doing something else...

When you're Larry Ellison, $500M pre-tax just honestly isn't that big of a deal.

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SEC review clears Apple of dodgy tax dealings

Trevor_Pott
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Re: Eh?

You might say that. Apple doesn't.

And at least by saying that we can have an honest disagreement: you are arguing trickle down economics.

I want proof.

You're wrong - I believe dangerously so - but at at least you're honestly wrong. I can respect that. I don't respect Apple, or anyone else who isn't honest about such repatriation.

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Trevor_Pott
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Re: These shareholder payments and management bonuses

So let's say I have a household of 6 (because I'm rich and can afford to reproduce somewhat.) I pull in roughly a half-mil a year. After taxes and some hand-waving, I'm left with about $200k. I plow that into a couple of houses and some cars; over the course of about ten years I acquire all the material wealth I really could want, before I start getting into the "just plain silly" jets and yachts kinds of purchases.

I'm no longer paying a mortgage. I don't really have much in the way of expenses. Even factoring in all my increased insurance costs and so forth I'm still looking at around $75K per year in outlay to support my family in a luxurious manner in secure neighbourhoods where I don't have to worry about getting robbed/killed/etc.

Now, admittedly, these are calculations I've done along the lines of Canadian cost of living, but I figure that after 15 years at $500K gross per year, paying my taxes properly I would be set for life. 10 years would buy me all the material goods I could want, set up 4 sprog for post-secondary education and so forth. Another 5 years would sock so much away into my retirement account that I no longer have to worry about that, ever.

As I see it, I could then work part-time for the rest of my life and bring in the $75K that I need to make the ends meet. I could spend the rest of my time writing the books that I want to write.

In fact, I am basically killing myself to try to get to exactly this place right now, because I really, really want to write those books.

But I just don't see "trickle down." More income doesn't equal more expenditure. In fact, it probably equals less. Instead of having to buy cheap consumer tat that breaks every year or two, I'd be able to afford proper quality stuff that lasts for generations. (And why would I buy anything else?)

At the end of the day, no matter how much money you make, you can only actually spend so much of it. You only eat so much, drive so many cars, live in so many houses, need so many sets of dishes...

Rich people aren't going to invest that money into high-risk ventures like a new business. Not unless they have so much that they are not only set for life, they've got some "rolling around in it" money too. Even then, they're far more likely to squirrel it away somewhere safe - or a significant portion thereof - "just in case."

I've thought long and hard about this. I've talked to a number of very rich people about the topic. While there is some divergence in opinion, the balance of people who have actually achieved wealth - or who are on the path to it - seems to be the same: hoard your money until you're sure you're set for life. Only then start risking the excess.

Not exactly a recipe for "trickle down economics." Unless you count "trickle down to the next generation, who will also hoard it."

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Trevor_Pott
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Re: Eh?

Which is fine, if you want to say "we want to repatriate this money with next to no taxes for the purposes of paying off the shareholders." That's called honesty. I've no problem with that; either the government - and the electorate - view that as acceptable fiscal policy or they don't. That's a decision for society to make, not a corporation.

Saying "allowing us to repatriate this money with next to no taxes will help spur innovation" is complete horseshit, and frankly I'm in favour of having people who are in such disproportionate positions of power lying so boldly to the public being thrown in jail. If we have to invent new laws for that to happen, I'm entirely down with that too.

"Trickle down economics" is a provable fallacy. It does not work. It has not worked. It will not work.

If you want to bring the money in to pay shareholders, have the goddamned testicular fortitude to say so. Don't lie.

To be brutally honest, Tim, I hold those who defend outright liars - or the "right" to lie about something like this as some sort of innate right of businesses and their owners - as people of even lower moral and ethical calibre than the douche canoes trying to pull one over on their nation.

Either what you - and those you champion - are about is decent, honest and honourable, or it isn't. If business is a moral end (or a means to a moral end) then stand up and defend the actions and decisions with no prevarication. If you cannot look upon your works, ye mighty, without anticipating despair from those your rule...

...then you'd better hope the pitchforks and torches don't maul your ass on the way out.

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NSA: Yes we 'experimented' with US mobile tracking. But we didn't inhale

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Re: Is this a first?

I've no problem with the concept of targeted intercept. It's a fundamental tool of modern policing and important for defending our nation against threats both external and domestic.

But you get a fucking warrant from an actual judge and you declassify any and all requests that do not pose an ongoing threat to national security 24 hours after arrests are made. You revisit any still-classified items every 6 months and you declassify everything that can be declassified.

Targeted intercept is fine. Dragnets absolutely are not. Secret dragnets authorized by secret laws and secret courts hushed up by secret national security letters are something that should be triggering a goddamned revolution.

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Block, censor, ban: India the biggest loser in online freedom stakes

Trevor_Pott
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Re: I'd love to know

Your lack of noticing us has been noted.

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US spy court says internet firms can't report surveillance requests

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Re: err ,,,, [auburnman]

In civilized countries which have found a balance between the individual and the group this isn't determined by your pocketbook. Nor is it a financial burden to go after those who have libelled you. Only in cretinous backwaters like the USA where "free speech" is applied with maximalist strokes, unless, of course, said speech is directed at government officials. (Which is ironic, because calling out government officials is why "free speech" is in their constitution in the first place.)

So no, you cannot simply say someone is guilty unless they are proven to be so. Not here in Canada. If you do so then you will in all likelihood be yourself guilty of libel, and the person whom you have wronged will not end up out-of-pocket to pursue this.

How the barbarians choose to handle their mewling masses is rather irrelevant. Their take concepts like "freedom of speech" or "presumption of innocence" are as utterly corrupt as the Chinese, merely different in the implementation of that corruption. (Though decreasingly so.)

The UK is not far behind.

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