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* Posts by Trevor_Pott

4564 posts • joined 31 May 2010

Cow FLATULENCE, gas emissions MUCH WORSE than thought - boffins

Trevor_Pott
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Re: Good work

...just capture the methane and sell it.

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City of London cops ARREST 6 suspected to be MICROSOFT COUNTERFEIT RING

Trevor_Pott
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Re: £100k

Except for the part where "£100k" means "full retail pricing with the maximum possible inflation of cost presuming that everything was bought under the most customer-hostile processes."

Which probably means half to a third of that in real-world dollars. Or about year's salary for one person. Also known as "the difference between an SMB with 10 employees folding and everyone losing their jobs or just managing to barely stay above water."

Context. It is lacking. But hey, OMG THINK OF THE STARVING MILLIONAIRES IN REDMOND *sob*. That's always a hit with the crowd and the logic is a hoot.

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Re: £100k

Kinda comes off like someone who "pirated" Server 2012 and a copy of SQL. Maybe a few copies of Office and Win 7. OOooooOOoooOOOOoooooooOOooo....

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Four teachers indicted in Steubenville social media rape case

Trevor_Pott
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Answer your own question, prole.

Obviously, not nearly enough people see this as a problem, otherwise it wouldn't be so.

Computer "hackers" will OMG NUCLEAR POWER PLANTS and CHILD PORNOGRAPHY and STEALING AMERICAN JOBS. If you don't support harsher punishments for them than for rapists (or those who knowing assist rapists) you just aren't thinking of the children. And really, what kind of person does that make you?

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How much should an ethical phone cost? An extra penny? Or $4bn

Trevor_Pott
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@skelband

The question is not remotely meaningless and facile. It is a legitimate and very concrete question that anyone proposing to reshape a society must face. It is part of making the command decisions that all leaders of man are required to make.

Example: we have the technology to end all traffic accidents within our lifetime. All autonomous, human-driven cars could be eliminated; replaced by Googlecar-robotic minicabs or a complex virtual-rail system (strips of tracking material down each road, driven by robots festooned with sensors that avoid hitting babies, cats, etc.) No country in the world is moving towards building such infrastructure and banning personal vehicles, despite the multitudes this would save every year.

Why?

Simply put: it's too expensive. The cost is not simply money, but an aspect of personal freedom. You could not simply get in your car and drive somewhere. To enable freedom at that scale, every single lane on every single road and highway across the country would have to be retrofitted. So we could spend a staggering amount of money and some freedom to accomplish this goal, or we could spend an incomprehensible amount of money.

The point is that we choose to do neither. Our leaders - and by extension we, the people - accept the deaths everyone killed in a motor vehicle accident because the cost - money and freedom - are beyond what we are willing to pay. Those lives have a fixed value and saving them is just too expensive.

Oddly enough, I'm okay with that. That's a decision that we make as a nation about our own lives. We are saying "we accept this risk upon ourselves and our children and our loved ones in exchange for not expending our resources on that particular safety net." We all accept the risks, we all reap some part of the rewards for not spending those resources.

That is fundamentally different from "blood minerals" because here we are simply writing off people who have no say whatsoever in the process. We are faced with a very tangible, very real choice: how much are we as a society willing to pay to stop rape, torture, murder and maiming of other sapient beings in another society?

Our choice is simple: Is $32 /device too much to ask us to pay to put an end to that? Gather up the number of people murdered, raped, tortured and maimed and do the fucking maths.

When you say "no, that's too much to pay in order to stop this shit from happening" then you have discovered your personal threshold for the value of a human life. You are unwilling to pay $X / shiny gizmo to prevent the suffering of X people thus you value each life at ($X * number of devices shipped into your nation) / individuals involved.

This is completely different maths from a society accepting risks collectively (as in the balance between freedom and security), a doctor performing triage or a military commander making a command decision. This is us, with the power in our hands to stop the suffering of people who do not posses the power to stop it on their own.

Anyone who cannot understand the above is a sociopath. Pure and simple.

The only relevant question is "how much is too much for us to pay?"

Everything else involving this discussion becomes a two-step process:

1) Get the cost of action below the "how much is too much" line so that we can take initial action.

2) Continue to grind the cost of action as low as possible so as to weed out inefficiency.

For the truly hard-boiled sociopaths who give no fucks whatsoever, the "how much is too much" amount will be zero, or damned close too.

Indeed, there exists a category of disconnected number-nerd types who will seize upon the fact that taking action now might not be the most efficient possible action, cost-wise, and thus naysay and holler.

They might support action if that action could be "proven" to be the most efficient possible action to take, cost-wise. Of course, since that is proving a negative, it's possible for them to constantly demand action never be taken because it is impossible to be sure that we are being absolutely efficient, that not one penny of waste exists in the solution.

I have nothing but the utmost loathing and lack of respect for such individuals.

1) Determine "how much is too much" to pay to end the suffering of other sapient beings.

2) Get the cost of action below the "how much is too much" line so that we can take initial action.

3) Continue to grind the cost of action as low as possible so as to weed out inefficiency.

Any other path of action is quite simply saying "the possibility of cost inefficiency exists, which may make me pay more than the absolute minimum possible to resolve the problem. Thus we should not solve the problem."

Adding "until we have agreed upon what the most efficient possible means is and agreed to use that means" doesn't make you any less a goddamned monster than if you hadn't added it.

I'm all for efficiency. But we can work to make a process more efficient after we've implemented a more inefficient version of the same process. When the lives of sapient beings (especially those who have no say in the risk/reward balance whatsoever) are at stake, you work with what you have and then continue putting in effort to make it the process you have better and more efficient.

These are lives we're talking about. Not delaying some purchase agreement so we can grind an extra $0.10 per unit off the vendor.

Anyone who cannot get the difference really, truly is a sociopath...and I am completely unable to respect them at all. You can the lot of you call me whatever names you want, but on this I promise you you will never change my mind.

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Trevor_Pott
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Re: @Tim

"Must make salary negotiations very hard."

Not at all. I pay my staff the best that I'm able. Everyone is aware of the finances of the company and we're all open about our needs. We discuss each individual's financial goals (such as paying off student loans, saving for a house, etc) and readjust our salary every year to take into account whatever profit growth we've made as a company. The staff get the bulk of the profits, I do not receive an increase higher than the lowest of them.

"Very glad you're not a doctor."

There is a difference between triage (or command decisions) and writing off people for convenience, sir. And you fucking know that.

"PS Thousands have died to make your life a bit easier. Getting frothy mouthed about it won't change the fact."

Bullshit. Working hard to alleviate the suffering of my fellow sapient beings is part of being human. Compassion, motherfucker, heard of it?

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Trevor_Pott
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Re: @Tim

I'm so very deeply sorry that I don't view human being as commodities to be bartered and discarded.

I'll do my best to be more of of an amoral sociopath in the future comments, just for you.

By the way, just out of curiosity, what's the value of your life? How much is an equitable amount to ask society to protect it from exploitation, harm and an untimely end? How much is too much to ask? Why? Do you apply the same value to others?

Please, detail your cold logic for the world, skelband. I await your wisdom, in awe of your profound humanity.

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Trevor_Pott
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Re: @Tim

If the choices on the table are "spend $10M to make the problem go away" or "spend $4B to make the problem go away" then spending $10M is more rational. Assuming it's possible given the political and economic realities that surround the issue.

If, however, the choice is between spending $4B to deal with the issue and not dealing with the issue at all, I say we deal with the issue and fuck the greedy "people" (and I use the term exceedingly loosely) that feel $32 per device is too much to pay for the lives of their fellow human beings.

Your presentation of the options on the table made it seem that the $10M option was not political feasible and that our choices had become "spend the $4B to deal with the problem" or "don't deal with the problem at all."

Alternative or more efficient solutions than $4B to solve this issue would be ideal. Unless you're a fucking sociopath, not dealing with the problem at all is absolutely unacceptable.

So hey, let's get viable options on the table and a means to move towards them. If, however, the more rational avenues are blocked, we still have an ethical obligation to proceed using whatever means are, in fact, available.

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@Tim

So just exactly what is the cash sum value of a human life? Or a rape? ...a maiming?

When is it "too much to pay"? $0.10 per phone? $10 per phone? $100 per phone?

What if morality in this regard is a cost with no benefits expressed as a cash sum at all?

Fuck 'em if they can't cope with dying for our fondleslabs? I truly am curious.

$4B a year seems pretty goddamned insignificant if we're talking about 2B devices, which is about what this says is the global consumption rate. That's $2 a phone. Is $2 /device "too much?"

What if we're only talking about $4B to cover units shipped into the USA? That's $4B across 125M devices. That's $32 per device. Is $32 /device "too much?"

I'm legitimately curious. I would sure as hell hope that every human being on earth's answer to that question would be the exact same, but I am all to painfully aware of the number of sociopaths that inhabit our world.

I would surely love it if we could get the kind of international cooperation together required to have all the refineries and all the chip spinners do their part and turn Billions of dollars of regulatory cost into a meager few million in externally-monitored self regulation.

Unfortunately, we have no way to compel many of these companies to agree to such a scheme or to enforce their compliance. They are beyond our jurisdiction. So instead we have to act on the "little guy" and use their market pressure to keep the multinationals in check.

Shitty, but there you have it.

I will gladly pay an additional $32 per device to ensure my widgets are sourced from conflict-free sources. Frankly, I'm fucking appalled that there are people who wouldn't. I am ashamed to be a member of the same species as those individuals and I consider anyone who finds that "too much to pay" as no different in my mind from the bastards perpetuating these horrific crimes: both groups view the life and suffering of another sapient being as irrelevant to their own selfish, petty desires.

How much is too much? And isn't a solution - even if it is not the most efficient solution - better than letting this sort of shit continue?

We must each answer these questions for ourselves.

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Leaked MS ad video parodies Chrome as surveillance tech

Trevor_Pott
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Re: "Great bit of advertising"...

Bullshit. Microsoft reads my e-mails in Outlook.com, Office 365, my chats on Skype, Lync, MSN Messenger, etc.

They've reduced the security of Skype to enable them to do so. So please, can the bull.

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Dude, relax – it's Just a Bunch Of Disks: Our man walks you through how JBODs work

Trevor_Pott
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Re: Scott Lowe's article, bad link

Derp.

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Cisco untroubled by mega-clouds fleeing its proprietary ASIC grip

Trevor_Pott
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Re: The only way to take cisco down

http://www.opendaylight.org/

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Google underwrites Firefox another year, even as Chrome outpaces it

Trevor_Pott
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@bigtimehustler

Text ads are fine. Static images are fine. Moving images are...well, I find them annoying enough that I block them most places, but I don't have a strong technical argument for it and I recognise the moral argument against it.

Anything that uses a code base which could execute code on my system is flat out not allowed. No Flash, no Java, no JavaScript. Those are only ever going to be enabled manually by me on a case-by-case basis, such as "I want to watch this specific video."

I'm sorry, but the "moral rights" of advertisers simply don't extend to "opening a security hole on my system through which I could be infected."

I also totally randomise my browser informaiton for each session and tab so their tracking is useless. I'll allow them to display ads to me, but my privacy isn't for sale.

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Trevor_Pott
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Everything is justified because

AMERICA, FUCK YEAH!

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NSW privacy exemption shares personal data with private sector

Trevor_Pott
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Re: Canada was first

Canada isn't quite so cavalier with privacy as the commenter above makes us out to be. There is a difference between "a targets and specific breach of individual privacy in order to save that selfsame individual's life" (medical records at an ER or with explicit permission to private medical facilities) and giving wide ranging access to the kinds of information that can ruin a person's life.

The insurance company is a great example. So, for that matter, is allowing an employer (or a jury) to review a record of accusations/juvenile misdemeanors, etc. This is why many items (especially for minors) "fall off"* a person's record after a given amount of time. (At least here in Canada.)

*All items on your police record are, in fact, permanent. That said, many are considered "inaccessible" after expiry for the purposes of background checks, etc. Police can still view your juvie record when investigating, and it will probably be taken into account if you go for a serious security clearance, but the insurance company or bank isn't going to get to see that you had a red light ticket 7 years ago or were accused/arrested for (but never convicted) of any number of things. Which, frankly, is as it should be.

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Trevor_Pott
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It's easy to make an "investment" involving privacy...

...when the privacy you're investing is someone else's.

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Who will recover your data if disaster strikes?

Trevor_Pott
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Re: And what about the DR plan if a critical supplier goes out of business?

Pano's stuff eventually got bought up and support was provided to existing clients. I think that's a far more common scenario in the IT industry than simply vanishing into the void. "An established client base" is still a valuable commodity; someone will buy it.

The bigger issue is those transition periods. What do you do between the point where a Pano Logic (or a Nirvanix) goes off the air and the point where the deals are done and their customer base is purchased during the fire sale?

Personally, I advocate the "keeping spares on the shelf" policy as much as possible. (Licenses, physical devices, etc.) How does one do that with Cloud Computing??? The only "keeping spares on the shelf" version of Cloudy computing I can see is Microsoft's CloudOS (on prem, service provider, Azure trifecta making it unlikely you'll lose access to all systems capable of hosting your infrastructure) or VMware (same deal as CloudOS, just less refined.)

Whether or not that constitutes "industry standard best practices" depends entirely on who's paying whom. Cloud providers will say such concerns are unwarranted and unnecessary. "Get of my goddamned lawn" coalface sysadmins like myself generally prefer the paranoia route. Each person will have to decide on their own.

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Those Xbox One first-day glitches: GREEN screens of DEATH, disc crunching

Trevor_Pott
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My Alienware MX18 still uses the original OS install, runs like stink and works like a charm. Don't know what you're on about, Windows 7 solved a lot of the crap that keeps endpoint weenies employed.

Though there's good money in "where the fuck is..." regarding Microsoft Tiles 8.11 for fondlegroups.

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Native Americans were actually European - BEFORE the Europeans arrived!

Trevor_Pott
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Re: Oh dear

There's plenty of evidence of pre-Clovis cultures.

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Microsoft touts SCROOGLE merch: Hopes YOU'LL PAY to dump on rival

Trevor_Pott
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Re: I want Google

No shit. I'd buy a few hundred, I think. One for each of the vExperts, at least. ;)

Even Better: Google could donate all profits to a charity. The EFF, say?

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Who wants a Xeon-powered, 12-core, RAID 10 … LAPTOP?

Trevor_Pott
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Re: I estimate

Funny, I was thinking of buying 4...

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Microsoft zaps self in foot with WinPho/Office remote control app

Trevor_Pott
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This app does not work with Office 2013 RT

So why the fuck should anyone else code apps for that platform, is Microsoft can't be assed to do it? Hmm?

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Cisco's reverse mentoring plan helps middle-aged managers grok Gen Y

Trevor_Pott
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"Engaging" with the younger generation...

...is useless if you don't actual listen to anyone, regardless of age.

Let me be loud and clear to Cisco, and they won't need social media to grok it:

Cisco, the world loathes you and your worthless, overpriced products because they are (drumroll) worthless and overpriced. There are a handful of things you make that noone else can touch. That's your anchor. Everything else is being undercut left and right.

Cisco, if you want to stop bleeding customers, lower your prices and make your products dynamic, admissible via API and maybe even advance to the point that your interface is something other than a requirement to memorize 500 pages of arcane CLI. I don't know if you noticed, Cisco, but nobody actually likes CCXXes. They're arrogant, egotistical pricks who cost way to much. When your competitors are offering widgets that are as fast as yours, allow companies to bin the expensive douchnozzle (running networks with any old sysadmin or developer) and do it for a quarter the price...why the fuck would anyone buy from you?

What? "Huawei is backdoored by the Chinese government" you say? How - exactly - is that different from you? China, the USA, it's all the same. Both foreign powers trying to turn the rest of us into serfs. So that doesn't work.

"Stability, reliability, blah-blah enterprise something marketing gobleddy gook?" Hate to say, buddy, but Juniper works a hot damn, so does HP, Arista, Dell...even Supermicro! Most don't need - or want - the majority of shit in your routers and those that do would can get it better elsewhere.

You exist on inertia and some core routing products that noone else can duplicate. Soon, Arista will take the latter part of that away from you. After that, where are you? Relying on your religious fanatics to advocate on your behalf? That's only going to get you so far.

...we hate the religious nutjobs evangelising your overpriced tat almost as much as we hate the tat itself.

If you need social media to figure out the above, you're doomed.

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Space tourist Dennis Tito begs US to BANKROLL HIS manned Mars flyby

Trevor_Pott
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Re: A Wasteful Stunt

Bull. Robotic terraforming of other worlds is worth 1000x any manned mission. We should be taming these worlds for our use. Starting with a permanent installation on Ceres to provide fuel for our ships.

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No more Service Packs for Microsoft Office? HA! Think again, Ballmer!

Trevor_Pott
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Re: Oops. I'm ten years behind

Nah, gotta say, LibreOffice has done for me for the past few years. Office 2003 is still on my main VM, but when I upgrade to Fedora 20 - Weylan/Weston/FreeRDP, baby.! WOO! - it will be Libreoffice.

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Ballmer: Microsoft stronger without Bing and Xbox tinkering

Trevor_Pott
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Being better than Ballmer isn't hard. But a government/military teat-sucker doesn't know the first thing about providing anything to the mass market. If what you want is bulletproof software that only the top 10% of companies and individuals in the G8 can afford, then your advice is sound.

If, however, you want to see Microsoft provide quality software for the majority of the world then you need someone like Nadella.

What you preach would turn Microsoft into something even more restrictive than Oracle. Maybe that's what you want...but it would certainly be a complete and utter clusterfuck for ht rest of the world that currently relies on Microsoft. The transition to "a vendor they can afford" would be messy, it would be expensive and it would be full of security holes and missteps that could well set IT innovation back a decade.

The whole world would be so busy reinventing the wheel that they wouldn't have time to innovate...and there would be IT for "us" and IT for "them." A digital divide that even generations of effort would be unable to erase.

Like it or not, Microsoft of today is one of the only vendors bringing enterprise-class software to the masses. They are a major force for commoditisation. I'm pretty sure plane boy would end that virtually overnight.

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Nadella or bust. Can the rest of the fuckers in charge and bring in proper engineers. Focus on making good products better and delivering what the customer wants. If you need to use metrics, use them to inform decisions, not to justify them. Above all, listen to your customers and potential customers. Build what people want and they will buy.

How the hell is a government/military-teat-suckling handout baby going to deliver any of that?

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Trevor_Pott
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Re: any bets on how long EOP will take to bin the good bits?

Wait, wait wait...Elopologists actually exist in the wild.

Whaaaaa?

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Samsung to throw fat wad of Won at rare earth alternatives

Trevor_Pott
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Re: Help

Actually, China owns most of the decent prospects for rare earth mines in Canada, especially tantalum.

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Salesforce boss Benioff foretells grim, unrelenting hyper-capitalist future

Trevor_Pott
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Indeed. I am absolutely in awe of Jack for this one. In. Awe. Unbelievable work.

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How d'ya make a JPMorgan banker cry? Ask him questions on Twitter

Trevor_Pott
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Intelligence and morality have nothing to do with one another. Each can exist entirely independently of the other.

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Indonesia turns Twitter into very leaky diplomatic bag

Trevor_Pott
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Re: cold southern comfort

@Irony Deficient Out treaties basically state that because our justice system is determined to be "equivalent" to the US, deporting people to the US becomes a miserable mess. If we don't want 'em then the US doesn't want 'em either and they would much rather that we pay the bill for banging the bastards up.

As for pursuing extradition, it's pointless. American's give zero fucks whatsoever about Canadian laws. Where we are supposed to to have jurisdiction, they repeatedly don't care. They even put immense political pressure on our politicians resulting in them breaking our own laws and having innocents tortured.

The prevailing view seems to be one of pointlessness. Canada must comply with American legal demands and Americans will only ever comply with Canadian requests if they are politically expedient for America. Sometimes they'll even deny our requests seemingly just to keep us "in our place" (if the comments of their ambassador are anything to go by.)

Even worse, the barbarians still have the death penalty and they murder our citizens, even we offer to repatriate them and keep them locked up for life. (Texas especially seems enamored of this.)

There is no justice in working with Americans. There is no point in asking them for help either. We are not "allies". We are a servitor nation. Allies would not treat each other the way America treats Canada...or individual Canadians. It is really as simple as that.

You don't ask your owner for favours; he'll take said impunity out of your hide.

So yeah, I think my province did right. The bastard is American's problem now. If he ever sets foot on Canadian soil again, we'll arrest him and $deity I hope they'll sent him to a jail cell in fucking Nunavut.

He's not worth the massive amount of political capital it would take to extradite him. Anything Canada "wins" that resembles justice will come out of our hides in the fullness of time. We might win an extradition of this man...but at what cost? American playing stubborn on Softwood lumber rights during the next pissing contest, costing hundreds of thousands of Canadian jobs (again)?

What price, justice? And what is the tax that must be paid on it to America's ego?

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Trevor_Pott
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@Iron Deficient

Not all of those 9,414 people are criminals. There are, however, more than enough who are bothering the city that I personally live in, thank you very much. If you were really interested you could talk to the police departments from all of our major cities and ask them about Americans and their involvement with organized crime. Long and short of it: they are bringing a great deal of it here, and they are bringing a great deal of expertise in "picking up the pieces" of broken organizations once our cops smash one.

For every crime ring we dissipate it seems two well-trained Americans come up and establish new ones. Apparently crime is so very profitable in the US that they are establishing international franchises. Wonderful.

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What's the US got to do with building a nuclear plant in Canada?

Massive US political pressure to wind down our nuclear estate and huge funding of the local NIMBY cliques to shout down the Bruce power proposal.

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Trevor_Pott
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Tar Sands, not shale. Big difference. Difference being: 99.999% of the issues with the tar sands can be solved by just putting a bloody nuclear reactor up there to supply the energy necessary to support clean extraction and proper post-processing.

Believe it or not, that would be easier under the EU than the US.

And we have a country full of criminals we can't deport. They're called Americans.

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I have a plan, let's swap Canada and the UK. The UK can be part of NAFTA and we'll be part of the EU. Seems to be what the UK want, after all. Are the UKIP running that country yet?

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Deep beneath MELTING ANTARCTIC ice: A huge active VOLCANO

Trevor_Pott
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Re: Ooops. Can you say "Tipping point"?

The concept of the "Icelandic hotspot" is heavily disputed. I personally don't buy into it as there seems to be no indication of a connection to the mantle. What's more, there's a negligible temperature delta between the so called "hotspot" magma and the rest.

Iceland is more productive largely because there is more tectonic activity and the plates are diverging at a faster rate. That's really it. If there is some element of "hotspot" - which again, the evidence leads me to doubt - then all it is doing is providing additional raw magma. Is is the forces of the divergence boundary that causes the explosive eruptions. A hotspot connection would only mean they have more to work with.

The volcano discussed in this article does not appear to be on a divergence boundary and thus there is no rational region to assume that it would behave any differently to the nearby Mount Eerebus or Mount Terror. (Or, for that matter, Hawaii.)

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Re: Ooops. Can you say "Tipping point"?

Iceland isn't a hotspot. Iceland is the result of the plates pulling apart. *big* difference.

Also: even on Iceland, when a volcano goes it rarely takes the whole glacier with it. Even when it does, the glacier starts to reform almost immediately. (A few years).

An isolated volcanic hotspot (which is going to produce *steady* quantities of magma, like Hawaii, or Erebus is not remotely the same as "oh shi-"-style volcanoes like Eyjafjallajökull in Iceland.

If you want to learn more, read up on Monut Erebus, a hotspot volcano that is "so terrifying" they build Mcmurdo station a mere 35km away, near the outflow of several of it's glaciers.

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FBI sends memo to US.gov sysadmins: You've been hacked... for the past YEAR

Trevor_Pott
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Re: (Not lice, not fleas but) Poly Ticks What's the big deal?

What party politics? I'm Canadian. I have no "party" within the US. They're all bloody nuts, but some have recently been demonstrably more nuts than others.

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Re: What's the big deal?

As I recall, the alternative was putting Sarah Palin a heartbeat away from personally commanding thousands of nuclear weapons. After that, your alternative was placing one of the most openly bigoted socipaths America has ever produced in the same position. (Pretty boy, not Cheney...though the Dark Lord did just wonders for your economy, didn't he?)

I'm not saying the Obumbler is fantabulous...but the available alternatives weren't merely disastrous, there were cataclysmic. Literally. Planetary cataclysm avoided with Palin and social cataclysm avoided with Ryan.

Mitt Romney Style!

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Supreme Court can't find barge pole long enough to touch NSA lawsuit

Trevor_Pott
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Re: Et tu, Trevor

If the system worked as designed those in power would never need fear upstarts or shifts in power. The "new rich" have been a problem for ages and power has changed hands frequently enough that those in power are not guaranteed their status for the duration of their own lives, let alone multi-generational aristocracies.

The system doesn't work for anyone. Not those in power and not those being governed.

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You're cute when you believe the system works.

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Laws are for the little people.

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Salesforce slaps Amazon, Google with glove: 'I'm THE FIRST $1bn-quarter enterprise cloud biz'

Trevor_Pott
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Let me get this straight...

...in the beginning we punished a company for losing money.

...then we punished a company for not making enough money.

...then we punished a company for not growing revenues fast enough.

...then we punished a company simply because it didn't "meet analyst expectations".

...then we punished a company because they couldn't beat analyst expectations.

...now we punish a company because they can't beat analyst expectations by enough.

What the fucking fuck?!?

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Nothing to SNIA at: Not dissing storage specs now, are ya?

Trevor_Pott
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Deduplication allowed a one-time deferral of new storage kit when it first started showing up in bulk around 2006. Storage volume was the Big Problem of the day and the ability to delay new filer purchases was a Good Thing. Very shortly thereafter all the dedup houses were bought up and integrated into the major filers in order to ensure that they could retain control.

Host-based caching is filling this void today; instead of allowing a deferral of storage volume it is addressing the growing need for high IOPS. In-SAN flash caching and hybrid arrays aren't enough. All-flash is too expensive. data access needs to move closer to the application.

Converged infrastructure and host-based caching are rewriting the IOPS and latency portions of this market just as deduplication rewrote the bulk storage.

Standards are thus critical if you're EMC because you can't just buy up the competition (there are too many this time.) EMC needs standards because standards will enable smart tiering at the hypervisor and eventually the guest/application level. It's the only play they have left. If any of the converged infrastructure or host-based caching companies survive then their offerings will drive down demand for Fat SANs at the center of things and Thin Simply Can Not Be.

If you want the future of storage, look to Nutanix, Simplivity and Maxta on the converged side and Proximal or Flashsoft on the Host-based caching side. These are the folks making storage cheaper for enterprises. They are a direct threat...and the reason standards are now being seriously considered.

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IBM and Nvidia: We'll build your data center like a SUPERCOMPUTER

Trevor_Pott
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Actually, buying nVidia makes a great deal of sense. IBM could buy the company, take the GPGPU piece and spin the rest off to Lenovo. GPGPU fits well with IBM's hardware strategy: get the best of the best of the best and sell it with insane margins.

GPGPU is the new mainframe, and IBM needs to be the only credible player there. Besides, GRID + POWER* = nerdgasm.

*IBM POWER GRID?

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Amazon, Facebook, Google give Cisco's switches the COLD shoulder

Trevor_Pott
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I use Huawei and ZTE. Why not? America is no more a friend of Canada than China; I've zero reason to trust either. Given this - and that they both have performance good enough for anything I could ask of them - I might as well buy the cheaper kit.

"Buy American" is bullshit. Both nations seek to be my nation's Master...but we only share a border with one of the bastards. I'll bung my $ at the nation that actually has to work to take us over or cow our politicians into submission.

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NASA probecraft to FLY the SKIES of MARS - IF it can make its launch window

Trevor_Pott
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$671 million makes no dent in the problems of healthcare/food security/housing/etc.

$671 million is a fuck of a lot of food stamps; something I hear you've recently been screwing your citizenry on.

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Trevor_Pott
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Re: $671 million?

The US doesn't receive hundreds millions of dollars in foreign aid, they choose as a nation to be backwards-ass barbarians without proper healthcare, education, etc. They actively vote for such lunacy.

I'd expect any nation that was at the point of requiring foreign aid simply to meet basic necessities of it's people to be deprioritising militarily spending, government handouts to megacorporations and exploration until they were back on their feet, financially speaking.

If you are just so fucked up that you collectively don't care about your poor - and thus don't seek foreign aid do help remediate the problem - then by all means, carry on. That's a social choice you make together: you build your nation, and you have to live in it.

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Rip-'n'-replace box maker gets $58m to make data centre poison cubes

Trevor_Pott
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Go Simplivity! They've got good tech and good people. Glad to see others are recognizing this. One of these days I hope to get both Simplivity and Nutanix into my lab for a nice head-to-head; these folks have sexy gear to show off and it just seems to keep getting better.

It's nice to see Simplivity will have the cash to start hiring additional bodies; Nutanix has been on a hiring spree and they'll need the wetware to keep up! Competition is good, and with both VMware and Maxta on the pure software side (and HP making Lefthand free for ProLiant buyers) the converged infrastructure space certainly has a lot of it.

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