* Posts by Trevor_Pott

6745 posts • joined 31 May 2010

Microsoft silently kills dev backdoor that boots Linux on locked-down Windows RT slabs

Trevor_Pott
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Re: not long before RT slab-tops are completely worthless

Aye. Buy good tires. Replace them when they start to go. Today, that's really all you need to do for most of Canada.

All seasons have gotten me through urban driving, all the hiways south of Athabasca in Alberta, and even through white-out blizzard conditions on the Coquihalla. I'm not sure I'd go up a corduroy road on them, but then again I'm pretty sure my wimpy little Scion XB would disintegrate on one of them anyways.

Now, some of this might be due to the fact that if it's stupidly awful outside I can choose to just not travel for a day or two. Benefits of both of us working from home. I doubt it, however. I think things like traction control and ABS probably have more to do with it. That and the fact that we've actually advanced tire design and materials technology rather a lot since the 70s...

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Keep up the pressure on the telcos, Canada

Trevor_Pott
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Re: Semi-Obsolete concept: FTTH as an "Urban privilege"

Why would I be polite? Politeness is obfuscation which is orthogonal to accurate communication, which is my sole purpose here.

And labeling organizations of people "sociopaths" absolutely is helpful. It makes it perfectly clear that I don't accept that individuals choosing to work in groups absolves those individuals - or the group - or the requirement to act morally.

What's stupid is the idea that as soon as blame can be shared (or ducked), morality doesn't apply. Equally stupid is every single individual who supports, tolerates, ignores or does not actively resist that concept.

Any society that rewards sociopathic behaviour, in individuals or in organizations, is deeply flawed and required massive change. Period.

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Trevor_Pott
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Re: Semi-Obsolete concept: FTTH as an "Urban privilege"

Large urban agglomerations are different; the high density means that risk can be spread out. Also, existing infrastructure keeps the cost per unit the same or lower compared to rural runs for everything but labour...but your get a lot more bang for your buck from urban work than rural work.

Re: sociopathy: you're trying to justify conscienceless behaviour by saying that operating in a group removes the requirement to act like a human. You might believe that to be true, but I think that makes you a fucking monster.

As for the rest, I'm very glad I upset you. You seem to need to be upset. Yes, telcos care what colour your skin is. Every corporation of any size does. They care because the colour of skin, along with other factors (such as where you live) play a role in determining the statistical likelihood of your being a good investment, a likely customer and so forth.

Ultimately, what corporations want is your money. But no corporation of any size invests equally or blindly. They put their money where there is the greatest chance of the highest return, and every conceivable factor that can be plotted and sounded is analyzed in order to ensure that investments are optimal.

Maybe you should learn to disconnect your own political leanings from discussions. Clearly I've touched a nerve by bringing up the fact that corporations - and especially the people who run large ones - don't operate in a socially beneficial, altruistic or even colour-bind manner.

Now I, personally, believe that is deplorable. It is behaviour we, as a nation, ought to regulate against to ensure equality. If you wish to believe otherwise that's your choice. Your morals are you own; you've your own right to them, just as I've a right to think you a monster. I'm content to leave it at that.

If you are, however, going to deny that discrimination as a facet of investment optimization happens, then you're a fool. One who is part of the problem because ignorant attempts to defend the telcos prevents us from collectively addressing the problem.

At the end of the day the hard truth is this: unrestrained market capitalism is prejudiced because it magnifies the extant socioeconomic dichotomies inherent in society. Socioeconomic dichotomies present for the most part due to prejudice.

This magnification of socioeconomic divides reinforces them and in short order we have a feedback loop. Especially when dealing with critical infrastructure such as utilities significant efforts must be applied in order to level the playing field and overcome prejudice and the resulting socioeconomic dichotomies. To date, I am unaware of any society that has found a workable alternative.

It's also been pretty conclusively proven that simply wishing the problem away doesn't work. But you keep right on trying, if you feel that you must.

Cheers.

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Trevor_Pott
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Re: Is it even possible to run fiber in muskeg?

Not done much work up north, I see. The ice roads are only needed for the heavy stuff. We have plenty of equipment that will haul less than a tonne of cargo (man + fibre) from A to B.

It's all about having great big huge surface area. They're based on the glacier crawlers that are enormous, but exert so little pressure they can run over your foot. Also good for not screwing up the ecosystems.

And why, exactly, would armoured cable need to be buried? What is going to harm it? This stuff is used to surviving oceans. This includes things like boat anchors and the like. A few caribou and some methane fires aren't really going to irk it much.

And if you did need to somehow bury it? Then bury it when you make the next ice road. Those are semi-permanent structures anyways; the next time they redo the corduroy they can cheerily run some fibre. Hell, we run pipelines all through hell and gone relatively easily; the cost of them is in the environmental assessment and the labour, not the materials.

Muskeg sucks, but it's not the 80s anymore. We have managed to master certain types of year-round travel.

And all of this is before I begin my discussion of the modern hoverbarges. Field tested primarily in Minnesota, these units are beginning to see increasing deployment in Canada's northern reaches. The two big factors that have restricted hoverbarge deployment in the past have been cost per hour to operate and a lack of reliability in the coldest winter months.

The latter issue has been solved by a couple of different companies and the current theory is that if the extraction industries in Canada start to buy into the hoverbarges then the overall costs will go down. A lot of this has to with the fact that the next-gen hoverbarges are using better components than the current LCAC hovercraft most militaries use, and there is an expected convergence resulting in lower component costs, etc. But that's really another discussion entirely...

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Trevor_Pott
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Re: Semi-Obsolete concept: FTTH as an "Urban privilege"

Sorry, but you're wrong.

A) "Middle class" isn't enough to justify running Fibre To The Bush. A household income of $100k, while certainly fitting in the upper end of "middle class", is enough to justify it. That does, however, leave most of "middle class" households not remotely worth the time and effort.

B) A little over 10% of Canada's population is Asian. (That number including all of Asia (including India) and not just pacific Asians.) The overwhelming majority of these individuals live in urban agglomerations of over 1M people. They also are not equally represented amongst households making more than $100k; that is still disproportionately dominated by white people.

Based on your screed, I am going to presume you are from Vancouver. In part because you talk about BC issues, and in part because you seem to believe there "plenty of Asian people". Vancouver being, of course, where individuals of Asian descent are dramatically over represented compared to the rest of Canada's major cities, to say nothing of the smaller towns.

Regarding BC's smaller communities, you couldn't be more wrong. A lot of what I wrote is due to first hand experience that I and others I know well have encountered in trying to get broadband into communities in BC. Mostly communities not too far off the Transcanada, and usually considered to be nice vacation destinations.

The rest is based on efforts here in Alberta, and working with people in Saskatchewan, Ontario, Nunavut, Quebec and the Maritimes. Of those, only SK is really different from the rest.

Lastly, I disagree entirely on your personal take on the work "sociopath". You are, once more, incorrect. A sociopath is an individual possessed of the capability to turn their ability to feel empathy on and off at will*. This is abnormal. Most human beings are unable to stop themselves from feeling empathy.

Normal people are not rational actors in an economic sense. This is one of the very first things that economists are supposed to learn! This is Econ 101 stuff right here!

Human beings don't always do what is objectively "best" for themselves, assuming your only criteria for "best" is greed. We will pass up economic opportunities to care for friends, loved ones and pets, for example. We donate to charities, support social programs like universal health care and even do things like spend hundreds of hours a year updating wikis online. None of which are economically "rational" activities.

The purely economically "rational" actor is a sociopath. No empathy. No remorse. No guilt. No anything that doesn't directly benefit the actor. So yes, the telcos are absolutely acting as model rational actors, but in doing so they are acting like sociopaths.

As for "with telcos' goodwill"...dream on. Never going to happen. They will be forced to behave with some form of compassion at the point of a gun only. It goes into law, and those laws are enforced with guns. Until the day the last appeal is exhausted, they will strip mine our populace for every last bent copper.

Like the unrepentant sociopaths that they are.

*Depending on who writes your definitions, the difference between a sociopath and a psychopath is that a sociopath is capable of empathy, but can dismiss it at will, while a psychopath is incapable of empathy at any time. The linguistic validity of this depends entirely on which school of psychology you happen to follow.

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Trevor_Pott
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Re: Semi-Obsolete concept: FTTH as an "Urban privilege"

Wrong.

Take the politics out of it and look at this from the "objective" viewpoint of a coldly calculating market sociopath.

In Canada, as in the US, rich white neighborhoods tend to have more money than any other demographic over the period of time necessary to invest in long term infrastructure. Whatever your personal or political beliefs are, the facts show that rich white people only like being around other rich white people and that with very few exceptions mixed neighborhoods will lead to white flight. This leads to a couple of problems.

The biggest issue is that non-whites don't make up a particularly large percentage of the population raking in $100k or more per household. Across all of Canada there might be enough folks who fall into that category to put together a small town, or a couple of decent sized neighborhoods. The problem is that they aren't all in once place; they're scattered about the country in smallish lumps, mostly moving into predominantly rich, white neighborhoods. (Just like any other rich person, regardless of colour is likely to do.)

When a tipping point is reached, the rich white folk take off. The formerly rich white people neighborhood fills up with less rich people (I can't believe I can live here!). Suddenly, the neighborhood you put all the time and money into feeding because it was full of rich people isn't.

Some patch of forest in the middle of nowhere that almost noone has ever heard of and is populated pretty much entirely by rich white people? Gold mine. The chances that "others" - be they poor people or non-whites - reaching the tipping point in that community to trigger the flight of the rich white folk is pretty slim. Great place to invest.

Now, you find Telus or Bell or whomever a neighborhood full of rich non-white people and they'll happily invest there. More so than they would in a rich white person neighborhood because, statistically, the chances of a bunch of rich non-white people block moving out are small.

Again: this is Canada. Not the US. There just aren't enough rich non-white folks out there making up entire towns in the middle of nowhere.

Look, prejudice is bad. Whether it is from companies or individuals. But "ability to pay" is usually determined on predictions of demographics over a 25-30 year timeframe, not "who lives there today". And "ability to pay" is all that matters.

Unfortunately, Canada absolutely is one of those countries where you need to factor in the innate racism of the populace when calculating your demographics over time, because that racism provably impacts demographics over time.

I, personally, would love to deny it out of existence. The kinds of people who make hundreds of millions and/or billions don't.

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Trevor_Pott
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Re: Semi-Obsolete concept: FTTH as an "Urban privilege"

Except they're not. The telcos have no interest in laying cable to anywhere that isn't full of lots and lots of rich white people. Some resort town filled with rich white people? Okay, they'll plumb a line. And they'll charge a testicle and a half to do it, too.

Town full of poor white people, or indigenous peoples, or immigrants? Hell no. And if they try to run it themselves, the telcos will throw up barrier after barrier after barrier. They're a monopoly, see? And just because they choose not to serve a community doesn't mean they'll let anyone else do it.

With the maritimes in a box - a history of kicking corporations in the junk until they complied had a hand in making things viable there - the rest of the country follows the above model. Pulling fibre may be relatively cheap today, but that doesn't mean the telcos are going to do it, and it sure as hell doesn't mean they'll let anyone else do so.

The backbones need to be opened, and the telco oligopoly needs to be broken. There are no other acceptable alternatives.

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Trevor_Pott
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Re: Is it even possible to run fiber in muskeg?

Why not? Use armoured cable like they do for oceanic pulls. If it gets wet, who cares? Not like anyone is living on that muskeg, so just run it across at ground level.

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Trevor_Pott
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Re: Don't need one million people per town...

I am aware of Aliant, and the very complicated legal history that allowed that particular oddity to exist. Are you?

Also: the maritimes are tiny. In population, but also in size. Start looking at whether or not you have FTTH in Labrador, eh? Or rural areas in pretty much any other part of the country. (Olds notwithstanding.) Then, where and when it does exist in rural areas, why don't sit down with the groups that put it in place - pretty much never one of the major telcos - and talk to them about backhaul.

They'll use words that are in your translation app.

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Missile bods MBDA win Brit military laser cannon contract

Trevor_Pott
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Re: and of course

Notice anything in particular about the nationalities of those who get prosecuted for war crimes...and that that don't?

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Tor board swept under carpet after Appelbaum 'sex misconduct' claims

Trevor_Pott
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Re: Balanced Board

You what's not nice? That we have to actually care about such things.

A) At what point does {whatever} equality* start being normal?

B) At what point do we stop with "positive/negative/right/left/upsidefown discrimination" and people can start doing the jobs they actually want to do in life without having to worry that if they born with the wrong {thing that is measured to determine group status} they'll have a harder time getting a job?

*And how do we measure {whatever} equality? Is it only equal is {group} is represented the same amount as {other group}? Is it equal if the representation roughly parallels the proportion of {group} in society? Which {group}s do we count? Why {group}1 and not {group}2? Do we only count against the perceived "dominant" {group}? Who determines when the "dominant" {group} stops being dominant? Do we then have to change against which {group} everything is measured?

Prejudice just sucks all over. Why can't we all just treat eachother like people? :(

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Brit Science Minister to probe Brexit bias against UK-based scientists

Trevor_Pott
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Re: It's the law, isn't it

"This is precisely the kind of thing that needs to be negotiated. You know, in the negotiations."

There will be no negotiating. Listening is what Airstrip One will do. They will obey or they will be left out in the cold to die. End of.

Exactly what cards do you think Airstrip One holds here? Exactly what does the EU need from Airstrip One that it's politicians would ever be willing to give up? Not a damned thing.

Airstrip One will leave, it will get fucking nothing, and it can come beg for scraps at the door like everyone else when it is ready to act like a grown up.

There is absolutely zero benefit to the EU giving Airstrip One a special anything. Actual allies - like Canada - take decades to negotiate trade agreements, and both sides end up making concessions. Airstrip One has a list of demands as long as my leg and no intention of conceding anything. This doesn't help the EU at all.

If the EU gives an inch to Airstrip One then they are encouraging the other racist xenophobes within the EU, and that's political rukus nobody needs at the moment. Also: any concessions the EU gives Airstrip One could be used against them by other trading partners in their negotiations.

No...Airstrip One will be made example of. And rightly so.

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Trevor_Pott
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Re: Boo fucking hoo

"And people wonder why we voted to leave"

Absolutely nobody wonders why Leave voters voted to leave. Quite the opposite, the entire world knows why.

It's just that most of us don't respect you for it. That isn't going to change. Ever. So just get used to it, eh?

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When is a refurbished server not refurbished? Ask this Dell reseller

Trevor_Pott
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So you prefer to have rack upon rack of equipment that is more expensive and more feature rich than is required to do the job?

Please submit your real name so that I can be DAMNED sure I never work with you on any job, ever.

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Trevor_Pott
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Re: so, dell does not do refurbished.. well...

Dell sells refurbished gear under their own banner. They just don't move it in adequate volume. More gear enters the refurbished channel than they can clear on their own. Hence the existence of xByte and their ilk.

So no...Dell doesn't really do refurbished very well at all.

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Trevor_Pott
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Re: One teeny issue

I think you'll find they've got a decent business set up. I was fortunate enough to get a peek at some of their roadmaped stuff and I think they'll do alright.

That said, if anyone does have questions or otherwise wants to poke xByte I am going to point folks at Mike Rigo (mike.rigo {at} xbyte.com). Apparently he's the designated lightning rod, so by all means let hm have it!

I find the whole xByte thing fascinating, and I wonder how many other weird little niche businesses are out there occupying other ecosystems that I haven't discovered yet.

Marginally off topic: another vendor I've recently discovered: Fibrestore. Suddenly, I can afford SFP+ cables! Hurray!

I really need to make a list of these SMB/SME friendly vendors...

Addendum: Whilst I was happy to learn Fibrestore existed, I was also dismayed that it had been around for so long and I didn't know they existed. The amount I could have saved on cables...

Some things we should be told.

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Israel's security minister suckers Zucker for Facebook'ed killings

Trevor_Pott
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Stop

Re: If those are public posts...

And who gets to determine what speech is valid, hmm? Israel, guilty of a huge number of human rights violations and war crimes? Palestine who are guilty of same? Saudi Arabia? Iran? Sudan? Albania? Russia? China? How about the DRC?

Maybe the power should rest in the civil service of various nations? Because it would never be used to shut down dissenting voices around elections, would it? Or to prevent protestors from organizing? To prevent the dissemination of information that might be embarrassing to someone in power?

Or maybe you can use it to "mark" people and put them on some kind of "list" for follow up later. This person over here said the wrong things. That one dated the wrong kind of person. This one there use a recreational drug.

Do you honestly think that the social progress of the past 100 years would have occurred if nations had the ability to stop dissenting groups from communicating, organizing and coordinating efforts? Would colored people have rights in America? How about homosexuals in the UK? Would women still be second class citizens, or even have rights at all?

Would I have a neighborhood of thousands of wonderful Syrian, Palestinian, Israeli, Polish, Ukrainian, German, Dutch, French, Chinese, Somali, Nigerian and Irish people, or would these people have died or been turned away long before they reached Canada's shores? These people are my friends. They are friends of one another. We have built a shared life together and the loss of any of us would greatly diminish the whole.

Many of these people are here only because they - or their parents, like for example, my father - escaped from a really bad situation. There were able to escape only because they could avoid government detection. And yes - absolutely yes - that straight up requires the ability to communicate and coordinate away from the watchful eyes of governments.

So, you know what? Fuck you. Fuck you for caring more about your nationalism and your xenophobia than my life and the lives of people I love.

Yes, people will use technology - any technology - to do bad things. But they will also use that very same technology to do good things. History has shown over and over and over again that with very few exceptions (usually weapons), the positive uses of new technologies vastly outstrip the negatives.

If you want to stop bad shit happening in your country stop electing hard right nationalistic xenophobic nutjobs and start working together to heal the wounds with other groups. Help build a world where everyone has a place and remove desperation as a tool that can be used by the crazed to radicalize the marginalized.

Security is found by teaching the value of peace, not through fear, violence and the end of a gun. When you and yours have learned that maybe - just maybe - you'll be ready to be part of a body that decides what is and isn't okay to print.

Cheers.

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The best way to find oxygen on Mars? Friggin LASERS, of course

Trevor_Pott
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Re: Rust?

Not only that, but the only reason there *is* more than trace atmospheric oxygen on Earth is life. Biotic processes are what separate the Oxygen from the rocks (Iron and Calcium, predominantly). Otherwise, Earth would look rather a lot like Mars, with much of our oxygen tied up in the rocks.

Of course, it's spectacularly unlikely that Mars (or Earth) formed with all the Iron being iron oxide. Oxygen is a very common element, but to reach the all-pervasive nature of iron-oxide on Mars there would have had to have been atmospheric oxygen on Mars at some point...and for quite a while too.

"Mars had an Oxygen atmosphere" isn't exactly news. Proof that it didn't would be novel. Alternately, proof that there was once enough Nitrogen on Mars to serve as a buffer gas would be interesting. If there was that much at one point, where'd it all go? Mars should be able to hold on to Nitrogen...I think? Hmm...now I have to go look that up...

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The problem with Canada? The price of broadband is too damn high

Trevor_Pott
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Re: The price of broadband is too damn high

$75 for a shitty 20 down 5 up capped at 200GiB. They want more to uncap it. I am in the process of moving to TekSavvy.

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Trevor_Pott
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Re: C51 product of Harper's Conservatives, .: loathe Trudeau's Liberals

I don't loathe all politicians. I have some level of passionate disagreement with Elizabeth May regarding her stance on fission, but otherwise seem to agree with her on most things. There are some NDP that I agree with some of the time (Cullen, Duncan, a few others). There are some Tories and ex-Tories that I agree with some of the time (Rathgeber, Chong).

In short: no political party represents me very well. (Which my position on the Political Compass explains. I believe strongly in both individual liberty and that the needs of the many outweigh the needs of the few (or the one).

There are times where it is necessary to subsume our personal interests or liberties in order that the common good be served, but - by and large - these times should be kept to the absolutely minimum required. Unfortunately, no ideology survives contact with humanity, and the fact that people are dicks to one another necessitates a certain fluidity of implementation.

Where I clash with most political organizations is that I prefer both the crafting of legislation and the implementation thereof to be rational, logical and backed by as much evidence as possible. Politicians get elected through appeal to emotion and the application of evidence is not frequently beneficial to their long term prospects for employment.

So call me whatever "wing" you want, but don't try to marry me to any of Canada's mainstream political parties. Except maybe the Greens. May and I can debate energy policy over beer and still be friends, I think. She seems like good people.

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Trevor_Pott
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Re: How about the US?

Openmedia works with the EFF on a lot of things. Hopefully their collaboration can help you too!

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NVMe SSDs tormented for months in some kind of sick review game

Trevor_Pott
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Re: More Details Please

I have used both storage spaces and the dynamic-disk based RAID. NTFS is the filesystem I most tested, but I did run a few ReFS tests. (ReFS can handle a few million more files, but honestly the difference, at least in Server 2012 R2, isn't that great.) I was using a stripe/RAID0 rather than parity or mirror.

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Trevor_Pott
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Re: Endurance

I abused the piss out of those things for two months and they have since moved into regular lab use. Josh has two in his video editing desktop that he abuses all day long. I have them scattered about the lab in every server I can find. I have yet to see them go below 99% lifetime, according to the diagnostics.

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Trevor_Pott
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Re: cratered during file copy?

Windows rarely give me issues until I hit 2.5M files. Around 5M you really start to notice it. By 10M it usually starts behaving very oddly.

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Trevor_Pott
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Re: Use a benchmark or compile a large project

If you had read the review you would have learned that I tried rather a lot of things. For months. Here are the benchmarks I've used.

Databases

Hammerora http://hammerora.sourceforge.net/  Microsoft SQL, MySQL, Postgres, OracleDB (if you have it).

OStrell http://blogs.msdn.com/b/psssql/archive/2014/04/24/version-9-04-0013-of-the-rml-utilities-for-x86-and-x64-has-been-released-to-the-download-center.aspx Microsoft SQL, as part of the SQL RML Utilities.

SQLIO http://www.microsoft.com/en-us/download/details.aspx?id=20163  This writes all zeros. It tells us a very specific thing about how "zero blocks" are dealt with. It's tricky. Follow http://www.mssqltips.com/sqlservertip/2127/benchmarking-sql-server-io-with-sqlio/ and http://www.brentozar.com/archive/2008/09/finding-your-san-bottlenecks-with-sqlio/

SQLIOSIM https://support.microsoft.com/en-us/kb/231619?wa=wsignin1.0  this is to test stability, not performance. https://www.simple-talk.com/sql/database-administration/the-sql-server-sqliosim-utility/

General disk tests

FIO http://freecode.com/projects/fio Read http://support.sas.com/resources/papers/proceedings13/479-2013.pdf and all will be revealed.

Iometer http://www.iometer.org/  Various configurations

Exchange

Jetstress 2013 http://www.microsoft.com/en-ca/download/details.aspx?id=36849

Jetstress 2010 http://www.microsoft.com/en-ca/download/details.aspx?id=4167

Background work tests

Using iometer determine your peak global IOPS as per above test. Load the system to 25%, 33%, 50%, and 75% of IOPS capacity. Now run various common administrative tasks and time them.

1) Full VM backup using VM backup software

2) Snapshot

3) Clone

4) Creation of VM from template

5) SQLIO test runs on a single VM (testing mixed workloads!)

6) Exchange Jetstress (testing mixed workloads!)

7) SQLIO and Exchange Jetstress (testing mixed workloads!)

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Trevor_Pott
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Re: Software RAID impact - ZFS?

Both ZFS and Storage spaces were unable to cope with these units any better than regular Windows or Linux software RAID. Well, actually, that's a lie. They coped "better", but not "better enough". The software "lash it all together" solutions were clearly bottlenecks in all cases.

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Trevor_Pott
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Re: NVMe devices

SHOULD work...but I'd need to test to confirm. Ping me by e-mail and I'll see about getting you remote access to a node with some cards in, you can then test before you set about buying.

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Trevor_Pott
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Thank Micron! They supplied the RAM for this little endeavour. I will be reviewing it separately. The full lab is here: http://www.trevorpott.com/thelab/

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Trevor_Pott
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Re: ZFS etc

Tried ZFS. Same problems as any other software RAID.

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Trevor_Pott
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Re: cratered during file copy?

Hey guys, I did buffered, I did unbuffered, I did every kind of copy I could imagine. I tried multiple operating systems, I even used LiveCDs in an attempt to remove the local disks and the SATA controllers from any use whatsoever. I tried every conceivable kind of anything I could imagine and i regularly ended up with the SSDs faster than any of the operating systems in play could talk to before running out of CPU.

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Scale Computing makes play for Nutanix's entry level market

Trevor_Pott
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The kitty's name is Paradox. He likes sleepmurdering, stringmurdering, pretendmurdering and a little bit of love mauling. He is a mighty predator. Did I mention how much he likes sleepmurdering?

Fear him. He is mighty.

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Charter halts TWC upgrades

Trevor_Pott
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That didn't take long.

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The Microsoft-LinkedIn hookup will be the END of DAYS, I tell you

Trevor_Pott
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Re: Looking for a job!

Bottles are expensive. We just have you work over a grate and there's periodic flushing of the sub-floor. XD

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Scale Computing is a tiny fish in a small pond. Fancy its chances?

Trevor_Pott
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Re: Couple Thoughts...

2. $6000 up front with $1000 per year is a lot of fucking money to many business, John. As you well know, but have never actually cared. What's more, you're completely ignoring the shitshow that is going from an EP license to "more than 6 cores", which is roughly as much fun as burning off your own genitals with acid and about as messy.

3) *yawn*. Not everyone's VSA is as horrible as Nutanix's. Maxta, and Simplivity both have great solutions that don't expend your cluster's resources running the cluster's storage. And at least with someone like Maxta you can actually use the damned software on something other than the narrowest slice of the highest end of hardware. VMware's storage team allows for approximately the square root of a gnat's fart worth of the world's hardware to be used, so what the hell's the point?

4) Scale are absolutely "go for billions or bust". They just plan to take a little longer to get there, and build an actual business underneath them in the meantime. Fortunately, they aren't the only ones with this model, and the HCI space now has many decent contenders offering HCI capabilities on a wide variety of hardware , with different price points and - most critically - the ability to scale from one node to many without getting randomly stabbed in the junk by unexpected massive leaps in licensing costs.

Hurray for THE FUTURE!

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Trevor_Pott
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Huw! How ya been, ya crazy son of a gun? Long time, no flaming beverages!

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Trevor_Pott
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I'd be very, very curious to find out who that client might be. Considering the number of scale installs I know about in the wild - and the number of them that have handled dead disks, node replacements and more - I would love to sit down and have a detailed discussion about the event.

If it was legitimately an issue with Scale's support or product, I'll pick up the phone and have a discussion with their CEO and we'll see what (if anything) has changed to ensure this doesn't happen to others. If it was an edge case phenomenon it's worth knowing what the exact details are so that I can write something up for Scale customers so we all know what to avoid. And then work with their devs to make sure that it can be reproduced and then prevented.

Please ping me using my contact page, if you can possibly share the info or - better yet - put me in contact with the client. These are pretty serious claims, and are worth investigating. Especially with so many Scale customers out there, and the growth that company is seeing.

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Trevor_Pott
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Review coming

I have had a chance to review Scale's new hybrid nodes and am just finalizing a review. These nodes are going into a customer deployment where we are collapsing 8 VMware nodes and a couple dozen physical servers into 4 Scale nodes. So far, the experiment has been a rousing success.

I also run my own company on 3 (admittedly aging) HC1000 nodes. After ~1 year worth of running workloads on it, I don't have any complaints. It has survived power outages and dead drives, network weirdness and other things. It does its job.

Scale isn't as feature rich as VMware. It never will be. For the target market, however, that simply doesn't matter. Small businesses make up 98.2% of employer businesses in Canada. Enterprises (500 seats and up) make up just 0.1% of employer businesses. In the US the percentage is a little different, but the rest of the world looks very much the same.

So Scale is one of a handful of vendors that serve the 99.9%. They don't meet every niche. They don't cover every possibility...but they solve most problems for a price that SMBs can actually pay. Perhaps more importantly, they listen. That's something few vendors do.

I can't speak to other geos, but in Canada Scale is doing quite well. Some of their competitors (Yottabyte, for example) are making headway here too. Even Tintri - who normally focuses on bigger fish - is starting to find its feet in the mass market.

The old guard of server vendors are no longer the only ones. Marketing is starting to make an impression even amongst SMBs. More importantly, once you give a lot of these new vendors a try, it's hard to go back. They make ease of use kind of their "thing".

All the above being said, take precautions. Do a POC. Don't buy blindly. Test the products first to make sure you understand all the differences in UI, that you know how move workloads across, and that you are comfortable with the featureset provided.

You needn't fear the new crop of vendors as much as many doomers in purchasing clinging to their junkets, hookers and blow will say. But you do need to keep your eyes wide open; new vendors are a new mix of features and a new support commitment. Most will be happy, but better safe than sorry.

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Is that how you define a flash array, IDC?

Trevor_Pott
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Re: This is all getting a bit silly.

Well, one of the most prominent folks at Solidfire/Netapp is Gabriel Chapman...

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You've gotta fight... for your right... to IT

Trevor_Pott
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Re: let us go forth and plot global domination

I have no interest in accommodating my enemies. They will convert or they will be ostracized until their beliefs are so marginally represented that they are irrelevant. Tolerance extends only so far. Namely: it does not tolerate the intolerant. As my views are largely focused around "the needs of the many", those that care only about "the needs of the one" must be fought without mercy or quarter until they are vanquished.

There is victory or there is death. History allows for no other alternatives.

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Trevor_Pott
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Why? Isn't global domination always the ultimate end goal? I prefer that global domination be achieved by "the people", through something roughly approximating a democratic government system where all citizens are cared for, treated as equals, allowed to express themselves and their rights preserved. All the alternatives are worse.

In the end, either the people win, or an elite wins. Either victory is through bloodshed or it is not. I prefer the people win, without bloodshed. So, by all means...let us go forth and plot global domination.

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Trevor_Pott
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"Just as many believe that we can't make a difference, you believe that we can in a very naïve way"

Funny, I don't think anything about what I've written is particularly naive. Group dynamics shows people are malleable, especially in large groups. Technology makes reaching people and manipulating them easier. The scientific method gives us the tools to experiment and refine our techniques.

Now, yes, all the tools are available to the enemy. The enemy is significantly better resourced than any individual one of us. That said, there are a hell of a lot more of us, and science absolutely provides for "accuracy through volume" as one possible method of refining techniques.

Nowhere in my article did I say that we can just up and make the world a better place "because internet". Nor did I even say that the internet gives us the ability to make changes bloodlessly.

If you want change - real change - you have to be ready to bleed for it. You may even have to shed blood for it. That's life. That's probably never going to change with our species.

But what technology does give us is ease of organization. It gives us the ability to beta test our ideologies. It lets us contact experts in various fields and plan for eventualities. It lets us share knowledge of what worked, what didn't, and try experiments and simulations to - sometimes even on real people/companies/governments/etc - until we find a solution within our means.

There's nothing naive about any of that. And yes, the colder you are, the easier it is to use the tools available.

That said, the ability to run experiments, contact experts, share knowledge and perform limited trials means that the truly sociopathic options need not be the only ones that work. We have the means to find alternatives. Even if we can't make our revolutions entirely without sacrifice, we can use the tools available to us to make them as quick and painless as possible.

And hey, who knows? Maybe - just maybe - we can even accomplish some of our victories using nothing more than technology, communication and democracy.

What a world that would be.

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Trevor_Pott
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Personally, I'm a socialist and I think the world is a horrible place with the deck stacked against most of us, thanks in no small part to those who dogmatically believe in ultra-free-market crap like "supply side economics" and "regulation is evil".

That said, I am also aware that people are malleable, technologies almost always have uses their originators never envisioned and that it is very early days yet for computers, the internet and formal social engineering.

I’ve experiments to run.

There is research to be done.

On the people who are...still alive.

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Trevor_Pott
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efforting

I can do this all day.

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NetApp shrinky-dinks ONTAP 9: Will support 4:1 data reduction

Trevor_Pott
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Re: Beware of what is being included in the data reduction ratio

Trying is not succeeding. And Netapp isn't actually changing the culture of the company...and it was the "I have a hammer, and all the world's a nail" culture that was the problem to begin with!

Netapp lashes out at criticism - especially valid criticism - and actively promotes the concept of its own infallibility and manifest destiny. This is why it fails. Until it can solve these cultural issues, it will continue to fail. No matter who is in the driver's seat.

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Trevor_Pott
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Re: Beware of what is being included in the data reduction ratio

Dude, you went to Nimble? When did this happen? Hope the new company is treating you well.

It's nice to see you coming around and realizing what I've been saying for some time: that Netapp makes stupid decisions and if they keep it up they're going to piss away all their quality staff, their customers, and their developer ecosystem (such as it is). I.E. they need to shape up or they're fucked.

Cheers!

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Trevor_Pott
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Re: NetApp should clarify the 4:1 claim

Yeah, what a load of old bollocks.

"guaranteed data efficiency reduction of 4:1"

And what do I get when Netapp cannot meet this? Because I promise you that for at least 5 of my customers there is no way on Jibbers' brown Earth that you're going to get greater than 1.3:1 data efficiency out of their data. It simply is not going to happen.

I'm really afraid of storage companies "guaranteeing" this sort of thing. Some of my clients might well be sucked in, sink a pile of money they don't really have into a bullshit claim by a "brand name" vendor, and then get screwed when it doesn't work, possibly having to go out of business.

Thanks, Netapp, you've made a bunch of work for me as I have to go proactively fight your bullshit marketing message. Goddamn it.

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Switkowski wades into NBN leak debate, ALP is furious

Trevor_Pott
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“The process is a form of political rumourtrage – the circulation of misinformation to diminish an enterprise for political gain.”

How the hell is is "misinformation" is what occurred was a whistleblower leaking the truth about the state of affairs?

Misinformation: I don't think that word thinks what you think it means.

Australia, why the metric monkey fuck do you keep electing these douchecanoes? Get a third party in play and flush the lot of these xenophobic bastards into the sea.

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Big Tech's quest to keep enterprises on board

Trevor_Pott
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So here's the thing: with the right software, storage really is just a whitebox commodity. Look at Caringo for object storage, as one example. Take your whitebox storage systems, set them to boot via PXE, and the master Caringo node simply hands out an operating system that gloms on to all the storage in the new node and adds it into the cluster. Easy peasy.

Now, Caringo is object storage. But what prevents this from being done with some sort of clustering scale-out storage solution that offers up SMB or NFS? Coho Data style tech but with a Caringo-like distribution to whitebox nodes. Nothing, really. You could even offer up iSCSI or FCoE from such a cluster.

Of course, why stop there? You can PXE deploy VMware, can't you? So you should be able to push a hypervisor with a config on it, VSAN and...oh. Hyperconverged! I hear the new Windows Server might have some laughingly horrible version of hyperconvergence built in, so if you hate yourself a lot you can do the same thing there too!

How long before Maxta figures out that this is the future and rolls together a KVM-based solution with their hypercovnerged software and gives you a self-borging HCI cluster that can also offer up SMB and NFS? Yottabyte? Cloudweavers? There are lots of players out there...someone's either done this already or will be soon. The tech exists, I've built a few versions myself.

Of course, then you have the problem of hardware. If you play this game you need to set a standardized model that you vet thoroughly, iterate once every 18 months or so as motherboards change and continually test. You need to establish redundant supply chains, buy enough through both to keep your distie accounts active and establish policies for retiring old nodes.

Contrary to what the article says, you don't need to hire extra bodies. You do need to be pee-in-jars obsessed with automated testing. Especially automated regression testing. When designing your next generation of node you need to buy between three and five different designs, varying the critical components (motherboard and HBA, if the HBA isn't on your motherboard) and you need to spend approximately three months running through all the testing. (If your test suite doesn't take three months, it isn't testing enough things.)

In today's world, your primary concerns are going to be around the HBA. Everything is about getting a good HBA that works in JBOD mode and allows great big huge queue depths. (Fortunately, most of the newer LSIs do at this point.) You need to make sure drives don't have a problem with your HBA (you can pretty much do this by checking to see if Dell has unique firmware for any of the drives they're selling with their PERCs) and you need to make sure there are no bizzarenesses with the motherboards. (Such as "you can only have one LSI card installed, or the PCI-E bus crashes due to ????????)

Every now and again you get a bug in the Intel drivers for the NICs. It's always the same bug. I'll save you a lot of time and tell you what the problem is. The problem is that if you have multiple Intel cards on a Trident-based switch where not all cards are running at the same speed (say you have links on the switch at 10GbE and one link at 1GbE) then the NIC drivers shit themselves and start passing traffic at something stupid like 200kib. Nobody seems to know why. The solution is to make all the links the same speed, or to put a "buffer" switch that isn't Trident-based in between the offending system and the Trident switch.

If you can cope with the above types of hardware issues (they should all come out in testing, if your test lab is designed to simulate all the edge cases of your production environment), you too can roll your own storage.

If you can find the software. Software that deploys via PXE and autoconfigures the nodes. If you cannot find a vendor selling you storage software that works in exactly that fashion and does precisely what you want, do not under any circumstances try to build your own storage at scale.

By "at scale" I mean more than about 5 nodes. Past 5 nodes, it's too much hassle to hand-hold storage. Trust me on this. Do not do.

On the other hand, if you have the software and the inclination towards automated testing that lets you cope with the hardware, you too can make glorious scaleable, self-healing pools of storage. Or hyperconvergence. Or both!

Enjoy!

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Big Cable uses critics' own arguments to slam set-top box shake-up

Trevor_Pott
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Re: War on Jobs

Trickle down economics is a lie. Provably so. People who believe in it deserve to be rounded up with the likes of young earth creationists and flushed into the sun.

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VMware flushes Windows vSphere client and Adobe Flash

Trevor_Pott
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Re: This is where I lost respect for Trev

Nah, I've never been "bought" by anyone. Some have tried - I've had honest offers of hookers, actually - but nobody is willing to meet my price.

If I sell out, I will lose all credibility and thus my livelihood. As such, in order to sell out, I need to be able to retire off of the selling out. In order to retire off of the amount made from selling out, I need to clear - after taxes - a little over $1.5M Canadian. This pays my debts, buys me a house on the island and gives me enough money to semi-retire and write my Sci-Fi novels.

In order to clear $1.5M after taxes I need $10M in gross income. I own 40% of my company and taxes will mean I only get to keep about 66% of what I make. Fiddling around with capital gains might up that some, but not appreciably, and shouldn't be counted on when factoring my "sell out" price anyways.

So, that makes my "price" $10M. If I am going to sell out, completely and thoroughly, to unreservedly say things I believe are not true and otherwise piss away my reputation and livelihood, I require a minimum of $10M.

To date, shockingly, no organization has offered me this amount of money. I know this because I still have to work for a living, I still live in this overcrowded shithole of a city, I still use Twitter, and my profile picture for every single site on the internet isn't a picture of my ass with the words "fuck you, world" tatooed in neon pink.

Not being bought doesn't mean I can't be snowed. And every now and again I just outright wrong. It happens. But totally in some vendor's pocket? That costs $10M.

Don't I ****ing wish.

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