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* Posts by Trevor_Pott

4277 posts • joined 31 May 2010

Samsung threatens to cut ties with supplier over child labour allegations

Trevor_Pott
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Um....what?

What the fucking fnord are you talking about? How does "broadening this to human rights abuses" make it "difficult" to deal with Chinese companies? That sounds like some straight up bullshit sinophobia.

Human rights abuses are not "common" in China...or, at least, they are no more common than in the US. Go work an Amazon warehouse, or pick veggies in the fields of a southern state.

There are going to be some companies in China that violate human rights, just as there will be in any country. It absolutely is not common practice, despite what you may have heard in the yankee media.

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What's wrong with hiring children?

I was building computers by 8. By 12 I was running smallish networks, and I put myself through high school by working at various businesses as well as running decent-sized networks. By the time I finished post-secondary I had over a decade of experience in computers with at least a decade of that being actual network administration.

There are labour laws about how much work a minor can do (hours/week wise) and they can't be expected to miss school for it. The minor needs to have parental permission and they shouldn't be paid any less for doing that work than an equally qualified adult.

If those rules are obeyed, what's the problem?

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Child diagnosed as allergic to iPad

Trevor_Pott
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Re: @Roo

The internet is full of vacillating drain bramaged novelty seekers. Can't we just have ONE place in tech reporting that encourages skepticism?

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@Roo

Get off my goddamned lawn.

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Nadella: Yes I can put 2 THINGS FIRST. I will say them at the same time – CLOUDOBILE

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"get with the new normal"

[Look at Android phone]

I think I have.

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There should only ever be one thing "first" in business...

...the customer.

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Mobile, cloud, social? Data? Nadella strings sexy words together

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Re: Great, Nadella is yet another 'yes' man...

Give the man a cookie, he's on to something here!

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Cloud first, mobile first

Customer last.

That absolutely is a vision. Just not one customers are particularly enamored of.

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New leaked 'Windows 8 screenshot': The Start Menu strikes back

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Still rather iffy about the tiles on the start menu. I'd have to play with it to see how loathesome it is, or isn't. Now, if only they could do something about the other squillion little annoyances in the OS...

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Who needs icons anyway?

I do.

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Do YOU work at Microsoft? Um. Are you SURE about that?

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Re: ATTENSHUN!

All those who "old fashioned" is a legitimate reason for removing functionality take one step forward.

[sound of machine guns being cocked]

T,FTFY

Just because something is old fashioned doesn't mean it is no longer useful. Computers are tools. Fashion shouldn't matter one whit.

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I don't suppose Microsoft have considered listening to the folks who buy their products and making software and services that those individuals and corporations actually want. Perhaps without a convoluted licensing system and prices that are affordable by all? A volume play, some might say. It worked for them in the past.

I just don't know that pissing away market share and attempting to capture the high-margin end of the market is going to work all that well. They face entrenched high-margin companies like Apple and Oracle on one side, and mad commoditsation by Amazon and Google on the other.

It strikes me then that the only real play is a populist one...so why is that the exact opposite of what they're attempting?

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Virty server bones thrown: Gartner mages see Microsoft rising

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Re: What A Load Of Shit

Your name is appropriate.

"FFS! The only difference between VMware and MS's offering is that SCVMM is a bucket of warm shit."

T,FTFY.

Mine's the one with an infrastructure that doesn't need my .ISO files to be in AD-connected "libraries" and has figured basic UI elements, like putting the ability to connect an .ISO file onto the console viewer. You know, usability stuff. For humans. Flesh-and-bone-and-not-PowerShell-scripts.

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InMage now InMicrosoft: Redmond slurps disaster recovery hardware biz

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The clustered NFS server is adequate, assuming you're a big fan of old school JBOD-style systems. Mind you, if that's the route you prefer, then Solaris or Nexenta are just fine, too.

As for "clustering various services" beyond just NFS, I have to say that my experiences plainly differ. While such things are "possible" in Windows - and, let's be blunt, they're a hell of a lot more friendly under Server 2012+ than anything that went before - Red Hat Cluster Service still walks all over Windows. (If you say "n lines of PowerShell", I shall strike you. Back into your box, marketdroid.)

Frankly, we enter a world of "needs assessment" here. What are you trying to achieve with the cluster? Are you simply trying to achieve a 2-node RAIN? Because if that's all you're after Windows Clustering is one of the least friendly ways to share files on the planet. It certainly doesn't come cheap. The minimum buy in is right up there with enterprise players...and I don't have to reboot them as often.

Are you trying to achieve namespace coherance? I trust Datacore's SanSymphony V a fuck of a lot more than lashing together Windows systems that get really cranky if the other nodes aren't identical in performance. Datacore's stuff can take storage from any number of different vendors, tier the storage, provide N+X RAIN across storage from multiple vendors, do sync or async WAN replication (latency dependent) and present the whole kit and caboodle as a single unified storage space.

Are you trying to create centralized storage for virtual machines? I would trust damned near anything more than Storage Spaces right now, and the JBODtastic storage-from-the-stone-tablet days preferred by Windows for it's clustering. Now, admittedly, there are some great enterprise storage clusters that are engineered from the ground up to take advantage of this by basically creating a two-node system-in-a-can (Supermicro's is a great example), but I'd still prefer a Tintri cluster, or a VMAX.

And what about the future? We're heading into scale-out storage, and scale-out isn't quite what Windows does. Oh, you can try to use Windows like a poor man's Datacore, pointing all the storage at your Windows instance and lashing it together with Storage Spaces, but you don't get half the functionality...and fewer big builds have been through that scale-out minefield than I'd like.

The future of VM storage is server SANs, full stop. File and Object storage will either be served by visualized file servers running on top of that, or - far more likely - by proper decentralized object stores like Caringo, with an NFS or CIFS shim.

Now, Caringo...there's the way to store a gazillion piddly files. If you need CIFS and NFS then it can do that...but all your next-gen apps can be properly coded to object storage and we can kick RAID to the curb. Thank $deity. Unlike other Object stores, Caringo doesn't have a single-point-of-failure name node, because it stores the metadata with the object. This allows for quick failover, recovery of partial drives, and the ability to set various classes of objects at different RAIN rates within the cluster. It seems to eat new nodes with a minimum of fuss and muss and retires old ones in the same manner.

So when I look at Windows Server I see a company that's doing yesterday adequately. But I can't say as I'd design tomorrow's datacenters on that technology. If it's all you know, it will get you where you need to go...for a price. A substantial price, and one that's only going to go upwards. Think "those who are still using Mainframes."

For the future, my VM storage will be server SANs, and my file/object storage will be HA NASes (low end) and Caringo-like object stores for the midmarket and above.

TL;DR It isn't that Windows can't do the job. It's that there are alternatives out there which are as reliable or more, as cheap or more, and which scale better with greater ease of use and less management overhead. I can use Windows, but I just don't have the time, money or patience to dick around with it any more*.

*At the low end, Windows is just To Damned Expensive. At the midsize, I just keep running up against it's limitations. 10M files brings the server to it's knees and cuts IOPS in half because NTFS is shit? Fuck. ReFS gets me to 40M files per volume. Woo. I'm dealing with a billion files with organizations that have 50 users and that's not going down.

And what about server SANs? They changed the game in a big way and Microsoft is *crickets* on the subject. I can't keep scaling classical bottlenecked centralized storage when I'm dealing with high-IOPS demand compute nodes whose capacity seems to grow asymmetrically of cost decreases to centralized storage.

Storage is evolving at break-neck pace, and there are great offerings out there now which have had massive deployments for 5 and even 10 years. We're not talking about greenhorn startups; the real changes are now enterprise ready. If I hitch my horse to the Microsoft wagon, I'm going to get left behind by all these kids in their newfangled horseless carriages.

Cloud first, mobile first, customer last. Microsoft's made it's development priorities clear, and they simply aren't aligned with those of us who want to run our own infrastructure.

If you plan to move your stuff into Azure, buy Microsoft's on-prem stuff. If you don't, they buy your infrastructure from quite literally anyone else. It's as simple as that.

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Cranial RAM cram plan aims to restore memory

Trevor_Pott
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No.

Just no. Some things are not okay.

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Trevor_Pott
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Re: bleeding edge research ?

"instant training for pilots, tank drivers, special forces and ship captains."

Pilots have already been replaced by autonomous machines. Tank drivers can be easily replaced by any of a dozen commercial driverless techs. What do you need with special forces when you have UCAVs and what do you need with ship captains when all the ships do is launch drones?

Robots fight. Humans in military are useful primarily for building and helping places recover from natural disasters. The military doesn't need soldiers anymore...it needs sappers.

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HGST's tiny whopper: Just 2.5 inches, but we've packed in 1.8TB

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Re: Toshiba MQ01ABB200: 2TB 2.5"

Savvio? Constellation.2?

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Trevor_Pott
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Re: almost the biggest

It's sexy looking. Of course, to afford one you have to grind up a utopia's worth of unicorns and virgins then lay it all out in a line for your HP sales rep to snort.

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Snowden seeks Russian asylum extension

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Re: Cuba

Well, the tourist trap towns are pretty damned nice. There's rather a lot to like there, in fact. Have you never been to Cuba?

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LIFE on Titan: If there's one thing aliens HATE, it's a SALTY BALL

Trevor_Pott
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Re: Methane exists through the Universe !

Wow. You're completely bugshit bonkers. Terrifying.

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Get ready for LAYOFFS: Nadella's coma-inducing memo, with subtitles

Trevor_Pott
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Mobile first, cloud first

Customer last, staff last.

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Satya Nadella: Microsoft's new man presses all the old buttons in LONG memo

Trevor_Pott
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MOBILE FIRST, CLOUD FIRST

Customer last.

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Cyber-Senate's cyber-security cyber-law cyber-scares cyber-rights cyber-fighters

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Re: Hopeless

Except that we're all thought criminals. Also, your/you're. FFS.

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Free Red Hat clone CentOS-7 is full of Linux Container love

Trevor_Pott
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Re: RHEL's choices determine CentOS

"@Trevor_Troll, you barely qualify to be read in Opie's Twitter-Voice."

Oh? How so? I pointed out that you could rather easily get Mate set up on CentOS 7, and it shouldn't break your distro to do so. That's trolling?

I said nothing about systemd. While I happen to agree with most - but not quite all - of the gripes on boycott systemd, I just don't have enough experience with systemd to really comment about how miserable it is (or not) quite yet. So I didn't.

I didn't recommend using extra repositories on servers - servers shouldn't have GUIs, this is Linux - but see no issue with their use on desktops. Linux desktop users are generally more technically competent than Windows users...or they're administered by competent people and locked way the hell down. So why wouldn't you allow the use of extra repositories that would make the desktop experience more usable?

How is any of that trolling, hmm? Or is your hatred for change so overwhelmingly powerful that if someone says anything good about a distro that you've decided is bad you must lash out at them?

Take your religion, and your spite and go decompile your own personality matrix, mmmkay?

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Re: RHEL's choices determine CentOS

"my understanding of EPEL is maybe MATE 1.8 gets upgraded to MATE 1.15 or something in a year or two with different configs &c = more work."

With the exception of a sendmail LDAP issue that was part of the core OS, I haven't had those kinds of repo issues with core, EPEL or RPMFusion in over 6 years. I think that sort of crap is behind the big repos now.

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Trevor_Pott
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Re: RHEL's choices determine CentOS

Are additional repos against your religion?

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Re: RHEL's choices determine CentOS

IIRC, EL7 supports MATE. So you aren't forced to use Gnome 3.

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Trevor_Pott
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CentOS7 is out!

I'm so happy! Absolutely made my week.

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It's alive! Space hackers fire up zombie Sun probe's engines

Trevor_Pott
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SPACE HACKERS. There are only a handful of people in the world who have earned that title. These folks got called it in print. That's a badge of honour well earned.

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Pint

Re: Sometimes

A smile on my face, hard to do of late. For the lads --->

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What is it with cloud computing? Engage VM, disengage brain?

Trevor_Pott
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Re: Trevor, could we have that in PDF ?

I apologise for the delay guys, but here is the PDF.

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That AMAZING Windows comeback: Wow – 0.5% growth in 2015

Trevor_Pott
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Re: What's to look forward to?

"Office 2013 is far more capable than older Office versions and the interface is cleaner too and it supports open standards unlike the older proprietary only versions."

Office 2003 still does everything I want. I have yet to find a single feature in the later versions that I personally or any of my clients give a damn about. Office 2013 has a rubbish interface design by lobotomised slugs and fawned over only by insects with compound eyes. Open standards should always have been a part of support for every version.

Also: 2003 never crashed even remotely as much as 2013 does. I hate the damned thing, and hope it gets consigned to a vista-like oblivion very, very soon.

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Trevor_Pott
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Re: What's to look forward to?

I liked Microsoft in the past. Once, I was one of their most ardent supporters. There are still many things I like about the technology Microsoft provides, and I respect a great many of the people that work there.

That said, on balance, I feel the star has faded. They have not kept the faith with their customers and there is no reason to trust them about anything.

Once, Microsoft was a company I wouldn't have hesitated to by my business and that of my clients on. Today, I use them only when no viable alternative exists. It's a shame, too...because in many areas Microsoft has some of the best technologies on the planet. Ah, well...

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VSANs choking on VMware's recommended components

Trevor_Pott
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Re: The RDT driver is no replacement for Infiniband

You know, this could be why I have so much luck with server SANs. I stopped using anything but 10GbE ages ago. You can get 24 ports of 10GbE for $5K from Netgear now. There's just no excuse.

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Trevor_Pott
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Depends on what you define as "a toy", I suppose. "Able to handle 125 VDI instances per node without complaint" seems reasonable to me. Alternately "200+VMs across 4 nodes that run a mix of workloads ranging from Exchange to SQL to VDI to image render engines" seems not toy-like to me.

Now, to be perfectly honest, I haven't run Maxta against those controllers. Maybe Maxta would run like a dog on them too. I do know that I don't need hardware controllers to run Maxta, and it does a damned fine job using AHCI SATA 7200 rpm spindles + SSDs. It handles all the I/O I want to throw at it on a per-node basis right up to the point that I run out of RAM.

Now, it's obviously an open question how each of these will behave when we start talking about setups that run $25K+ per node just for the hardware. I can't answer that. But I do know that Maxta runs real-world production workloads just fine on some rather weedy hardware using configs that VMware officially pooh-poohs for their own offering.

It's all about what you're optimizing for. Are you optimizing for IOmeter and SPC-2 benchmarks, or for workloads that are ridiculously latency sensitive that only 0.000002% of the world actually employ? Or are you optimizing for the kinds of workloads (and disk/CPU/RAM balances) utilized by 80% of the world's businesses?

So yeah, some of this shouldn't have made it onto the HCL...but there are things that got pulled from the HCL (or never made it on) that also raise huge questions about what the merry hob VSAN is doing that it can't get workable performance out of the same hardware that is used by Nutanix (certain LSI controllers), or Maxta (AHCI).

It makes me ask uncomfortable questions. Like "is the only thing that VSAN has to offer a series of high benchmarks, and even then only when used on the absolute best of the best hardware"? How does VSAN work with the kinds of hardware normal people and mundane businesses can actually afford, or already have to hand?

If asking those questions, instead of blindly lapping up marketing tripe and praising a solution that is twice as expensive as others competing offerings is "not understanding storage basis" I'm remarkably cool with that.

"How many IOPS do you need" is just as important a question as "how many IOPS can this solution deliver." And what's really of interest is the lovely question "why can X deliver Y IOPS on Z hardware, but W cannot?"

And, quite frankly, I don't care who gets upset when I ask those questions.

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What I fail to understand is why VSAN is so sensitive. Maxta runs like greased lightning on even marginal hardware.

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China clears Lenovo's slurp of IBM server biz

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I'm unsure why US.gov would care? I thought they used Amazon-sourced govclouds now...

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Is there too much sex and violence on TV?

Trevor_Pott
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Re: It cpould be

Well, I'd have told that waste of carbon that not only does a predilection towards profanity demonstrates an increased vocabulary due to acceptance of words he simply bans, but the ability to improvise epithets indicates a creative mind that is capable of adapting to the evolution of the language. Thus your vocabulary will always be broader, as it is more dynamic than that of our friend the trogloditic cockferret.

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Dimension Data cloud goes TITSUP down under... after EMC storage fail

Trevor_Pott
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Trollface

This never would have happened if they'd used proper enterprise storage. Trusting in these newfangled startups just puts customers at risk! That's what I don't use cloud computing.

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VMware's super-secret MARVIN: It's software-defined war on future IT

Trevor_Pott
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Re: Hardware?

VMware doesn't have to make the hardware, just rebadge Supermicro nodes.

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Trevor_Pott
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Re: Confusing

You're absolutely, 100% right. I got StorSimple and StoreVirtual mixed up. Sorry, I've been working with startups all day that are building StorSimple competitors and the dang thing stuck in my mind.

Why the heck does everyone have to name everything so bloody similar? Maybe we should start naming the next generation of products in Klingon, I think we're running out of horrible manglings of English.

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Trevor_Pott
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Re: Confusing

From the article: "the tidbit that is most likely at the core of MARVIN – VSAN – is the political equivalent of a live wire."

So yes, confusing. And highly, highly political, and you sir have struck to the heart of it. Also remember that EMC has ScaleIO, and Cisco is buying up array vendors. Add in FlexPod, and the fact that other converged competitors (Nutanix, SimpliVity, Maxta, etc) all run on VMware (as at least one of the options) and you get a glimpse of the politics.

Now go beyond storage. Pivotal makes what amounts to wickedawesome orchestration software. In some senses that competes directly with VMware's own offerings in the area. And EMC? Where are they? They can't sell "just storage" for more than another 5-10 years, so they have to have strategic moves beyond the creation of the EMC federation.

EMC federation companies cooperate and compete, even as they own bits of eachother. Nutanix, SimpliVity, Maxta and so forth are official partners of EMC federation companies, as well as vicious competitors.

Dell has launched a tight tie-up with Nutanix, but is also "100% committed to VSAN". Supermicro makes Nutanix's hardware, which Dell will be selling for several months until they get their own nodes done, at which point Nutanix will still sell Supermicro-sourced nodes. Meanwhile, Supermicro looks to be at the core of MARVIN, and has several "VSAN ready nodes" on the VSAN list, as do Dell, HP and so forth.

And what about HP? They have StorSimple and Lefthand and are trying to make a go of all sorts of things. They sell VSAN nodes and VMware, but also crank out 3PAR and are a leading force behind Openstack. They are looking to become a major cloud provider via Openstack.

"Complicated" doesn't even begin to cover it. These companies are big enough to be competing internally. When you start to try to pick out the complex interrelationships even amongst members of allied companies like the EMC federation it gets hard. Try to look at alliances of convenience like VCE and you'll go mad.

Wheeee...this is what I do for a living now! (It's still better than troubleshooting Xerox printers.)

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El Reg is looking for a new London sub-editor

Trevor_Pott
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Re: Sir

"Oh, my day-job is much more enjoyable.

It's the abject poverty for the other 15 hours a day that's stressful!"

Rule of acquisition number 125: You can't make a deal if you're dead.

The stress of the day job damned near killed me. Writing is a cathartic release.

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Re: Sir

Writing doesn't pay nearly as well as systems administration. From experience, however, there's less stress sin the writing. I'll take navigating PRs over troubleshooting printers any day of the week.

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Windows 7, XP and even Vista GAIN market share again

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@Don Dumb

Things which are ass are bad. Sorry, it's the 90s slang that got bred into me. You'll just have to cope.

As to your magical woo-woo crystals sending you a positive vibe about Windows 9...what proof you have? Vista/7 are ages behind us. The brass involved all got shuffled or canned. "Microsoft" isn't a person, it's people, and there's no reason to believe any previous patterns will hold.

Microsoft has been getting more self-insulated and subject to corporate hubris, not less. That says to me that the chances of them "not getting it" for Windows 9 are rather high.

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Re: History repeating

Windows 7 was accepted because it was less ass than Vista.

Windows 8 has "one OS' worth of experience" over Windows 7 and it is significantly more ass than either 7 or Vista.

There is no reason to expect Microsoft will "get it right" with Windows 9. They either will, or they won't. But their corporate hubris is powerful, and it may crowd out the sort of thinking required to make an OS that will be widely accepted. Only time will tell.

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Remaining Snowden docs will be released to avert 'unspecified US war' – ‪Cryptome‬

Trevor_Pott
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Suffice it to say that you're a better person than I.

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Re: Potty Trouble is

The Sept 11 attacks don't even count as a skirmish. A couple thousand people died. Minor infrastructure damage. The difference between that and a nuke is something you are obviously completely incapable of comprehending.

Yes, the Sept 11th attacks didn't catalyze the west to retribution, because they weren't that big a fucking deal. Americans were shocked out of their belief that their vaunted exceptionalism protected them from the consequences of their own foreign policy hitting them on their soil. That's unfortunate - and it really sucks for the families of those killed - but it is not even remotely, not even within several orders of magnitude - close to a nuclear attack.

America got pushed into the dirt by the nerd they were busy bullying. The rest of the world pretty much said "saw that coming" and went on their merry. American then killed one million people in Iraq in retribution - a nation that had nothing at all to do with the Sept 11 attacks - and got bogged downing in Afghanistan getting it's ass handed to it by a bunch of cave-dwelling lunatics. (To be fair, we ALL got our asses handed to us in Afghanistan, including Canada. Mind you, at least some of our war dead are because the Americans decided to bomb us.)

When America actually identified the people responsible - the whackos in Afghanistan - for Sept 11th, her allies rallied to her side and we marched on the people responsible. We did it according to the rules of war because the act in question - the Sept 11th incident - did not in any way warrant an abrogation of the various treaties that determine those rules of war. Put simple: Sept 11th wasn't a big enough deal to warrant tearing down hundreds of years of international agreements about conduct during a war. The threat was not big enough.

Nuke a city, and that changes. In an instant the threat moves into the realm of "absolutely must be terminated at all costs." With a nuclear attack - and only an attack of that scale - would western nations be willing to switch from "defensive aggression" to "conquer with an eye to eradication."

If you cannot see the difference between the two levels of incident, there is something very wrong with you.

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EFF sues NSA over snoops 'hoarding' zero-day security bugs

Trevor_Pott
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Re: The EFF is a joke

The EFF NSA is a joke. They have no clue and they don't represent the interest of the populace.

T,FTFY

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Amazon sues former employee who took Google cloud job

Trevor_Pott
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Re: Can't see the gray area here

Non compete agreements can't be enforced here, so let the poxy whoresons add whatever clauses they like. I'll tell 'em "up the jacksie" and be off on my merry.

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