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* Posts by Trevor_Pott

4309 posts • joined 31 May 2010

Inside Steve Ballmer’s fondleslab rear-guard action

Trevor_Pott
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Re: No, Liam, I won't be using a fondleslab as my primary computer.

Swiftkey and I still haven't figured out how to work together. I am trying, but it's still very tough going.

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Trevor_Pott
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Re: No, Liam, I won't be using a fondleslab as my primary computer.

Windows tablets have shit battery life and gave up on having a proper multitasking OS for that bullshit 8.11 for Fondlegroups "two things at a time, tops" crapfest.

Windows tablets are just as much post-productivity devices as iTat. Not that I'd expect a fairly proven brand tribalist like you to be capable of understanding such concepts. URG SAYS LURV MICROSOFT

UG, UG. MICROSOFT.

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Trevor_Pott
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Re: No, Liam, I won't be using a fondleslab as my primary computer.

Liam's an opensorcerer, not a hipster twit.

The commenters may be hipsters. I'm convinced Liam was just trolling.

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Trevor_Pott
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Re: Reg Users are not typical

Nobody here - not one fucking person - is claiming tablets won't take off. They're not claiming tablets won't outsell PCs. They aren't even saying tablets won't be more popular.

There are always more content consumers than content creators.

The point that everyone is trying to make - and that the polyfondle hipsterati can't grok - is that tablets won't replace the PC. They are an and not and or. They will replace the PC for consumption amongst consumers. They won't replace the PC amongst content creators and there are still several hundred million of us around the world.

So go, consume. Please. Pay your money and fondle your rounded patent-encumbered magic shiny box. I make good money off the likes of you.

But the tablet is not killing the PC. It is replacing the television, print media and other consumptive activities.

PC sales will fall. Then they'll level out and stay there with minimal growth for decades. How many fridges, really, need to be sold every year? Tea kettles? Coffee makers? But everyone still buys them. Acquiring them is even part of the right of passage into adulthood. Replacing them a subject of fierce household debate over time and requirements. This is where the PC now lives.

To say that the tablet will "kill" the PC is like saying the introduction of the microwave will kill the oven. Not going to happen.

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Trevor_Pott
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Re: Consumer vision

The problem with the hotdeskitng tablet idea is that gets you into a fundamentally new paradigm of device. That's not a tablet. Tablet's are monotasking, consumer-driven with interfaces that are great big fat touch targets with terrible screen real estate usage. They are optimized for consumption with no thoughts given over to productivity.

How do you use a mouse with an operating system that refuses to recognize the mouse, treat it as a first class input device if it does recognize it, or not speak to a significant number of features (such as more than one mouse button) in the very rare instances an App is aware that more than fondlebuggery exists?

What you are trying to describe is what Windows 8 should have been but wasn't and likely never will be. An operating system - and applications - that work in portable, fondlestroking mode and in a stable, precision, multitasking productivity mode.

Nobody is interested in building that. That takes innovation, resources and a lot of effort. It requires two full UIs. Not just for the OS, but for every app!

Creatives and the productivity minded just aren't a big enough market to continue supporting in the mind of people who chase "growth" over actual revenue. So they get shafted. It will be a decade - probably more - before that pendulum swings 'round again. When it does, we'll be talking about post-tablet devices.

A tablet with a keyboard and mouse is as like a 500 button universal remote for a television with one channel...and so far the only effort to build a digital multitool gave us Windows 8: the spork of the new millenium.

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Trevor_Pott
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Re: Consumer vision

I don't dispute that fondleslabs will be big.

I absolutely do dispute that they will "kill" the desktop.

Fondleslabs aren't a replacement for the PC. They're a replacement for the television and print media. Content consumption. Not creation.

Where I get uppity is the suggestion that "an established market" such as "professionals who need professional tools" is somehow going to disappear in a puff of fondlefucking. It won't...and the companies who abandon the professional in favour of chasing Sally Slanted Forehead will be pissing away a huge market - and margin - even if it is a static market.

Fondlespanking devices of all flavours are an and not an or unless you happen to be very, very poor. In which case - and pardon the bigotry for a pragmatic moment - who gives a fuck? Poor people are getting poorer. Rich are getting richer. The wealth gap is widening, not shrinking. So the money is at the top, not in a race to the bottom.

Despite not wanting to rub myself all over some glass and orgasm loudly to the brand name du jour I still do belong to a cohort of individuals whose money is valuable, even desired.

Imagine that. Or is an app required to do so? I don't know how it works these days...

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Trevor_Pott
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Re: No, Liam, I won't be using a fondleslab as my primary computer.

I don't believe software for tablets will get "better" unless they become WIMP PCs. The underlying theory of usage is just so different. Consumption based, not productivity based. In mofetn fondlefuckery keuboards and mice are fifth-class input methods. Behind grunting and rolling your penis around on the screen.

An evolution into a productivity-based device would so fundementally alter their OS and app designs, APIs, basic rules of use, etc that they br a different class of device...the aformentionned post-post-productivity PCs that re-embreace productivity.

We're at lrast a decade away from that. Probably two. This is not an "around the corner" evolution. Fondlecrap isn't going to magically gain proper multitasking, arbitrarily resizable, overlappable app spaces or other goodness frequently used by professional content creators.

It's crap today. All signs point to it being even worse crap tomorrow. "It might suck less some day so IT'S THE FUTURE" convinces me of nothing. Show me proof, with today's purchasable tech, as described above. Other2wise you're blowing smoke.

Go ask OQO about redefining the future. It's inevitable, you see.

In3vitale.

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Trevor_Pott
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Re: No, Liam, I won't be using a fondleslab as my primary computer.

I said nothing about being "a techie." I said "I'm a content creator." Far bigger group.

But yeah, yiu knwo what, you're right. It's okay to just write off hundreds of millions of peoplle around the world. Fuck those guys and their not liking touch.

Hipsters forever. Amen.

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Trevor_Pott
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Re: No, Liam, I won't be using a fondleslab as my primary computer.

I have tablets with keyboards and mice. They are univ3rsally crap. They are nowhere near as productive as a real PC. Next.

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Trevor_Pott
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Re: No, Liam, I won't be using a fondleslab as my primary computer.

And my point was "I don't care about consumers." Content creaters are users too.

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Trevor_Pott
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Re: No, Liam, I won't be using a fondleslab as my primary computer.

It was typed from my Samsung Galaxy Note 2 while in bed. I'm unable to sleep (anxiety) and thus trolling the interbutts.

I can type 100 WPM on this thing. It's just not all that accurate. I always have to take anything I try to "create" on fondleslabs to a real PC for post-processing. But hey, the downvoters think I'm fulla shit, so obviously I'm just holding it wrong.

Oh well.

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Trevor_Pott
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Re: No, Liam, I won't be using a fondleslab as my primary computer.

Did I say cloid apps can't be productive? Where? I just made a video using goanimate.com. The past two days of my life have ben spent being productive in the cloud.

My issue was with the inpit methods. Precision pointers and keyboards are critical for making quality work in a reasonabke timeframe.

You CAN create on a fondleslab. It just takes 10x as long. Maybe in the future we'll have apps that make up for the inherant assness of the input type. We don't current have such tools today, nor any real hope of them in the near future. What we have instead is 6 years of touch being useful for nothing more than consumption and no notable forward motion beyond marketing and broken promises.

Want to convince me touch and voice are good enough to go toe to toe with the keyboard, stlyus and mouse? I've laid out above what's required. Repeated assertions won't change my mind. Anecdotes mean nothing. Only concrete scientific evidence that has been reproduced and addresses the diversity of human thought and perception will change my mind. That is what it takes to alter a lifetime of personal experirnce, decades of professional experience and years of dedicated research into the topic (which I have done.)

Whrere the app lives is a separate argument. How we use the damned thing is all that I was addressing. As for convincing me of the wonders of touch...

...proof.

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Trevor_Pott
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Re: Fallacious argument

You can't use logic in these arguments. Brand Tribalism will trump any attempt at rational arguments.

-- Sent from Samsung Galaxy Note 2.

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Trevor_Pott
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Re: No, Liam, I won't be using a fondleslab as my primary computer.

Prove me wrong.

Have a large group of individuals create quality multimedia; writing, touched up photos, audio, video, quality code, animation, 3d design and more on both fondleslabs and desktops. Let them have access to any software or hardware they desire for the devices, but restrict input methods on the next-gen types to touch and voice only.

Now, how long does it take the average individual to create finished works of equal quality based on devices of each input paradigm? When you can prove that the majority of people - or even the small subset of non-linguistic thinkers I belong to - can produce better quality works, faster by using touch, arm waving and voice then I will give fucks.

Until then, it's just the gnashing of teeth and the wailing of hipsters. I demand evidence...what I've seen thus far makes touch an inherently consuptive input methodology. That is not just my personal experience, it is looking at large quantites of research on the topic by well-funded scientists.

So...prove that this is "just my opinion" by doing the hard work to prove me wrong.

...you can prove it, can't you?

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Trevor_Pott
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No, Liam, I won't be using a fondleslab as my primary computer.

I am not ready for a post-productivity input paradigm. I am too old and set in my ways to make the jump. Touch is a consumptive design method. I can't think of myself as "just another consumer." So I'll keep keyboards and precision pointers around. I'll use old tech if I have to. I'll even exit IT and look for a new career as a writer.

These young pups can have their Microsoft Tiles 8.11 for fondlegroups. I'll resign myself to being one of the few who create, not consume...even if that makes me anathema to the hoi polloi and the digital hipsters of the new millenium.

WIMP works well with how my brain works. Search doesn't, commandline doesn't and one-thing-at-a-time swipy fondle groping doesn't either.

Fondleslabs and Kinects may well be the future of the endpoint. PowerShell may well be the future of the admin. If so, I'll be cast adrift with no interface to call my own, no device that works well for the way my brain processes information.

That's okay. The older I get, the less I care. I can, in fact, live happily without needing up-to-date computers and the approval of the internet. Eventually, the pendulum will come back 'round, and they'll realise that people like me are an "untapped market." Just like the CLI saw a resurgance, I expect the post-post-productivity computer design to be a productivity-based one once more.

I'll spend my retirement with computers that don't suck. In the interim, I'll spend my time makeing the stuff the young fondleslabbers consume. On my desktop, laptop and netbook.. My old, oudated, GET OFF MY GODDAMNED LAWN machines.

And I'll charge the poxy whoreson hipsterati through the nose to access my content, too.

Ta.

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Why Microsoft absolutely DOESN'T need its own Steve Jobs

Trevor_Pott
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Re: $1000s to replace apps?

For some people the cost is low. Certainly not for all, I doubt even for "most" and absolutely not for the "high value eyeballs" that everyone wants to capture. Your Aunt Tilly isn't representative of the world at large...and certainly not representative of the chunk of it that companies aim to monetize.

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Trevor_Pott
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Re: "coast" for a decade, growing profits year over year by 15%

From your keyboard manipulating digits to the Redmondian ether, sir. Amen.

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SaaS superstars' cynical sales schemes make them dinosaurs-in-waiting

Trevor_Pott
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Oh my gods...

...I agree with someone from Gartner. Clearly, I am going to hell.

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Saturn's moon Titan had swamps, say astroboffins

Trevor_Pott
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Uh....

...who thinks Titan might harbour life? Really? There's liquid methane on that moon. It's very nearly too cold for there to be self sustaining biochemical processes, let alone anything we'd recognize as life....

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Happy Thanksgiving, Apple. Now how about THREE more patent legal battles for dessert?

Trevor_Pott
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Re: If you troll your patents..

They patented rounded corners. Also ridiculous software bullshit like "bounce back on scroll." All of which was invented by others.

Apple are a patent troll. I don't care if they make widgets too, they're the trolliest troll this side of trollsville and I hope they die by that particular sword. All umpteen billion worth of cash they have locked away tightly from taxes.

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Trevor_Pott
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Re: If you troll your patents..

Indeed. Sympathy felt for Apple is negative. Glee. I feel glee.

Maybe if they become target of enough patent trolls, Apple will stop being one themselves and start pushing for reforms too.

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SLAPPING an iPhone out of a corporate drone's hand: You're not the only one who longs to do it

Trevor_Pott
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For the record, the conversation about this article went something like this:

Trevor: "Hey Adam, you're the Microsoft guy that uses all the Microsoft with added Microsoft, eh?"

Adam: "Uh...yeah?"

Trevor: "I don't think we really talk all that much about enterprise support of smartphones; can you do a comparison of your Win Phone widgety tilewhatsit against the iPhone?"

Adam: "Sure."

It seriously was just an idea that was pulled from the ether. No particular reason, other than "this is something Adam knows stuff about and is qualified to write about and there's no way I'm spending my money on buying one of those wretched things, so +++Adam".

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UK parents to splurge £3 BEELLLIIIION on kids' tech gifts at Christmas

Trevor_Pott
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Religious humbuggery?

I think it's great that religion is being pushed out of xmas. Avarice and naked capitalism aren't all that much better, but I'm down with almost anything that reduces the influence and reach of authoritarian xenophobic moral absolutists. Down with that sort of thing.

Personally, I celebrate the solstice. Because science.

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What lies beneath Microsoft's Cloud OS?

Trevor_Pott
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Re: pivotal?

They're actually pretty different. But that, good sir, is another article entirely...

Keep an eye out!

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Trevor_Pott
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Re: Cloud OS

Disagree entirely. You aren't even remotely understanding Google's business model. Google cares nothing about you putting your data in their datacenter. Google Mail, Google Docs and all such things are nothing more than offerings to get you addicted to the cloud. Google doesn't care if you use Google Docs or LibreOffice's upcoming SaaS offering. They don't care if you use Chrome or Firefox. They only care that you do your work online, not locally.

Would Google prefer that you use Chrome over Firefox? Sure. But it's really no skin off their nose if you don't. Would they like to datamine your documents and e-mail? Sure, but it's really no skin off their nose if they can't.

Ultimately, they make their money through your generalized addiction to the net. No on element - email, document, browsing, etc - is enough for them to form a complete picture of an individual. Get the person hooked on thinking of "the computer" as "the network" and "the browser" as "the gateway to my apps and information", however, and suddenly you own that user.

Google are everywhere. They have trackers and Analytics and what-have-you on virtually every site on the internet. Amazon-hosted SaaS app? Awesome! They're probably using Google Analytics.

The only real competitor Google has is Microsoft. Microsoft want to own your data. More importantly, Microsoft want to keep Google out. Microsoft wants to mine your data and they don't want to let Google do so.

So wherever Microsoft can capture data, a user, a website, what-have-you it disappears from Google's Giant Map Of All Of Humanity. That's A Bad Thing as far as Google is concerned. So Google needs to break Microsoft. More importantly, they need to break people from Microsoft.

That means getting them off Windows and off Office and off IE. Google will use any and ever tool to do so. ChromsOS, Android, Chrome, Firefox, FirefoxOS, Libre Office, Google Docs...it doesn't matter. What matters is killing that Redmondian Black Hole that Google can't extract data from. Nobody else is really a threat, (well, Facebook...but they are already on the "rapid decline" portion of the exercise,) because everyone else plays ball.

Next up: breaking into China...

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Trevor_Pott
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Re: all well and good in theory

Not really. It always takes Microsoft 3 tries. The first try is ME/Vista/Windows 8. The second try is mostly workable, sort of. The third try is amazing.

Then they "reorganise", decide they need to tear up every single one of their perfectly functional products, piss off their entire user base, burn their partners, create incomprehensible UIs, make their licensing even more draconian and push out another 1.0 turd.

Your alternatives are: Oracle ('nuff said), Apple (fucks given about enterprise = 0), Google (the NSA wishes they were this intrusive), Amazon (run at a loss to capture market share then turn the knobs until long after their screams for mercy have faded into a background din), VMware (dude, where's my strategy?), or Open Source (all right, we have two hands, a GPS and a Sherpa...where's our ASCII?).

HA HA, BUSINESS!

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Trevor_Pott
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Re: Cloud OS

All right, let me try to clear this up:

Google's Chrome OS is about running endpoint software applications in a browser. This is mostly so that they can be run as cloudy SaaS apps, but far more importantly so that the application is standards-based and can run on any operating system. ChromeOS's sole purpose is to break the requirement for Windows on the endpoint.

ChromeOS can run an application locally or it can run it from anywhere on the internet, but at the end of the day it is just Linux with a browser on it.

CloudOS is about running backend applications and entire operating systems anywhere you want. Locally, at a service provider, on the Azure cloud. The entire purpose is to lock you into Microsoft's ecosystem so you have to pay Microsoft rental fees to access your own data forever. Your applications can be anything - and they don't have a requirement for any form of user interface - and they can run anywhere.

CloudOS is viewed as the back-end that would power the kinds of SaaSy apps that google wants us all to become addicted to with ChromeOS. Microsoft recognizes that they have lost their endpoint monopoly and are thus seeking a backend monopoly to make up for it.

Google are trying to free us from dependence on any one operating system, or even browser (thus why they fund Mozilla.) If we feel like we have choice as long as we use standards-based web apps then we'll use standards-based web apps! People like to feel they have choice. Anything on the web, Google can track it, monitor it and advertise against it. Google wins.

Microsoft have figured out that there is more money in holding your data hostage than there ever was in holding your endpoint OS and UI hostage. (Thought they'll give that a go, too, for as long as they possibly can.) Hold someone's endpoint or UI hostage and they'll install something like Classic Shell or uBit Menu. Damned people and their damned choice. Had to control.

Hold your data hostage and they'll pay you and pay you and pay you and pay you. If you hold their data you hold their entire business. Once you have them all by the balls you can then start turning the knobs, one at a time. Works for Oracle, Cisco, EMC...

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Trevor_Pott
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Re: A Chain is only as Strong as it's Weakest Link

RAT doesn't make Metro go away, you arrogant twatdangle. It just forces you to install that utter turd on your local system.

As for your "if you don't use PowerShell for administration you aren't a competent sysadmin" get fucked.

Jackass.

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Trevor_Pott
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@Wade

Well said. Completely agree. Though Windows 7 needs Classic Shell to get the up arrow back, and you need to disable Snap, because Snap is just-sub-Microsoft-Licensing-class evil in software form.

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Trevor_Pott
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Re: Cloud OS

...

I...I don't even know where to begin. I am going to need a lot of sleep before I can even begin to figure out how you could conflate the two concepts. Also: there's no S in my name.

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Trevor_Pott
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Re: Interesting.

Agree. See here.

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Trevor_Pott
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Re: Hmmm

...

I spent at least half the article taking the piss out of Microsoft, and you read that as an advert? Check your bias at the door, please...

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Trevor_Pott
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Re: A Chain is only as Strong as it's Weakest Link

I agree, there is a critical importance to the stability of the underlying OS. Which is why Windows is such a damned fine contender.

Oh, you still think it's a crashy, security nightmare? Sorry, but 10 years ago called, they want their prejudice back. You've a lot to learn. Far more than I'm willing to type out in the comment section here.

Piss on Microsoft for a great many things - gods know I do - but Server 2012 R2 is a damned fine, damned stable operating system. The core install (or the Hyper-V server variant) are both solid offerings. Linux, Unix and so forth have their own issues. When you talk about the "core" of the OS, they are pretty close to equal.

Now, would I prefer a hypervisor based on Wind River or QNX? Sure as hell. Do I believe for a second that Xen or KVM are any better than Hyper-V in the real world? Hell no. I could - at the moment, and not for much longer - be convinced VMware is more stable and secure.

I think you've a lot to learn about Windows Server, how modular it is, how secure it is and - mostly, from your post - how far it's come since your prejudices were formed. It might well be the basis of an interesting article.

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Trevor_Pott
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Re: End Game

Yes...and no. Microsoft is still addicted to the endpoint. They want their OS everywhere. Microsoft on your lightbulb! (Assuming they can convince someone to cram 8GB of RAM into the damned thing.)

The ticket here is to get people addicted to renting. Microsoft views that ability for individuals and businesses to "sweat their assets" in times of financial downturn as a serious problem. During a financial downturn is when Microsoft needs those steady, ticking revenues the most!

The goal isn't to get the OS off the endpoint, or the server. The goal is to get you on a subscription where you pay every month for the right to use that endpoint/server, with your data as the held hostage to ensure that you'll fire half your staff before you'd ever consider not paying your Microsoft subscription.

In Microsoft's world you can sweat the wetware, but by $deity don't sweat the software.

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Microsoft wields turkey knife, slices Surface to $199 for Black Friday

Trevor_Pott
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US centric, much?

The Aussie writer says "the day after thanksgiving", meaning the day after American thanksgiving, despite the fact that the real thanksgiving is celebrated over a month earlier.

Nice to see the USA has so utterly taken over the culture and thoughts of even Australians that they cannot separate one nation's (false and at the wrong time) observance of a holiday from the entire rest of the world.

Awesome.

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Keeping warm in winter the el Reg way: Setting a NAS box ON FIRE

Trevor_Pott
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Mushroom

Re: hit the thing with a semi

I say nothing!

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Trevor_Pott
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Re: How does it fare

That thing is a tank. Seriously, a tank. You could hit the thing with a semi and it would probably still work.

To put this in context: it is only slightly longer than your average 4-bas NAS and less wide. It has less total volume than an HP microserver and yet the damned thing weighs as much as a 3U 1500VA APC UPS. Those drives are protected. Go ahead and drop a brick building on it. It'll cope.

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Trollface

KZERT

"Borrow"?

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Trevor_Pott
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Re: How does it fare

That is part of what we tried to simulate. The unit basically had white-hot coals underneath it, burning "building" all around it (including on top) and ultimately ended up buried in very hot coals for 15 minutes before we decided to put it out.

Thus I'd say "it handled having a burning building on top of it rather well."

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Trevor_Pott
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Your details have been noted, citizen.

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Re: I was expecting ...

We get paid...but it was an "own initiative" type thing, so a lot of it was on us. It was a blast, so I've no complaints...but it does put a bit of a cap on expenses when a large chunk is from your own pocket. That said, learning new things makes us better at this next time, so suggestions are always welcome.

We'll look into the fire-resistant cables next time, however, I don't think that will help the external power supply. Go watch the video again, you'll see the PSU burning up not long after the thing is put into the fire. Pretty sure that kills any attempt at SNMP gathering, no matter which cable we use.

That is where get into the remote temperature probes. Which is where the real money comes in. Near as i can tell a probe good to 800c would probably have run us more than the entire rest of the event combined...

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Re: I was expecting ...

Uh...it was on fire. And the power supply went up in seconds. We burned the unit for 20 minutes and then doused it in cold water for 20 minutes. The unit was up for less than 60 seconds. It seemed somewhat anti-climatic to post that. (For the record, we didn't even see the disks hit 55 before the power went.)

Looked into probes that could be used for this purpose. They were way beyond our budget. (As it is we lost several hundred making this video; there's no way we'll get paid enough to cover our time and materials.) So...yeah. Physics.

Physics sucks.

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I don't know about lightning strike-levels, but the power did light up really pretty-like doing that sparky thing whilst we were busy burning it. Suspect the electronics inside got a good jolt.

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Re: And this beats Glacier...how?

Because the cost and the restore time are out of reach for many businesses, and certainly for many individuals.

Additionally, owning the equipment lets you sweat your assets in times of need. "Services" don't.

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Re: by bell and by book next?

Claims the same extreme waterproofing and seems to meet the claims. They cost about as much as your average 4-bay NAS would; not bad, considering. With the new 6TB drives coming out...

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Hello! Still here! Surface 2! Way better than iPad! says slightly desperate Microsoft

Trevor_Pott
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@Hooksie

So, I'm missing something here, Hooksie. Call it a misinterpretation.

Let's pick your comment apart some, shall we?

"Actually Trevor"

This says Trevor. I'm going to assume it's directed at me. I don't see any other Trevors around.

"I think that very fair comment was directed at The Register."

No, it's really not. There's no evidence presented. Just mud flinging from someone with some bent feelers.

"you didn't write the article did you?"

Um, actually, I'd have to check on that...nope, this is one of Jasper Hamill's. He's a nice chap, by the way. Head glued on straight, sharp as a tack. I think you'd like him. Unless, you know, you're crazy. I think you'd have to be crazy not to like the guy.

"You have s fair mind"

I'm going to presume that the stray "s" is supposed to be an "a". They're close together on the keyboard, that could be a typo. I am unsure what "a fair mind" is, but I am going to choose to believe you mean that I am fair and objective. I'll take that as a compliment, I put a crazy amount of effort into this.

"and intelligence"

Debatable.

"so you would be barred from writing for this site."

Wait...what? You've completely lost me here. (And we were getting along so well!) You see, I think you're trying to say two things here. First, that The Register would not let me write for them. Secondly, that The Register would not hire someone fair, objective and intelligent to write for them.

Okay, let's address that in two parts.

1) I have been writing for The Register for almost 4 years. While I'm sure there are some there who are not exactly fond of me, I'm going to go with "they'll let chumps like me scratch aimlessly at the walls and push publish."

2) The Register loves fair, objective and intelligent people. While I personally do - and have, loudly - dispute the objectivity (or fairness) of some writers as relates to certain topics, there is absolutely no form of downward editorial control from on high saying "believe this, write this, act in this fashion."

The mere fact that I can mix it up with other writers - even editors - about things should prove the diversity of opinion encouraged. I get into it with other writers about everything. From the lobotomy-friendly climate denying that some choose to engage in to the ultra-capitalist diminution of human beings into "capital resources" to who should be the next CEO for Microsoft. (Nadella or bust!)

That's part and parcel of being a good news organization. Differing opinions are allowed. No "party line" exists. And nobody is a shill for any company.

I have written about companies I am involved with. When I do so, I post a disclaimer about that. Examples are here and here. Am I a shill now? How about if I told you that the about page on my personal website contains a disclaimer section that is up front about any possible sources of bias that might affect my writing? Am I still a shill?

I think you should read up some on the concept of brand tribalism. It is entirely possible that your concept of who is (and is not) a shill is being influenced by your own personal preferences regarding brands/companies/products and so forth.

No writer is perfectly objective. Not me, not other El Reg writers, no one. But we try, damn it. If we are biased by anything it is all of the preconceived notions and prejudices that are encompassed within "a lifetime's worth of personal experiences". We are not shills because The Register gets paid to advertise on the web pages or other such silly nonsense. As writers, we're insulated from that crap by the excellent sales team that works at The Register.

If you want an example of this you need look no further than myself. Microsoft advertises with The Register on a regular basis. I'm sure you've seen the ads by now. I talk smack about them all the time and they deserve to have smack talked about them because they make stupid mistakes and piss off their customers, partners, employees and investors alike.

I also - just by the by - talk smack and take the piss out of anyone and everyone else too. Because, you see, I write for The Register.

...and we bite the hand that feeds IT.

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WTF is the Internet of Things and how insurers will use it against you

Trevor_Pott
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Re: Fish tanks on the internet...

Cheers. I'll reach out to them and see if perhaps my ideas and their technology can be combined!

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Trevor_Pott
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@Ken Hagan

A lot of IoT devices will be designed badly and be a terrible idea that will lead to all sorts of problems. No question. I've written about that before.

Some will be so simply they can't be "hacked" in the sense you're thinking about.

Others will indeed be fully fledged, properly designed, well defended computers in their own right that are low power enough to live off ambient energy. Today you need to be little more than a sensor, a radio and some minimalistic logic to be a backscatter device. Two years form now expect full-bore ARM devices to live in that category.

Hell, even the "dumb sensors" are often "smart" enough to have IPv6 tunneling that they then don't report to a computer on your LAN, they report directly to the cloud. Certainly other "internet of things" devices such as the internet-connected smoke detectors don't report in any way to a local server or PC. They just find network access and report themselves to a SaaS app hosted on Amazon.

You are still thinking like and edge-defending IPv4 sysadmin, sir. You are dating yourself and demonstrating that you don't really understand what IPv6 is going to "enable"* or how it will completely change our networks - and our lives - irreparably.

*you'll note that I'm not exactly in the camp of "IPv6 is a good thing" specifically because of what IPv6 "enables". It's great if you're an ivory tower douchepopsicle with an unlimited budget, but the ramifications for end users and SMBs were not only not thought through, they were actively dismissed with extreme prejudice when brought up.

As is typical for ivory tower douchepopsicles, the response of IPv6 designers and evangelists is that end users simply need to get better at network security, understand IT more and spend more and more money on security product, router, etc. There is a reality disconnect there that is going to be a goddamned nightmare to deal with as the Internet of Things explodes and there is a reason I'm getting out of IT before that proverbial encounters the circulation device.

We will all be paying dearly for the arrogance and shortsightedness of IPv6 designers for the two generations, at least. But shhhhhh. Don't talk about it. Otherwise people will call you names on Twitter.

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Trevor_Pott
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Re: What is with all the luddites

Also: http://www.ted.com/talks/chrystia_freeland_the_rise_of_the_new_global_super_rich.html

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Trevor_Pott
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Re: What is with all the luddites

"Are you seriously suggesting it hasn't changed the world?"

The internet changed the world. It didn't change people. So, like any tool, it has been used for good and for evil. More evil than good, of late...and likely that will be the way of things in the future. That's human nature.

"As for 'goodness and freedom', I was a big promoter of the upside potential and I think time has proven me correct in that."

No, it hasn't. It's proven the opposite.

"Rather than pretending you can escape the inescapable you may better advance your own cause by staying to make sure that sanity prevails and we don't end up with Big Brother prosecuting thought-crime before the fact."

Bullshit. Authoritarians cannot be stopped. Almost all living people in the first world simply haven't known true dictatorship and thus must experience it again before they realize that sacrifice and vigilance are necessary to defend against it. Humanity will have another very dark time ahead of it before we realize - for a generation or two - that freedom is more important than security. Anyone who stands up to those seeking to put the hoi polloi under their thumb will be crushed. There's not a goddamned thing I can do to stop it. Not one.

"In the next fifty years we could be living in heaven or living in hell. Our leaders are currently voting for hell. Unless we counter with a very strong vote for heaven, we will be leaving a disastrous legacy to our grandchildren. You can't vote if you leave the system."

Heaven and hell don't exist. My contribution was to not have children. I know what's coming and I won't bring another generation into that future. No amount of "voting" will alter the course of our society.

"I am not sure that privacy as we know it is a viable notion going forward."

Hence my middle finger in the air at society in general and a planned retreat from the rest of the world.

"The only viable response to privacy concerns long term has to be political and social as well as technological. To respond as a part of the body politic you have to remain a part of the body politic. Dropping out just to protect yourself is pointless."

You're a doe-eyed fool wearing rose-tinted glasses. Listen to me very carefully here: the only way that meaningful change will occur is if a lot of people die. By this I mean hundreds of millions. Humanity will not rethink it's NIMBYist, authoritarian tendencies unless we go through the looking glass one more time.

Even that will only waken one, maybe two generations to the delicate balance before we careen once more into the abyss.

All of human history is our ancestors learning the same lessons over and over and over and over and over and over and over and over and over and over and over and over and over and over and over and over and over and over and over and over and over and over and over and over and over...

Our descendants will not be any different; and in fact, we ourselves are the same.

Over 95% of Americans support gun laws banning fully automatic weapons, requiring background checks to get weapons and so on. Do you see a trampling hoard of movement in that direction? Goddamn it man these people almost put Sarah Palin a heartbeat away from personal responsibility for thousands of nuclear weapons.

No amount of hope, cheer, goodwill or happy thoughts will change the wealth gap, the power gap, the overwhelming influence of the military industrial complex or the burning need of those who have power to do everything humanly - or inhumanly - possible to ensure that under no circumstances they stand even the remotest risk of losing that power. Uncontrolled, unmonitored people are a risk to the power of those who currently have it. The gap between "them" and "us" is so vast that it cannot be bridged. We've already lost, fellow peasant, you're just stupid enough to believe you're still free.

When they push too far - and I think that's twenty years out, yet - the revolt will be swift, it will be brutal, and it will be unbelievably, overwhelmingly bloody. A social upheaval and civilian massacre the likes of which this world has never seen. Entire nations will lay in ruins, their citizenry shredded and their economies ruined for lack of warm bodies to push the buttons and make the system go.

Entire fields of knowledge and learning will be lost. Our society will be set back a generation, maybe more. Nothing we can do will prevent this. Nothing we do can even mitigate the carnage that is to come.

If you want to contribute usefully to society then dedicate yourself to the preservation of knowledge. All knowledge. Recognize the future for what it is and help plan for the aftermath. I will never have the resources to build a true archive of knowledge - though I fund what I can.

Instead, I seek to recuse myself from this increasingly intrusive and depressingly hateful society so that I might write. I will leave a legacy only through my books. Those books will hopefully be ready by future generations and carry with them a message of hope. Of ideas and ideals that were forgotten, suppressed, pushed to one side in a mad dash for personal security and uneclipsable power.

The knowledge I will preserve is that of decency towards your fellow beings, of doing the right thing, even when it does not benefit you. Of working for the future even when the present cannot be saved. These are concepts that I think will be hard for the survivors of the coming wars to pass to their children.

A bitter, broken people have little use for concepts such as inclusiveness, acceptance and tolerance. People look inward after those events. They ostracize an they cast about for someone - anyone to blame. If it is an identifiable group/nation/race/whatever...so much the better.

I can't stop the future. But maybe I can pass down through the generations what little good ours had discovered. That is all I can do, and I'll let nothing stop me from doing so.

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