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* Posts by Trevor_Pott

4299 posts • joined 31 May 2010

Mozilla fixes CRITICAL security holes in Firefox, urges v31 upgrade

Trevor_Pott
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Re: firefox ESR updated too

@fibbles

No home button. I only see a back button, not a back and a forward. No "star" button for enabling bookmarks. Buttons for common apps like lastpass, ghostery and refcontrol aren't visible, so I am unsure if you just don't have them installed, or you UI doesn't show them.

There doesn't appear to be a bottom status bar, so I'm unsure how integration of things like TrackMeNot works, and it gives the impression that it will be one of those ADD nightmare "appears when it wants to, disappears when it wants to" sort of things. No idea where NoScript shows up in your config.

Your config may look superficially like a usable browser, but it's missing a lot of the critical elements.

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Trevor_Pott
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Re: firefox ESR updated too

"It looks exactly like the previous version here." probably because you used the default UI for the previous version and not the truly "classic" UI that was obtained by enabling the menus. You know, the actually usable UI? The one without the stupid single "Firefox" pull-down button/menu thing?

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Trevor_Pott
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Re: firefox ESR updated too

Except that the classic theme restorer

a) doesn't bring back the UI I actually used and wanted

b) have a mechanism for management at scale

Who cares if the others are webkit based? Chromium or Opera are fine browsers, and with better enterprise management.

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Trevor_Pott
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Re: firefox ESR updated too

"Alternatively, install the Classic Theme Restorer extension. It reverts the fucking awful new interface to a usable one."

No it doesn't. Not without a LOT of fucking around. Even then, you can't get something that's exactly like the true classic theme. You know, the theme you got when you enabled menus on the previous version? You just sort of end up with an awkward abomination. Worst of all, there's no way to create a configuration that's "mostly usable" and then push it out to all users. You have to set it up manually for each user/system you install on.

Awesome.

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Trevor_Pott
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Re: firefox ESR updated too

Two reasons:

1) Firefox's new look is a horrible, mutated, awful mess of fuckery compared to Chrome's fairly smooth interface. It's "like chrome" in the same way that AOL is like Windows 8.

2) Chrome has a task manager that has increasingly proven useful.

Given that Chrome has finally almost reached plugin parity (on plugins that matter) with Firefox, Mozilla has to actually compete on merit. If you betray me by changing the GUI without giving me a simple option to return to the previous GUI then I will abandon you. Pure and simple. Give me choice or get right fucked.

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Trevor_Pott
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Re: firefox ESR updated too

Damned straight. I started converting most of my sites to Chrome or Opera after the UI change. They didn't have a "stop sucking" button in the browser, and I don't particularly enjoy being Microsofted. So fuck 'em, I've got better things to do than try to contort 50 plugins into shape just to make the bloody thing look normal.

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White? Male? You work in tech? Let us guess ... Twitter? We KNEW it!

Trevor_Pott
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Re: Terminology?

But it's perfectly okay to refer to grown men as "boys". Or any other derogatory term, for that matter, hmm? Just, heaven forbid, don't use a slang term to refer to someone with a vagina!

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Trevor_Pott
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Re: Odd

"I would point out that, while that's true, the graduate population is a much easier statistic to get and probably reflects the total population of appropriately qualified applicants. "

Except that's full of shit. The IT industry has a much higher % of white males as extant practitioners than graduates. New graduates are simply more diverse, and it is irrational to hold the whole industry to that standard. To do so would be to say to every white male "we're sorry, but because this industry existed for 30 years as overwhelmingly white and male we're going to massively limit your options for getting a job. Sorry you don't have any say in how you were born."

In an industry that has already largely achieved artificial equality then basing it off of graduate %s may be rational. For IT, however, it's not. People older than 25 don't just die off, you know. We keep working in the industry into our 70s.

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Trevor_Pott
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Re: Odd

The stats that need comparing are company make-up vs the total appropriately qualified populations, not simply graduate population make-up.

T,FTFY.

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Trevor_Pott
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Re: A Better Question

So you only use graduates as your comparison barometer? Why? Why not the totality of the industry, including those who have been working in it for some time? The demographics of current graduates probably look nothing like the industry as a whole.

Also, we have to look beyond just the tech industry. CxOs don't have to have tech backgrounds to run a tech company. Same with secretaries, janitorial, marketing, etc...

I'd say your proposed means to answer my questions demonstrates a great deal of bias on your part, almost like you have a predetermined conclusion you'd like to discuss, but need a way to twist facts or narrow the discussion so that the your point seems valid.

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Trevor_Pott
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Question 1: how does the % of $_minority in $_company compare to the % of $_minority within the general population?

Question 2: is a company bad/evil/racist/etc because it has the same % of $_minority as in the general population, but not the same % of $_minority as there are whites/males/etc?

Question 3: Question 1: how does the % of $_minority in $_company compare to the % of $_minority trained to do tasks relevant to the company within the general population?

Question 4: is a company bad/evil/racist/etc because it has the same % of $_minority as are trained to do the tasks relevant to the company, but not the same % of $_minority as there are whites/males/etc?

Question 5: are such audits actually about equality at all?

Question 5a: how/how not?

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UK government officially adopts Open Document Format

Trevor_Pott
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Re: Yay!

That's fine. You love the ribbon. I loathe it. The difference between you and me is that you seem perfectly okay with removing from me the choice to use one or the other. I don't care if you have the ribbon. Ribbon it all up. But give me the choice to disable it and re-enable my menus.

Your way isn't the only way.

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Trevor_Pott
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Re: Yay!

Once, not so long ago, I to was one of the loudest Microsoft evangelists. I still believe that they employ many of the best and brightest our planet has to offer and that they have some of the best tech.

But I no longer believe in the company, it's leadership, or it's direction. I don't trust Microsoft. Considering how much I once did, that should say rather a lot right there.

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Trevor_Pott
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Re: Yay!

pokerface.jpg

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Trevor_Pott
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Re: Yay!

I don't know. A format is just a format. Microsoft still make an office package that has some powerful evangelists. That takes time to chip away at. For Microsoft to lose they'd have to basically piss off the very people who have helped them build an empire over the past 30 years while producing products that the majority of individuals hate.

Surely Microsoft is too smart for that. Look how much their executives get paid! Obviously anyone who makes that much money is incapable of making the kinds of mistakes that could be easily predicted by a commenttard on an internet site.

Even if they were to do the above, is that enough to overcome "incentivization" of the "decision makers" in positions of power? Oracle's still around...

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Trevor_Pott
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Re: Better but still a bit of a pigs ear

Have you seen the horror Word produces when you save as HTML?

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Microsoft confirms secret Surface will never see the light of day

Trevor_Pott
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Microsoft decides not to ship form factor that has been proven by iPad mini, Nexus 7 and Kindle Fire is eschewed in order to double down on the existing models that don't sell particularly well.

Microsoft's tone deaf approach to comprehending markets continues unhindered. Why would it want to ship a model that actually is usable with one hand and comfortable for the majority of individuals?

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vBlock user says EMC bug slipped through VCE's matrix

Trevor_Pott
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None if this would ever have happened if he weren't using some fly-by-night high-risk startup. Proper enterprise vendors with proper enterprise support is what's needed to prevent these sort of things from happening!

You know...I can't even type that with a straight face anymore. I am going to print this article, roll it into a tube and beat the next person who talks about how Nutanix SimliVity or Maxta aren't "proper" vendors to within a micron of their cognitive capacity.

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World Solar Challenge contender claims new speed record

Trevor_Pott
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Please do tell UNSW that all future record attempts are invalid unless a playmonaut observer is included on the trip to verify events for Vulture Central.

(Also: good job those guys!)

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Comcast bosses: THAT pushy sales rep was only obeying orders

Trevor_Pott
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"a great sales organization always listens to the customer, first and foremost."

Now, it's been a while for me, but based on the actions of American corporations I am pretty sure those words count as treason under US law. I presume the fellow in question will be hanged soon?

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Yorkshire cops fail to grasp principle behind BT Fon Wi-Fi network

Trevor_Pott
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Re: Not wanting to defend plod, but

"So while plod might come around to ask if you saw someone doing a four fingered shuffle in your garden, you yourself would not be under suspicion of any crime."

They'd find a crime to suit, or just make one up. You used the internet. You're a terrorist and a pedophile.

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Trevor_Pott
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Re: Not wanting to defend plod, but

"You'll get your computers, tablets, laptops etc back eventually...."

Really? Because I know some folk who are damned well innocent who've not gotten their stuff back after two years. Besides, the way laws are structured it's virtually impossible for any of us to be innocent of everything. Our lives are on those machines. Search them hard enough, you'll find something to jail them for, even if it's not what was on the original search warrant.

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Trevor_Pott
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Re: Not wanting to defend plod, but

"No actually, in court the police and CPS would have to prove it was you, which would be impossible."

Since when? The US and UK moved to "guilty until proven more guilty" ages ago. When it comes to the internet, presumption of innocence was ejected. It's not going to be returning.

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Nadella: Apps must run on ALL WINDOWS – PCs, slabs and mobes

Trevor_Pott
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Re: Remember 'universal' Windows apps for PCs, slabs and mobes? Microsoft's Nadella does

Actually, you know the really horrifying part? I've being doing commercial content creation for startups for long enough that - when there's a need to - I actually can speak the lingo. It makes my skin crawl. I have achieved a state of actually being able to understand these folks and even converse in their twisted dialect.

It's horrifying.

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Trevor_Pott
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But the first - and only - true "Cloud OS" (in the sense that it runs virtually nothing locally and is designed for mobile and cloud apps exclusively) is Chrome OS. So is Microsoft's "mobile first, cloud first" (customer last) approach in fact a ringing endorsement that Google is the future?

Enquiring minds want to know...

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Trevor_Pott
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Re: "...developers are targeting not just Windows Phone customers..."

"Metro feels like that nasty multi-tasking add-on you used to be able to add to DOS. Just looks nicer."

Geoworks Ensemble 2.0: Metro before it was cool.

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Trevor_Pott
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You know, I had a great deal of respect for Nadella. When I met him he seemed to have his head glued on and understood the plight of his customers. But this apparently all changed when he took the CEO's seat.

What was a brilliant engineer that looked towards creating products that businesses of all sizes needed for prices they could actually afford has become twisted into merely carrying the banner forth with different verbiage. Nadella is banging the "cloud" drum as loud as he can, not realising that it will never be an option for many of us, and won't be an option for most of us until he accepts that we don't move on three-year refresh cycles. The cloud has to be cheaper than 5 year refresh cycles for the commercial midmarket and 10 year refresh cycles for the smallest businesses.

That's before we get into data sovereignty concerns or what Microsoft laughingly terms "support" for both Office 365 and Azure. What is on the table today is not okay, and it's not the the foundation of a stable, mass market future.

Yes, there will always be a niche group of businesses - mostly those that are developer heavy and/or cloud evangelists that would use the cloud even at thrice the price - that will eat whatever is put in front of them without asking nasty questions about value for dollar. Yes, for certain workloads cloud computing makes good sense for enterprises...especially those that massively overpay for their IT as it is.

But the cloud isn't going to build tomorrow's sysadmins. An MSDN account no individual can afford (and most SMBs won't buy) isn't a replacement for Technet. Ever increasing SPLA prices aren't going to keep service providers and the channel alive, and "one app development style to rule them all" won't help your developers if everyone loathes Metro and refuses to uses Metro apps.

Microsoft under Nadella is accelerating the decay that it was experiencing under Ballmer. Ballmer was making bets on Metro, the Cloud, Mobile and so forth...but he wasn't busily sawing off his traditional markets, products and services like Nadella.

Now, maybe I'm horribly, completely, world-endingly wrong. Maybe I am the last hold out of a dying past and the world actually wants this cloudy, subscription-based, US law applies to your data and you have no rights world. Maybe everyone in every other part of the world has the ability to "just charge more" whenever Microsoft decides to turn the knobs on their pricing and maybe the whole world is okay with Microsoft having so much control over monthly business IT costs that they have a knob that gives them tangible effect on the global economy.

If, however, I'm not completely batshit bananas here then many - if not most - businesses agree with me that we have yet to be convinced that this is the future we want to buy into. If that's the case, then Microsoft under Nadella is taking a gigantic risk. Killing off their partner and channel ecosystem by pieces, telling the sysadmins and technologists who supported Microsoft for decades to fuck off and kicking non-niche SMBs and the commercial midmarket to the curb.

They are betting on the cloud - and mobile - to the point that they are willing to simply throw away all previous segments and businesses, and along with it any hope of being viewed by the general public, sysadmins, or people who sign the cheques as different (let alone better) than Oracle.

They are prepared to bet reputation, goodwill and market share all on cloud and mobile. If they are wrong, they are done. They are actively pruning and eliminating their backup plans.

I am willing to admit I could be the crazy one here. I don't get paid billions, Nadella does. But if there is a coherent strategy here that is something other than "wildly gambling with the jobs of 100,000+ people" I honestly can't see it.

Microsoft feels to me like Sony did in the 90s. I looked to Sony's actions and said "you can't keep making these proprietary formats, or putting rootkits on your CDs or charging 3x what everyone else does for electronics, etc." Everyone said I was mad then; Sony was a legacy. Sony would endure.

Well, Sony hasn't fared well. And in large part it's because of the overwhelming contempt with which they've treated their customers. Microsoft, on the other hand, seems prepared to add partners, developers and staff to the list of groups they treat with contempt, which makes me less than positive about their long-term outlook.

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Hybrid upstart Tintri: Legacy vendors? We're eating their lunch

Trevor_Pott
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Can't say I disagree, but I do believe they have recognized some of this and are working towards making those changes. That's part of what the hiring is about. A lot of it is wrapped up in making sure they have SEs available to train clients, partners, etc. They're not perfect - oh, not by a long shot - but they're a lot easier to deal with than most startups. Or, for that matter, most of the majors.

They'll work it out. Of all the companies out there, I think they have the tech and the talent to do so. Even when it requires introspection and change. Would that I could cast that capability upon Microsoft or VMware...

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Microsoft bags more CASH – but profit's flat as Nadella waves axe

Trevor_Pott
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Enterprise and consumer are two of four markets. You - like bloody everyone - have completely neglected the commercial midmarket and the small biz markets. MS has no strategy there either...but it used to own those markets. Sad.

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Trevor_Pott
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I would feel sorry for him, except that he's continuously pushing Metro apps and subscription everything as the future. Both are bad for, well, everyone.

Mobile first, cloud first, but customers, developers, partners and staff all come last. That's a bit bass ackwards.

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The triumph of VVOL: Everyone's jumping into bed with VMware

Trevor_Pott
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VVOLs and VASA are important standards for communicating capabilities between array and management software. The key here is to combine easy with obvious. The last thing we need to have happen is that VVOLs make it even easier to make so many LUNs you completely forget when you're hitting the arbitrary LUN limit of your array.

How the information is presented in the UI and whether or nor provisioning procedures/scripts/orchestration/automation are reworked to take advantage not only of the new ease of use, but the new information on limits is going to determine viability within a given organization.

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Games industry set for $5 BILLION haircut, warn beancounters

Trevor_Pott
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So what will you be playing in 2019?

I don't understand the question.

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Kickstarter tin-rattlers offer reboot of '80s Integrated Space Plan megagraphic

Trevor_Pott
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Re: Boots on Mars and break a leg

You are not going to lose that kind of bone density in three months. Especially when we have figured out how to do low-g resistance exercises, (thanks, ISS!). Also: Mars is far lower gravity than Earth. Just don't plan on coming home.

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Experts gathered round corpse of PC market: It's ALIVE! Alive, we tell you

Trevor_Pott
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Re: Reports of its death are greatly exaggerated

Uh...people talk about the demise of the OSX-based Mac market all the time. Will they/won't they? Mac Pro refresh wot? Etc ad nauseam.

Where the bagel have you been?

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Microsoft's MCSE and MCSD will become HARDER to win

Trevor_Pott
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Re: "In test for SQL certifications we ask you to actually create an SQL query"

When I want to get into that sort of stuff on Windows, I turn to Liquidware Labs. It isn't as easy as it is in *nix.

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Trevor_Pott
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Re: "In test for SQL certifications we ask you to actually create an SQL query"

The command you seek is secedit.

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Trevor_Pott
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I have an idea. It's outlandish, but there you go. Why not make the tests more relevant rather than "harder." An example of this might be testing fundamental concepts and/or working on the problem solving capabilities of the individuals taking the tests, rather than their ability to regurgitate propaganda or memorize "the shortest number of clicks" to find the place where Microsoft has most recently moved the control panel items necessary for actually administering a PC?

Microsoft exams are far too much "tell us how Microsoft views the world" and not enough "identify the category of problem and the various ways you might solve it." They are a lot of wrote memorization and virtually no actual problem solving.

The reason I make fun of MCSEs is that they can't format a floppy disk in order to update the BIOS but they can remember obscure powershell commands with exactly the right syntax in order to call up something that used to be two clicks away after login.

Another good one would be "describe and demonstrate understanding of the basic principles of the various common tools for detecting and recovering from a malware infection on a Microsoft PC, starting with Combofix and ending with DBAN." Oh, I could go on for ages and ages. Maybe we should create an El Reg Certified BOFH exam? If you pass without dying you get a Vulture pin and a cow prod?

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Too many IT conferences to cover? MICROSOFT to the RESCUE!

Trevor_Pott
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Re: So, let me get this straight...

Most SMBs without a dedicated sysadmin use an MSP. MSPs are a nice way to use a small number of sysadmins to support a large number of SMBs while still getting all the benefits of running your own infrastructure. Still way - way - cheaper than the public cloud. But hey, if you enjoy paying more for less, be my guest. It's not my money you're wasting.

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Trevor_Pott
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Re: So, let me get this straight...

If I say that I will buy one high-end, enterprise-class server to run a single workload then I can make Azure seem cost efficient. But the thing is, unless I'm a really small SMB, I'm never doing this. I run multiple workloads on a single server. (Thanks, virtualization that is over a decade old.)

The costs of a single workload get very small, very, very quickly. But Azure does not. Azure still costs $virgins for each and every workload. And it doesn't matter if you're using "the cloud" or not, you still need a sysadmin. Someone still has to manage and maintain that workload.

Sorry, but Azure is only most cost effective in niche cases, and it absolutely isn't cheaper for the majority of small businesses.

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Trevor_Pott
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So, let me get this straight...

Microsoft's strategy with the cutbacks seems to be "cut all departments, divisions, and marketing expenditures that our customers, partners and staff actually enjoy or which might make life easier for individuals who fall into one of those three groups." They are in turn going to reinvest in products, technologies and services that are of dubious value to the mass market, to non-Americans and to the channel that has built their empire for the past 30 years.

That says to me that Microsoft is trying for an Oracle-like high-margin play, preferably with recurring revenue (SA, Cloud), and to hell with popularity, mass market, etc. I see a few problems.

1) They historically suck at high margin plays.

2) Everyone in the entire tech industry, from startups to megaliths is trying for the exact same areas. Most of them have a head start, better tech, more evangelists and marketing that knows how to convince fortune 2000 companies that low value for dollar is actually high value for dollar.

3) Because everyone on the planet is trying to drain the high-margin money out of the fortune 2000 there is a massive opportunity in the midmarket that noone else is trying to exploit. This is where Microsoft made it's billions. It's also the very segment that Microsoft is busy alienating.

4) The SMB market has been entirely abandoned, and they aren't buying this "cloud" bullshit, because the value for dollar is basically nonexistant. Microsoft used to at least play here in a token fashion, and it earned them happy joy-joy fuzzies from the proletariat. Those goodfeels are now going elsewhere.

5) Unlike the SMB market, Microsoft hasn't abandoned the consumer market...they're just really, really bad at it. They aren't getting any of the required goodfeels from here.

3, 4 and 5 basically mean that mass market public opinion is doing a PlaysForSure(TM) on Microsoft; if their high -margin-or-bust play fails, they are utterly fucked. They've nothing to fall back on, because they're actively working to drive away customers in all other segments. I don't get it. It looks to me like Microsoft is making a hell of a gamble that they can do "high margin" better than those with decades of experience playing that game...and systematically annihilating any possible backup plans in the meantime.

I wrote a while ago that Microsoft will be hard to kill because it's got so many different segments on the go that it could afford to have several of them not work out. What I didn't count on would be that Microsoft would actively go out of it's way to start killing off as many of these segments as possible.

Microsoft looks hellbent on going from "strongly diversified damned-near unkillable colossus" to "desperately gambling one-trick cloudpony". It's absolutely irrational.

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Lawyer reviewing terror laws and special powers: Definition of 'terrorism' is too broad

Trevor_Pott
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Re: He must have missed the memo

"he's actually one of the good guys"

So why isn't he in jail yet?

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Trevor_Pott
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"MPs will be asked to "revisit" Blighty's current anti-terrorism law to address the broad definition problem."

It will be found to be insufficiently broad, as apparently it didn't prevent someone from questioning the previous definition. This will be rectified promptly.

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THUD! WD plonks down SIX TERABYTE 'consumer NAS' fatboy

Trevor_Pott
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"Is there a reason QNAP and Synology or another manufacturer's NAS owners wouldn't be interested in these drives?"

A) Migration is a bitch.

B) 6TB drives cost $virgins, so the chances you'll just march on out and buy 8 shiny new ones to refurb your extant Synology are basically zilch for a couple years yet.

Though this does mean the 3TB disks should start hitting "sweet spot" pricing, displacing the 2TB drives...

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August Patch Tuesday to bring Windows bug fixes AND FEATURES – report

Trevor_Pott
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Re: Microsoft, please don't add a start menu ....

Uh...what? Your solution to "make Microsoft suck less" is misandry? Awesome possum.

Put me in the category of "hire the best person for the job." Experience, knowledge and a willingness to solve the ongoing cultural issues is what matters.

Gender, OTOH, absolutely doesn't matter.

That said, I vote Mary Jo Foley for MS CEO. She'd do wonderfully.

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Trevor_Pott
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Re: Microsoft, please don't add a start menu ....

I'd like to say "nobody could be that tone deaf", but this is Microsoft. If there is a way to alienate customers, partners, developers or staff Microsoft will engage in that activity with gusto.

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Trevor_Pott
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Re: Microsoft, please don't add a start menu ....

I seriously doubt that an official Microsoft Start Menu will "kill" Classic Shell or Start8. Remember that the start menu is a part of explorer.exe. Worst case scenario is that you need to do a complete shellectomy and replace explorer.exe with something less asstastic.

Now, that would be a lot more work than knocking together a new start menu, but it wouldn't be the first time complete replacement shells were created for Windows. They'd cost a big of money, but after some initial proliferation, the world would settle on a standard set of two or three.

We aren't beholden to Microsoft for the UI. Quite frankly, I think Microsoft should go ahead and continue screwing the UI up royally. If Windows 9 doesn't have a positive reception form the market either then there will be real effort put into new shells. The viability of sticking with Windows 7 once Windows 9 comes out is pretty small. But we aren't going to collectively accept the design decisions Microsoft tries to force on us unless we actually agree with those decisions.

What's more, Microsoft can no more lock down the ability to replace the shell than it can throw out it's military contracts, contracts with banks, etc. There are lots of instances in which full shell replacements are in use in critical areas. It's just time they made their way into the public consciousness.

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iiNet says metadata retention means a great big tax on everything

Trevor_Pott
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So add a line item to every subscriber's bill. "$5 surveillance tax." Your xenophobic, ultra-right-wing Aussie voter crowd will suddenly care.

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Boffins discuss AI space program at hush-hush IARPA confab

Trevor_Pott
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Re: Time

40 terawatt. 40 watts is just going to tickle.

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It's FONDLEMANIA: Mobile devices outstrip PCs on China's internet

Trevor_Pott
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Re: This is very interesting.

I'm not sure what you mean? China has made corruption a captial crime and is slowly altering both it's government structure and culture to cope with a nation that is both increasingly a mixed economy and has access to unlimited information.

Don't assume that just because China has the Great Firewall today that they will seek to censor information at the same level that they do now forever. Will they always censor some information? Probably; but so do all nations, including the US and UK. Will they forever censor information about Tienanmen? Likely not.

The goal of the Party is to stay in power. That means adapting to changing circumstances, not blindly ignoring them. The difference with them is that they have the time, the culture and the means to adapt at a pace that won't cause massive social upheaval or calls for the government's head.

They can push the really horrible stuff out of the public consciousness until it's so far in the past that it just won't matter to the average citizen. They can milk a gentle lessening of restrictions and increased "freedoms" for all the "we love our government" goodthink that is possible.

China is slowly but surely moving towards a mostly free - but still regulated - press and internet, from a restricted and locked down variant of the same. It's people will love the government for it. Western nations, on the other hand, are moving to a mostly free - but increasingly regulated - press and internet as well...but they're coming from a position of nearly absolute freedom. Their citizens will hate them for it.

China is not going to one day implode because it's citizens will have access to western schools of thought and then turn on their government in recognition that The West Was Always Right and that demand change and revolution. Far from it. China is cultivating a great deal of nationalism and pride in it's citizens who increasingly view the west as immoral, decadent, corrupt cowboys.

As much as we like to play up the people who leave China because they dislike conditions or the government, we don't seem to notice or care about those who leave our nations or culture behind for the same reasons. Every nation has those unhappy with the folks in power. What is hard to see is that people in other nations can actually be - and often are - quite happy with how things are.

The Chinese population is - by and large - quite happy with the government. They want things to be better, but who doesn't, in any nation? Similarly, it would surprise most westerners to know that Putin has massive support in Russia; their culture, beliefs and morality are actually that different. Like China, they view the west as a corrupting immorality that needs to be opposed.

So no, I really don't think China will fall because people have access to the internet. If anything, it will make them stronger, more educated, better able to collaborate and result in a more sophisticated and technologically advanced society. One that the west is going to have a lot of trouble keeping up with for the rest of this century.

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US judge: YES, cops or feds so can slurp an ENTIRE Gmail account

Trevor_Pott
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Re: This makes sense

"Stop someone in the street for what used to be a non-arrestable offense and have an automatic warrant to search not only their person, all their computers but now any online account held anywhere in the world."

E-mailing while black is about to become a thing.

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