* Posts by Trevor_Pott

5809 posts • joined 31 May 2010

Microsoft pulls a patch and offers PHANTOM FIX for the mess

Trevor_Pott
Gold badge

Re: Here's the REAL fix

"overall problems had been pretty rare"

Define "rare". I get at least two "requires intervention on all affected systems" patches of the "Microsoft really fucked this one up" every year. Exchange Update Rollups, I'm looking at you...

7
2
Trevor_Pott
Gold badge

Mobile first, cloud first.

Security last, privacy last.

Microsoft's priorities are 180 degrees from where they should be.

7
2

This week it rained in San Francisco and the power immediately blew out. Your tech utopia

Trevor_Pott
Gold badge

Re: Come to Vancouver

"everyone wants to live here"

Lies. I loathe Vancouver. Now, Tofino...I would like to live in Tofino...

1
2

Canadian watchdog goes to court to probe Apple's iPhone deals with mobe networks

Trevor_Pott
Gold badge

Apple.

Canadian telcos.

There are no good guys here.

2
0

'I'm begging you to join' – ICANN's NetMundial Initiative gets desperate

Trevor_Pott
Gold badge

For $600,000 a year I will provide you a space - physical as well as virtual - to discuss the governance issues of the internet. I will even provide top quality technical content to help kickstart discussions as well as the manpower to moderate discussions and even edit proposals.

That doesn't take a "council". It doesn't take politicians or chairpersons. It takes an accountant, a devops team, some writers, an editor and an ombudsman. With some money put away to rent a conference room for the annual meeting.

The difference is that what I propose would be focused on generating ideas towards actual solutions. Kickstarting discussion with thought leadership content, a trained ombudsman to work through disputes and an editor to make sure that proposals turned in by special interest groups are actually comprehensible and even engaging to the populace at large.

With $600,000 I could pay the full time salaries of people who would be dedicated to those goals. A hell of a lot more would get done than NetMundial, let me tell you.

What's needed here isn't a council, it's a professional magazine aimed at governance issues. Turning ideas into viable proposals then bumping those back to the various other organisations that work on internet governance and letting them vote on them, lobby for them, or otherwise do what they get paid to do to make the internet go.

Screw captain cockwombles and his band of merry council misfits! Give me Timothy Prickett Morgan and a gaggle of technosphere support staff any day.

2
0

Apple lawyers fight to silence dead Steve Jobs: 'No right' to hear him from beyond the grave

Trevor_Pott
Gold badge

Re: A different view of 9/11

"Trevor! Americans are Ninja's who get everything right? Seriously?"

Where did I say that? Hmm? Provide the exact quote and context, then please provide a logical and rational reason you interpreted what I wrote to be what you said I wrote.

What I said was two things:

1) Americans have the power, technology, access to skills, resources, manpower and even advanced group manipulation techniques to have pulled off a conspiracy of the scale suggested. If there was a damned good reason to do so. It would take years of planning. It would be a massive undertaking, and it would be the largest, most complex conspiracy of all time...but they absolutely, 100% could do it.

There is, however, no rational reason for them to have done so. If they had wanted to start a war against some brown people so they could steal some oil it is a hell of a lot easier and more efficient to just select a few ultra-loyal troops and send them on a mission to hijack some planes and actually crash those planes into things.

Why, why, why in all the worlds that spin would they waste time and money using missiles against the towers (or demolitions, or what-have-you) when it is cheaper and easier to just actually hijack the fucking planes? Bonus: you don't have to spend the next decade covering it up, because you did what it said on the tin!

2) "Branding everyone who looks at the evidence of their own eyes and finds unanswered questions a 'Conspiracy Nut' or 'Conspiracy Theorist' is lazy and cowardly."

There are unanswered questions. There are also a lot of answered questions that the conspiracy theorists refuse to accept. I call people "Conspiracy nuts" and "conspiracy theorists" not because they question what's in front of them, but because they

A) refuse to believe solid, verifiable evidence that the overwhelming majority of experts vouch for

B) cannot provide a logical, rational reason for why all the various points of data (most of which are provably false) sum up to their claims.

C) they can't answer the most basic questions about flaws in their logic. For example "why would anyone destroy the towers and claim it was planes, but not just actually use planes?" Especially since there is all sorts of evidence and testimony from a huge number of experts that verify that planes could (and did, thank you very much) cause the level of devastation under discussion? Are you really going to tell me that people setting about to start a war that will kill millions are squeamish about a few hundred people on some planes? When they blow up towers with thousands in them? Really?

"Do your OWN research, look at photos of the construction of the twin towers, the state of the sites afterwards with no concrete chunks, just powder, and the hugely strong core of the buildings which included the lift shafts completely gone."

I have. I was once very interested in the design of those buildings because they used a non-standard design for sky rises. I got into studying them as an adjunct to some really neat stuff I had learned about Bamboo skyrises in China. I then learned all sorts about how they collapsed, which lead me to study a massive amount about demolitions (both of skyscrapers and underwater demos of things like oil platforms).

I learned enough about these topics that I would feel perfectly comfortable sitting down to discuss any aspect of thing with someone who legally qualifies as an expert. You know what I learned? There is nothing about the collapse of the towers, the dispersal of the debris or the type of trauma received (point impact + massive thermal disturbance) that is untowards. It all makes perfect sense, given the materials in play, the construction used and the temperatures involved.

I even built models. We used them in an attempt to design a server enclosure that would withstand an oil pipeline incident in which the bitumen caught fire. Could we keep the equipment inside collecting sensor data the whole time, and relaying signals down the line from sensor webs further up? What sorts of impacts could it withstand, and what temperatures? Etc.

So, I've done my homework. Are you now going to tell me I'm just a sheep because, having done my homework on this subject, I came to the same rational, logical conclusion as the majority instead of the uninformed and irrational conclusion held by the unmediated and unwell minority?

"Be sceptical of other opinions, even ones you agree with."

You really don't know me, do you? I rarely agree with anyone, and I'm skeptical of everything.

"Don't just parrot the insulting and ignorant garbage you've been taught over and over again."

When I want to insult someone, I don't do it by parroting what I've learned from others. I come up with my own, completely novel ways of doing it, and I do so because I have done the fucking legwork to be confident in my position.

Seek professional help. Your quality of life will improve.

1
1
Trevor_Pott
Gold badge

Re: Not strange to me...

"I do not believe that 19 Al Qaeda terrorists managed to fool the entire US Secret Service, that they managed to hijack 4 aircraft, whilst leaving no trace of how they managed to execute what can only be considerd as a perfectly executed scenario."

Then you lack imagination. I can personally think of about six different ways this could be pulled off today with the existing security at airports. To say nothing of pre-9/11 security. And I'm not a black ops mastermind. Lots of people have rightly pointed out that much of existing airport security is security theater, not actual security. Imagine how much worse it was "back in the day"?

Also: ECHELON wasn't exactly PRISM, ya know? It was easier to organize bad guys to do bad things back then. I don't see why it's so hard to believe this was doable. It's far harder to defend a fixed point (or a whole crazy metric shitload of fixed points) against a mobile attacker, let alone one that is willing to die to see their mission accomplished.

"I cannot believe that these attacks were not pre-planned by someone on the American side of the fence, it's just not feasible."

Why not? Also: why couldn't Al Qaeda just get some Americans to help them out? Or just bribe the right people? Or infiltrate agents into the government agencies so they had people in the right low level positions to look the other way? Virtually every nation on this planet has spies and saboteurs deep into every other nation...why wouldn't transnational radical movements?

"I cannot believe that there was not a political motivation behind these attacks."

There was. You don't do something like that without a political motive. But why does it have to be an American political motive? And how does "there was a political motive" translate into "it wasn't planes?"

You are just asserting, asserting and asserting. But you aren't joining any of these dots - half of which are provably false - into anything that logically or rationally explains why planes weren't used..

0
0
Trevor_Pott
Gold badge

Re: Not strange to me...

"I will give you 1 point for your theory on foreign satellites; this is a subject that I have never seen mentioned anywhere. I presume that foreign governments are not likely to admit spying in the states though, so they have to remain quiet."

Foreign governments spy on America openly all the time. Many - including Canada - have released images from their spy satellites at various times. (For example, I believe we released imagery of the aftermath of hurricane Katrina.) Why would any nation with spy satellites be worried about revealing that they spy on the USA? Everyone does it, and everyone openly talks about it.

"You are right, I cannot prove or disprove what was actually flown into the buildings or Shanksvilel, nor how it was done but I am convinced that it was certainly not done using the means that were publicized."

Why are you convinced of this? The evidence that we, the public, have to hand actually supports the official story perfectly. The only item that I can see which might be conspiratorial is that those who hijacked the plane may not have been in the employ of those we are told they worked for. But there is no way to prove that one way or the other.

"The manner in which the 2 towers and the WTC 7 fell, the statistics of this happening defy all probability. All three building fell “perfectly” to the ground"

Actually, that's incorrect. In buildings where the exterior structure is load bearing, this is how they fall, especially when it's due to thermal stress. I can demonstrate this using ice forts that are commonly built by Canadian children. Also: if you don't believe me, try talking to demolitions experts who are familiar with the design and construction of the towers in question. They'll confirm. Making buildings collapse in that exact manner is their job. There are really neat videos all over youtube of them doing that. They can tell you why and how that amount of jet fuel will cause that exact collapse pattern.

"7 of the hijackers are alive and well, the BBC found them and interviewed them. So ban goes the theory about 19 hijackers."

Why would all members of a hijacking team need to be on the planes? You send the minimum force required so that some can stay behind and train new radicals. For that matter, how do you know they aren't simply mentally ill individuals seeking glory/to be copycats/whatever? There are lots of disturbed people that "attach" themselves to the horrible crimes of others.

"Both “planes” hit their targets perfectly, this is a task that is apparently “extremely, read almost impossible” for a very seasoned 767 pilot and yet they would have us believe that people barely capable of flying a Cesna managed to do it with complete control. ( I have been in and tried a real flight simulator, a C-130 and learned first hand that yes it is difficult to fly a plane. I cant even begin to imagine what it means to fly a 767.... )"

They're actually pretty easy. I've flown several planes, and I'd have no trouble hitting those towers with far more finicky aircraft. Remember that a modern 767 is essentially "fly by wire". Unless you've taken all three computers offline, they will compensate for pretty much everything (including the weird drafts and gusts you get trying to fly that low over a bunch of highrises) and allow you to hit a great big fat target like the twin towers.

Trust me when I say that it is way harder to put one of those planes down on a standard runway in the middle of an Albertan snowstorm (where the winds go 100 kph and shift directions suddenly and randomly). Especially when there's been a local power outage and the IVR is down. Yet I've been on one while it was done, and the pilot absolutely managed to land it on the button.

"Why was a 747 engine found on Murray street. AA and their 767s do not use these kinds of engines."

It was not. I know what you're referring to, and the individuals in question got it wrong, but this has been perpetuated by the conspiracy theorists ever since, regardless.

"When Convar recovered data some of the mainframe hard drives there was proof that more than a 100 Million dollars was illegally moved on the morning of the attack. This leads to believe that someone was aware of something was going to happen."

And? That doesn't mean that people didn't crash planes into it. A does not connect to B in any way.

"TC7 – Not a controlled demolition, very hard to believe. Coincidently it is well known that is was an FBI/CIA/NSA building."

You belief isn't really relevant. People that know more than you are convinced that it happened as described. The overwhelming majority of experts are. Until you have some pretty massive expertise in this area, your opinion is invalid.

"WTC6 Core – Wtf happened t here.."

That's not even a claim of anything.

"The Pentagon – Why do so many pilots and even Gen. Stubblebine refuse to accept that an aircraft hit that building? There are far too many credible people refuting the facts, these are people with nothing to gain and a hell of a lot to lose. This doesn’t make sense."

Why do so many people believe in a deity when none exists, nor there is any proof of it. Most have nothing to gain and a hell of a lot to lose. It doesn't make sense. Yet they continue to believe in a deity that doesn't exist. You are starting from a false premise: that all human being act logically, consistently and rationally. They don't. People do stupid, harmful things based on false evidence all the time.

"Stock markets - 600% increase in “Put Options” on American Airlines on Sept 10….. No one has yet claimed the money that was maid on these transactions..."

And? A does not connect to B. It doesn't remotely indicate that it wasn't planes used to crash into those towers.

"The Pentagon’s defense sensors were switched off except for the one that captued the incoming aircraft? Now this really is hard to believe..."

Those same sensors detect cruise missiles. Which, being honest, is the only thing the pentagon would have had to worry about in a time of peace with no known hostiles anywhere near their location. It's perfectly rational.

"Flight 93 – Shanksville – Absolutley nothing to show that an aircraft hit the ground except for a hole. No parts, no engine, no bodies, no luggage, nothing… A 100 tonnes of Airfcraft + passengers etc just “disintegrated”."

Plenty of wreckage was recovered. You are proceeding from false information and accepting it as truth.

"Please do not respond to the above points, we would be at it for weeks and neither of us would advance. I just want to convey some of the issues for which I do not see, nor have read any truly rational solution that outweighs the pro-conspiracy theory solutions thesis."

Oh, no, I feel I absolutely had to reply to the points. Because what it points out is a pattern of broken logic on your behalf. You are making completely irrational judgements over and over and in many cases clinging to outright false claims that were later clearly and publicly refuted. You have lost any and all objectivity.

You have decided that what occurred was that planes were not crashed into those towers and you are actively altering your perception of reality to fit this. You reject anything that doesn't fit your theory and accept anything - no matter how thoroughly debunked, no matter how irrational - that might support it.

I largely share your distrust of the American government and I am telling you that this instance your objectivity, logic and rationality has been compromised. You have read The Register's forums for enough years to know that I am not someone who would blindly accept anything told to them - especially if it was told to them by supporters of the American government - and I am telling you sir that you have gone to a really dark place here.

I do believe there is lots about 9/11 that we'll never know the 100% truth of. That's perfectly rational to believe, as the US government loves to classify everything, and only release as much information as the law forces them to. I can even buy that it is possible the whole thing was done by some sociopath war profiteer. That's possible.

But it is categorically not possible that those towers were taken down by anything other than a pair of passenger liners. That you insist on claiming this indicates a very severe mental disorder on your part. Please, sir, I beg of you: seek help. You're not well, and the truth of it shows in shattered "logic" and thoroughly refuted evidence that even someone as prejudiced against the American government as I simply cannot accept might be true.

1
0
Trevor_Pott
Gold badge

Re: Not strange to me...

@Khaptain

Let me try to put this a simply as possible: the government of the United States of America is not as stupid as you portray them to be.

Look, anyone who reads these forums as much as you knows that I am no fan of the US government. So please, take what I have to say here with careful consideration, instead of dismissing me out of hand for disagreeing with you.

I know that no matter how much physical evidence, video evidence or so forth is presented to you, you will not believe it, because there is always a way to fake it. You know it, I know it; if the United States government wished to fake something like 9/11 in the manner you described, they probably could have.

There's only one problem: I don't believe they're that stupid. Here's why:

By 2001 the United States has had well over 50 years of having the best black ops intelligence community on the planet. They are the smartest, they are the best, they are the most well resourced and by far the most experienced. The whole crux of your belief in their ability to pull of such a conspiracy rests on that fulcrum, and I cannot deny the truth of it.

But in being so experienced they would never - I repeat never - be so careless as to use missiles on those towers, then claim it was planes.

I fully believe that there are people in the US government callous enough to destroy those towers in order to start a war so they can go club some brown people over the head and steal their oil. Dick Cheney alone is the fucking dark lord of the Sith, and he's far from the only one. But I need you to understand this:

If the United States government wished to start a war by getting everyone all riled up about bad guys crashing planed into the twin towers, then they would hijack the fucking planes themselves and crash them into those towers.

The risk of something going wrong, of things not looking right, of some foreign nation having a spy satellite in the right place at the wrong time...there is no black ops department anywhere in the US of A that is stupid enough to use missiles and claim it was planes. Even the fucking janitors can plan a better op than that.

I don't know who crashed those planes into the towers. There certainly seem to be enough crazy fundamentalist Muslims that it's perfectly plausible that exactly who everyone claims was behind it actually was behind it. I could also believe that any of several dozen complete psychopaths in the US government ordered the hit.

But they would absolutely have used real planes full of real people to do it.

And that - that right there - is why your conspiracy theory falls apart. If you wanted to hold up evidence that said "here is why I think the hijackers were actually black ops fanatics hired by Blackwater and in service to Dick Cheney" I might well be inclined to review your evidence and give it honest consideration.

But starting this out with "it wasn't planes, it couldn't have been planes, it had to be missiles" is just lunacy. Sheer lunacy. At the end of the day bra, no black ops team is that sloppy.

2
0

Hungry, hungry CPUs: Storage vendors hustle to get flash closer to compute

Trevor_Pott
Gold badge

Re: IBM Power has CAPI

That's...really bloody sexy. That makes my inner nerd very, very happy. Want.

0
0
Trevor_Pott
Gold badge

Re: Meh.

The Netlist lawsuit looks to be flaming out. To put it bluntly, Netlist is running out of money. Their stock price is in the toilet, their patent judgements are still in limbo, the judge bumped one lawsuit for time and all but killed the other. Netlist got their notice from NASDAQ, has failed to have their much promised "large order" show up for the past 9ish months...

Diablo doesn't have to worry about Netlist anymore because they simply won't be around much longer. At the end of the day, Diablo has access to more financial resources than Netlist do, and they aren't bleeding cash at the same rate. Even if Diablo is guilty of breach of contract - which will be down to how the judge interprets things, methinks - Netlist just might not make it that far.

Hell, Netlist has had to recently admit that they are having trouble "securing raw materials". Rumor has it they only have about $10M left, at a burn rate that will see them bankrupt by June.

Meanwhile, Diablo does have a DDR4 version in the works, it's called Carbon2.

Many of us are skeptical about MCS's claims. is it really that much better than PCI-E? What are the real-world numbers? Do the headline numbers make real world difference in today's applications? All good questions, and I absolutely don't intend to let Diablo just make a bunch of claims without holding their hands to the fire.

We all have questions, so please, do suggest tests to throw at this kit. Getting hold of it has been hard because every single MCS DIMM that Diablo's partners crank out seem to get bought up before anyone can really run them through the wringer. If I have anything to say about it, The Register will get the opportunity to test the validity of Diablo's claims about this technology soon. So let's get some real tests designed to push this stuff to the limits.

At the end of the day, it's about the proving out the tech. The rest of this stuff? I don't think it's going to be an issue for much longer at all.

0
0

El Reg Redesign - leave your comment here.

Trevor_Pott
Gold badge

Things I like about the new design:

1) Articles have pictures on them. Yay! Pictures add a lot to the experience, I think.

2) New masthead: the awesome motto of awesomeness is now nestled under "The Register." Biting the hand that feeds IT, forever!

3) Social Media buttons are more visible on article pages, make more sense, aren't blocked by my anti-spam stuff. Works out well, looks very nice.

4) I like the new footer. All the info you want, but not crammed so close together the links feel claustrophobic. Much nicer.

5) Articles on the front page have little counters for comments. It's cute. Shows the community engagement.

Things I don't like about the new design:

1) Articles have pictures on them. Boo! This means I have to pay a lot more attention when choosing my article images. Work, work...

2) Author info, posting time and social media buttons are below article picture. It seems counter intuitive. I keep looking for them above the picture.

3) The whitey whiteness of whitening. My kingdom for a black theme.

0
0
Trevor_Pott
Gold badge

Re: WTF have you done to this site?

Ars looks a lot better if you log in and play with the settings some. You can move to a much more dense display of the articles, and have them in list form rather than that stupid verge-like tile format. Plus, dark theme, yay!

Ars does a lot wrong, but they do science reporting right and they offer some flexibility in the display of their site. Gotta like that.

2
2
Trevor_Pott
Gold badge

Re: Hard on the eyes

I agree. I am currently mocking up a black theme as part of my CSS overrides for El Reg. I can't take all the white. Sadly, there's no ability to choose between various colour schemes in and apply to your profile while logged in, so it's "create overrides, then distribute to every bloody browser I use".

Why don't more sites offer black themes? White on light on dark is way easier for some of us to read than dark on light. Must be getting old. Bad eyes.

4
0

This Christmas, demand the right to a silent night

Trevor_Pott
Gold badge

Re: Good article

@JLV, I've no problem with someone saying christmas. Go hard. If that's your holiday, that's your holiday. But I've quite a bit of issue with someone telling me not to say "Happy Holidays". Where does anyone get off telling me I cannot choose to be inclusive?

This time of year doesn't belong to any one religion.

Personally, I won't call it "christmas" because I choose not to acknowledge one group over another, especially one group that - not to put to fine a point on it - have more than enough well funded and obnoxious sociopaths trying to run it for everyone else already.

Maybe once people like Westboro have been ostracized, banished and dismantled by the other believers in their particular sky fairy I'll do that particular group the honour of acknowledging their holiday. Until then, they're just one amongst many...and the least of the bunch.

Happy Holidays!

1
0
Trevor_Pott
Gold badge

Re: sometimes...

How do you get promoted beyond "co-owner of the company/dude who runs the thing?" I'm curious.

4
1
Trevor_Pott
Gold badge

Re: This is why...

"I can count on one hand the number of times I've been rewarded after providing exceptional service."

Bingo. Nobody rewards excellence. But they absolutely hold you to it as the new standard, and punish you when you can't maintain it.

3
0
Trevor_Pott
Gold badge

Re: Good article

"I do not believe that pretending it is not Christmas, or whatever, is being considerate."

And I believe your beliefs make you an asshole. And that your religion is stupid*. Happy holidays.

*For the record, I have negative respect for your religion, for any country that attempts to make a given religion the "state religion" (officially or unofficially) or for people who believe that everyone around them should behave as though $_religion is to be the default. If you want to worship a sky fairy, go forth and do so on your own time. But by His Noodly Appendage, I'll not let some religious nutter treat me like I should be one of them. I'm not. I will never be. And I find the suggestion that I should be, would want to be, or should pretend that I am overwhlemingly offensive.

Adjust yourself to my lifestyle, if you wish. I'll not be adjusting to yours.

2
6
Trevor_Pott
Gold badge

Re: Good article

"Also, in the vein of acting more human, we should probably say "Christmas" instead of "holiday season"."

Why?

2
4
Trevor_Pott
Gold badge

Re: sometimes...

"I would assume that the majority of people in management positions are educated people, yes, and that they got there by understanding how to play well with others. "

And when you get home, do you spend your time assuming unicorns exist? Managers are managers thanks to cronyism. There is no other reason.

8
1

DoJ's extra-territorial data demands: now Ireland is baulking

Trevor_Pott
Gold badge

Re: Washington State corporate charter

So what you're saying is "non Americans should never use any American public cloud service".

Good to know. My nation's laws > US laws. If you can't abide by my nation's laws, then I'll not be using your service. I suspect most of the world will feel the same.

0
0
Trevor_Pott
Gold badge

Re: ".those nations which face up to their moral failures with a modicum of honesty and resolve"

Canada, for one. Anyone else know of any others?

0
1

Part 3: Docker vs hypervisor in tech tussle SMACKDOWN

Trevor_Pott
Gold badge

Re: Re:NonStop

I don't know what's got you in a twist. I don't exactly remember saying NonStop servers were generally applicable. They are, however, a hell of a lot easier to use than they were back when they were Tandem. They are x86 now, have virtualisation capabilities (give or take) and are a perfect platform to run containerization on top of.

Expensive? Yes. Bulletproof? Absolutely. But you don't need to design the application for NonStop (though it helps.) Is Docker itself on NonStop? Not yet, but it's only a matter of time. HP has it's own containerization technology on there for now, but adding Docker support is simple, logical and inevitable. And it will make their NonStop-X line far more attractive.

So what is your beef? That I called NonStop expensive? That I didn't mention some fault tolerant product you personally sell? Or that I pointed out that containerization needs mainframe-like setups or to completely recode the application for application-level fault tolerance in order to actually achieve HA or FT?

Perhaps you'd be happier if I said "Superdome X" instead of NonStop? Afterall, it's basically a NonStop X with Linux instead of NonStop OS.

NonStop was an Itanium-only thing that needed a lot of care and feeding. HP is evolving it into something that is so easy to use that it is a real and legitimate challenger for virtualisation systems in the commercial midmarket. 2015 will see NonStop X and Superdome X make some real inroads here, especially as the prices come down from "holy what the hell crazy madness" to "that's worth a look."

So, if I am wrong in how I have talked about NonStop, please, do enlighten us all as to exactly how?

0
0

Hunt the RAID killer: Exablox builds object storage that isn't

Trevor_Pott
Gold badge

Exablox

From what I've seen of the units, they seem promising (though admittedly one has not crossed my lab as yet.) One thing I will say, however, is that I like whoever did Exablox's industrial design. For a filer, they're really pretty. It's silly, but they always make me smile because of it.

0
0

Brit boffins debunk 'magnetic field and cancer' link

Trevor_Pott
Gold badge

Re: @User McUser

"How does the presence of reflectors on the Moon prove humans personally put them there?"

Short version? Because back then we were really shite at that level of precision in remote space robotics. We couldn't have aimed the bloody things properly. Getting things "within a few meters" was spectacularly accurate.

2
0
Trevor_Pott
Gold badge

Re: It won't work.

"abortion and breast cancer"

Really? I missed this one. Is this a geolocated bizarreness, or am I just unobservant? (Both are possible.)

8
0
Trevor_Pott
Gold badge

Re: You can't use science to disprove theories not based on science

See: Star Trek Voyager, episode Future's End, episodes 3x08 and 3x09.

4
0
Trevor_Pott
Gold badge

pokerface

Unbelievable. What utter bunk. The scientists are just in it for the money. It's a conspiracy!

Side note: please imagine a "joke alert" icon has been selected. Apparently the mobile UI doesn't offer the option...

17
1

Mars was a WET mistress: Curiosity probes once-moist bottom

Trevor_Pott
Gold badge

Re: @Mark...well , there you have it....

No, I think we'll have a bunch of people on Earth who try to kill off everyone else on earth who believes the aliens exist, because they won't accept the science, and find those that believe in aliens to be heathens. The question is: will those be a lot of people, or only a few? It's the next couple of generations that will tell the tale, as (thank $deity), we're starting to really get people to move away from being literalists.

The fewer literalists, the lower the chance for massive social upheaval.

0
0
Trevor_Pott
Gold badge

Re: @trevor

"Informed faith" is an oxymoron. By definition, faith is belief where knowledge isn't possible.

That said, methinks you presume a lot from other "people of faith". Just because you have manged some high level of cognitive dissonance in which you compartmentalize faith and an understanding of at least basic science doesn't mean the majority do.

The number of people out there who honestly believe in the god of the gaps - and use it regularly when attempting to convince atheists their faith is true - is huge. There are far - far - more people out there who reject science, reject the idea that things like "life on other planets" could exist than you seem to be willing to accept.

Maybe you got "lucky" and ended up with a shaman and congregation that actually believe some variant of $_religion that is compatible with $_Y_percent of modern scientific understanding. Congrats. That's pretty cool, in a way, but it isn't the "mainstream" experience.

If anything, those sorts of questions and discussions are carefully avoided by the "mainstream" shamans. They focus on $_mandmans_text and espouse their interpretation. But for billions of people on this planet religion is taught far closer to "$_madmans_text is the literal truth". And there's where it all goes horribly wrong.

If you're a harmless religious type who is capable of somehow reconciling modern science with irrational belief in the unknowable, then to put it bluntly, it doesn't matte what you believe, or why. You are highly unlikely to be a threat.

But the $_mandmans_text literalists? They are threats. Each and every one. Anything that can be done to get people to walk away from that belief system is worth doing. The money spent becomes justified quite quickly when the ranks of the literalists is thinned.

Maybe the move from being a literalist to a science/faith cognitive dissonance type. Cool. Groovy. I don't care. Once they're not $_mandmans_text literalists their chances of being a threat are spectacularly reduced.

So what's important here isn't proving "god doesn't exist" to the cognitive dissonance types. They're not relevant. What matters is having one more tool to use in attempting to save those who have been sucked in to $_mandmans_text literalism.

We'll work on the cognitive dissonance types in future generations, once we've dealt with those who are actual threats.

2
0
Trevor_Pott
Gold badge

Re: @Trevor_Pott - Questions And Statements, Valid And Otherwise

"So in the span of a few short words you've managed to go from the correct idea that scientific theories are provisional and subject to change (in consequence of the acquisition of better data, different interpretations of the data or of the pre-existing theories on which the theory under discussion is built, or simply in consequence of someone having newer and maybe better ideas), to the completely erroneous idea that science has arrived at something which you seem to think is very, very close to an incontrovertible truth."

No, I think what's key here is that you seem to believe that a very - very - small possibility that the current theory is false means that, somehow, it is almost inevitable that this will be proven wrong.

I am not taking any offence at all to your asking what is the current state of knowledge. What i took offence to was your request that things be know "beyond a doubt". KNowing anything "beyond a doubt" is utter horseshit, yet that seems to be the standard you require before you believe something.

If anyone is "pompous" here, it's you.

You clearly have an agenda and are determined to see others agree with it, though you're attempting to wrap it up in inquisitiveness.

Contrary to your bogus assertions, I do not believe that we have arrived at "The Truth" at all, because I don't share your irrational requirement for knowledge to be "beyond a doubt". I am, however, entirely content to look at the evidence, say "the possibility that we're wrong about this is irrelevantly small" and move on to building on that knowledge to ask newer questions and learn more things.

You're like a creationist screaming that we shouldn't set about working on new isotopic dating methods because we haven't proven "beyond a doubt" that the Earth isn't only 6000 years old. With perhaps a handful of exceptions, the entire scientific community is perfectly happy with the evidence that the Earth is way the hell older than 6000 years, and is ready to put it's time and effort into getting more accurate information about just how old, and the details of it's evolution.

Similarly, here we are with a scientific community that is pretty chill with the idea that Mars has a wet past, but you're demanding "beyond a doubt" evidence. Most scientists aren't trying to prove Mars had a wet past any more, they accept that it had one. They're not trying to find out how wet, and over what periods, and what the conditions were in those waters, how long did it last, etc?

So, do I find your "stop science, I don't think we're sure beyond a doubt" to be utter fucking horseshit? Absolutely. Do I accept that we've got this "wet Mars" thing taped enough to stop working on if Mars was wet and start working on how wet Mars was? Again: absolutely.

Search hard enough, and you'll find someone with a science degree who will claim the Earth must be younger than 6000 years. If any when they can explain away all the evidence that leads the majority of scientists to accept the more mainstream theory of 4.6B (+/- 0.2B) years, I might listen to the Young Earth types.

Similarly, I am sure you can find a scientist to claim Mars couldn't possibly have been wet. If and when they can explain away all the evidence that leads the majority of scientists to accept the more mainstream theory of "wet Mars", I might listen to the Dry Mars types.

And if you don't like that, blow it out yer arse.

2
0
Trevor_Pott
Gold badge

Re: @Grikath: Rocks.

"show me the evidence that proves beyond doubt that it was water and could only have been water, and shows that no other capable liquid could occur on Mars other than water (and since you deemed my question worthy of ridicule, I am expecting a very simple and obvious answer)"

Nothing can be proven beyond doubt. Exhibit A: moon landing deniers.

That said, there are plenty of things on Mars which we've turned up so far that individually are highly likely to be the result of water and cumulatively almost guarantee it. Various clay and mineral deposits (which include things that have water locked up in their crystal matrices), the particular patterns of sedimentation and, IIRC, the rates and patterns of weathering are all evidence for water on Mars. And very specifically water, as opposed to another fluid.

There are other items - for example some sedimentary deposits - that could have been the result of multiple fluids. (Yes, there are sedimentary deposits that fit in both categories.) Unfortunately for the "not water" hypothesis the cumulative evidence says that it is unlikely to the point of irrelevant that there were two different fluid cycles on the planet.

Is it theoretically possible that some completely novel set of chemical interactions took place on Mars that just happens to look exactly like water? Sure. I also could have been switched at birth with the Trevor Pott from an alternate universe. It's just really, really unlikely.

So unlikely that it's up there with "god actually exists". It's not worth considering unless and until we learn some really outrageously new science that could even begin to explain the evidence but reach a different conclusion.

A scientist is always open to the possibility of the bizarre. That said, the business of science is one of probabilities, and science rests on the business end of Occam's razor. Right now, today, water is the only fluid that fits the evidence. What's more, it's the only fluid we know of that can fit the evidence.

Thus, until someone can come up with a means by which another fluid can fluid the evidence, Mars has a wet past, a thick atmosphere and was warm. Given the evidence thus far, alternative hypothesis have a heck of an uphill climb to overturn current theory in this regard.

3
0
Trevor_Pott
Gold badge

Re: well , there you have it....

s/"Any truly spiritual person"/No True Scotsman

There are plenty of "spiritual people" that would have you labelled a blasphemer for what you just said. $_text is the literally truth, and anything else is lies. Or didn't you know that?

But, oh, you aren't a fundamentalist, eh? Texts are mooshy and open to interpretation. So then it's all about how you feel about things. Truthiness has more value than truth.

Of course, the part where you are just a sack of chemicals and I can change how you feel by putting the right chemicals into you won't open your mind to the truth of science, will it? Thought not.

My mind is plenty open, sirrah. And I need no more majesty than the universe itself. It's plenty mind boggling as it is, no "higher power" required. In the meantime and between time, the ability to see off some of the "$text is the literal truth" whackos is worth a thousand times the current expenditure on space.

Sadly, I have no idea how to go about enlightening the truthiness brigade, but that won't stop me from seeking a means to that end.

4
1
Trevor_Pott
Gold badge

Re: Rocks.

We don't need to observe a thing directly in order to know it occurred. Evidence occurs in multiple forms, and where it can be tested empirically gives science a window into the unobservable.

For example, there are plenty of geochemical signatures that - to our current knowledge at least - can only occur with Mars having had a thicker atmosphere. Perhaps more to the point, when we replicate relevant conditions in a lab (and Earth itself is one hell of a lab, never forget,) we see identical (or near enough as makes no difference) geochemical signatures.

That moves the balance of probability from "Mars was always as you see it now" to "Mars had a large atmosphere". Evidence then starts stacking up and eventually the "thick atmosphere hypothesis" moves from hypothesis to Theory. This means that we no longer need to prove that it occurred; there is so much evidence that it did we can simply take it for granted.

Instead, if you want to advance an alternate hypothesis - for example, the hypothesis that Mars was always as you see it now - you need to do the work. You need to not only demonstrate how this could be true, but explain away all the supporting evidence for the thick Martian atmosphere theory.

That's how science works.

How science doesn't work is that every time something comes along that you disagree with because it makes you uncomfortable you get to derail the conversation by demanding that every single element be explained to you down to base principles. Once something has proven itself enough to be a Theory then the onus isn't on scientists to explain everything to you, but on you to explain how your alternate view of the world fits with the evidence accepted by the scientific community.

In other words: yes Mars had a thick atmosphere. And the burden of proof is on you as the one challenging science for which there is strong evidence to provide not only new evidence for alternate claims, but an explanation for all extant evidence.

Now, if you have an explanation for an alternate hypothesis that matches all extant evidence, I'm entirely open to discussion. Otherwise, you're aught but a troll.

4
2
Trevor_Pott
Gold badge

Re: @Mark...well , there you have it....

Alien religions won't likely say "humans are special", though. And I doubt they'll say "control women's vaginas" or "adhere to the authority of the leader of this human cult".

So they're blasphemers.

7
2
Trevor_Pott
Gold badge

Re: well , there you have it....

"If we found it, what would it prove?"

It's not about what it would prove so much as what it would disprove. If there is life that is not on Earth, then Earth isn't special, and the case for god or gods becomes much, much more difficult. If life exists (or existed) "out there", then it is a victory for rationalism and critical thinking and an important defeat for faith and Terracentrism.

If your evidence for god is nothing more than an ever-receding pocket of scientific ignorance then the small you can make that pocket of ignorance the fewer people will cling irrationally to faith. If nothing else is achieved from the Mars explorations except that, we will have nonetheless accomplished something mighty.

4
2

Bloke, 36, in the cooler for leaking ex's topless pics on Facebook

Trevor_Pott
Gold badge

Re: Why not just unauthorized

"The only true libertarian is one who disappears into the woods and lives off the land, far away from the rest of society. "

And what's wrong with this? Hmm? I happen to like it.

You still haven't told me why your morality should override mine. You've made a lot of baseless claims about libertarians, but you haven't answered the question. Sounds to me like you're just an entitled prat angry that people are questioning authority and threatening to upset a social order in which you are currently in the position to tell everyone what to do.

I see no need to listen to you. Your morality isn't mine, and I don't accept or acknowledge your "right" to dictate my ethics, beliefs, values, morals or behaviors.

To wit: Go fuck yourself, ya goddamned poncy prick.

0
2

Australia to block piracy sites if Big Content asks nicely in court

Trevor_Pott
Gold badge

"Okay, that doesn't actually use the word prove, but it's strongly implied the intent is to have some due process. Of course what the law will actually say once the politicians and lobbyists finish warping it will likely be a different story."

Really? And how has that worked out in other countries which have used these sorts of laws? I seem to recall quite a few UK blunders in which things like the Chaos Computer Club get blocked. Or where an newspaper is blocked because of a comment.

Just because the "implied intent" is that there be some form of due process doesn't mean that the citizens of a nation should accept that it will be so. The default position must be one of not trusting those in authority over us, and of stipulating explicitly their rights and responsibilities, with as little wiggle room as possible.

Otherwise, they will inevitably abuse each and every privilege they are granted. And once powers are granted to governments, they are rarely - if ever - released.

This is a means to censorship without the right to challenge before the censorship is enacted. That, by definition, means there is no due process. Everything else is hand waving. Relying on the judge and/or the companies involved ot act in good faith is - pardon my french - outright fucking lunacy.

They is no reason whatsoever to assume that they will act in good faith, or that said judges are somehow immune to regulatory capture.

See; FISA courts.

3
0
Trevor_Pott
Gold badge

"But generally a court will kick out a case based just on suspicions, if the plaintiff cannot back up their suspicions with evidence."

Sure, if it's an actual trial. There are lots of instances in which you go to a court to get them to sign off on something but that it doesn't involve a trial. A warrant would be an example.

So it seems to me it's entirely possible here what we're talking about is Big IP going to a court and saying "we suspect BobsDildoShack.com of hosting our IP", getting a ban and then it being up to the owner of BobsDildoShack.com to respond to that ban.

See, in a trial, there's representation. The opportunity to answer your accuser and defend yourself. In anything else, there is absolutely no reason to assume that the court's involvement is anything more than a FISA-court-like rubber stamping process.

Nothing about this seems like these are presented to the court as "cases". As described, it's far more like "getting a warrant". Show minimal evidence, get rubber stamp, and the onus is on the accused, not the accuser.

Except, you know, there's not actually any "getting a warrant" involved, and no reason to assume that even that minimal level of evidence is required.

10
1
Trevor_Pott
Gold badge

"As long as the IP holders have to put the evidence before a court of law and prove their suspicions, before a court order allowing the site to be blocked is issued, I don't really have a problem with it."

There's no evidence this is required. Just that Big IP needs to have "suspicions". There was no mention they'd have to actually prove anything.

3
1
Trevor_Pott
Gold badge

"Suspected of"

Not yet proven. Suspected of. Nice. 'Straya!

7
1

Microsoft opens Azure cloud to US govt for vid surveillance, etc

Trevor_Pott
Gold badge

Article about Microsoft saying "put video/audio surveillance in the cloud" appears on El Reg the day after I finish churning out a whitepaper about why that exact scenario is a really bad plan. Not from a privacy and security standpoint, but from a pragmatic one.

After I pick up the exploded remains of my irony meter, I need to go pester the client to see if we can fast track acceptance so that I can post the link. Because this is a debate I'd actually really lov eto have with a group of very smart people from Microsoft.

3
1
Trevor_Pott
Gold badge

Re: Hypocrisy?

"Why do you mistrust US so?"

Why should I trust it?

2
0

NASA prods sleeping New Horizons spacecraft: Wakey, wakey, Pluto's calling

Trevor_Pott
Gold badge

Re: PLUTO.......Planet, planetoid, Celestial Body or what?

Oddly enough, no. They likely coalesced around a rocky core, for starters. Pluto isn't - so far as we know - essentially "a ball of rock with some snow on top". You could think of it more like "a gigantic pile of parkinglot gravel and snow mixed up randomly, but in such huge quantities that it's gravity pulled it into a sphere."

The gas giants, by comparison, are basically an earth-like ball of rock surrounded by a truly outrageous amount of volatiles. And here it is thought that you're going to find a much more diverse set of volatiles than you'll find on Pluto. The biggest thing being that's where all the Nitrogen in our solar system seems to have gone.

But Pluto almost shares more with comets than with rocky planets, gas giants or ice giants. It is a plutino, a form of Kuiper belt object. They are their own class, with their own composition, their own traits and similarities. Kuiper belt obejcts really aren't like the other planets - or even the main belt dwarfs Vesta and Ceres - at all.

In reality, the main determinant of whether or not you're a planet is a combination of size and composition. You probably can get away with being a "planet" at a smaller diameter than something might be considered a "dwarf planet" if, as a planet, you're a big hunk of rock instead of a snowball. Density matters. It is a determining factor in whether or not you've cleared your orbit of any of the really big things or whether you're just one bit of rubble amongst many.

And Pluto emphatically is "just one bit of rubble amongst many". There are a couple of KBOs out there bigger than Pluto that we know of already, and quite probably a few we don't know about as well. I think the last estimate was that there could be another 200 KBOs of approximately Pluto's size and composition.

So, if Pluto is a planet - a full bore, honest to $deity planet - then we must accept all - or at least most - dwarfs as planets. We go from a system of 8 major planets and categories of dwarf planets to a system of hundreds of planets.

Being a planet (or not) ir pretty arbitrary anyways. It's a classification designation created by humans to make it easier for humans to understand the solar system. So the surest reason that Pluto had to be demoted was simply because doing so made the solar system easier to understand.

8 planets, each largely unique, most with their own "ecosystem" of sattelites to learn about. Several dwarf planet and minor body categories each with collections of bodies that are roughly similar, most that exist less as their own separate "thing" and more as a "cloud of things" within the solar system.

That's fairly easy to understand. Certainly easier to remember and get engaged with than "our solar system was 250+ planets. Mercury, Venus, Earth....(208996) 2003 AZ, (55637) 2002 UX, (90568) 2004 GV...

If you're looking for absolutes in this decision, you won't find them. It's messy either way. But the decision to demote Pluto to a dwarf will make our solar system easier to understand for the next generation of astronomers who try to get a handle on just how diverse our little neck of the woods really is.

At the end of the day, that may be the best argument of all.

0
1
Trevor_Pott
Gold badge

Re: PLUTO.......Planet, planetoid, Celestial Body or what?

Pluto is one step above "comet". It is not a planet. Ceres is a better candidate for "planet" than Pluto. It's a rubble pile just barely large enough to have achieved hydrostatic equilibrium. Barely. Drag that thing into a Mars-like orbit and it would melt.

Space popscicle != planet.

1
2

Microsoft tries to defend Irish servers from US g-men invasion, again

Trevor_Pott
Gold badge

The hell of it is, Microsoft is the only cloud provider positioned to actually win if the USA pulls a douchecanoe here. Unfortunately, it would require some political maneuvering within Microsoft that they are currently incapable of.

Microsoft could license their technology to third-party service providers at reasonable rates and allow the creation of Azure, Office 365 and other such things by companies with zero US legal attack surface.

Of course, that means that Microsoft wouldn't get 100% of the subscription revenue from those setups and they simply aren't prepared to do that. Microsoft is only interested in driving their partners out of business so they can hoover up all that lovely subscription revenue. Instead, they could the arms dealer of the cloud wars, ensuring that everyone has a decent shot at privacy and security.

Sadly, they're just far more interested in a few extra % of margin to actually consider doing what's right for the people.

4
0

No NAND's land: Flash will NOT take over the data centre

Trevor_Pott
Gold badge

Chris: while I agree that most individual drives shipped into the datacenter will be of the spinning rust variety, I believe the missing element here is hybrid setups. "All-flash" may be a bit of a rare beast for some time to come. We flat out don't have the global fab capacity to replace rust disks, even if we were willing to.

But by the same token, rust disks are inadequate to the job. The immediate future is, IMHO, flash/rust hybrid setups. In array form or hyperconverged form.

We'll see about "all-flash" for primary storage in a few years. That said, I'm working with a few startups that are making damned fine data intelligence/tiering software. I suspect "all flash" for primary workloads is 3-5 years away, with hybrid for tier-2 apps and "all rust" (or "cloud") for archival.

It's all about the Benjamins, and the squeeze is on for the rust vendors. They are being moved into the commodity world, inch by inch. 15K SAS? Somehow, I don't think we'll be needing that for much longer.

3
1

Cisco tears off gloves, throws copyright and patent punches at Arista

Trevor_Pott
Gold badge

Re: Fair cop?

If the CLI can be protected by law, then APIs can too. They're basically the same thing. Except we've been down that road already, and Cisco fucking knows it. Which means they are doing this for another reason. That reason is most likely "to spread fear, uncertainty and doubt about Arista". Now their sales team can go in and say "do you want to buy from a tiny company like Arista with a huge lawsuit looming over them?"

All of this has happened before, and we shouldn't let it happen again.

0
2

Kaspersky exposes SONY-CRIPPLING malware DETAILS

Trevor_Pott
Gold badge

Re: What do these three have in common?

Iran is a friend of NK. Iran was having a dispute with SA. This all seems to tie to NK to me...

2
0

Internet cash-point boss says 'no thanks' to ICANN's web power grab

Trevor_Pott
Gold badge

Re: Excellent question

"So while it is a great idea that there be an internet community effort to fix issues around privacy, online security, spam, child protection and so on, everything that has been said and done is more about trying to become the main venue for controlling conversation about the internet itself."

This sort of answers my question. It does raise in me a few other questions, some out of pure fear.

1) How do you "fix" issues around privacy and security through the creation of an unelected quango with what amounts to negative oversight? All I picture is Baron Harkonen telling Dr. Yueh that he has "released" his wife...released her from her mortal coil, that is.

A power-mad dictatorship whose existence relies on the tacit approval - or at least tolerance - of the world's nation states does not remotely seem like an organisation which can be made to bring those selfsame entities to heel, and unless the governments of the world are full participants in agreeing that privacy and security of anyone other than themselves is an issue then the whole thing is a farce.

Internet privacy and security must begin with an international digital armstice, not the declaration of a global quango.

2) How, exactly, do you solve "spam and child protection" issues in a non-technical manner? I suppose one avenue might be government cooperation and/or treaties which harmonize relevant laws. Unfortunately, I don't see how that can occur without also running up full against the issues of privacy and security discussed above.

Ultimately, all of these issues come back to one - and only one - thing: what are the fundemental rights of human beings? What are the rules by which we will govern our interactions with <i.all</i> humans, regardless of race/gender/sexuality/etc and most especially, how we will treat members of other nations.

The west created the Universal Declaration of Human Rights, and most of the world saw that it was good. It became the basis of a great many legal systems, including the new constitution of Canada in 1982, and our Charter of Rights and Freedoms.

Unfortunately, it is not universally accepted. Islamic nations took particular issue with the UDHR, stating that it violated Sharia. They instead signed the Cairo Declaration on Human Rights in Islam which, to be blunt, if fucking terrifying.

Similarly, Asian nations took offense to the UDHR. They believe in a Cardassian-like subsumation of the individual's will to that of the state. The Bangkok Declaration was signed and it reads like a sham document that says a human's purpose is nothing more than to do whatever his society tells him to. A drone who is to be bereft of individuality and who must like that state of affairs, or die.

So here we have three major differences in belief to start with. The UDHR itself getting the majority of the world behind it, and - to my mind at least - seem to provide the most rational balance between "the needs of the many" and "the needs of the few, or the one".

Unfortunately, instead of helping to spread it's ideals, some of the UDHR's staunchest supporters are looking for a way out.

The United States, for example, clearly views itself above the spirit and letter of any human rights documents. Furthermore, non-American citizens are not deserving of human rights (such as the right to be considered guilty unless proven innocent, the right to life, etc) unless those rights can be used as a political tool to leverage a recalcitrant nation into doing what the US wants.

Consider, for example, that the United States is a signatory to the International Criminal Court, but they have not ratified it. In other words, they believe they have the right to send people to the ICC whenever it is convenient for the US, but they absolutely refuse to allow any American citizen to be held accountable for their actions by the ICC. Meaning, amongst other things, that the US believes their citizens should never be prosecutable for war crimes.

In addition, powerful groups within the UK have made leaving the European Union a priority, stating openly their desire to be free of human rights legislation. This is largely driven by a desire to be free of any "right to privacy" or a need to treat non-British citizens with any amount of basic rights.

How - how I ask you - can a digital dictatorship set up by people the world's power brokers only barely tolerate even begin to sort out the issues above? And if they don't sort out the issues above, how can we ever come to agreements on privacy and security, let alone spam and child protection?

I fear the answer. If we cannot meet at a position of maximum rights for the individual, and these people are determined to continue until they "succeed" at something, the result is likely to be a position of minimal rights for the individual, and a diminution of the status of the citizen across the the world.

I would dearly love to be wrong about this, but it all seems so deeply rooted, and so many of these topics are live wires. It may sound melodramatic, but my analysis of this situation says that a continued attempt by ICANN to become a political force around internet governance may ultimately lead to an international agreement to repeal large chunks of human rights which would damn - and potentially doom - us all.

Your thoughts would be welcome, sir.

5
0

Forums