* Posts by Trevor_Pott

6006 posts • joined 31 May 2010

Microsoft makes 'business case' for marriage equality

Trevor_Pott
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Re: MS going for the niche markets!

"Question : Why do the above commentards feel the need to mention their heterosexuality ?"

Mostly to preempt homophobes like yourself who will inevitably claim that everyone who seeks equality does so because of latent homosexual tendencies, or what-have-you. Because bigoted fuckbags like yourself are traditionally incapable of comprehending that people would defend the rights of groups to which they don't belong.

As for my "tantrums", I'm glad you are accustomed to them. They will continue ad aeternum whenever there is someone who is sufficiently bigoted in the comments. I don't need to - or want to - be excused by the likes of you. I want you to know that you will be opposed.

Here's hoping you have a terrible, horrible and truly awful day!

Cheers.

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Trevor_Pott
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Re: Poly?

A) What does polygamy have to do with Muslims? And why would it only disenfranchise Muslims?

B) Do you mean polygamy or polyamory?

C) Do you have a problem with polyandry or just polygyny?

D) What about individuals in open relationships? Or Swingers? Should they be persecuted? Or is it all good so long as they don't cohabit/attempt to get "married"?

E) From whence do you derive your definition of what marriage "should" be?

F) Why is that definition not simply "one or more people choosing to spend as much of the rest of their lives together as possible in the hopes that sharing eachother's lives makes them collectively more happy than they would have otherwise been?"

G) Why should the definition of marriage be anything else?

I could go on, but I think there's more than enough room in those questions for you to be a remorselessly raging bigoted peckerhead in your responses.

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Trevor_Pott
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Re: MS going for the niche markets!

I'm 100%, proud-to-be-boob-loving hetero, and Microsoft went up several points in my esteem for helping to fight on this battle front for equality. Even if it was for their own commercial benefit, they did the right thing.

So maybe it's not just "gay people" who want equality.

Maybe, just maybe, all heteros don't all live in mortal terror of a penis entering our ass, and thus don't need to denigrate an entire identifiable group of people because of our own irrational fears. Ooooooooh. The gay people are coming for you! Invent an anal bum cover! Ooooooooooh!

Putz.

Good on Microsoft for standing up for human rights. And to all you homophobic douchecanoes out there - and I say this in the most disrespectful way humanly possible -...eat a dick. Cheers.

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Storage infrastructure wakeup call

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You know, when you click the link it says pretty clearly "By Freeform Dynamics, sponsored by X-IO Technologies". And, to be perfectly honest, there's nothing in Tony's article there that is untowards. Furthermore, I am pretty familiar with the Freeform guys, and they don't screw around. They would have collected the data and done proper analysis on it.

"Sponsored by X-IO"? Sure. I buy that's the case. But that won't make what's in the report invalid. Maybe that's the problem, eh? It's hitting a little too close to home?

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$10,000 Ethernet cable promises BONKERS MP3 audio experience

Trevor_Pott
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Re: @ Trevor_Pott

@JahBless: I do have hearing that allows me to hear just slightly outside the range for "normal" people. I can pick up things the average person can't, especially as my hearing doesn't seem to have degraded much with time. But I loathe audiophiles.

The whole "you just can't hear the X, so you don't understand" is highly unlikely, given the tests that were done on my hearing. The difference is one of not caring. Also: I maintain my ability to Hear Things Real Good by not putting 400 watts of WTF on each ear, cranking the fucker to 11 and blowing my own clothes off.

If missing the 1111th note in the extra long trill due to a gamma ray impact in your cable is going to completely destroy your ability to appreciate audio, go to a psychiatrist right fucking now.

There is zero sympathy to be had from me for these "people". They are overcompensating for some missing part of their humanity by attempting to spend their way to the pinnacle of theoretical penis swinging contest that has no practical application. Buying the next gold plated cable will not salve the psychological damage that made them desire that cable in the first place, and it will not advance their position within the ranks of the social groups that ostracized them and helped trigger the most recent round of wasting their paycheques.

Audiophiles need psychiatric help. They are not well. Not only are they not well, they are not well in such a way that vehemently denying their illness is a core part of their illness and they lash out (many times violently) against those who attempt to intervene. They're like mean drunks, except they get drunk off of hearing (or not hearing) things that are completely in their own mind. It's the worst parts of schizophrenia made manifest in gold plated fuckery and manifested in people who are just barely functional enough to make it through a work day before coming home and going hallucinating a whole bunch.

What really twists my tit about them is that part of their illness manifests itself in a burning need to make everyone else around them miserable by attempting to ceaselessly convince those people the hallucinations are real. It's not enough that they go home and very loudly go mad, oh no! They must drag each and every one of us down to hell with them!

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A *DAMAGED* cable can still do 100Mbit. A *DAMAGED* audio cable can almost always do 10Mbit, unless it's severed. You should be able to get any audio you want down either of those. SO i go back to my comment. WTF are you using?

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Trevor_Pott
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What the fucking fucking fuck are you using for audio equipment that it doesn't have a goddamned buffer. If there is packet loss of even $spectacularly_huge over a 1Gig (let alone 10Gig!) connection, you shouldn't be noticing any issues with your audio. The thing playing the song on the other end should be able to cope with packet loss, congestion and the fucking woo woo crystals that align themselves to make the audiophiles think gold plated penises are the answer to their feelings of crushing, crushing inadequacy.

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Ex-squeeze me? Baking soda? Boffins claim it safely sucks CO2 out of the air

Trevor_Pott
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Re: Carbonates are how the Earth deals with excess CO2

"Where do you plan to put it all?""

Under a mountain of ice?

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Obama pinches VMware's CIO for same gig at White House

Trevor_Pott
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"Want to know what CIOs have in common? They generally don't know anything about technology. If you doubt me, take a look at vSphere 6. It's an excellent example that VMware doesn't even have a sound understanding of what needs to be done in a data center. "

You're an idiot. On two fronts. The first: vSphere 6 is actually damned fine software. Yes, being forced to use a flash UI sucks ass. No, it's not the end of the world, and yes the software itself is spiffy and awesome.

But the more important proof of your toolhood is that you do not grok the delta between CIO and CTO. The CIO is someone who implements technologies. Or rather, he leads teams of people who implement the technologies he chooses.

Now the CTO, on the other hand, is the guy who designs the technologies sold by a company. If there's someone upon whom you should be casting aspersions for your irrational dislike of vSphere 6, it's not the CxO with the "I" in the middle, but rather the fellow swapping the "x" for a "T".

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Internet lobs $$$s at dev of crucial GPG tool after he runs short of cash

Trevor_Pott
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Re: Scooge McCorps

The point of free software is that others are free to use it.

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Trevor_Pott
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Re: How to donate

Agreed. I don't have much, but I have, I'll donate.

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Net neutrality: Someone WILL sue. So will the FCC's rules hold up?

Trevor_Pott
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Inforamtion service versus service provider.

I think this is pretty simple.

If you are an information service then you have some say over the information provided, and you don't get to hide under "safe harbour" provisions. The MAFIAA get to target you directly for every copyright infringement that passes your network, and angry parents get to go after you for every child bullied, every bit of kiddy porn downloaded.

If you are a service provider, you merely provide a service and content is provided by others, meaning you can hide behind "safe harbour" provisions. You simply pass the bits, so the copyright lobby and the angry parents can go after you.

So which is it, telcos? Are you service providers, and information services? Are you dumb pipes, or do you curate the bits? Make your choice wisely.

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vSphere 6.0 is BADASS. Not that I've played with it or anything. Ahem

Trevor_Pott
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Re: VDI for small company

All part of the service!

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Trevor_Pott
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Re: You call this an improved client? You are having a laugh, Trev.

VMware's management tools are way - way - better than the competition. Way better.

As for Docker taking over...

http://www.theregister.co.uk/2014/12/02/docker_part_3_containers_versus_hypervisors/

http://www.theregister.co.uk/2014/12/04/docker_part_4_prognostication_microsoft_and_the_red_wedding/

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Trevor_Pott
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Re: You call this an improved client? You are having a laugh, Trev.

Spoken like someone who hasn't had to actually use the various management tools on offer for a living.

VMware is entirely worth the money. And then some.

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Trevor_Pott
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Re: It's become too expensive

Okay, here I need proof that VSAN is slower on the same hardware than storage spaces. The past 6 months of testing tell me a dramatically different story than you just did.

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Trevor_Pott
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Re: VDI for small company

Hi Porco Rosso, the first question we have to answer is "what do you mean by VDI?" If you just want your users to log into something over RDP, grab a desktop and have a Windows computing experience, you don't need to give every user a VM to do that. You can probably get away with one (I would normally argue two, just for paranoia's sake) Windows Server instances done up with Remote Desktop Services.

For small deployments, I use RDS where I can, because the licensing on "real" VDI is fearful. You can use Liquidware Labs's UEM software to do most of the "really neat VDI stuff" that you would want without even having to buy the expensive VDI licenses. This includes migrating resources between VMs and physical systems, including application settings for applications that don't migrate. It's complicated topic, but - as luck would have it - Liquidware recently commissioned me to write a whitepaper on the topic, which you can find here: http://info.liquidwarelabs.com/Whitepaper_UEMFormLandingPage.html

If I were to design your environment blindly (and without more information it's pretty blind!) I'd say "go buy a VMware Essentials or Essentials Plus kit (depending on which features you feel you need), get Windows Datacenter licenses for all the servers you need and use Veeam to back it all up."

VMware Essentials is cheap cheap cheap, like $500 for 3 servers. But you don't get HA or any of the other really nice toys for that. That's okay, but all you really care about is the fact that it gives you access to the backup APIs. The chances that you need HA for 10 users is pretty small. Hardware doesn't fail that often, and - to be perfectly blunt - you'll run a business just fine off of a single physical server (which runs multiple virtual workloads) and using Veeam to back that up to something like an ioSafe (http://www.theregister.co.uk/2013/12/02/setting_the_iosafe_214_on_fire/) NAS.

This gives you full disaster proof storage. It gives you expandability (you can add nodes to your cluster as you grow,) and you can fit a lot of workloads on a single modern server. But the server a Windows Datacenter license so you can have as many Windows VMs as you want.

Virtualise two copies of Windows Server for Remote Desktop Services and spin up a third to act as an RDS gateway. This way your users will be load balanced between the two VMs, and you can take one down for maintenance while only affecting half your users. Or, since it's datacenter, spin up 10 server VMs, one for each user! (Don't forget you still need 10 RDS CALs, no matter how you spin this.)

You can then put all your remaining (server) workloads in either Windows or Linux VMs as you see fit. If you plan on going past one server to start, look at hyperconverged solutions in order to be able to get away from SAN or NAS complexity for such a small deployment. Just take the local disks on you nodes and lash them together into a single storage pool. There's a list of the big players in the article. E-mail me if you need introductions to any of them.

Your biggest single expense should be the Windows license. A single server is cheap, and a two disk IOsafe with enough storage to back up your workloads is cheap too. VMware Essentials is cheap, and you don't need essentials plus with one server in play. Veeam for a single server should be free.

*Poof*. SMB setup for 10 users on a single server with recovery time objectives and recovery point objectives that should be compatible with your typical 10-man shop. If that doesn't seem like it would work for you, please give me more info, and I can suggest alternatives.

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Trevor_Pott
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Re: Shiny object.....squirrel!

"I'd rather see them reduce the overhead and improve their cpu scheduling so I can drive higher utilization levels in a more balanced fashion"

What workloads are you running - and with what configs - that you can't flatten a VMware node if you want? I'm intensely curious, as I spend all day long comparing metal to virtualised systems and there's not a hell of a lot of overhead with VMware for most workloads.

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Trevor_Pott
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Re: woe betide the un-v'ed

Um....do any of these meet your needs?

http://www.theregister.co.uk/2013/03/12/vmware_enterprise_review/

http://www.theregister.co.uk/2011/11/16/virtualisation_licences/

http://www.theregister.co.uk/2010/06/16/virtual_management/

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Trevor_Pott
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Re: Update Manager

Yeah, in the GUI section. VUM has "it's own client", which is basically a version of the C# client with the plugin installed. No real change there. It's a bandaid, not a fix.

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Nutanix is out in front - but can it stay ahead of the burgeoning pack?

Trevor_Pott
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Short version? Yes. Nutanix can make IPO if they want, and if nobody offers them a big enough bag of cash in the meantime. Those talks are continual, ongoing and multi-party, I am sure.

The thing to bear in mind is that Nutanix is neither stupid nor a one-trick pony. They are perfectly aware that their market is begin commoditised, and they have no intention of getting trapped playing the same game VMware has been playing for years. VMware has been trying to deny the commoditisation of the hypervisor while casting about desperately for something - anything - to lock everyone in to their specific hypervisor.

Nutnaix will admit - privately, if not publicly - that hyperconvergence is already a commodity. Their goal is to ride the wave at the top to see how much hay they can make until everyone else realizes that competitors like Maxta, Scale Yottabye and so forth exist, and then plowing that money into both brand building (name recognition!) and R&D. They have secret squirrel projects of their own to address tomorrow's problems, even as they are building out their sales for to sell the stuff that answers today's problems.

So far, so good. That's what you expect a company that isn't yet a lumbering monopoly in their field to do. Nutanix will shed market share as other competitors gain traction, but the market for hyperconvergence itself is growing at such a rate that they simply don't care. Let 1o other companies duke it out to be the Android of hyeprconvergence. As far they are concerned they're the iPhone of that market, and they'll dine on that for the better part of the next decade.

The losers here are the array vendors. Just look at EMC's numbers to grok that. "New storage" is growing rapidly. "Old storage" not so much. So there's plenty of money for the hyperconverged companies to gobble up. Who ends up with what slice of the pie is, when all is said and done, irrelevant.

It's irrelevant because the hyperconverged wars are over almost as soon as they began. This market has so many players it's been commoditised even before all the entrants are spun up. So the question isn't "who gets what slice of the pie" or even "who gets the high margin bit of the pie", but "who has a solution for to do five years from now where there's no more margin in hyperconvergence to be had at all?"

And to know that, you need to know what they're up to behind the scenes...and most of these folks are increasingly tight lipped about that...

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NASA: Give us JUST 0.5% of the federal budget and we'll take you to MARS and EUROPA

Trevor_Pott
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Re: Ted Cruz

He's a fuck of a lot more crazy than being a climate change denier, although that's pretty fucking crazy. He's pretty anti science up and down the whole of the spectrum, and touts god as the cause and reason for most things. He has demanded evolution not be taught and so on and so forth. He is fucking batshit looney tunes insane with added sky fairy. Lock 'im up, and then melt the key down for use in deep core drilling.

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Re: Ted Cruz

It's Ted Cruz. I don't know if you're aware, but he's completely fucking batshit insane. Full bore ultra-right wing anti-science whack job with added Jesus.

NASA's fucked.

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Anthem, America's second biggest health insurer, HACKED: Millions hit by breach

Trevor_Pott
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Re: cornz 1

Facebook is more valuable than Portugal, isn't it? So I fully expect American megacorporations to have the resources of a nation state and be able to defend themselves. When you're as big as Anthem, you don't get excuses.

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Intel silicon photonics modules can't take the heat of the HPC kitchen

Trevor_Pott
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Imagine: a 64 node cluster running all NVMe or MCS flash drives with 1TB/node with 18 cores (2 sockets) per node and all the bits internal to the node lashed together at 1Tbit interconnect. Then lash the nodes in the cluster together with 100Gbit interconnects.

That's a hell of a minecraft cluster.

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Who's come to fix your broadband? It may be a Fed in disguise. Without a search warrant

Trevor_Pott
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You ask for some hardlines and some computer equipment. Someone thinks this is "suspicious". Then you get checked up and raided? Wut?

What happened to "innocent unless proven guilty?" Surely there has to be some pretty legitimate grounds for suspicion before you lie your way into someone's home (rented or not!). Using lies to get in to someone's home to see if they are doing anything that might be illegal enough to investigate sounds a lot like fishing to me. Hmm...

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Extra detailed Big Iron coverage, LIVE TODAY at The Platform

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Really, anything with TPM in it is good. Been one of my favourite tech journos for quite some time. Asks the hard questions; we need more like that.

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How Pivotal cracked the one-billion-dollar code

Trevor_Pott
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Re: Open Source Business Models

A billion dollar "price tag" (corporate valuation) is far different from a billion dollar run rate, which is what Red Hat surpassed.

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The Pirate Bay clambers back online after cop raid sunk site for 7 weeks

Trevor_Pott
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Re: And so

Who pirates music anymore? The music producer caved, and we can find anything we want for dirt cheap and DRM free all over the internet from legit sources?

Pirating is for TV, textbooks and sometimes movies. You know, those mediums where the copyright holders have refused to provide what's requested in a form that isn't a massive burden to their legitimate users and where the copyright holders insist on not only charging exorbitant amounts, but want you to keep rebuying over and over and over?

Give the people what they want in a format they want to consume, at a price they can afford and holy fucking shit it turns out that you can compete successfully against "free".

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Snowden reveals LEVITATION technique of Canada’s spies

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Re: I hate to say I told you so...

The difference is that here the lawsuit is already well into the late planning stages, the funding exists to see it through all the way to the Supreme Court, and the judges tend to be highly sympathetic to the people, not the spooks. In the fullness of time, CES (formerly CESC) will pay for their indiscretions. Canada isn't the USA. Here, at least, the wheels of justice still turn. They turn slowly, but they still do turn.

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Trevor_Pott
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Re: What wasn't said...

"Did anyone ever think that wasn't the case?"

The 99.995% of internet users who aren't highly qualified IT professionals. Even most IT professionals don't have the faintest clue as to the extent of possible surveillance.

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Trevor_Pott
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Re: What people are downloading is really not the government's business

A) We are. Please go to www.openmedia.ca for the latest in Candian civil liberties battles, with a particular emphasis on fighting for digital rights.

B) Please try www.sync.com. The data is encrypted in flight and at rest. The company is Canadian and the data is stored in Canada. The company cannot access the data it stores, even if it wants to.

If you have further concerns please, I strongly encourage you to support Openmedia. They are are only current organised means of fighting this nonsense, and they work closely with those organizations (such as various First Nations bands) who have even more power in the courts than we do when it comes to bringing our government to heel.

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Re: Blame Canada

We're sorry.

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Let's be clear, everyone: DON'T BLOCK Wi-Fi, DUH – FCC official ruling

Trevor_Pott
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"But why would you use a personal wifi hotspot anyway? To run that you would need 3G or 4G in the first place so why carry two devices. Why not use a device with 3G/4G in the first place?"

Because I'm Canadian and I go to the USA for conferences. which means picking up a bruner SIM and stuffing it into a hotspot device so that I - and my team - have data wherever we go. That leaves us able to use voice for roaming (which costs virtually nothing) and avoid paying $mortgage for data roaming.

Do you have any idea what data roaming is when you take a Canadian SIM into the USA? Even the faintest clue? Now tell me you're going to run a team of technology journalists posting near-live multimedia from conferences off roaming data charges.

Egads, man!

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Australian spookhaus ASIO could retain private data FOREVER

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Re: Odd

Why should an intelligence agency retain data on people that have not been determined to be a threat? We are supposed to be innocent unless proven guilty.

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Google reveals where AT&T, Comcast, Time Warner Cable will next offer Gbps broadband

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Re: UK

I'd pay $250 a month for gigabit internet. No questions. Currently I am paying $100 a month for 25 down/5 up. $250 a month for gigabit wouldn't even be a question. Hell yes. Google's $70 a month or the UK's $100 a month? Sign me up eleventy years ago!

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'Boozed up' US drone spook CRASHED UFO into US White House

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Re: Not all there

Yeah, that could happen. For 0.5 seconds before a secret service agent threw a net on the bugger. And then the people who already want to kill US politicians might want to kill them that little bit more. Um...oh well?

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Trevor_Pott
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Re: For the Nth time

"only they strip out the camera and replace it with a vial of vx gas (or something else along those lines)"

Except that the Parrot AR can lift less than a pound. What is your vial made out of that you can get enough gas in there to do real harm when released outside in the open air? How did you get the gas in there and then transport it without killing yourselves in the process if your container is that light?

I have been thinking about this for the better part of a day and I can't come up with something that's under a lb that could reliably do enough damage to be freaking out about.

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Re: Not all there

Please explain exactly how you propose to make a Parrot AR drone into a weapon with the singular exception of "flying it into the rotors of a chopper"? It has a lift capacity of approximate the square root of fuck all.

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Re: I can imagine...

Please explain how you plan on picking up drones without either microwaving the local wildlife or a computer the size of iceland.

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What gets the internet REALLY excited? Kittens? No. EXPLODING Kittens

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Re: Tesla

Actually, I've studied the life and times of Tesla rather extensively. He has quite a few concrete achievements. Many of which Edison flat out stole. Just because other people like something (or someone) doesn't mean you have to hate it. Mind you, if you haven't learned that by now, you probably never will.

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Switch it off and on again: How peers failed to sneak Snoopers' Charter into terror bill

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Re: Experts?

"I would argue that anyone who does not have at least one degree that required differential equations and linear algebra is not educated."

Fairy snuff. But I can implement virtually every component necessary to create the modern internet, design the networks at macro and micro levels and even write code that makes it all go, if required. And I ain't got me no degree.

Challenge your mathematician grad to do that. Fuck, I challenge most Comp Sci graduates to create a boot floppy and update a BIOS, especially if they have to attach the floppy first!

White collar folks shouldn't be making all the decisions, eh? Some of us blue collar types have visibility they don't.

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Want to win Microsoft's cloudy love? Just spend $500

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Re: <sigh>

Americans. *sigh* Privacy is such an inconvenience, eh?

If the cloud provider has a US attack surface great than "none", it's not a cloud provider that anyone should consider using. Oh, what's that? Microsoft is trying very hard to kill it's own channel, even as it asks them to pay over $1700 just to get in the doors of their own conference? Yep! You don't own the customer relationship anymore, MSPs! You're just sales people with really shitty commission rates peddling Microsoft's cloud software and shouldering all the risk while receiving no benefits, no loyalty and no long term prospects of survival!

Amazing!

Cloud first, Mobile fist. Customers, Partners, Developers, Staff and - most especially - privacy last.

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IBM details PowerPC microserver aimed at square kilometre array

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Dear IBM research team

Damn fine work. Carry on.

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VDI is heading for a minor DAAS-aster

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Re: Do you have to choose?

Agreed! This is just more of the same Gartner "the cloud will conquer all" bollocks. DaaS is just one more tool in the toolbox. It will emphatically not kill of VDI.

--Submitted using my crappy Canadian DSL that doesn't do video from an American DaaS provider worth a damn, even when that provider is using the amazing nVidia GRID cards for acceleration.

--Submitted from the VDI instance in my home lab that *is* using GRID cards and provides an experience that wrecks DaaS, and that DaaS won't be able to touch for the next 15 years.

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Five years of Sun software under Oracle: Were the critics right?

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Open Office. No mention? Que?

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Charlotte, NC thinks it has won the Google Fiber lottery

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Re: Hmmm... can we re-think the goodness of Google fibre?

Funny, digital tools marketed as "privacy enhancing" sell well here. And I am constantly having people ask me how to set up _blank_ "so that other people can't access it".

People WANT privacy. They just don't want COMPLICATED privacy. What they REALLY want is Gmail and Skype, but completely private. Alas...

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Official: Whiteboxer Super Micro is a $2bn server company

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Re: a mere 20 years...

"Have you run other brands on the same condition and seen them shut down or fail otherwise?"

Yes, as a matter of fact I have. That's my job, eh? To do that sort of testing. And -a s a rule - Supermicro holds up better. There are exceptions (some models from Dell seem particularly overdesigned) but overall Supermicro seems to handle the thermals better.

Look, testing systems (in many cases to destruction) is my job. In fact, it has largely become the only part of systems administration I still consistently do. The rest of it has become automated or I have simply walked away from as I have lost interest.

But companies, be they customers looking to find the right server to put in extreme situations or vendors looking to have their gear tested pay me to test hardware, software and services. It means I get to play with a pretty wide variety of stuff.

At the end of the day, Supermicro make damn good gear. It's better today than it was a year ago, and I see no reason to believe it won't continue on that trend. They've set themselves apart from others by focusing less on how to "monetise" their existing customer base with needless add-ons or licensing sub-components of their firmware and keep on with the "build good kit and sell it cheap".

Here's hoping that seeing them move to $2B/year and beyond causes the other vendors to sit up, take notice and start getting competitive again.

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Should Google play carriers at their own game? There's never been a better time

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Note the "€" in your post. That is different from the United States of privacy invasion. You'll note that such things in the US are rare, and getting rarer. And it's worse in Canada!

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