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* Posts by Trevor_Pott

4453 posts • joined 31 May 2010

DOCX disaster recovery: How I rescued my wife from XM-HELL

Trevor_Pott
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Re: Simple solution I've always used

Since actually reading the article or any of the other comments in this thread is to tedious for you, I'll repost a previous comment here.

The document was open and unclosed for 30 days. It was saved repeatedly. Thus there were many versions of it in the version control document, however, the error would not be noticed until the document was closed and reopened.

In other words: the word processor - be if LibreOffice, Word, or any other that is capable of saving files with improper XML - is perfectly capable of allowing you to continue editing the document after creating the XML error, so long as you don't close and reopen the document.

This means you get as many versions as you want just by mashing the "save" icon on a regular basis, and/or using autosave...but they all will contain the error from the moment the error was introduced. Which, in this case, was around page 2.

Thus backups don't help. You have:

1) Initial document created.

2) Five saves until error is created on page two.

3) 600+ saves after that all that have [good document] + [XML error] + [more good document].

As long as it contains [XML error] it won't open.

Had your advice been followed we'd be back to "two pages of document" instead of "32 pages of document." Interestingly enough, those exact same two pages of document were what Writer could read before it encountered the XML error.

In other words, your advice doesn't prevent the problem is actually useless because of how Libre Office treats XML-flawed documents.

What's more, as was explicitly stated several times in both the article and various posts here in the comments, we did have a versionning system in place. We just don't have to do it manually, like primitives scratching on stone tablets. Applications can autosave now. And you can mash the save button. Any change you make gets sent to Sync.com/Dropbox/Livedrive/etc that then versions it for you.

In fact, the wife actually periodically WOULD save the document to the desktop, to Dropbox, to the local NAS, etc...all without the requirement to close the application.

Cheers.

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Trevor_Pott
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Re: Simple solution I've always used

As per eleventeen squillion discussions about versionning in this thread; your solution wouldn't have helped.

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Trevor_Pott
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Re: Which Office product is at fault?

Detail exactly what about Libre Office requires more time input than Microsoft Office? Please also account for the time that must be spent working out the licensing required to appropriately license Microsoft Office (both in VDI and non-VDI environments, where multiple devices are involved, where more than 5 devices are involved and where devices are used both at home and in an office environment.) Additionally, factor in the time require to manage said licensing as well as the time required to generate the income to pay said licensing.

...or are you just completely full of shit?

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Trevor_Pott
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Re: Which is why...

"Microsoft Office is still miles ahead of the alternatives."

List the 'features' in Microsoft Office that I, personally, my family or my clients care about that are available in Microsoft Office that are not available in LibreOffice or Google Apps. Present a solid commercial rationale for why these features are worth the price delta on a per user basis.

Please include an analysis of the "value" of my data being made available to the NSA/GCHQ/etc on demand so that they can scan it in order to send innocents to jail and/or steal whatever innovations I may have to to give their own companies commercial advantage. Please include an exacting means by which I can ensure that closed source software - let alone American cloud-integrated stuff - is free of such snooping, should I choose not to avail myself of the "feature" of governmental integration.

If you cannot provide a credible analysis of exactly why and how Microsoft Office provides a better value than the competition, in real dollars and cents for features that I actually care about then I have only two conclusions to draw:

1) Your absolutist statements are false because they do not apply to everyone.

2) You are completely and utterly full of shit.

Please not that both conclusions are not mutually exclusive.

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Trevor_Pott
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Re: Proper version control

Prove it.

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Trevor_Pott
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Re: Which Office product is at fault?

I'm guilty too. Many's the time I've written a parser from scratch because the documentation for the existing ones in the language I was using was dense enough that I felt trying to grok it would take 3x as long as just writing the thing myself...

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Trevor_Pott
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Re: Simpler way to fix DOCX files...

OpenOffice didn't read it either. Had the same issues as LibreOffice.

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Trevor_Pott
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Re: Which is why...

Given the "how" this occured, I'm 100% positive that LibreOffice Writer 4.1 would have caused the same error (with the same fix) for ODF as it would have for OOXML. I'm less sure that many of the oMath or Excel errors in Word would have been the same in ODF as under OOXML, as they are most frequently issues with "order of tags" rather than "when the tags are committed". Thus it is theoretically possible that Word could write a oMath error to DOCX but not to ODF.

Either way, I'm now glad that both formats exist as they do; in a human-fixable fashion.

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Trevor_Pott
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Re: Bah!

The oMath issue is simply the most famous (infamous) example of this. Also: lots of organizations have unpatched Office installs. I hope this encourages some folks to patch. AFAIK, Office 2003 and 2007 require hotfixes, not patches. There are still similar bugs in Excel, and for all I know the specific issue in LibreOffice has been patched by now. (She was using an older version, after all.)

This has nothing to do with which productivity suite you use. It is about how the error can occur in the format. Any application can cause it. Now you know about the error and know what to look for if/when it hits you.

If you have a religious issue with Open Source software - or Microsoft, or whomever - take it elsewhere.

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Trevor_Pott
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Re: Did you try the obvious?????

I can say absolutely that virtualisation wasn't an issue here. 1) Virtualisation doesn't work that way. 2) VMs are all granted static blocks of RAM in my config. 3) Looking at the raw XML it became pretty clear that she had attempted to create a hyperlink, thought better of it and cancelled. (Asking her confirmed this.)

Which meant that LibreOffice created the <Hyperlink> tag but didn't erase it when the cancel was hit. It is likely a specific error related to trying to add a hyperlink to text that had been formatted in the way she was formatting it (blue + italics + something else.)

It absolutely isn't a glitch in the matrix, issue of the OS, hypervisor, etc. It's a bug in the code. Just like that oMath bug in Word, or the many similar ones in Excel. Some aspect of the application made a commit to the XML structure when it shouldn't have, expecting that you would then follow through with something, or that if you pressed cancel it would "un-commit" the changes made. It's a bad design choice...but apparently a reasonably common one.

If anything, this incident should be used as praise for XML-based file formats. OOXML is something that can be edited in this fashion. .DOCs could not. That's a step forward.

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Trevor_Pott
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Re: Proper version control

If we had used Dropbox instead of Sync for version control we wouldn't have version history to commit #1. It would have eventually wrapped as it jettisoned the older versions.

I agree that a proper version control system is a really good idea...but very few people have them.

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Trevor_Pott
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Re: change file extension

Because not everyone chooses 7Zip and I was trying to write it targeted at everyone. I don't trust the native Windows Zip client to repack the document properly, so I wanted to subtly hint that getting a proper Zip client would be a good plan, however, if they chose a different client I wanted to have some instructions in the article for how they could go about getting into the file.

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Trevor_Pott
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Re: Culprit

Wow. Jesus shit-pickling Christ, will you please get your head out of your very biased ass? Where did I - in the article or the comments - says "don't use Microsoft, use LibreOffice?"

I said "this is a class of error that at a minimum Word and Writer can and do both cause. In my case, the error was caused by Writer, but anything that writes to a DOCX can theoretically cause it, here's how you fix it."

Saying "Word does this too" is not saying "LibreOffice is better". They are distinct concepts. Saying "Word does this too" is to reinforce that this is an issue that can occur with the document format, and that any application could theoretically cause it. Or a single-byte corruption error could cause it. Or $deity knows what else.

The point is that "which productivity suite is 'better'" has absolutely no place in the discussion at all. It doesn't matter. Since both Word and Writer have been proven to cause this class of error then knowing about the class of error and how to solve it are what matter.

Take your religious issues elsewhere.

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Trevor_Pott
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Re: Did you try the obvious?????

The document was open and unclosed for 30 days. It was saved repeatedly. Thus there were many versions of it in the version control document, however, the error would not be noticed until the document was closed and reopened.

In other words: the word processor - be if LibreOffice, Word, or any other that is capable of saving files with improper XML - is perfectly capable of allowing you to continue editing the document after creating the XML error, so long as you don't close and reopen the document.

This means you get as many versions as you want just by mashing the "save" icon on a regular basis, and/or using autosave...but they all will contain the error from the moment the error was introduced. Which, in this case, was around page 2.

Thus backups don't help. You have:

1) Initial document created.

2) Five saves until error is created on page two.

3) 600+ saves after that all that have [good document] + [XML error] + [more good document].

As long as it contains [XML error] it won't open.

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Trevor_Pott
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Re: Bah!

Word does it too. http://support.microsoft.com/kb/2528942/en-us

There. It's a link. It was in the article. It was in this thread. It describes an issue where Word causes exactly this kind of error, with a different object.

This is not the only error where Wor fails to write XML into OOXML formats appropriately. I am aware of at least three others.

Thus the article is not about either Word or LibreOffice. It's about the CLASS OF ERROR. Any word processor can create it. It isn't about "bashing" any particular word processor or "exhonorating" any one. They all do it, in subtly different ways.

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Trevor_Pott
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Actually, it's worse. .doc files are binary blobs, not XML. If they had a similar weird error writing metadata to the file it would simply be corrupt and unrecoverable. That said, you can get around this in two ways:

1) Configure Office 2003 to save in DOCX/XLSX/etc.

2) Use Word 2010 and uBit menu to get the menu back. Delete all tabs that aren't "menu" from your config. Suddenly, it looks just like Office 2003!

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Trevor_Pott
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\o/

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Trevor_Pott
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Re: Something very wrong here.

Hell if I know. I would have thought this type of application would be pretty basic, but nothing I used could do it. The XML parser in Notepad++'s plugin store just said "error on line 2". Helpful. Visual Studio was equally useless. None of the "we'll fix your broken Word document" applications were worth a damn either.

It's really odd because if someone had written the recovery app exactly as you suggested it would have worked just fine. Market opportunity for you?

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Trevor_Pott
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Okay, smartass, how does restore from backup save you in this situation? If you are so cosmically empowered with systems administration skills, explain to me exactly how it resolves the issue.

My "backups" in this case consisted of a complete version history right back to version one of the document, care of Sync.com. Windows Previous Versions had a copy taken twice a day, every day, since version 1. The auto-rarchiver had every fifth or sixth version of the document as it landed on the NAS. None of that helped.

The "last known good" copy of the document had only two pages of text. Thirty pages of text - about three weeks' worth of work - had been written to the document after the error was originally introduced. Using the backups would have wiped out thirty pages worth of work.

So how, exactly, do "backups" help with that?

Given the lack of reading comprehension you display attempting to read a simple article, I am convinced you are unable to read (and remain focused on) a technical document of any length. That tells me that it is you who should be retiring. Preferably to some place where they keep the electrical sockets covered and only let you use dull sporks to eat.

Seriously, is "restore from backups, job done" the level of service you give your customers? Your own wife? "No thinking about the situation, simply push the button and don't think about it." Not only must you be one of the worst sysadmins to employ but your sex life must be akin to trying to fuck a Dalek!

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Trevor_Pott
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Re: The wife was using an old version of LibreOffice Writer (v4.1)...

Really? Then why do I get more bizarre errors with Microsoft Office than anything else I use? What office package do you recommend that is absolutely reliable? This is the first error I've seen in Libre/Open Office in over a decade. I've seen a hell of a lot more out of Microsoft Office in that time...

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Trevor_Pott
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Re: Bah!

Word does it too. This particular example involved LibreOffice, but after research I'm pretty sure every single word processor out there has at least one variant of this bug.

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Trevor_Pott
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Re: Open documents

First time it's happened to either me or my wife in a decade. Seriously, we use persistent VDI for everything. The server's rock solid. We can just disconnect our RDP sessions and walk away. Documents are versionned to Sync.com. Who would've thought something like this could happen, eh?

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Trevor_Pott
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Re: Did you try the obvious?????

Yes. You do realize that Previous Versions only triggers on a pre-set schedule or with Windows Backup, hmm? We save to Sync.com, which contains a version history of our files. The issue is that the error crept in around page 2, but we didn't realize it until page 32. Even had we gone back to the "last known good" version of the file, we would have lost 30 pages - the better part of three weeks' - worth of work.

That was explained in the article in detail. Neither Previous Versions nor Sync nor Dropbox nor any other version control mechanism could have prevented this.

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Trevor_Pott
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Re: For the sake of completeness...

I don't know who Maven is. I can compare her to my bearded dragon, however. Both are passed out on the chair absorbing sunlight. I think they're plants or something. Require sunlight to recharge...

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Trevor_Pott
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Re: Which Office product is at fault?

"No excuse. Everything has bugs now and then, but committing unparseable XML to disk should not be one of them."

Word does it too. A link from the article goes here: http://support.microsoft.com/kb/2528942/en-us which is one of the more famous examples of Word doing this exact same thing in a subtly different way.

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Trevor_Pott
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Re: Which Office product is at fault?

I have had both Word and Writer cause the issue in subtly different ways. A little bit of research on the internet shows me that every single word processor that I can think of which handles DOCX has (or had) at least one bug that can cause this error.

Thus the error is not restricted to any one product but is in fact a common style of error relating to how badly people write XML parsers.

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Trevor_Pott
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Dropbox only keeps so many versions in history. What do you do if Word introduces the error on page 2, autosaves every minute, but you don't close word until page 32? Every single save in the dropbox history would have the error.

Remember: these errors can be introduced, but go unnoticed until you close the application and attempt to re-open the document.

Besides, if your last good version was "two pages of text" you are going to want that last 30 pages!

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Look inside ELON MUSK'S CAR! Tesla S wundervehicle has voom

Trevor_Pott
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Re: 'everyone going to a shopping centre...'

"I'm not sure making you stop for an hour where you used to stop for 2min is going to work"

Roadside diner. Welcome to 'mericuh.

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Trevor_Pott
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Re: Still waiting to see where the power's coming from

Wind works great...where wind works great. We have scads of it out near Crow's Nest Pass in Alberta. Cheap and reliable power.

The problem isn't the peak demand wind. It's that we still have all this goddamned coal around. What we need to be doing is tearing out our coal plants and replacing them with Nuclear. Especially in Canada! We have proven reliable technology, the best engineers and craftsmen in the world and enough Uranium to last until we can start mining asteroids for more.

At least Ontario has the Bruce Power nuke plant. Bloody hippies got the natives all riled up when Bruce tried to build one up by Athabaska and they murdered the project. Bastards.

Nuclear and Hydro for base load and wind to supply peak. That's a decent setup and it's where the bloody money should be going.

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EU privacy A-Team tells Google: Get a grip and obey OUR laws

Trevor_Pott
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Re: I don't get it

They are also dumping money into lobbying to have the law overturned. Good money bought those laws, so anyone trying to get them reversed is automatically suspect!

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Don't believe the hyper-converged hype: Why are we spending stupid amounts on hardware?

Trevor_Pott
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Re: @Trevor Potts

I've no idea. The cynic in me suspects that our dear storagebod finds Nutanix and SimpliVity to be simply outside his comfort zone. Which, in IT is exactly when it should be investigated. It's the stuff that lies outside our comfort zones that will define the future of computing.

Hey, I know great people at Maxta, Nutanix and SimpliVity. If Storagebod wants to meet and greet, I can absolutely arrange it. I think that a laying of hands needs to occur. Sitting down with this stuff and actually using it will, I believe, change the fellow's mind in a right hurry.

All of these companies offer right proper kit, damn solid and easy to use. It is not a toy. It's not a joke. It's not some attempt to grab margin from the stupid. Server SANs absolutely, without question are a critical element of the future of storage.

"Object storage verses Server SANs" will be the new "block storage versus NFS". With all the added fun that Server SANs are typically object stores in their own right! They will be the primary storage mechanism of the next 15 years, with disk arrays and filers replacing tape as an archival medium. (The age of MAID is upon us! Tremble in fear!)

That means that if you do storage for a living and you aren't learning about Object stores, ranging from Hadoop to Caringo as well as Server SANs ranging from Nutanix to Maxta then you're cutting your own throat. Your understanding of the intimate details of LUNs, cache tuning and the vagaries of the NetApp and EMC operating systems are about to mean sweet fuck all.

We've entered an era in which the storage systems don't come with nerd knobs, because we've got software smart enough to look after itself. Those people needing full-bore nerd-knobby access to everything will be in the extreme minority, and they can afford to hire a room full of PhDs to keep their precious snowflake ticking along.

The future belongs to Object projects like Swift, Server SANs like Maxta and whiteboxers like Supermicro shifting Openserver-like tin...and you can quote me on all of that. That's my prediction, and I'm sticking to it.

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Trevor_Pott
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"Surely the value has to be in the software: so have we got so bad at building our data centres that it makes sense to pay a premium for a hardware platform?"

Wish granted. Meet Maxta. Hyper-converged infrastructure as a software-only layer.

Nutanix and SimpliVity simply remove the burden of haggling with vendors, verifying against an HCL and waiting for the HCL to catch up with new hardware. For that, they charge a price.

Is that worth money? IIRC, cher Storage bod, you are the fellow who talks about EMC, Netapp, HP and so forth like it's a good thing...and what are they doing except packaging up hardware and software and selling it as an appliance? I can buy Supermicro fully redundant arrays and add my own software. From Windows Server to Nexenta to what-have-you it's absolutely no different than turning to EMC/Netapp/HP/etc. Except that I'd be rolling and configuring my own instead of pushing an RFQ to my vendor pool.

So, do you build from Supermicro, Huawei, Quanta and so forth? Controlling every level of the stack intimately? Or do you use RFQs and your pet vendors? Why? What value do you see in EMC over Supermicro?

Now, how is that same value different from converged stacks like Nutanix or SimpliVity?

The future is here. The storage admin is non-requisite. If you want to employ one, then by all means make them work for their money and make sure they control capital costs by tightly integrating everything. However, you can just punt them out on their arse now and buy converged infrastructure, letting the virtualisation admin handle everything. Hey, with NSX they can even handle networking too.

Where's the value? In reducing headcount, or at least reassigning those same bodies to different tasks that could be producing ROI greater than the cost of having someone else do the integration for you. Same as it always was.

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Everyone can and should learn to code? RUBBISH, says Torvalds

Trevor_Pott
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Re: @AC101

"I think a society of people who can 'change a tyre' is a far stronger society."

Why do I need to know how to change a tire? Tire goes flat, I call CAA and they're there in less than 1/2 hr with a spare to fix the problem. Meanwhile, I'm using that 1/2 hour to generate income by writing, checking e-mail, what-have-you. There are people who get paid to solve these problems. They specialized in solving them. Let them do their job.

Put another way: batteries going dead is "a thing" in Canada during the winter. I could whip out jumpers cables, flag a passing motorist and waste 45 minutes of both of our time trying to get the thing going...or I could call CAA, get in the queue for one of the battery trucks and wait. While I'm waiting, I'm not outside freezing my ASCII off. I'm inside, getting work done. When the truck driver arrives with his Jesus battery of ultimate jumpstarting doom, I'll pop the hood, he'll take about 30 seconds to get my car started and I'm off.

Unless you've an intention to be a developer, learning to program has no value to you.

Teaching kids to think is what social studies is for. It's where you learn the history of the world, along with it critical thinking. I don't know what kind of fucked up education system you have, but learning critical thinking was the whole fucking point of social studies for us. The ability to deconstruct our species history, to understand that logic is useful, but is only one method by which humans reason...that is what you need to be able to live and compete in this world.

You don't need to replicate that by trying to teach people "how to think" in a programming class as well. What you need to do is a better job of teaching them to think in the class that is already mandatory and designed specifically for the purpose!

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Netflix agrees to end network warnings in Verizon slowdown spat

Trevor_Pott
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If the ISP doesn't get to charge at least two different companies, maybe three or four, for the same bit of data then society has obviously failed, Google will kill babies and pirates are responsible for all of it. Anyone who disagrees is obviously lacking in understanding of economics, morality and ethics.

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Google to let Chromebookers take video content OFFLINE

Trevor_Pott
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Re: "got a proper laptop for not much more"

Most people only need the most basic of tasks. Chromebooks are a mass market item. For everything else, there's OSX.

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Trevor_Pott
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Re: Do as I say...

Yeah, going to go with downvoted due to {"Fact": [Google's] dominance in...online video}.

There is plenty of rich competition in the online video field, even if we are talking about Youtube. Youtube isn't exactly a competitor to Netflix, and Movies is an afterthought compared to them, or to iTunes. Youtube owns the cat video market, but even there had good competition.

Google is nowhere near being able to leverage a "monopoly" or even a "dominant position" in online video to do much of anything. Certainly not to make an OS dominant. This is not Microsoft leveraging an OS monopoly to force a shitty browser down everyone's throat.

Not yet, anyways.

Google has Netflix, Apple, Amazon and even Microsoft to content with yet, and the battle hasn't even begun, let alone is anywhere close to over.

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Trevor_Pott
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Re: "got a proper laptop for not much more"

"You can get a basic Windows 8 laptop for very little more - if you don't mind "refurbished", for considerably less - but that isn't really the point."

And it's running Windows 8. That's trading in a Civic for a Lada and calling it an upgrade.

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Trevor_Pott
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"Returned my Chromebook within 7 days and got a proper laptop"

So, a Macbook running OSX?

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Patch NOW: Six new bugs found in OpenSSL – including spying hole

Trevor_Pott
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Re: Quick to fix in Open Source, but it leaves questions.

Unless the customer themselves are assholes - I.E. sociopathic or possessed of an intolerable personality - then I would treat the 10,000 unit customer the exact same as the 1 unit customer. The rationale is simple, and based in raw economics:

1) End customers and SMBs are used to getting the short end of the stick. Treat them well and they will tell others.

2) Today's 1 unit customer is tomorrow's 10,000 unit customer. Businesses grow and change, and I think past the end of this quarter.

3) I would rather have 100x 100-unit customers than one 10,000 unit customer. I don't like the idea of all my income being dependent on one (or a small collection of) businesses/individuals. That gives them massive amounts of power over me, and I went into business so that I could RAID 6 my income.

Treat people decently and they'll keep coming back, often times with a friend. Treat people like shit and word about that will spread a dozen times as fast. Or, put simply: obey Wheaton's law...

...don't be a dick.

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Trevor_Pott
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Re: Quick to fix in Open Source, but it leaves questions.

Ah, LDS. Still beating your drum of "fuck poor people in the ass with a pineapple grenade", eh? If you aren't big, you don't matter.

Smoochies to you too, baby.

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Has Google gone too far? Indie labels say it's crunch time for The New Economy

Trevor_Pott
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Spare me

It's Google's network, so they can do whatever they want. There's no reason they can't provide a "fast lane" for those who pay, isn't there? And why should they have to put up with unions? Unions are the source of all evil by allowing collective bargaining!

Oh wait...

So, how can you have it both ways, hmm? Be anti network neutrality (the network belongs to the ISPs, they can do whatever they want!) but all heap big angry at Google, who is doing nothing different?

How can you be anti-union, but pro indie cartel? It's perfectly okay for the indie companies to try to band together and bargain collectively, but the ruination of society itself if human beings do it to protect their labour?

There's a lot of "defend the fatherland established power structures" here, with a lot of hatred directed towards those who have managed to carve a new niche out for themselves in the world. Perhaps most of the griping is simply a chronic dislike of change itself...or perhaps some rage over not having invested enough in Google at the outset.

Nobody is in the right here.

Google are offering substantially worse terms to the indies. They are also kowtowing to the majors who are asking for (frankly) some insane terms that are utter bullshit. Google shouldn't be giving the majors those terms or the indies. Both the Indies and the majors are trying to dictate to Google how Google's own marketplace will work and that's equally bullshit. If they don't want to use Google's market they can fuck right the hell off an make their own.

The proper way through this is to set one set of terms that applies to everyone. Those terms should be sweet enough that the content creators want to shift their content through the market but not so sweet that the content creators get the run of the place.

In a perfect world, the goal is to replace the labels entirely, with the new markets that are emerging being a cheap and easy way for creators to access an audience. Of course, creators need to not be able to be isolated in a divide-and-conquer fashion by those who own the market, so some form of collective bargaining needs to be possible.

It's about balance. The creators shouldn't get to run roughshod over the distribution channels or the end customer. Neither should the distribution channel dictate terms to both sides, and the end customer shouldn't have an expectation of getting content from either the creator or the distributor for free.

The problem here is that people with power - and by that I mean not only those with money, but the pundits with vast audiences who influence public and political opinion - have all picked one camp and evangelize the power and grace of their chosen tribe. Half the world is off bitching about the poor, starving creators, or the poor beleaguered middlemen or the inherent "right" of the end customer to get everything for free.

The other half is trying to insert themselves in the middle as yet another layer of middlemen that should have a "right" to not merely some of the profits, but somehow most of the profits. How many middlemen do we need? There are labels, markets, CDNs, backhaul providers, last mile providers, software developers, various government agencies and device manufacturers all trying to be middlemen.

Well it's the 21st fucking century. This can go Creator --> Market --> End customer. A market like Google can handle everything from advertising to electronic distribution to the last mile to the device. We don't need layers upon layers of middlemen all creating artificial scarcity in order to bleed money from the stone of an increasingly impoverished end customer.

What we need is to take as many middlemen as possible - starting with labels - out back and putting two in the head and three in the chest. We need mechanisms so that creators can bargain collectively without labels, but that prevent this collective bargaining from getting too much power.

Balance. Find it, maintain it. But this ridiculous posturing where the chosen tribe of every mouthpiece with the soapbox should have ultimate power and everyone else can scrounge for crumbs needs to end. We all gotta eat, so stop trying to screw everyone around you and work cooperatively for a fucking change!

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Is it THE END OF BIG DATA? Quarta Horribilis for high-end storage

Trevor_Pott
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Re: Decline in the growth of out of house storage

"extra cost of storing it themselves"? Storing it yourself is cheaper.

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Trevor_Pott
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The important category is "other." All those startups that are so readily disparaged by the fanboois of the big array vendors? They are not all crap. And people with money to spend know it.

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Where do you stand on multi-function network appliances?

Trevor_Pott
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Where do I stand on them? Palo Alto Networks > *.

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US Army loses 16,000 personnel records in South Korea

Trevor_Pott
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Re: No Surprise

I this the better question is how many of us haven't worn a hat that is other than white. My youth was spent as one of the few technologically savvy fellows in my city during the 80s and 90s. There were hijinks.

But you grow up. You realize that while blackhatting may be fun, exhilarating and a boost to the ego, it's also a very real risk. As you get older you get a wife, possibly kids, pets, a mortgage; there are people that depend on you and they could be in a bad way if you were to end up in jail.

I think that's natural. I think that pure white hats are exceptionally rare...but that most companies (and even governments) don't require them. The lighter shade of grey is just fine, even if the only "black" in your hat is tacitly ignoring the "dark deeds" done by your contacts (and friends) amongst the information systems penetration community.

Those who never had the bug, who never had the curiosity to know how things work...they'll never understand. It is the curiosity which drives; "how is that designed" and "can I get around it?" It can make one into a notorious hacker, or a brilliant engineer.

The difference between one and the other is having learned enough life lessons to channel the curiosity into something beneficial...most of the time, at least.

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Feds: Amazon cloud can be used for healthcare data

Trevor_Pott
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Now you can have all the security of a single, big fat target and it will cost more. Thanks, cloud computing!

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FIGHT! Intel disputes ARM's claims of Android superiority

Trevor_Pott
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Re: that fps test is worthless

I care. If the device is capable of emitting 300fps and is capped at 60fps then it's idle for goodly chunks of time. That means those transistors can be powered down between frames, or spend their time doing something else. It probably means that system gets way better battery life than some system that is struggling with all it's might to hit the 60fps barrier.

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Cisco COO: 'I actually thank God that we had a crisis'...

Trevor_Pott
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No they haven't. Cisco engineers, SEs and sales twits are all over Twitter spewing forth overwhelming quantities of contempt and arrogance for all and sundry. Cisco has a hell of a lot more housecleaning to do before they're a humble, customer-focused company.

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Japanese finally produce a ROBOT which isn't DEAD INSIDE

Trevor_Pott
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Re: The Daleks are coming!!!

"Emulating an emotional response will seem like total insincerity by the observer, leading to annoyance and eventually violence, when the perceived response is seen as some kind of robot sarcasm."

A robot that can simulate emotion is still more human than many people I've met. Besides, how do you know you're not just "simulating emotion" by displaying reactions you have observed to be socially contextually relevant? You have a chemical reaction that occurs in your brain that triggers the behavior patterns? How's that different from a subroutine?

You're a machine. The robot's a machine. Based on your posts, I daresay it has a chance of being the better machine.

Specisist.

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Thanks for nothing, OpenSSL, grumbles stonewalled De Raadt

Trevor_Pott
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Re: Act like a kid, get treated like a kid.

"How can anyone take open source seriously when major bits of software are managed by pouty children?"

Because I've met many of the assholes in charge of some of the most important closed source software...and I trust the pouty children far more.

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