* Posts by Trevor_Pott

6175 posts • joined 31 May 2010

Naked cyclists take a hard line on 'aroused' protest participant

Trevor_Pott
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Re: @Trevor_Potts again

"The problem, if there was to be one, would lie within the "intent" that the person has with the aforementioned item(s)"

To a very limited extend, I understand why some people might be concerned about an individual carrying a gun. Particularly if they are American urbanites and the gun in question is a handgun.

Do remember, however, that I am from a sparsely populated region of Canada, and have spent most of my life in places where it's absolutely not weird at all to see someone carrying a long gun around most of the day. I also grew up in a military community, so seeing folks armed as part of their duties was perfectly normal and nothing to worry about at all.

Where I have a problem is the assumption of intent based not on an individual in question's actions, but based upon the twitchings of the observer's paranoid mind spiders.

If I am lying on a nude beach with a full erection, by what right do you say I have intent to do anything wrong? If I am participating in a nude protest (or campus nude-and-freezing-polar-bear-dive or whatnot) by what right do you ascribe a different intent to me because of an erect penis versus a flaccid one?

A person carrying a gun has a choice about how they carry that gun. Someone participating in nude - or for that matter, clothed - activities has absolutely no control whatsoever over whether or not they have an erection.

So while I can almost, sort of, under some limited circumstances when dealing with observers possessed by mind spiders understand why "gun = panic" to some people, nothing anyone here has said explains to me on what grounds they presume intent, guilt, or anything else about a man based on the whether or not his penis is erect.

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Trevor_Pott
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Re: @Trevor_Potts again

"I personally have no problem with you waving your erect penis around in public. I was attempting (and apparently failing) to explain why society-in-general finds such behaviour worrying, to the extent of drafting laws against it. I thought the gun analogy works, but obviously for you (and at least 42 others) it doesn't. So be it."

What you said boiled down to "presume everyone guilty instead of innocent".

Reality is "sex is bad because a priest told me so".

So that's actually two nerves struck. The first, anything that smacks of guilty until proven innocent makes me very, very unhappy. The second: religion is completely irrational and should never be allowed to be the basis for any law. Sadly, it is the basis for the anti-nudity nonsense, like it or not.

And have a good day yourself.

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Trevor_Pott
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Re: @Trevor_Potts again

"You do however have conscious control over whether you reveal your penis to others."

Why should it matter if I do? Because you have religious hangups? Why should your bizarre belief in the ravings of desert madmen be allowed to affect my behavior, hmm? The threat of violence from people who uphold your right to force your beliefs on me is really the only reason I wear pants at all. Pants are evil.

"Indeed, but at the risk of collecting yet more downvotes, I would like to point out that an erect penis can be used for a lot of things that an flaccid penis cannot, just as a gun can be used for a lot of things that an absence-of-a-gun cannot. That is why the the items in question are more worrying to observers."

So we're guilty of violating your imagination unless proven innocent? What the fuck?

"Except, again, for what it can be used for. An observer seeing a fellow wielding a gun or an erect penis would be justly concerned at what that fellow might be about to do with it."

No, he's not justified at all in worrying about that, unless a threat has been made. If a threat has not been made, then it's just a person with a goddamned erection. Even a person with a gun is just a person with a gun unless and until they make a threat to something with it other than carry it around.

Why do you keep insisting that your ability to dream up fantasies should strip from others the presumption of innocence?

"They might, for instance, be worried that he will poke someone with it, or that it will go off accidentally in his hand. A fellow with no gun, or a flaccid penis, raises no such concerns."

So you're worried that my penis might touch you? Why is this a concern? How is it any different than my hand? Or my nose? My hair? My kneecaps are way less clean than my penis, I'm sure, but would you be afraid of them?

Or is it spooge you're afraid of? Maybe you'll get spooged on. Will you die? Will the world come to an almightly, grinding end? Or will you wipe it off and say "dude, not cool" and just go about your day?

Or are you fixated on the gun analogy here, the one that doesn't really work? Guns have safeties. And people can get training in how to handle guns. They don't tend to go off unless you're either stupid or you are intending to make them go off. That's even presuming that the gun is loaded and there's a round in the chamber, which would be an idiotic way to carry a gun around.

"But to pretend that observers need not be concerned at the implications of their unexpected appearance for unwanted physical attention, pregnancy, or at least laundry services is clearly nonsense. The flaccid penis presents a much reduced set of risks "

What an absolute load of horseshit. I should be judged and restrained, my freedoms removed because of what I might do, even those no intent to do so has been displayed?

An erect penis is not intent to rape, or to copulate, or even to do anything except be erect for a period of time before being non erect. You do not spontaneously get pregnant because you are in the presence of an erect penis. You don't even get spooged on unless there's some effort involved, so even your laundry tripe is revealed for what it is.

"Surely such a logical and empirical observation cannot be so controversial as the forum votes suggest?"

Your delusional paranoia and presumption of guilt is emphatically not empirical observation.

"However I assume that you do have conscious control over whether you reveal your penis in public. To extend my "flawed", "irrational and dangerous" analogy further, this is exactly why concealed carrying of weapons is permitted in many US states, whereas waving your weapon around in public is not. One behaviour is likely go unnoticed, whereas the other is likely to cause public anxiety and distress regarding the perceived risks."

If you are distressed by the sight of an erect penis then you need to be disturbed. Actually, you probably are disturbed, mentally, complete with delusions of sky fairies and the belief that sex, sexuality and nudity are somehow bad.

People with your mindset rule only through force of arms and violence. The day will come when there aren't enough of you crazies to force us to obey the paranoid and hateful voices in your heads. On that day, a magical world of no more goddamned pants will ensue. Maybe Kilts will become a thing again. Or we'll invent some form of protective covering for our legs that is not bloody pants.

Either way, it will be marvelous to be able to do so without folks with your mindset to oppress us. maybe I'll even live to see the day where I can walk in a public space and have well-ventilated, sweat free testicles. Publicly visible or not.

And there may, or may not be erections. Those occur on their own schedule. But you might consider investigating them, as they can be great fun and you sure as all hell need some.

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Trevor_Pott
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Re: Oh great

"You sound a typical impatient car driver who think only he should be on the road."

And you sound like a self-important cyclist who thinks the laws of the road shouldn't apply to him.

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Trevor_Pott
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Re: Death race

"More worryingly is that there is a culture building within motoring world where this is applauded."

This is a bad thing. Though if I'm being entirely honest, more than once I've wanted to run one or two of the cyclist buggers down for being utter fucksticks, but have thus far been able to restrain myself.

The problem isn't cyclists or motorists. It's self-important assholes. There are plenty of cyclists who think the law just doesn't apply to them. There are plenty of motorists who think the same.

The difference is that is a cyclist decides that the entire universe should just get out of their way, and YOLOs through a red light, or does 10kph on a 110kph hiway, right down the centre line (both of which happen all to frequently around here) then the cyclist is going to inevitably come to very real grips with the fact that the right of weight doesn't work in their favour.

A cyclist being an asshat at a motorist usually results in an injured or dead cyclist. A motorist being an asshat at a cyclist also results in an injured or dead cyclist.

I agree 100% that we need to have awareness raised such that asshat motorists are both aware of the law and prosecuted for breaking it. That said, we also need to crack down on asshat cyclists, because the quickest way for a cyclist to cut their risk in half is to obey the goddamned law in the first place.

Sharing the road requires predictability. Both sides need to agree on a code of behavior - in this case the law - and abide by it. That allows us to operate vehicles of all sizes without too many really nasty consequences. When anyone - on any vehicle of any size - decides the law doesn't apply to them, that's when bad things happen.

Of course, being human, it's a hell of a lot easier to just villainize "them" and ignore the failings of "us". Regardless of who is "us" and who is "them". :(

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Trevor_Pott
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I don't have conscious control over whether or not I have an erection. I do have conscious control over whether or not I carry a gun. Thus your analogy is not only flawed, it's irrational and dangerous.

Perhaps more to the point, I can carry around both and erect penis AND a gun and proceed to use neither of them, except when and where appropriate. That part of this absolutely is under conscious control.

An erect penis is no different from an unerect penis. Or a woman's nipple. Or her elbow. Or some of the hairs on my ass. It's all just parts of a body, man. It's what you do with it that matters.

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Trevor_Pott
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"Does simply looking at the average naked female body actually get you aroused ?"

Yep. Without fail. Hell, even partially naked ladies. And captain winkie doesn't seem to be particularly choosy.

"live naked bodies don't look "erotic" especially when outdoors."

That's not what my biology has to say on the matter.

"I would go as far as to say that arousal is a psychological state of mind that is "self induced" rather than "externally induced". Personally I can't ever think of any occasions when "spontaneus erection " has ever happened."

Okay, where's the proof of this? And if you are correct, where's the training/schooling/what-have-you to consciously control this? As I said, the religious school of guilt and shame didn't work. I have absolutely no conscious control over captain winkie that i am aware of. So I'm curious. It wasn't a subject that we were even allowed to discuss as children. In my society it's a subject that's taboo to talk abotu as adults.

Some people - most notably powerful ladies within the feminist movement - demand that we "control ourselves", and insist that all men can do it as a simple act of will requiring next to no effort. I've never in my life been able to exert any concious control over captain winkie, despite being in many situations where I wish I could.

So, hey, if you know of the magic solution, please do share. It would be useful, if I am to live in a society where apparently I am supposed to be able to exert mental control over my biology that I learn how.

Unless, of course, it's all opinion, and not backed by and empirical evidence or actual science.

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Trevor_Pott
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I would pay rather a lot of money to be able to control when I where I experience arousal/get an erection/etc. I'm not talking about Viagra here, but the ability to just flick some sort of mental switch and not be tying up blood by engorging my dong, or having my thoughts race around carnal pleasures.

Or hell, the ability to be "ready to go" at a moment's notice, not just standing at attention but psychologically as well. That can be a stumbling block after a particularly difficult day.

Do other people have this talent/skill/mutation? Am I a freak for not having the ability to do this? Every time I read one of these things where men are expected not to be aroused, or not to look at {member of preferred sex} or not to think of {whatever is a thoughtcrime} I find myself wondering "is that even possible for the average man?"

And if it is, how do I remediate it? Are there schools? Genetic resequencing? What's the solution? A lifetime of religious "guilt and shame" about sex and sexuality didn't work. Surely if this is something enforceable by police then it is something I am expected to have conscious control over, and thus it is a life skill that should be relatively easily able to obtain?

Yes? No? Am I alone in my thinking and concerns here?

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LightSail mission stalled by .CSV log file embiggenment SNAFU

Trevor_Pott
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At it's orbit? Atmospheric drag, most like. With a little bit of solar wind. Even with the sails down, the cubesat still presents a surface to catch photons/protons emitted from the sun.

There's a whole lot of very small stuff up there, but if it hit, say, a piece of debris or a micro-meteorite, chances are the little cubesat would be toast. That basically leaves "interactions with photons" (radiation, solar wind, etc) and "Earth's atmosphere". Which, BTW, goes rather a long way up.

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MIT's robo-cheetah leaps walls in a cyborg hunt for Sarah Connor

Trevor_Pott
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Re: wankers. -- NOT FAIL

"Keynes was also one of those people that manage to actually NEVER be right about anything."

You're so full of shit your eyes are brown. It's supply side economics that is the complete and utter fallacy. Trickle-down-your-pants economics is up there with every chunk of Randian bullshit as some of the most toxic ideas mankind has ever produced.

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'I thought we were pals!' Belgium, Netherlands demand answers from Germany in spy bust-up

Trevor_Pott
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Re: Not a question of being manly enough

Fuck of a lot more worried about the xenophobic sociopaths in charge of the UK than I am the folks running Germany.

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WTF is going on with the zombie NSA-friendly Patriot Act? Let us help

Trevor_Pott
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"Canadian government has authorised their own brand of completely unnecessary surveillance bullshit"

Vote NDP. Full repeal, period.

Trudeau is a traitor for voting for the C-51 abomination and a coward for doing it despite (supposedly) hating the thing. He forced his whole party to vote against their conscience because he feared he would be called "soft on terrorism" during the election. We must not let the fucker get away with that.

As for Harper, he's an utterly corrupt socipath with no semblance of morality. He needs to go. Years ago.

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What scares you most about ‘the cloud’?

Trevor_Pott
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Re: sorry to do this

That company was asking for it your honour, they were provocatively incompetent!

Disgusting.

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Make Adama proud: Connect your Things wisely, cadet

Trevor_Pott
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Re: No wide area?

Mostly. Or they are non-static but remarkably short range. (Think geofencing). Most IoT stuff is ultra low power and very short range.

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Trevor_Pott
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Re: What about good ol' wifi though?

IoT is (mostly) about ultra low power. WiFi gobbles the power. WiFi is also comparatively long range to most other IoT protocols. It's pretty much it's own thing, in it's own category.

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World loses John Nash, the 'Beautiful Mind'

Trevor_Pott
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Re: It should also be pointed out

Schizophrenia != multiple personality disorder. MPD is but one of many possible illnesses along the Schizophrenia spectrum, much like ADHD, Aspergers, major depression and OCD are all on the Autism spectrum.

The first step to overcoming prejudice against individuals with atypical neural presentation is to actually learn something about it.

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Nominet new CEO opens giant can of worms, sticks head in

Trevor_Pott
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Well you certainly don't want sharks in charge of a monopoly, and there are few battles for hippies to fight. So I would say you want neither. You was aspies. Coldly logical, efficient, pragmatic, detached from the emotional malaise of both the board and the hoi polloi.

Not on the side of the domainers, or the bureaucrats or even proper domain holders. Aspies would simply run a registry. The best damned registry they knew how. Taking care of technical and financial issues and ensuring that the entire enterprise was viable in the long term.

Which is why they'll never get elected to the board.

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'The Google execs, the journalists, plus Brit and US spybosses in a cosy mansion confab'

Trevor_Pott
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Re: Gasp! Could This Be For Our Benefit?

Why is there no mention here of the presumed subject of those closed meetings: Muslim and Chinese cyber-warfare infiltration and subversion of our national grids and infrastructures?

Because that emphatically isn't what is being discussed. Without question, what is being discussed is how to control us, the everyday citizens of western nations. Regardless of whether or not those citizens belong to an ethnic, religious and cultural group that has you terrified. And yes, that means they are discussing how to control you Sisyphus. They are not discussing how to keep you safe.

They don't give a rat's ass about keeping you safe, and they never, ever have.

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UK data watchdog: Massive fines won't keep data safe

Trevor_Pott
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Re: Fine is a contract employing someone

Customers haven't had any rights for decades. Why start worrying now?

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Polygraph.com owner pleads guilty to helping others beat lie detector

Trevor_Pott
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Re: They should've arrested the clown who invented the device

Aha, thankee for the in depth response. I knew polygraphs relied on more than just galvanic response - as you said, that's the poly part - but it's been a few years since I've done my research into Scientology and the e-meter specs were a little fuzzy. Cheers!

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Trevor_Pott
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Re: They should've arrested the clown who invented the device

Isn't the e-meter based off the same technology as the polygraph? Galvanic response?

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Trevor_Pott
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Re: So, it has happened. Thinking is now a crime.

Lying under oath in a court of law is a crime. Where's the crime in lying for a job interview, hmm?

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Trevor_Pott
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Re: Bloody replicants getting everywhere

Actually, it does. See, there are warm deserts and cold deserts. Desert just means that precipitation is slim to non-existent. Large parts of Canada's arctic, for example, are deserts. They just aren't the "hot Nevada sun" kind of desert. So which desert matters, as it gives me an idea of what is plausible to see at my feet, and I can then infer what the first thing I'd see might be by using my knowledge of flora and fauna statistical distribution for the various world deserts.

For that matter, why be limited to Terran deserts? Most of our solar system is desert. That's a lot of different things I could see at my feet. There's some interesting geology out there!

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You have the right to be forgotten 41.3 per cent of the time says Google

Trevor_Pott
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Re: Much as I dislike Google...

"What makes you think you have got a right to any information, right or wrong, about anybody, public figure or not?"

The Universal Declaration of Human Rights, Canada's Constitution and Canada's Charter of Rights and Freedoms. For a start, that is...there are quite a few other relevant documents that guarantee me freedom of speech/expression, the right to assemble (physically and digitally) and many others. Abridging those rights can only be done under a very narrow set of carefully defined circumstances.

Mind you, I live in Canada. The UK just gave a majority to sociopaths who appear to have implemented thought crime legislation within, what...a week? How long until they fund the Fingermen?

Now me, I'd be in the streets every day over that. I have been taking action pretty much every day against Canada's Bill C-51 (our snooper's charter that is nearly as bad). The difference is that I am absolutely convinced that our courts will throw Bill C-51 out as soon as it hits them. I am pretty convinced the UK's courts won't do the same there.

Now, what do you support? The ability to speak to truth to power? You seem to support authoritarian control of the populace instead.

By all means, create methods of enforcing exist libel laws. We have been tweaking the balance (some times well, some times not so well) for over a century as our societies have evolved. We have laws about where free speech stops and the rights of someone else begin. There is no reason not to enforce those.

But I absolutely do have the right to speak truth. Not to slander, not to libel, but to tell the truth. Any society - or individual! - who would seem to remove that right for any reason is, to my mind, an enemy of all peoples, everywhere.

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Look out, law abiding folk: UK’s Counter-Extremism Bill slithers into view

Trevor_Pott
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Re: Define 'extremist'.

Keep Bajor for the Bajorans!

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Adjustments will be needed to manage the Macs piling up in your business

Trevor_Pott
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Re: Open question

Last time I checked it worked with the latest Samba. Zentyal SBS does a dang fine job...

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Metadata scope creep sees Border Force ask for access

Trevor_Pott
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Australia: a gigantic desert filled with monsters, run by religious xenophobes and surrounded by water you can't drink.

But it did give the world bearded dragons, so it can't be all bad. ;)

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Nutanix announces beta of Community Edition software

Trevor_Pott
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I've done the remote POC. It's not remotely what you portray it as.

First, gettin gyour own workloads on it is difficult, if not impossible. Three isn't much bandwidth available, so unless you've talked them into the better part of a week, you don't get to look at much. Secondly, the chances you'll have access to an identical piece of hardware that you can load up with alternate setups is basically zero.

So not only are you highly limited in what you can test in a Nutanix RPOC, but you can't compare Nutanix like-for-like against their competition on the same hardware. That's what the community edition does for me, and for many of the others I have talked to who are excited to play with it.

The community edition is Nutanix putting it's money where it's mouth is. They say they're faster, stronger, smarter and better. Now we all get to prove it.

As for your erroneous belief that the tech bloggers and analysts of the virtualization and storage community won't be testing this, you don't know them very well. I happen to know that many of these folks are very excited by the Nutanix community edition, some having just recently build out 4 node clusters just so that they could test it, and other hyperconverged solutions as well.

Believe it or not, all of us, from Howard to Stuart, to Hans to myself actually spend most of our time learning. We test all sorts of things because without taking the time to do that our voices have no value and we don't get paid.

You are correct about one thing. There *is* a reason that you have to sign up to the trail with a non-free e-mail address. (It doesn't have to be corporate. Many bloggers have their own domain names and those will be accepted, thank you very much.)

Nutanix is very concerned that whomever downloads and installs this is going to have a bad experience. They want to be able to stay in constant contact with the initial Community Edition user community. They want to make sure that any and all questions are answered and that a positive experience is had by all. What's the point of a community edition if you get bad reviews from frustrated users?

To put this another way: Nutanix doesn't need a stack of corporate e-mail addresses to try to sell to. They have that already. They have unlimited piles of this stuff. Every single event their booth is hopping, to the point that it's usually the busiest booth there. The Citrix event that just went down is a great example: there was a Citrix conference but you'd never know anyone but Nutanix showed up.

I'm not saying Nutanix is perfect - far from it - but I know many of the people involved in this project and have followed its development for well over a year now. The point of the community edition is emphatically not simply lead gen. It's community building.

Marketing/sales may try some lead gen shenanigans at various points. In fact, they'd probably be stupid not to. But that won't last forever. It will come in waves.

Nutanix is trying to differentiate themselves from VMware. One of the ways they're doing that is by opening the kimono a little and making it possible for the community - and ultimately SMBs - to take advantage of/explore Nutanix's technology without the ridiculous cost.

Try THAT with VMware! Unless you happen to be pretty damned influential, good luck getting enough licenses for even 4 nodes out of them! VMware still guards VSAN like a pitbull, even from thought influencers, and have a pile of "you can't review us unless we say so" in their EULAs.

Again, Nutanix isn't hugely better, but they are somewhat better. More to the point, I think the Wheaton's Law brigade is winning internally...at least as regards working with the community.

The big question is...why are you, personally, so upset by the community edition? What about it's existence threatens you so much?

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Trevor_Pott
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Re: lead gen campaign

"Really who has 4 bare metal servers in their home lab that meet these requirements?"

I do.

Most vExperts do. Pretty much every EMC elect or Cisco Champion does. A goodly chunk of the MVPs. Not folks that will buy Nutanix, but folks who influence companies who might, or who write about it. It's called "thought leadership". Given that John Troyer has been advising Nutnaix on things community related, I wouldn't dismiss the whole "reaching out to thought leaders" thing. Troyer has a proven track record.

This is exactly the right move for Nutanix as it comes under threat from an increasing number of competitors: build a loyal cult following amongst the sorts of people who themselves have decent followings. Of course, the "thought leaders" aren't easy to influence. Everyone is trying to influence them, so they become pretty immune pretty quick. You can only really convince them if they have whatever it is you are trying to sell to hand, and can bash on it.

Nothing succeeds with thought leaders like getting your gear into their labs.

Like it or not, it's how the game is played. More to the point, Nutanix has been building this strategy for some time, after having talked to the best of the best at influencing those who influence the rest. The community edition isn't for the hoi polloi. Hell, it's barely aimed at me, and I have been spending rather a lot of time and money putting together a lab.

It's aimed at the Howard Marks and Steven Fosketts of the world. The Stuart Minimans and the Hans de Leneers. Big names with 10x the influence someone like me has. VCDXes, high participating enterprise admins and top 50 bloggers.

The rest who want to play with the toys will be supported. They will be tolerated, but they are not the key target. Welcome to IT. I hope you enjoy your stay, but it's a hell of a lot more fun if you just let your grip on sanity go and start thinking about social dynamics like M.C. Escher thinks about architecture.

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Microsoft's run Azure on Nano server since late 2013

Trevor_Pott
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You're not to talk about the elephant in the room. It gives fanpersons sads.

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Scale Computing: Not for enterprise, but that's all part of the plan

Trevor_Pott
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Re: Hmm, doesn't qemu-img work for converting your images to QCOW2 format?

Nothing in the Scale UI to use it, and I don't happen to have LInux workstations with appropriate oomph or storage set up on the site where I have my production systems. VM migration stuff had to be either part of the HCI solution itself, a bootable ISO, or a Windows-based application.

Hopefully in the future, we'll see Scale integrate migration/conversion software into the UI, as it should be available to the Linux OS running on the HCI nodes themselves.

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Flash banishes the spectre of the unrecoverable data error

Trevor_Pott
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Re: Retconned units of measure piss me off

Suck it up, princess.

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Don't panic as Server 2003 rushes towards end of life

Trevor_Pott
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Re: DFS Changes

Long story short: it was intentional. DFSR was increased in the number of files it can read/write simultaneously, and more besides.

http://blogs.technet.com/b/filecab/archive/2013/07/31/dfs-replication-in-windows-server-2012-r2-revenge-of-the-sync.aspx <-- Server 2012 R2

http://blogs.technet.com/b/filecab/archive/2012/11/12/dfs-replication-improvements-in-windows-server-2012.aspx <-- Server 2012

http://blogs.technet.com/b/filecab/archive/2009/01/19/dfs-replication-what-s-new-in-windows-server-2008-r2.aspx <-- 2008 R2

Each iteration becomes progressively more powerful. It also becomes more and more impossible to replicate the same files on the same (or even 4x better!) hardware, and run other workloads besides.

The new DFSR is far more capable and efficient regarding replicating flies. It just does NOT play nice with its neighbors. In fact, in many situations, even after turning everything down in the registry I haven't been able to get it to play nice. 10M files seems to about do for it. At 50M files it gives me nothing but grief.

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All-Russian 'Elbrus' PCs and servers go on sale

Trevor_Pott
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15 years later, Elbrus finally delivers. Well, I'll be a monkey's uncle.

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Astroboffins eyeball MONSTER GAS HALO hugging Andromeda Galaxy

Trevor_Pott
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We've presumed that these "halos" exist for some time. This is merely observational evidence. It is not the sought after dark matter.

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How NVMe tamed the cowboy world of the flash card

Trevor_Pott
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Re: dirty consumer here

October.

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Weird ARCHAEAN LIFE FORM found at 'Loki's Castle' DEEP beneath Arctic Circle

Trevor_Pott
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Re: You don't know what you are messing with down there.

We'll find out when we see if McConnell gets reelected.

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Pacific nation accidentally does good thing in web crackdown

Trevor_Pott
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Re: Really?

How about spending time looking up what UKIP candidates and supporters say and do? There you see a disconnect between published policy and practice. A dramatic disconnect.

UKIP = ultraconservative xenophobic peckerheads. It's that simple.

And no, they aren't mainstream. Thank Jibbers.

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Hyper-convergence? I believe – just not like this

Trevor_Pott
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Re: Hyper Converged newness vs Big Iron oldness

OoooOOOooooo, Good topic....

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NASA's Messenger craft SMASHES into Mercury: See ya later, alien crater

Trevor_Pott
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Re: Dear engineers,

If my phone 'works as it always did" then clearly the phone network's gotten worse. Damned thing drops calls 10 times a day. Never used to have that problem.

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One bit to rule them all? Forget it – old storage types never die

Trevor_Pott
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Re: 10m files?

What is important, I think, is not "how many files can you manage", but "how many files can be managed with acceptable performance. With traditional file systems (extX, NTFS, etc) this really does drop off dramatically after about 10M files. After that, adding spindles and controller cards doesn't matter. The issue is the file system, it's complexity, it's size, how much of it fits into RAM and other such considerations.

It's the tipping point where "whole system" concerns become far greater than spindle throughput.

So it's worth a right proper "try before you buy" with file systems. Get the wrong one and you could wind up with a filer that's dog slow and no amount of added disks will make it faster.

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Trevor_Pott
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Re: Print Button

http://m.theregister.co.uk/2015/05/01/bits_on_a_disk/

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Trevor_Pott
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Re: 10m files?

I am not talking about the ability to store the files, but rather the approximate point at which file access performance starts to degrade significantly. With NTFS this absolutely is 10M files. With ReFS, you can push that a little higher. ZFS, EXT3 and EXT4 all start to see some pretty big drop offs between 10M and 15M files. NetApp's more recent files (past three years or so) are some of the better setups; I've seen 30M files before the access starts to degrade.

Note: you can put more files on these file systems. That doesn't mean that doing so will allow accessing files on a 100M file-populated system is anywhere near as fast as accessing a file on a 10M file-populated system. Especially if the system stores these files for more than just cold archival.

If these files are accessed even semi-regularly. (Let's say 2M files a day are read or written of 10M) then the system is spending all it's time faffing about with the index. The more files you touch, the more time the system cranks away on the index rather than the data blocks.

Different file systems handle it differently, but the rule of thumb is that you have to start paying very close attention to your file server designs once you surpass 10M files. (Dramatically upping RAM, for example, or considering using a file system that can offload the index to SSD, etc...)

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Trevor_Pott
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Childcatcher

Re: Pointy Haired Boss.

*kzert*

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Take time to get to know the flash you think you love

Trevor_Pott
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Re: Intel 2014 paper is a good read

That is a good read. Thanks for the link!

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We'll buy patents for cash, says Google – just don't feed the trolls

Trevor_Pott
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Is it "in a mobile device"?

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Paranoid about the NSA? The case for dumping cloud's Big 3

Trevor_Pott
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Re: Keep ISP & other services separate

"Changing ISP"

You live in a fairy land.

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Trevor_Pott
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Re: @Vimes

"It might make a useful article, how to chose & set up a router and NAS + few machines so you can VPN in and access your data or desktop with tolerable risk?"

http://www.teamdrive.com/

Problem = solved.

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Trevor_Pott
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"Make NAS visible to outside world".

Um hmm. And do you want to to wager how long it would take me to crack your off-the-shelf NAS with 13 pending updates and 50 known vulns...only 35 of which the vendor has patched?

Hell even I have black vulns for most of the major NASes. DO NOT EXPOSE NASES TO THE INTERNET. EVER. DO NOT DO.

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Trevor_Pott
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If CSIS or CESC dig into my data, they must answer to a judge. Or, if not, then at the very least I cannot be sued in a Canadian court for their misdeeds.

If I am complying with Canadian law and our security services decide to break that law, my clients cannot win in court against me: they have to fight the spooks.

Ah, but if I host my data elsewhere...can I really say that I am obeying Canadian law? The data is not subject only to Canadian law if it's outside Canada. What's more, it may be impossible to know whose laws it is subject to (large cloud providers move data around the globe as part of routine maintenance).

So, unless I have a crackerjack legal team, why take the risk? Keep my data in Canada, let my customers duke privacy concerns out with our government.

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