* Posts by Trevor_Pott

6714 posts • joined 31 May 2010

VW offices, employees' homes raided by German prosecutors

Trevor_Pott
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Re: To be honest...

No question there. It behooves us to limit both as much as we can. Other companies can do this. It isn't an either/or proposition. Either CO2 is reduced or NO2 is reduced. Both can be achieved.

VW chose not to. That's the point here.

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Trevor_Pott
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Re: To be honest...

Carbon Dioxide is fucking poison, you git. How about we put you in a room with a gas mixture that is 72% Nitrogen, 21% oxygen, 5% carbon dioxide, and 2% trace gasses (primarily Xenon) and see how long you survive, hmm?

CO2 is poison. Full stop. That your body can tolerate low levels of poison without dying doesn't make it something you can ignore.

Worse, CO2 isn't the fun kind of poison, like ethanol. At least ethanol gives you happy fun times before the massive headaches, vomiting, nausea and death. CO2 goes straight for the "overwhelming migraines", "inability to focus", "crippling nervous system pain" and then, finally, mercifully, death.

Please don't parade your ignorance of science around in public as something of which you're proud. It's embarrassing enough that you've got the dumb, pride in it's possession is just mind-boggling.

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Pitchforks, torches, and awful quotes – we read what Cisco's CEO said

Trevor_Pott
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Re: Two authors and "I/me" in the article.

Mystery is: wrong item picked from dropdown menu. Sorted, and thankee.

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HP creates laptop for SITH LORDS

Trevor_Pott
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Re: I'd like a Klingon version

I've got a Krenim notebook: damned thing won't stay in temporal sync with the NTP network.

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Mozilla to boot all plugins from Firefox … except Flash

Trevor_Pott
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Goodbye firefox.

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Silicon Valley fights European Court of Justice ruling with small print

Trevor_Pott
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Re: Makes no sense

"Then why did this ECJ decision take over a decade?"

Because Europeans aren't obsessed with doing things fast they're obsessed with doing the right thing.

Americans don't even know what that is any more.

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Trevor_Pott
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Re: Makes no sense

"Those who needed the Safe Harbor rather than any of the other exemptions can no longer do so, but presumably can now sue the Commission for any costs in relocating to Bulgaria or Argentina and losses during the transition that are directly attributable to not correctly implementing a directive. That sounds like a large bill for the Commission, or rather for EU taxpayers."

Only an American would be so unbelievably fucked up that they believe corporations should be allowed to sue governments for the cost of complying with the law. Your mind is fucking disgusting.

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Don't want to fork out for NAND flash? You're not alone. Disk still rules

Trevor_Pott
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Re: Give it time

I have. I depth. SSDs still make no sense outside of Tier 0 and some Tier 1 apps. They make no sense at all below Tier 2. Even at Tier 2, hybrid is the way to go.

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US tries one last time to sway EU court on data-slurping deal

Trevor_Pott
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Re: India

Better Marx than Rand. And better what Adam Smith actually wrote, in his totality than what Americans think he wrote, by only paying attention to one part of one book. And better proper regulated social democracy than the lot of 'em.

Oh, and there is, at any point in time, a fixed number of jobs available. That may change from moment to moment, but there are not going to be more jobs available than are required to get things done. If you aren't paying locals to do those jobs, you're just shipping money out of the country.

Ultimately, what matters is the net flow of money into the country. And by net flow, I don't mean "squirreled away into the bank accounts of the ultra rich". I consider that functionally out of circulation, and trickle-down-your-pants economics is a fucking farce. The ultra rich don't really reinvest all that much, especially lately. They just camp on the damned money and it is thus functionally out of the economy.

What is the net money available for use by the bottom 95% of the country? Is that increasing year on year, decreasing, or staying more or less the same? Adjust for inflation and divvy up per capita and we can start to have a real conversation about the economy.

Next, we can have a conversation about how globalization depresses wages in first world nations, but how it has led to the spread of laws and regulations that emphatically prohibit the hoi polloi from benefiting from globalization through the legalization of the "grey market". Wages go down, but the price of goods under copyright doesn't. Wages go down but the cost of pharmaceuticals doesn't. So on and so forth.

These are good conversations to have. Ones about the net effect of all this Randian bullshit. That net effect, by the way? Not good.

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Hand-cranked ‘DDoS’ floors Thai government website amid protests

Trevor_Pott
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Re: The Land of S̶m̶i̶l̶e̶s̶ Kim Jong-Un Jr.

Assad is responsible for over 95% of deaths in Syria during this war. The rebels about 4%. ISIS about 1%. They are not the threat western media makes them out to be, and they are NOTHING compared to the monster that is Assad.

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Trevor_Pott
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Re: The Land of S̶m̶i̶l̶e̶s̶ Kim Jong-Un Jr.

Sometimes killing people is necessary. You may not like it, but that's the reality of the world.

Take Assad in Syria, for example. Him, you kill. No hesitation. There are plenty of others. People who aren't capable of reason. People who can't talk things out; whose drive for power or sheer sociopathic inhumanity will never let them be talked down.

You may not like it, but I hope you're grown up enough to recognise the truth of it.

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Want cheaper AT&T gigabit service? Move to a Google Fiber city

Trevor_Pott
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Re: Goes without saying...

"How many of us would work as hard, facing no pressure, as we would facing it?"

What an American work ethic. Goddamn.

Many of us work with hard because we take professional pride in our work. As has been proven time and again, "working hard" and "being well remunerated" have fuck all to do with one another. So whether or not you work hard shouldn't depend on how likely or not you are to be replaced: it should be a point of professional pride. Always do the best you possibly can.

Now, that doesn't mean you don't go looking for a better job every now and again, but it does mean you don't slack off just because you think you can get away with doing so. Or, you know, so grownups behave in most places I've been.

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KARMA POLICE: GCHQ spooks spied on every web user ever

Trevor_Pott
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"Well unless you are a crim, what have you got to hide?"

Jean Charles de Menezes had nothing to hide and they fucking murdered him for it.

What about Alan Turing? He shouldn't have had to hide what he did have to hide and that ended pretty damned badly too.

We're not so different today. Are you interested in being next?

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'Self-deleting' Mexican ATM malware let sneaky miscreants slurp cash

Trevor_Pott
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Re: What if these incredibly creative criminals

Are you kidding? Worstall would never advocate something that actually benefited the people instead of the 1%. He would want anyone who did anything that ever threatened the utter dominance of the 1% melted in public, all while claiming that it was "for the greater good". Then he'd demand deregulation so that the 1% could stimulate the economy by paying us all less all through the magic of "the invisible hand".

Robbing the rich in order to buy shiny shiny thus actually enriching the majority is essentially Worstall's antiparticle.

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How can we manage this internet thing? The Euro gov needs YOU

Trevor_Pott
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Re: Geo-blocking

Bullshit. It's about time globalization started benefiting the people instead of only corporations.

There are no good reasons for charging different rates for something based on where someone resides. Period.

There may be good reasons for not offering services at all based on geographic location. The only two good reasons I can think of for not offering services based on location are:

1) "It is a government service that, by definition, is only available to residents of a given location (as opposed to those services which are available to citizens, and thus should be accessible from anywhere).

2) "Selling this product or service is illegal in the target location". This can include conforming with export laws as well as conforming with local sale laws.

"I want to make more money" is absolutely not a good reason for geo-blocking. If you consider that to be a valid reason, I hope you evaporate with expediency.

Either globalization levels the playing field for consumers as well as producers or we should not have it. Period.

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SimpliVity saddles up the lawyers, sues rival Springpath

Trevor_Pott
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I know next to nothing about the lawsuit. SimpliVity is very purposefully not saying much about it: their lawyers have rightly told them not to and I have not asked.

What I do know is rather a great deal about their storage system. It is not a "hashed key storage system". Or, to be more precise, describing Simplivity's storage as a "hashed key storage system" is a bit like describing a car as "a door handle with some accessories". It is rather more involved that your typical NoSQL setup (which is basically what a hashed key storage system would be).

When I think "hashed key storage system" I think things like what WinFS was supposed to be: essentially, a database, but with a rich index. SimpliVity's underlying storage is to a database as a database including fully modern HA, DR and incremental forever backups are to a standard paper filing cabinet.

I really don't want to get in to attempting to describe the technical bits here in the comments. There exist no pithy buzzwords that actually capture what SimpliVity is doing. There are no simple hand waves to easily facilitate smirks of dismissal. To explain SimpliVity I really need to marry graphics to words. And I'm doing so. It has been my major project for the past week and will be for this next week.

What SimpliVity is doing with storage is honestly quite clever. It's also tricky enough to really get at first. Most people are tempted to dismiss it as something they already know because that makes it simple and it prevents them from having to admit that there might be something that they don't already know.

Storage experts who are motivated to actually learn - and learn in detail - usually need an hour or so to fully grasp what's going on. Once they do there is quite literally an "aha!" moment where you can see (or hear) the "click" of understanding. This is followed by silence...then usually an "oh shit", as you realize that what SimpliVity has in their storage platform is a couple orders of magnitude more awesome than the simple hyperconvergence they're using it for.

And it absolutely, 100% is worth patent protection (assuming SimpliVity's nerds came up with it first). And this is me saying this. I am Andrew Orlowski's antiparticle. I'm usually the guy crapping all over intellectual property overreach.

I had my "aha" moment about a month ago. I knew more about SimpliVity storage than most, but I got my hour with the brain trust and that really let me grok what's what. I then had the honour of being included in a conference call with a number of storage industry luminaries as they went through the same process and each of them had that very same "aha" moment followed by a "wow".

These are the cynical fucks who pend their lives tearing storage companies to shreds. I didn't exactly think anything wowed them anymore.

So, yeah...there's a little bit more to it than "hashed key storage system". In fact, your broad categorization attempt is exactly why I want to take the time to explain it properly.

We're all so bitter and jaded. So full of ourselves and ready to inflate our sense of self worth by stomping on others. We've become a society of people who define ourselves not by what (or whom) we like...but by what (or whom) we hate.

But here is something cool. It's proper nerdy tech. It's the sort of thing that made me like computers, oh so very long ago. Before the help desking and the printers and the cloudy bullshit and Microsoft Licensing ruined everything.

Sitting in that room at VMworld, scribbling diagrams on a paper easel and finally getting what I can only describe - in the olden sense of the word - as a truly legendary hack...all the bullshit just melted away. The past 20 years of my life, all the stress, all the worry, all the every day frustration and pain...it just vanished.

I was a kid again, and I was truly marveling at the possibility of a technology.

I haven't felt that way since I was first shown Mosaic, and I truly understood what the World Wide Web would mean.

Now: maybe it's true that I'm just a naive so-and-so who doesn't know enough about the world. I usually think that getting dozens briefings on virtually every new technology in every field on the planet has rendered me jaded. Maybe I'm wrong. Maybe I still have rose coloured glasses.

But this particular storage tech is one that made me feel like me again...even if just for a moment. So for that reason alone, it's worth the time to do pretty pictures and putting real effort into doing it justice.

Maybe - just maybe - I'll convince one other person not to cheaply categorize and dismiss SimpliVity's technology, but instead to delve deep and reach the "aha" moment of their own. If I can "pass it along" to just one person, I'll feel like I've done my job. :)

Long winded, I know. I'm avoiding sleeping. Alas, my rant is done and it off to the facepillow for me...

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Trevor_Pott
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Um....no. I will explain in more detail soonish. Working on the deep dive.

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Only paying for Microsoft software that you use? It's coming

Trevor_Pott
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Re: Perhaps MicroSoft are looking at this the wrong way 'round...

Sorry, my original comment was direct at Sandtitz.

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Trevor_Pott
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Re: Perhaps MicroSoft are looking at this the wrong way 'round...

K: Are you American or a Briton by chance? The blatant disregard for privacy strikes me as being something that is fairly common there, and baffling just about everywhere else.

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Trevor_Pott
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Re: @Pascall Monett - This transitional period is fascinating

Why do I need Active Directory if I all my apps are tied together with OAuth? AD is a solution to a specific problem, but no longer the only one.

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Are Seagate and NetApp in denial or in de hot seat?

Trevor_Pott
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"NetApp continues to be dismissive of the long-term competitive threat of emerging storage vendors"

<Yoda>That is why you fail</Yoda>

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Synology systematically soups up filer software

Trevor_Pott
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Re: Xpenology

Except for the part where the DRBD-based replication is A) a pain in the ASCII to set up and B) not terribly reliable. It's way - way - better than it was, but still nowhere near as reliable as HCI.

Now, if Synology would drop DRBD and switch to LizardFS we could talk. They'd have a reliable scale out storage infrastructure underneath and we could then use the containerized/KVMed DSM on top.

The DSM isn't bad. In fact, I love the DSM. The problem is that as soon as you want HA or the ability to scale beyond one node's worth of storage Synology just isn't good enough.

Maybe in Synology 7 they'll adopt LizardFS. Of course, by then, open sourced HCI solutions like NodeWeaver will have incorporated not only Docker support, but integrated SMB/NFS file support so we won't NEED Synology anymore...

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US librarians defy cops, Feds – and switch on their Tor exit node

Trevor_Pott
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Re: Not a problem

So post your real name, Anonymous Coward. You deserve to go to jail for the crimes committed by those who manufactured your comptroller. Child labour, industrial espionage...all of it! You are sanctioning it explicitly through your purchase of the relevant equipment. By your own logic you are to be held accountable for the crimes of those others, and will be punished according to the most stringent regulations available on the planet for those crimes.

Maybe we should just line you up against a wall and have you shot.

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Let's Encrypt certificate authority signs first cert

Trevor_Pott
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Re: Yes! Get on with it ElReg.

I use lots of technology compatible with IPv6. I just use NAT66 (but not NAPT66) to do 1:1 address mapping to allow me to A) have an internal address space that isn't visible to the public and B) handle readdressing on networks that can't afford the outrageous costs of BGP connectivity. Oh, and I don't care if that breaks $application (not that I have found any it has, yet).

Not accepting the shit shoveled my way by the ivory tower types isn't quite the same as not embracing the future. It's anticipating potential problems and architecting around them.

Hey, isn't that what you lot are supposed to be getting paid for too?

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DSSD hires ex-Violin player as hardware engineering veep

Trevor_Pott
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Re: Good luck wit dat

Au contraire: proprietary SSD formats are just the perfect thing to create lock in on the storage medium and keep margins at some ridiculous amount above street value.

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Swooning MEPs go all Directioner over Edward Snowden

Trevor_Pott
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Re: With any luck...

And I hope sociopathic Anonymous Cowards like you get cholera and shit yourselves to death.

Snowden was at least a net benefit to humanity, mate. You're not.

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The remote control from HELL: Driverless cars slam on brakes for LASER POINTER

Trevor_Pott
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Re: You are being too harsh

An excellent point, Mr. Hand. What does happen when a Google self-driving car meets another Google self-driving car? Do they both come to a halt in a confusion of LIDAR reflections? Please say it isn't so?

Having seen multiple of them driving side by each, they seem perfectly fine. They are able to approach from multiple angles, make the correct decisions about right of way, and proceed through intersections to go about their day.

I think that's been solved aged ago, mate.

FYI: There are lots of cars out there with LIDAR that ship in volume. They also see eachother on a daily basis. They have not freaked out and stopped working thus far. Similarly, Google cars encounter LIDAR-equiped cars from other manufacturers on a regular basis (especially in Mountain View, I assure you!) and they don't have any problems interacting.

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Trevor_Pott
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Re: Not so different from a conventional car then

The bad news is that a busload of orphans carrying one-eyed puppies is directly behind it.

But since youa re presumably of the "humans are superior" camp (teh camp of the insane, btw,) you wouldn't be following too close and would easily have enough reaction time to stop in response to the car in front of you.

...wouldn't you? I mean, you do follows the laws regarding road saftey...don't you?

If not, why is it the fault of an autonomous car doing the safe thing that you are unable to maintain focus on your one job of driving and drive within the rules?

...or are you trying to put human fallibility and inability to actually pay attention, follow the rules and drive in a safe fashion off onto the robots? A human driver in front of you might do something strange that you don't predict at any moment. As a driver it is your job to be ready for that - for anything really - at any time.

If you can't do that, why the merry fuck are you behind the wheel?

Sounds to me like perhaps you should be replaced.

Maybe by robots.

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Trevor_Pott
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Re: Not so different from a conventional car then

Humans adapt. Hardware not so much, nor so quickly.

You are hardware. Just of lesser construction.

Fleshbags are failure.

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DSSD says Violin's right: SSD format is WRONG for flash memory

Trevor_Pott
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Re: Proprietary flash modules

Bullshit fantasy drivel.

Proprietary players will subsidize loss leaders to drive competitors out of the market. Once they have a hold on the juiciest segment of the market they feel they are likely to get, they'll turn the knobs and squeeze. Lock-in will mean that customers can't go anywhere and proprietary components (likely combined with the storage equivalent of HP chipping their ink cartridges) will mean that the costs per GB of proprietary flash will be astronomical compared to standardized flash.

Which is the exactly same shit that those very same storage vendors pulled with spinning disks. Which lead to the current storage wars and the explosion of startups offering new ways to do storage and eating into the margins (and market share) of the spinning-rust titans.

Of course, because the dominant players have already been through this before, they will be a lot more proactive about killing off potential competitors than they were in the past. (This is already beginning to be seen.) The margins on disk-based arrays have plummeted, but there is no way that the big fat storage daddies are going to let this happen to flash.

Nosiree.

That blinkered, Americanized - almost Randian - view of economics which relies on faith and carefully ignoring abuse of market dominance is a lie. As big a lie as "trickle down economics", which is another in the pack of scurrilous economics bullshit fed to the mentally incompetent to keep them pliant.

No. Proprietary flash modules give proven market dominance abusers a means to abuse their dominant position in the market. And the instant that they've managed to leverage their dominant position in the disk array market to achieve a dominant position in the flash array market, they'll start to squeeze.

That's the Oracle school of economics, and it's fucked right the hell up. It's also the only playbook that tech megacorporations work from.

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Trevor_Pott
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Proprietary flash modules

Just think about how much over market price they can now charge for storage! It'll make the disk array days looks tame.

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IDC says server-based storage sales are soaring – and Dell's pwning the market

Trevor_Pott
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Re: SDS

Yes.

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Microsoft's 'successful' Nokia slurp kills off Lumia photo apps

Trevor_Pott
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After "plays for sure", it seems to me everyone should have seen this - and all the future server shutdowns - coming. The cloud is not forever. It's just someone else's computer. A computer they will eventually turn off.

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HP learns to walk and chew virtual gum at the same time

Trevor_Pott
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VMworld PSA:

Don't eat the chicken. Seriously. Do not eat the chicken.

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Tintri T850: Storage array demonstrates stiff upper lip under pressure

Trevor_Pott
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Talk to @exchangegoddess about using these things. You put them into play and the next time you actually have to look at the UI it's like 6 months later, and then only because you want to fine tune some QoS tweak. Pretty much an "out of sight, out of mind" product.

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Trevor_Pott
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Re: just wondering

Not on purpose, but there was a large electrical storm that knocked out power. It seemed to handle things okay. No bizarre corruption that I could detect.

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Trevor_Pott
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Re: Direct quetion :

What they officially support and what works are two totally different things. Official support is pretty limited and restricted to VM workloads only. What actually works is more or less what you'd expect from a compliant NFS datastore.

That said, you should always stick with what's officially supported. If only for CYA in case of emergency.

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Trevor_Pott
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Re: Direct quetion :

I did. It didn't know what the VMs were inside it's UI, but otherwise allowed me to do what I need. It shouldn't be hard to add the more complete capability, but for the moment, it just treats KVM VMs the same as it does, for example, an .ISO file loaded up via NFS.

NFS is NFS is NFS, really. Everything else is the unit going "oh, hey, I know what that file is, let's present it in a friendly way".

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VMware eyes hyperconverged model for private clouds

Trevor_Pott
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There are more Cumulus switch vendors than Quanta and Dell. I have a Supermicro Cumulus switch on my bench, for example. I wonder if this will integrate with those units?

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Swiss watch: Cuckoo-clock cops threaten Win 10 whup-ass can pop

Trevor_Pott
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Re: @jason 7

I fight for what's right, not what's convenient.

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Trevor_Pott
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Re: @jason 7

That would be the "cloud first" raining down upon you, mate.

Cloud first, mobile first.

Customers, partners, developers and staff last.

Where would you like your privacy renditioned to today?

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VMware appoints development chief as new CTO

Trevor_Pott
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Re: Does this mean...

Spoken like someone who has never had to actually use the soul-draining horror that is System Center. System Center anything really. It's all crap. Some more crap than others, but goddamn is it a bucket of terrible crap.

Microsoft: forget the war on drugs, there's the war on usability to fight!

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VMware quietly sneaks out NSX 6.2 update and/or bug-blast

Trevor_Pott
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Re: expect nothing

scalability, HA, failover, 3rd-party plug-in integration

Every major hypervisor has these. has had these for ages.

The things VMware has that other hypervisors don't (like FT, wan vMotion, etc) are still pretty niche. There are reasons why VMware is still dominant. Basic functionality isn't one of them.

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Coho Data containering in the dock – now with added Google, Splunk

Trevor_Pott
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I've had a chance to give Coho data a look

Coho's offering is really quite interesting. A little bit niche, but if your needs fall into that niche I they seem to do a fine job there.

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Manhattan-sized iceberg splits from glacier – and spotted FROM SPACE

Trevor_Pott
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Re: Just where do ...

But who will stand against the Borg then?

Are you kidding me? I'm (mostly) a transhumanist. Cut my brain out and implant it in a 40 foot tall spider robot body, please and thank you. Fuck this weak and pathetic flesh bag. It's stupid and I hate it.

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Trevor_Pott
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Re: Just where do ...

I get the impression that you feel your species is essentially lacking and ought be curtailed.

No...I think that we're a superpredator that has largely overwhelmed the ecological niche it evolved to fill. We've compensated with technology for a while, but now we're at the point where that technology is making us largely redundant. That's opening us up for a self-imposed Matthusean catastrophe wherein socially and culturally we have no room for the "extra" people who are no longer needed to provide cheap labour for the rich and powerful.

I am not arguing ethics about this. I am arguing pragmatism. Those in power aren't going to suddenly find a use for the milled masses. They aren't going to invest in training those milled masses, and the cost of training is such that you need to be gainfully employed just to obtain it today anyways.

The skills floor is skyrocketing and the number of skilled workers required dropping. Meanwhile, we just can't stop having fucking babies. We're overpopulating. Not because of what we theoretically could sustain, but because of what we pragmatically and realistically will choose to sustain, based on 10,000 years of recorded human history.

Maybe we are guilty of a crime? Do we have Original Sin upon our heads?

No...that's absurd. That's for religious fuzzy wuzzies or really extreme eco-freaks. That said, we are functionally immune to anything excepting gross evolutionary pressures. if you're born with a handful of really awful conditions you're probably not going to reproduce. Anyone else, however, can. You don't even need to find a long-term mate these days. It can be done as a straight up financial transaction, if you choose.

The end result is that a bunch of fairly bad genes are being passed on. Me, for example. I have a bit of genetic fuckery that means I cannot feel thirst. Instead, I feel an overwhelming (and sometimes unstoppable) craving for carbohydrates. Carbs tend to make me dehydrated, which causes a nasty cycle.

I can, for example, be in the middle of making pasta, telling myself (out loud or in my head) over and over "I shouldn't make pasta, I don't need pasta, I'm fat enough, thanks, I need water, water will solve this" and be entirely unable to use my conscious mind to override my body's actions.

I am also somnambulent. Video exists of me, dead asleep, getting up and just eating bread. Because my body can't tell it needs water.

That's not okay. That's a really bad bit of genetics. There are some others, but you know what, I'm doing humanity a favour by not passing that shit on.

Now, I know, some genetics that appear to be negative can convey benefits. For example, immunity to a plague we haven't encountered yet. That said, our technology is marching on such that the dubious potential genetic benefits of some generally pretty awful genetic traits are less and less relevant.

While I don't look at the "ethics" of how we are inevitably going to treat our "surplus" poor and undereducated, I do think that there is some ethics to examining the genetic inheritance that we might personally pass on to the next generation.

"The people" have fuck all power in the real world to affect how the rich and powerful treat the "surplus" population. Whatever your ethical views (and frankly, I'm not Randian at all in my own personal ethics,) moralizing about how we will treat those people is pointless. They will suffer by the billions, at best eeking out marginal lives living on handouts.

Yes, I know, the optimistic (and, IMNSHO, crazy) believe in the fairy tale that robots and technological advancements will be a "tide that lifts all boats". I do not. There isn't a lot of evidence for that. As our ability to produce increases so does the concentration of wealth.

We don't look set to actually do anything about inequality beyond providing the means for the poorest to eek out those marginal, hand-out lives, and we are decreasing the opportunity for individual self advancement in our societies.

So regardless of one's ethical or moral beliefs I think the pragmatic approach to dealing with human nature is to stop and ultimately reverse the total human population growth. I am not advocating the extinction of humanity, but its reduction over time to levels that allow human nature to allow everyone to leave reasonably comfortably. This has nothing to do with what's possible. it has everything to do with what is.

From an ethical standpoint I think an additional reason to reduce our population is simply that some of what we are - our genetics - needs to end. Normally evolution would take care of this for us, but we've largely cut that out of the equation. If humanity is going to use artificial means to bypass evolution we need to use artificial means to make rational choices about genetic propagation.

That isn't a call for eugenics. It's a call for personal responsibility regarding genetic propagation. We have the technology to choose whether or not we reproduce. Ethically, morally, I feel that means we have a duty to educate ourselves about the consequences of reproduction and make rational choices about whether or not we should reproduce.

Just because our ancestors uses baby spam to overwhelm the planet doesn't mean we should. Humans need to be managed sustainably. Just like any other animal species on the planet.

We just happen to be the only species capable of doing that management consciously. There is nothing ethically or morally wrong with doing so. In fact, in my opinion, doing so is our duty as sentient beings.

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Trevor_Pott
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Re: Just where do ...

I have a stadium's worth of ancestors, every one of which did not have your attitude

A pity. Look at the results.

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Trevor_Pott
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Re: Just where do ...

And? So what? Human nature means that even if we produce enough food for 10 Billion people we don't and won't redistribute it to those who need it.

Besides, life is about more than mere survival. Being kept alive with no purpose, no hope, no chance of ever being more than another mouth to feed is not being alive. There's an essential piece of humanity to being needed, being wanted. That's something that our radically surplus population are having an increasingly hard time with today; in our fully automated future there is even less room for them.

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Trevor_Pott
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Re: Just where do ...

What's the point of yet more children or grandchildren? Especially from poor regions? It's somehow a good thing to bring yet more people into the world that we can't feed and who won't have jobs because everyone has been replaced by a shell script or a robot?

If the only hope for that child is to be labour that's just slightly less expensive than that provided by a robot you've consigned that person to a miserable existence. Better to have fewer offspring who can be properly cared for. Or none at all. What makes your genes worth passing on, hmm?

(For the record, I've opted out of procreation in part because my genes are terrible but mostly because there are too damned meany people already.)

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Seventh bigshot flings self out of EMC Federation window

Trevor_Pott
Gold badge

Re: Waiting...

Maybe they're busy getting their marketing department ready for the big VMworld push? It's about that time of year.

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