* Posts by Trevor_Pott

6176 posts • joined 31 May 2010

Cops turn Download Festival into an ORWELLIAN SPY PARADISE

Trevor_Pott
Gold badge

nope.gif

13
0

Scientists love MacBooks (true) – but what about you?

Trevor_Pott
Gold badge

Am I going crazy, or wasn't there a third party USB driver for NT? I thought I remembered USB devices on an NT workstation once...but it was so long ago it's all hazy.

4
0
Trevor_Pott
Gold badge

Re: My Tuppence Worth

The problem with Surface Pros is that they are sold by Microsoft, and Microsoft can't be trusted with anything, ever. They not only don't have our best interests in mind, they aren't even trying very hard to hide it any more.

Cloud first, mobile first. Staff, partners, developers and customers last.

6
5
Trevor_Pott
Gold badge

"don't get confused about who's adding the real value to the project"

I'm not. It's the systems administrators that add real support. Systems administrators build layer after layer of defenses and kludges, patches and scripting to handle the shitty, code cranked out by dimwitted, asinine "programmers" who can't look beyond their own blinkered arrogance long enough to perform even the most basic unit testing. Developers are a goddamned menace.

In a world where this shit parade that is modern applications run critical systems upon which lives depend it is systems administrators that keep us all actually alive. If it were up to the developers, we'd all have died a dozen times over as soon as some unexpected exception occurred and blew up the whole goddamned contraption.

It's not the engineers who design the plane that make it fly. It's the maintenance crew that make sure the damned thing works - and who solve problems the engineers never anticipated - that keep her in the air.

Never, ever trust developers. especially when lives matter. They'll just assume that the entire goddamned world is exactly like their lab, and then people die.

9
2
Trevor_Pott
Gold badge

"that "5 sigma" discovery involved a massively complex system of computer programmes, and you they are not considered as computer savvy?"

Not really, no. Developers typically know fuck all about hardware and even less about systems administration. Scientists even less than your average developer. The ability to code is emphatically not the ability to understand thing one about the issues that a systems administrator needs to worry about. Off the top of my head:

1) Hardware, operating system and applciation lifecycle management

2) Procurement, logistics and supply chain management

3) Licensing, support and regulatory/legal compliance

4) Enterprise operating system management

5) Application distribution and management

6) Back end systems integration

7) Public key infrastructure, key distribution and management

8) Data protection

9) Endpoint threat detection, mitigation and response

10) Endpoint monitoring and remote assistance

Just because you can write some C/C++/Fotran/Python/whatever that tells a controller somewhere to activate an electromagnet, or start collecting information from a sensor doesn't mean you have the first idea what managing endpoints is like.

To use a crude analogy, you're saying that the cast and crew of the latest blockbuster film know everything there is to know about operating, managing and maintaining a modern multi-megaplex cinema - from ticketing to crowd control to video distribution and display to building maintenance and utilities - because they made a film. Making the greatest film in the world doesn't mean you know a damned thing about getting in front of the eyes of the populace. By the same token, even building the goddamned large hadron collider doesn't mean you know thing one about endpoint management.

For that matter, point me to who knows how to build a large hadron collider, hmm? Just the one person who knows how to built every instrument, every component, every cooling system. One person who managed to fit all that knowledge inside their brain. There is no such person.

So I ask you, if your job is to design and operate something so complex that no one person can know everything there is to know about, why - I ask you, why - would you fill your mind with "needless trivia" like endpoint management? It's a thing that someone else does. Like janitorial, or security.

9
1

Google's super-AI boffin, Bilderberg nobs, and a secret Austrian confab

Trevor_Pott
Gold badge

"In fact, it's more of a chance for world leaders in politics, business, and technology to exchange ideas frankly without having to hold back for fear of being quoted. "

Why should they be allowed this luxury? We're not.

If we must give up our civil liberties then our leaders should be under the microscope of absolute and unremitting transparency 24 hours a day 7 days a week. No secrets for us should absolutely mean no secrets for them.

18
0

VMware unleashes Linux on the (virtual) desktop

Trevor_Pott
Gold badge

Re: Client desktop - THANK YOU, VMWARE.

Why would I push out anything? It's supported in Horizon View! Update master image and recompose!

0
0
Trevor_Pott
Gold badge

Re: THANK YOU, VMWARE.

Less about the distro than the desktop. Cinnamon or Mate, with a strong leaning towards Mate. Mint is obvious as a choice, but we're leaning towards script-deployed slack, mostly because it lets us avoid systemd.

2
0
Trevor_Pott
Gold badge

Re: Sigh...

"And when the task is producing a Word document or an Excel spreadsheet or a PowerPoint presentation you're back to Windows."

No, you're not.

"And no, other office suites don't compare and yes, the requirement is for Word, Excel or PowerPoint"

Even if that were true - and you'd have to be a blinkered, half-witted, lobotomised idiot to honestly believe it - you can use the web versions of Office 365 to get your brand tribalism on. They work just fine under Linux.

"Linux on the enterprise desktop is just a non-starter for the vast majority of use cases and will continue to be so for a long time to come, unless it is forced down the throat of users by politicians (see Munich)."

Wrong. It's all about the applications. Nothing more. And yes, more and more people are willing to work with "equivalent' applications. Smartphones have actually made people more willing to try new things on computers.

"The technical superiority of any specific platform has very little to do with adoption and always has, however much techies may hate that fact."

You're right. Cost is the driving factor. Your personal blinkered predjudices have fuck all to do with anything.

16
2
Trevor_Pott
Gold badge

Re: Has nobody told them X11 is a Network Protocol?

X11 is shit, wrapped in shit, covered in shit, turned into a shit burrito, eaten by a shit monster, shit out, wrapped in more whit, covered in more shit and turned into a second shit burrito.

Especially over WAN.

2
4
Trevor_Pott
Gold badge

Re: VMware should keep their f$%@##ng mouth shout about Linux

No, I used the web UI to manage vCenter. I use the VCSA. The VCSA is a vCenter appliance that comes loaded on Linux. I've been using VCSAs since VMware 5.1. They work fine. I don't know why you need Windows at all to run vCenter.

And yes, the VSCAs work just fine for very large deployments.

12
0
Trevor_Pott
Gold badge

Re: Does VMware still offer that abomination

The VSCA has all the bits to PXE boot/install things and takes like two tickboxes to set up. What the fnord are you on about mate? Like the gerdesj said: no Windows, .net or anything like that in sight.

6
0
Trevor_Pott
Gold badge

Re: VMware should keep their f$%@##ng mouth shout about Linux

Um. I seem to be managing my cluster from CentOS using the WebUI. What's your beef?

10
0
Trevor_Pott
Gold badge

THANK YOU, VMWARE.

I will be purchasing a lot of Horizon 6 now. I have been waiting for this to GA for some time. PCOIP is all that I was waiting on to bring Linux to thousands of seats. Native Linux remote protocols suck out loud.

9
0

Config file wipe blunder caused deadly Airbus A400M crash – claim

Trevor_Pott
Gold badge

Re: Lack of imagination when thinking up things that can go wrong.

TSA agents don't. Sympathy, empathy, emotion...it's drilled out of them. Cored out with a mellonballer and burnt in front of the new droid. They exist to make everyone's life as miserable as humanly possible. They exist to presume guilt. They exist to cause suffering.

TSA agents aren't people. They may once have been, but by the time they don that uniform, they're something else entirely. Something...darker. An evil that festers and ferments and infects our society from the edges in. A cold self-loathing and self-doubt that destroys not only the individuals, but the spirit of entire nations.

TSA agents are not merely soulless automatons, their entire purpose is to turn all of us into obedient soulless automatons. And the only tools they are permitted to use are fear, suspicion and intimidation. Not enough that they are suspicious, spiteful, petty, arrogant, emotionless and inhuman, their actual job is to make us turn against eachother as quickly and efficiently as possible. To make us obedient to them, but hostile towards one another, even our own family.

TSA agents do not have feelings. They have functions. And I pity them for it. Some might even have been good people, once. I do hope that maybe, when their sentence is served, they can reclaim some fraction of that lost humanity. Unfortunately, for every one that leaves there are a dozen waiting to take their place.

25
1
Trevor_Pott
Gold badge

Re: Lack of imagination when thinking up things that can go wrong.

"Or the unthanked people doing airport security."

"People"? Have you met them? "People" is not a descriptor I'd use.

"Soulless, emotionless, remorseless, unfeeling, unthinking drones" maybe. But that's being very, very polite about it.

16
3

Nobel bro-ffin: 'Girls in the lab fall in love with me ... then start crying'

Trevor_Pott
Gold badge

Re: What about XYZZY people?

They were eaten by grues.

4
0
Trevor_Pott
Gold badge

Re: what does 'the same gender' mean?

Off the top of my head: human *bilogical* genders, as dictated by genetics and hormone levels:

X

XX

XX (Androgenic, non-PCOS)

XX (Androgenic, PCOS origin)

XY

XXX

XXY (Klinefelter)

XXY (Non-Klinefelter, Male identity)

XXY (Non-Klinefelter, Female identity)

XXY (Non-Klinefelter, Binary identity)

XXXY

XXYY

XXXXY

XYY

In addition, humans can be born as chimeras (sometimes called "mosaic individuals") containing cells that consist of two or more combinations of the above. (Though there had yet to be a documented case of a human chimera with more than two origin cells.) Chimeras are where two distinct zygotes fuse into a single being. Instead of having the DNA of only one individual, some % of the cells (usually half) are from one individual and some % of the cells (usually half) are from another.

This can lead to human chimeras where, for example, half the individual's cells are XX and half are XY. More than that; it's not just the sex chromosomes that are different, the entire DNA is different, as different as they would be between brother and sister. That is because, in effect, the chimera(XX, XY) is their own brother and sister.

All of this is before we get into epigenetic issues that can cause hormonal changes in individuals from a young age which absolutely can and do alter gender identity at a very fundamental level during or before puberty.

Human "sexes" are not binary. We have way the hell more than just two biological sexes, and we have even more genders. All from a biological and hormonal perspective, without needing to touch "choice" as part of the equation.

And I am sure I'm missing a few in my list above. Check your prejudice, eh?

9
4

Condoleezza to China: 'The rules' mean cyber-spying isn't allowed

Trevor_Pott
Gold badge

Re: Sorry

"Was anyone from the UK speaking at .NEXT? Did they criticize the GCHQ? If they did not, wouldn't that be a ringing endorsement of, uh, "British exceptionalism"?"

If there were British and spouting about digital security issues without criticizing GCHQ, then yes, that would be British exceptionalism. Same if a Canadian did it without mentioning that we're now a police state, or any Aussie talking about anything security, ever.

7
1

Using leather in 'leccy cars is 'unTesla', rages vegan shareholder

Trevor_Pott
Gold badge

What do you call a vegetarian?

Prey.

13
1

NY, Connecticut investigate Apple for Music service violations

Trevor_Pott
Gold badge

Re: Why sue Apple?

Why not sue Apple?

1
0

Google shares optical layer SDN with its friends

Trevor_Pott
Gold badge

Re: It means Software Defined Networking

*Sigh* Aspies. Not everything is literal. There are these things called metaphors. They help people understand new concepts, which is what was being discussed here.

1
0
Trevor_Pott
Gold badge

Re: It means Software Defined Networking

Fairly apt.

With SDN you have a single UI that manages all your switches. They are joined to the managment server like you'd join ESXi nodes to vSphere.

Instead of configuring each individual port on each individual switch like you'd configure every install of Windows by hand in a beforetime baremetal datacenter, you make configurations at a higher level. You can clone or snapshot configs, migrate configs from port to port - even across switches - or automate deployments in a Puppet-like manner. (Or use Puppet, if you want!)

Connecting to each individual switch to control them is like bashing two rocks together. It's as patently insane as manually babying each node in an entire datacenter.

So yeah, I buy SDN "is to networking what virtualization is to servers". It's not entirely accurate, but it gets the important bits across.

0
0

Industrial Wi-Fi kit has hard-coded credentials

Trevor_Pott
Gold badge

Class Action Lawsuit

Can you hear the lawyers stampeding?

6
0

Tech giants gang up on Obama over encryption key demands

Trevor_Pott
Gold badge

Dear US.gov,

Please ban proper encryption by all technology companies in your nation.

Signed,

The entire rest of the world's IT industries.

26
0

Microsoft: FINE, we'll help your web sessions be secure, SHEESH

Trevor_Pott
Gold badge
Trollface

It's good to know that the browser that I'll only ever use once - to go to http://www.ninite.com - will be able to redirect me to https://ninite.com/ without typing in the extra s. All that effort saved!

4
3

HP to buy EMC? We think so, say Wall St money men

Trevor_Pott
Gold badge

Re: Really?

Legitimate question: outside of the the really large printing press stuff, do any of HP's printers work after purchase? I haven't had a reliable HP printer since the HP Laserjet II.

0
0

Private cloud is NOT dead – and for one good reason: Control of data

Trevor_Pott
Gold badge

Re: Both are equally important

"anyone with very sensitive data"

That would be everyone.

3
0

SDN's dream: Use what you've got, not what you're promised

Trevor_Pott
Gold badge

SDN command centralization is handled by making the controllers clusterable multi-master affairs that are virtually impossibly to kill. Also, the switches don't stop working if the command processor goes down. It's only certain types of changes to the fabric that cease being processed. Some changes will continue to be processed as they can run on dynamic protocols that - while normally mediated by a central controller - can operate independently of the central controller in a pinch.

SDN can make meeting various standards easier than manual configuration. The reason for this is that the more advanced SDN/NFV controllers can be configured not to allow network changes which would violate given standards rules. (No open paths to the net without various layers of security, for example.)

Also: SDN absolutely has simple methods for recovery when changes are made. Configuration changes are typically documented by the controller. Why not, it's just logging as far as the controller is concerned! You can roll back your entire network to a previous point in time by simply reimposing a previous configuration state, if that's what you need to do.

Hell of a lot easier than changing everything by hand.

1
0

Forget black helicopters, FBI flying surveillance Cessnas over US cities. Warrant? What's that?

Trevor_Pott
Gold badge

Re: So what's new?

"I will continue to disagree that police presence at a public demonstration, including airborne surveillance, necessarily constitutes oppression or even tracking. "

Police presence at a protest doesn't constitute oppression or tracking. That is police keeping the peace and only collecting names and information of attendees if they break the law.

Police hoovering up every detail they can hoover up about every attendee at a protest absolutely is both tracking and oppression.

One is the presumption of innocence and maintenance of the rights of individuals and the group. The other is a presumption of guilt, and the shredding of the rights of the individuals and the group.

1
0
Trevor_Pott
Gold badge

Re: So what's new?

You're absolutely wrong. Monitoring who is attending public protests or gatherings to discuss lawful change in government absolutely is suppressing them. Governments in the US do monstrous things on a whim. That's when innocent people aren't being gunned down, tased or worse.

The people in the United States have every right to fear for everything they have, from a job to material goods to their very lives if they are identified as being part of a group that someone in power doesn't like. Engaging in activities that are dedicated to tracking who is participating in anti-establishment activities absolutely is supression of those activities.

And don't get me started on bullshit tactics like kettling, or the insanity of Bill C-51 here in Canada.

1
0
Trevor_Pott
Gold badge

Re: So what's new?

"Contrary to a later assertion, they also do not have a right under the US Constitution to assemble to change the regime or remove particular people from office; for that we have procedures to amend the Constitution, elections, and legal processes. "

Making use of the legal methods available to remove people from office, or make major changes to the constitution, etc requires that people assemble to discuss this. It absolutely is written into your constitution that people have the right to assemble to plot to overthrow you government. What isn't allowed is plotting to use violence to do so.

That said, given that your government is trying it's damnedest to prevent people from peaceful assembly to discuss peaceful methods of regime change, illegal assemblies to plan illegal violence may be the only path forwards for them.

When those in power seek to use that power exclusively to keep themselves in power (rather than to serve those who granted them the power their wield) there can be no reason. It becomes an issue of survival. And humans react badly - especially in groups - when they feel cornered.

1
2
Trevor_Pott
Gold badge

Re: Telemarketers

Those who looted and rampaged for the very first time actually achieved results. The system in the US is so broken it probably needs more of that, rather than less. And that's the goddamned problem. We should be able to resolve our issues peacefully. With in the US of NSA this is no longer possible.

0
0
Trevor_Pott
Gold badge

Re: Telemarketers

"The instigators, looters and arsonists deserved Hellfire missiles."

If you truly believe that, it's time for a civil war in your nation, and I fucking hope you lose. Badly.

1
1
Trevor_Pott
Gold badge

Re: So what's new?

"The example of Baltimore a few weeks back suggests that general - i. e. "mass" - surveillance may be quite reasonable. "

How?

People have the right to protest. Some people may have rioted, but "guilt by association" is currently not legal in the United States. If people are rioting, you do the hard goddamned leg work of catching them. You do not associate everyone who is participating in a perfectly legitimate and legal protest with rioters, any more than you associate all members of a particular religious or ethnic group with terrorism.

You might try to say that the protests had been deemed illegal by the folks running the place, except that doing so is a violation of the constitution of the US of NSA, which specifically allows all sorts of assembly...even assembly aimed at changing the regime or removing specific people from power.

Unless, of course, you want to say that the constitution doesn't mean anything, or that the law should not apply equally to all people. In either case it would mean the law is invalid and should not be upheld, the nation as a whole should be defunct and the US of NSA should now be considered in a state of civil war.

The law applies to everyone or to noone. And the law of the land includes the first, fourth and fifth ammendments, at least in the US of NSA.

3
3

IT-savvy US congressmen to Feds: End your crypto-backdoor crusade

Trevor_Pott
Gold badge

Re: Go FOSS and forget about the Yanks.

"All you'll do is fragment the Internet"

Why is that bad? The world would be a better place if the US of NSA were isolated.

0
0
Trevor_Pott
Gold badge

Re: It's a real pity

Metadata is data, you voyeuristic, sociopathic half-wit.

0
1

HP is 80 per cent closer to breaking up. Now, about the IT estate...

Trevor_Pott
Gold badge

Re: I can barely recall when HP was one of the best companies in the world...

Not at all. Being a shareholder gives me a voice (however small) in how a company is run. I get to vote for board members, and those board members make promises to me (the shareholder) about how they will run the company.

If I hold shares in a shoe company and that company is using child labour I have two choices: sell my shares to someone who doesn't have a problem with that, or use my small voice to agitate for change. I generally prefer the latter. All that is required for evil to flourish is for good men to do nothing.

1
0

Ruskies behind German govt cyber attack — report

Trevor_Pott
Gold badge

Re: what, like hacking the Russian government?

"Logistics and sending orders requires data networks"

Why? We did it for a century using voice networks.

0
0

SpaceX asks to test broadband in SPAAACE

Trevor_Pott
Gold badge

Re: Excited now.

...why would you do that to innocent bacon?

0
0

Dotcom keeps assets, for now

Trevor_Pott
Gold badge

Re: I've said this a few times ....

"The USA has the right to pursue alleged criminals out side the USA"

Only where extradition treaties exist, and they must abide by both the letter and spirit of the treaty AND they must abide by the host country's law. The US is decidedly not pursuing this in an honest, transparent or even legal manner.

The US has no rights outside it's own territory that are not granted to it by sovereign nations or multinational treaties (which only exist because sovereign nations consented and then ratified them.) Full fucking stop.

0
0

Second-hand IT alliance forms to combat 'bully' vendors

Trevor_Pott
Gold badge

Re: Is not "the bullies" fault, it's the customers's fault

She was asking for it your honour! Have you seen the way she dresses?

0
0

US Senate passes USA Freedom Act – a long lip service to NSA reforms

Trevor_Pott
Gold badge

Re: It's very unfortunate that...

"Now more crims will escape punishment because authorities will not know about them until after they impose their evil"

Most criminals are good people. Many of them are better in most ways than huge numbers of people who have yet to be identified as having broken the law.

The law isn't about good and evil. It's about power and control.

0
0
Trevor_Pott
Gold badge

Re: As Ive said before

"For all the talk about the NSA database, I've never heard of any innocent person being the slightest bit harmed by any use of it. Its supposed dangers are entirely hypothetical, whereas the dangers posed by criminal conspiracies which might be tracked through such a database are demonstrably real."

I've been harmed by the NSA database. So fuck you.

And there are lots of "criminals" who haven't harmed anyone. Providing a perfectly harmless (when used appropriately, in moderation) substance such as marijuana, or engaging in sodomy, being gay, being a hardworking illegal immigrant...the list of people who have broken laws but ultimate been a benefit to society is huge.

Being a criminal emphatically does not mean you harm anyone. Some criminals do. Most criminals don't.

The law has long ago become not about protecting the citizens, but protecting those in power from the loss of their power, and/or imposing the paranoid morality of the crazy few upon all. Full stop.

2
0
Trevor_Pott
Gold badge

"If you arent doing anything wrong you dont have anything to worry about"

Hands up, don't shoo- *blam*

*blam* *blam* *blam* *blam* *blam* *blam* *blam* *blam* *blam* *blam* *blam* *blam* *blam* *blam* *blam*

All lives matter.

0
0
Trevor_Pott
Gold badge

Re: OK

In the fullness of time? Probably the second amendment nutters who, as it is turning out, may be a hell of a lot less nutty than we think.

What the fuck world have we created?

0
0
Trevor_Pott
Gold badge

Re: A weaker system

"A single 5TB drive could store an hours' worth of speech a day for 1.3 million people (8kbips sampling)."

More, if you use AMR instead of MP3...

0
0
Trevor_Pott
Gold badge

Re: A weaker system

"The telcos aren't keeping what you're saying, just the info on what numbers you called."

Metadata is data!

0
0
Trevor_Pott
Gold badge

@GH1618

You're a bad person. I will fight you and everyone who believes as you do with every ounce of my being until the day I die.

1
0

Naked cyclists take a hard line on 'aroused' protest participant

Trevor_Pott
Gold badge

Re: @Trevor_Potts again

Because of the very false conceptualization that people who aren't terrified of genitalia are somehow "perverted".

If there's a perversion, it's in believing that some part of a human body needs to be treated as visually "horrifying". Though I'll take "belief in a god that doesn't exist" as also quite fucked up.

2
0

Forums