* Posts by Trevor_Pott

6511 posts • joined 31 May 2010

US data suggests Windows 10 adoption in business is slowing

Trevor_Pott
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Re: Not necessarily

"Don't forget, you don't get a forced upgrade screen for Windows Enterprse Edition either,"

Don't forget, you're an asshole if you think that's an acceptable "solution".

Cheers,

Someone who works with individuals and companies too small to Enterprise Edition/Microsoft would you like to spend 6 months arguing about your licensing "position"/PAY MORE NOW FOR A SUBSCRIPTION "Software Assurance" THAT YOU DON'T WANT OR NEED.

P.S. And they STILL don't let Enterprise Edition "customers" turn off spying. So paying them more STILL doesn't get you control over your own OS.

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You're only young but you're going to die: Farewell, all-flash startups

Trevor_Pott
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Re: Tintri

HAHAHAHAHAHA Netapp.

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Ford Googles self-drivers

Trevor_Pott
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Warning lights that a car is currently driven by a meatbag seem very sensible. After all, they're far worse drivers than robots.

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Trevor_Pott
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Good!

The day petrolheads are limited in their recklessness to racetracks and manual hiway reservations the better life is for the rest of us. Commutes will be safer, with the ability to get things done during the dead hours of travel and without having to be crammed into crowded public transit with a ****ing broom.

Bring on the door-to-door robots that remove the tedium of travel, I say!

And crucify the asshole recently found to be going 140kph through a school zone at 7:30am on a school day. It takes a human to achieve that level of douchebaggery.

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FBI ends second iPhone fight after someone, um, 'remembers' the PIN

Trevor_Pott
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Re: Well...

"The responsible Agency should keep an eye -now and then, depending of activity level- on anybody who is educated in Chemistry of Explosives, just in case."

That's ludicrous. Unless the person has done something suspicious they should absolutely not have their privacy invaded by the state. That is what the presumption of innocence is all about!

Getting an education is not suspicious, what the fuck horrible backwards-ass society do you live in?

I hope everyone who thinks like you moves to an island somewhere and dies of sheer stupidity.

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MIT launches campus lunch bug bounty

Trevor_Pott
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Please find bugs. Please do not do anything which may lead to finding bugs.

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Microsoft to hike certification exam prices

Trevor_Pott
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Re: And exactly what...

Depends on how they submit it and what their background looks like.

If someone submits a resume to me to be a virtual admin and they have 10 years of systems administration under their belt, a blog with some intelligent things, demonstrates they participate in user groups and a Twitter that's followed by half the vExperts, you know what...I'm probably going to hire that guy. Certification or no certification.

Who the person is matters way more than the letters they throw at you.

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Dell looking at higher debt mountain to buy EMC

Trevor_Pott
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Re: Gutted for Compellent

Gotta say I agree. Compellent is bloody brilliant. Can't say I'd like to see VNX replacing it any time soon...

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Stalled cloud growth, software flatlining, hated Lumias unsold... It's all fine, says Microsoft CEO

Trevor_Pott
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Re: Bankruptcy?

Yes. Bankruptcy. For an entity Microsoft's size that would probably take 30-40 years to play out. But to presume that is simply can't is the province of faith and a determination not to learn from history.

Microsoft isn't going under tomorrow, but I said nothing of immediacy in any of my posts here.

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Trevor_Pott
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SCO hung around for a long time too. What's your point?

Yahoo. Sun. Novell. On and on. Netapp will take a long time to shrivel and die too, but ineptitude is caustic, contagious...and fatal.

The two ways to kill a company are to allow your customers to walk away from you or for you to walk away from your customers. Deciding that trust is irrelevant and that you will gladly dispense with it in order to meet arbitrary and irrelevant adoption metrics absolutely is walking away from your customers. Spending billions on a market segment and remaining less than a joke is your customers walking away from you.

Tick, tock. There's time left on that clock...

...but how much?

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Trevor_Pott
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I wonder what will come first: bankruptcy or a realization that obtaining and retaining the trust of your customers, partners, developers and staff is vital to the long term functioning of a business?

Oh, I forgot, they're Microsoft. They don't need trust. They abuse dominant market positions.

...but for how long, I wonder?

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Translated: BlackBerry CEO John Chen on cops-snooping-on-BBM

Trevor_Pott
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Re: So, what are YOU doing to protect yourself?

"You know for a fact if you heard that you were sitting on top of a dirty bomb you would want the FBI to find it any way possible."

Entirely untrue. I would rather that I and everyone I care about die than that my government or any of my government's allies circumvent the Universal Declaration of Human Rights or the national-level rights and freedoms documents of our nations.

Some things, you die for. The ideals of liberty, freedom and the universal application of the rule of law are among them. Nobody, not cops, governments nor corporations can ever be allowed to be above the law. And yes, if we have to lose a city or two every generation that is entirely, 100% worth it.

The price of freedom is eternal vigilance. Not against scary boogymen terrorists, but against authoritarians and fearmongers who crave power and use fear to obtain it, suppression of dissent to keep it.

Learn from the past. Je me souviens. Do not let the horrors of our ancestors be replayed so that you can have the illusion of security.

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Trevor_Pott
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Re: So, what are YOU doing to protect yourself?

The whole point of our entire economy is that we don't all have to be capable of everything. We perform labour and receive money in return. We exchange that money for goods and services performed by people with different specialties. In this context it is 100% rational to tell the companies we buy our technology from that we want a device that meets our needs. Privacy is one of those needs.

Why is privacy a requirement? Because "if you keep your nose clean, you'll be left alone" if a fucking lie. It is flat out not true.

If it were true, you wouldn't have Jean Charles de Menzes, or Tamir Rice, or the quite literally millions of unlawful infractions and outright murders committed - unpunished, unsanctioned and thus condoned - by the powers that be against completely innocent people.

"If you keep your nose clean, you'll be left alone"?

Tell that to Cameron Todd Willingham. Oh, you can't, they executed an innocent man.

Maybe you can tell Ricky Jackson that he really deserved all those terrifying years on death row for a crime he didn't commit.

It goes on and on and on and on. And you think that giving our governments panopticon powers to observe every single thing we do is going to improve matters? Do you not understand that today's warrant-required access is tomorrow's warrantless mass surveillance?

What, exactly, do you think our governments, who allow their police services to convict and murder the innocent almost always consequence free, are going to do once they have achieved total surveillance and legislated away the requirements for the presumption of innocence?

Think that's a bridge too far? Maybe you should look into the rights law enforcement has in the US to ignore 4th amendment for anyone 100 miles from a US border (80% of their population) and how this is increasingly being used. Maybe it's worth reading the TPP, TTIP and dozens of other treaties on the table, or concluded in the past 20 years to see how they are pushing their laws on the rest of the world.

Maybe it's worth looking at how we adopt not only their broken laws, but increasingly their completely insane law enforcement practices.

"If you keep your nose clean, you'll be left alone" is demonstrable bullshit. So is the idea that if we recognize that we should have no recourse excepting building our own privacy and security from the ground up.

The only choice is to fight the authoritarians and continue doing so for all of eternity. It is the cost of freedom. And it is a war cannot win, but absolutely cannot afford to lose. Those in power will use every means at their disposal to root out and crush dissent. Thus the means at their disposal must now and forever be limited, to ensure that dissent is always possible.

Our only path to victory lies through unity. Which is probably exactly why you advocate isolation. If so, that makes you a traitor.

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Saw-inspired horror slowly deletes your PC's files as you scramble to pay the ransom

Trevor_Pott
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Re: Without the in-your-face dramatics

It's not evil when corporations or governments do it.

Now back to work, prole!

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NZ Pastafarians joined in noodly wedlock

Trevor_Pott
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Re: Finally, a GOOD religion

First off, I'm a Crabstian, not a Pastafarian. Secondly, I most Rastas I know are not only chill with Pastafarianism, they'll don the colander and salt the water with the rest of us. And yes, I can be Crabstian and celebrate Pastafarian traditions with all mirth and ceremony just as the Rastas can do so. Pastafarians encourage such inclusion.

And if there are Rastas who truly have a problem with the term "Pastafarianism" I honestly and heartily encourage them to head on over to Venganza.org and raise the issue. There is a really good chance that the Pastafarians there will discuss the issue seriously and with sincere and honest consideration for the feelings of the Rastas and may well attempt to change the term to "Pastians" or somesuch.

The key here is that Pastafarianism, as a term, was never designed to "make fun of" Rastafarianism or Rastas in any way. And I am pretty sure that Rastas know that.

It's the angry white protestants who are getting all falsely upset on behalf of the Rastas - who are perfectly capable of raising issues on their own without white folk having to do it for them, if they actually happen to care about a topic - who are the xenophobes. It's all about deflection and poisoning the well, not about actually giving a damn about the Rastas, or peaceful coexistence.

Maybe, one day, when everyone can learn to stop taking themselves so goddamned seriously, we have have nice things.

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Trevor_Pott
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Re: Please be careful how you mock.

You don't get far with religious believers no matter what you do. They believe in something that cannot be proven. Logic and rationality are anathema to them.

If and when they are ready to engage with the rest of the world in a rational fashion, I'll be more than happy to engage with them. But I don't and won't respect irrational or inertia-based devotion to the illogical and unprovable.

Satire, at least, has a purpose. And I don't see anyone burning people alive in the name of Pastafarianism or even satire more generally. So off yonder, ho!

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Trevor_Pott
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Re: >something to tell the grandchildren

Mine was nerd themed. I'm a Crabstian and she's a nihlist. So far, we've outlasted a lot marriages of folk we know who did the full on evangelical protestant wedding thing.

Jibbers must be looking out for us.

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Trevor_Pott
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Re: >something to tell the grandchildren

My wedding was about why I and my wife said it was about. Just who the fuck do you think you are to tell me what "a" (meaning, in part my) wedding is about? Who the fuck are you to be dictating the meaning of something to 7.5 billion people?

Nobody. That's who.

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Trevor_Pott
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Re: Finally, a GOOD religion

Pastafarianism doesn't make fun of Rastafarianism at all. And I have yet to meet a Rasta who was even a little offended by Pastafarianism. Have you even met Rastas? I don't think they have a xenophobic bone in their body.

Now, Christians - more specifically evangelical Protestants - they have no problems about projecting their mindspiders onto others and using that strawman made out of wigglies to try to put down someone they don't like. Far be it from them to actually analyse their faith or the ridiculous lengths they go to in order to try to force that faith on others.

Nope, rely on tactics that try to pain skeptics as somehow terrible so that any skepticism they bring to the table is invalidated by this theoretically heinous act.

One which nobody - not even the whining Protestant casting aspersions - actually believes is horrible, nor that any offense was ever intended by anyone involved.

But hey, keep on truckin', mate. Preferably until you're way the fuck away from the internet so you can't spread your shite all over it.

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Trevor_Pott
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Re: Bunch of tosspots

"rather, it is because societies have tended to function reasonably well and flourish under Christianity"

Are you high? Please share.

Addendum: I loathe the societies Christianity built and would dearly - dearly - love the opportunity to build and live in one built by pastafarians. I believe with every fibre of my being it would be superior in damned near every way.

I bet we won't even burn anyone alive to create that society. Holy Meatballs, Batman!

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Trevor_Pott
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Re: Bunch of tosspots

Just because other individuals rationally but independently choose to do the same thing as you does not mean any of you are sheeple following a crowd. Now, believing what you are told to believe because it is what your parents believed and what you were raised to believe without questioning or examining the rationality or logic of that belief system, on the other hand, absolutely does make you a mindless drone.

Believe whatever you want to believe, but for the love of Jibbers Himself, arrive at that belief on your own using logic and reason instead of succumbing to the inertia of your upbringing.

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Intel bins ESXi in in-house private cloud revamp

Trevor_Pott
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Pint

Re: Soon to be 100% KVM across my entire install base.

6321 individual hosts and counting across 22 companies.

Multiple production environments.

*shrug*

But since you are entering with a closed mind further conversation seems irrelevant. So: beer.

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Trevor_Pott
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Soon to be 100% KVM across my entire install base.

We've all been telling VMware this would happen for ages. They didn't care. They still don't. Make of that what you will.

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Big Content seeks to ban Kickass Torrents from Australia

Trevor_Pott
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I don't suppose the relevant corporations have tried providing the same services that Kickass provides, but legally and for a fee? No?

Maybe that's worth a go. All your content in one place, easily searchable, downloadable and yours forever to play on any device you choose. Hell, I'd love to give a company like that my money.

No? Okay, Streisand effect and failing one more time it is then.

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US congresscritter's iPhone hacked (with, er, the cell networks' help)

Trevor_Pott
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Re: within the grasp of powerful crime gangs and government agents

Yes and no. If you're talking Russia, I doubt it. But the USA? Yeah, there's a difference.

When you work for a crime gang or a pervasively corrupt government you tend to know you're not the good guy. Unfortunately governments exist where the higher ups are corrupt, but the day-to-day joes are largely decent people. This means that the majority of those working for these sorts of governments honestly thin they're the good guys.

There are a handful of governments (mostly Nordic) where corruption is actually a rather rare phenomenon, and thus it is legitimate for the minions to think they're probably working for the good guys, but there sure aren't a lot of those governments out there.

So yeah, there's some difference between a crime gang a government, if only in how they recruit.

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Hey, tech industry, have you noticed Amazon in the rearview?

Trevor_Pott
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Pint

(beer)

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Trevor_Pott
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Re: Careful...

Let me try to be perfectly clear about this:

You're fucked. IT is fucked. Steel workers are fucked. Programers are fucked. Robot makers and butlers, cahiers and pop stars. You're all fucked. We're all fucked.

We have reached a point where we not only automate one industry's worth of jobs out of existence, but we are automating them all out of existence. At the same time, we're giving more and more power, rights and protection to capital owners while massively cutting into the rights of free speech, assembly, protest, and to organize concerning labour issues.

Despite multiple trials demonstrating that basic income programs are not only viable but shockingly efficient we are globally descending into a hyperconservative mindset that is not only xenophobic and bigoted it is greedy, grasping and violently objects to the idea of "giving handouts". So the one thing that could allow our civilizations to cope with the loss of jobs and the flood of ultra-cheap basic goods is something that is completely off the table in most nations.

So: we're fucked. There aren't going to be jobs for any but the elite, unless you happen to be willing to work for less than robots. Now, in some cases, people will indeed work for less than robots, but they will eek out a shitty, horrible existence.

Having been indoctrinated for generations never to raise our voices to those in power, the owners of capital will live high on the fruits of robotic labour, and the rest of us will slowly descend into the squalor of subsistence or barely-above-subsistence living.

This will take 50 years to play out, but the seeds of it are visible everywhere. There are no "go work this job, you'll be safe, secure and make fuckloads" jobs. For anyone. Anywhere.

You want a solution? Agitate for social change. Get the peasants revolting. Work towards a more equitable society. Convince your nation to implement social services reforms including basic income.

Unless and until we all do that, we're collectively fucked, and our children are multitudinously omnifucked.

That's the truth of the matter. If you don't like it, well, sorry. I don't lie to people if I can avoid it.

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Trevor_Pott
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Re: Careful...

Where did I say "fallacy"?

I say study what the luddites did and didn't do, as they have been through this already. The luddites - not the so-called fallacy - are the lesson.

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Trevor_Pott
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Re: Nice Rant

These vendors can adapt or they can die. There are no other choices.

You either enable IT to become as easy to work with as Amazon, or IT won't be there for long. And in order to enable IT to be as easy as Amazon you need to be able to meet IT's needs quickly, efficiently and in real time. You also need to provide them with hardware, software and services that enable IT to deliver a self-service approach to their internal customers.

That's the way the world is now. Cope.

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Trevor_Pott
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Re: Nice Rant

Yes.

And?

In case you hadn't noticed, virtually all sectors are facing this issue across all of society. This is the 4th industrial revolution. At present, nobody has any solutions to the problem.

Next.

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Trevor_Pott
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Re: Careful...

Ask the luddites. They faced this same issue. Maybe you can learn from history.

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Trevor_Pott
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Re: Nice Rant

They don't.

Next?

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Trevor_Pott
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Re: Careful...

They don't need me to be a sysadmin. And in case you hadn't been paying attention, I saw the asteroid headed for sysadmins a great bloody long time ago and systems administration is no longer my day job. I'm a writer. Systems administration is a side gig I maintain only to have legitimacy in what I write. It is less than 25% of the company income at this point, and dropping fast.

So no, mate, I'm not complaining about myself. I'm complaining about you. I told the world this shit was heading down the pipe ages ago and then I got the hell out of Dodge.

Have you noticed that great big hunk of death-dealing rock hurtling towards you in the sky? Because if not, you should look up, mate. Sooner, rather than later.

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Defence in depth: Don't let your firm's security become a boondoggle

Trevor_Pott
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Re: Therein lies ruin

There are so many layers to how wrong you are that the air around you has flavours.

Please never practice anything related to IT. In this or any other reality, anywhere in any of the multiverses.

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NASA gives blacked-out Kepler space 'scope the kiss of life

Trevor_Pott
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Re: Bah!

Where do I sign?

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Senator Wyden recalls SOPA fight in bid to defeat encryption-weakening efforts

Trevor_Pott
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As for those who buy the line that "if you've done nothing" and you "don't care if the government is listening in to your Amazon Echo," he recalled the era of J Edgar Hoover and his wide-ranging surveillance of groups he deemed unsuitable. "I wonder what political and social movements we might never have heard of if J Edgar Hoover had access to all the technology available today," he noted.

Fucking BINGO. The idea that "if you've done nothing wrong you'll be left alone" is at best naieve. More honestly it is a purposeful ignorance of reality by those whose overwhelming self interest and sociocultural myopia ensures they actively prevent themselves from caring about the plight of those not exactly like them.

It is simply not okay to believe "if you've done nothing wrong you'll be left alone". It is morally wrong, as it implies a carefully curated apathy and ignorance that harms society as a whole.

We need everyone on the line fighting this fight; each of us standing up for eachother is one ten millionth as powerful as a single one of those who seek to tear down the presumption of innocence and remove our civil liberties. It takes all of us to stand up to those in power. There is no room for apathy or willful ignorance anymore.

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Data protection: Don't be an emotional knee jerk. When it comes to the law, RTFM

Trevor_Pott
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That's nothing more than faith speaking, and it means no more than when people bleat about their god(s).

Microsoft is a large cloud vendor, and they don't even recognize a customer's right to control their own operating system. In what universe can anyone be fool enough to believe they think customers own their own data? Or that Google believes this? Amazon?

Your data belongs to them, to use, abuse, sell and give to the snoops as they see fit. If you pay them enough money, they might let you use that data in between periods where someone else is using it.

Public cloud vendors can not be trusted. Especially American ones and most certainly ones named Microsoft.

But hey, you go put your customers' data in the cloud. I'll weep when you're sued into a hole in the ground when that data is inevitably used against your customers.

I wonder what president Trump will do with all that delicious data. How nice of you to make his oppression so easily automated.

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Seagate says it's scooped the 'fastest ever PCIe drive' record

Trevor_Pott
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Re: Trevor, are you listening?

Sadly accurate. That will do as a stand in.

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Norman Conquest, King Edward, cyber pathogen and illegal gambling all emerge in Apple v FBI

Trevor_Pott
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Re: Correction

"For too long, we have been a passively tolerant society, saying to our citizens 'as long as you obey the law, we will leave you alone'.”

--David Cameron

The concept of "if you keep your nose clean, you'll be left alone" is nothing more than a lie told to (and only believed by) the incredibly naive. The rest of us have to live in (and try to shape our society to compensate for) a world in which even the smallest power corrupts absolutely.

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Trevor_Pott
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Some very authoritarian arguments and assumptions in play here.

The author states: "Taking a step back, it's fair to say that the majority of law-abiding citizens would want prosecutors to be able to access evidence that could help convict someone of a serious crime, regardless of how strongly they feel about their own personal privacy."

I disagree. I don't think the majority of citizens - "law abiding" or not - want the police to have any more power than they already do. A vocal minority of people trust the police. Most don't. And the police, spooks, governments and so forth haven't been doing anything to regain the trust they have lost. They can't be trusted with the power they already have. There is no reason whatsoever they should be allowed access to the treasure trove of information on our phones.

Why, you might ask? Because of the silliness of the concept of "law abiding" (shall we play No True Scotsman?). Nobody is law abiding. NOBODY. Every single one of us commits multiple infractions of the law every day. The laws are designed like this. Not only can no one person know all the laws to which they are supposed to be beholden, but many of those laws are contradictory or criminalize ordinary everyday activities.

Phones and computers contain us. Our lives in all aspects. If there were some means by which it could be assured that law enforcement agencies - from the NSA down to the local bylaw cops - were only allowed to search phones when they had a damned good reason to believe that level of privacy invasion was warranted, they had a judge signing off on it and there was layer upon layer of oversight...maybe - just maybe - we could all meet in the middle and talk about this like adults.

Unfortunately, no such means of restraining the police exists. They are too powerful, politically, for anyone to rein them in. We've see that over and over and over again, in all western nations. Cope in the US roll on out of a cruiser in response to a call and in one fluid motion murder a 12 year old boy in cold blood. No calls for him to surrender. Nothing. Why? He was playing with a toy gun in a park. They get away with it. And then the city sends the family of the murdered child a bill for $500 for the ambulance.

If police have the capability to pwn a phone they will use it to go fishing. They will use it without oversight. They will use it without warrants. They will use it to investigate every tiny crime and misdemeanor in an attempt to fine evidence - any evidence - of further things they can nail someone with.

And they will! Every single one of us, as stated above, is guilty of something. And our phones probably know what. How can we, as a society, justify handing over that level of power to an unaccountable, unrestrained and massively corrupt group of law enforcement agencies who have every interest in ruling their communities and absolutely zero interest in serving their communities?

In addition to the above, there is a quote from Generic Corrupt Cop #42: "If Apple can refuse lawful court orders to reasonably assist law enforcement, public safety will suffer. Crimes will go unsolved and criminals will go free"

So his argument - and that of authoritarians everywhere - is that it is perfectly fine to remove the presumption of innocence in order to catch the guilty. This is wrong.

It is, in fact, better that a thousand guilty men go free than one innocent man be punished for a crime he did not commit.

Giving the cops unrestrained access to our personal lives gives them the power to go fishing to invent things to crucify us with. They can - and they will - use that power injudiciously, to further prejudice and as a means of punishment against dissidents and dissenters.

Unless and until we can solve the problems inherent in the schism between the people and those who are supposed to serve them we should absolutely and emphatically not be granting our self-styled masters yet more power over us.

Fix the system first. Then we can talk about letting that system see everything we've ever done, or ever will do.

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Worried by VMware's executive exodus? Dell should be

Trevor_Pott
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Re: um

But VMware doesn't believe that they have a problem, so to suggest fixing anything is blasphemy. Their software, in their own minds, is unimpeachable. Much like Microsoft's ardent belief that System Center is something other than a cybersexually transmitted disease.

VMware gauges themselves against System Center. Microsoft gauges System Center against VMware. Both of them are trapped in the fucking past, with software that was miserable to install, manage and maintain 10 years ago, let alone when you compare it to modern "cloud" user experiences.

Microsoft can be partially excused due to largesse. They really do have a massively captive user base. VMware does not. There are valid, viable alternatives to VMware today, and by the time VMware figures that out, they'll already be in the grave.

Some companies just can't harness enough humility to reach the escape velocity of their own hubris.

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We suck at backups. So let's not have a single point of failure any more

Trevor_Pott
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Re: Hmm

There is no time to think about this. THE DIRECTOR'S EMAILS ARE NOT BEING PROPERLY FORWARDED TO HIS HOME ADDRESS! What are you doing about that?!

This.

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Why Tim Cook is wrong: A privacy advocate's view

Trevor_Pott
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Re: Why Trev Pott is wrong - a privacy advocate's view

"ANY device including the latest iPhones is vulnerable, if it permits the automatic installation of vendor signed updates"

EXACTLY.

EX-FUCKING-ACTLY.

Nail on the head. Vendor update mechanisms are a security vulnerability and all of our devices need to be designed with the idea that the vendor can and will eventually be compromised.

No device should ever install an update against the explicit will of the device owner. Not Apple, Not Microsoft, not Google. If you choose to enable automatic updates, that's your bellyache. But if a device is configured for security - including setting it to manual updating - then that device should not be able to be updated forcibly by any party! Any attempt to do so should brick the device, period!

Furthermore, no device should set about updating while locked. Ever. This prevents devices which are set to auto-update from being pwned by vendors if its been physically removed from the owner. Devices should ONLY set about updates when the user can be informed what is going in, and have the opportunity to cancel the updates before they proceed.

The idea that vendors are somehow trustworthy is bogus. Vendors are beholden to the governments of the nations in which they operate and thus must be considered to be as malicious an actor as the most corrupt members of the law enforcement agencies or courts to which that vendor is subject.

We, as customers need to understand and accept this. Vendors need to understand and accept this as well, as design their products to protect us (the customer) from them (the vendor and those who can command the vendor).

If you don't like that, find another reality, but this is the cold hard truth of the one we live in today.

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NetApp to chop 1,450 staffers from payroll, reveals revenue stumble

Trevor_Pott
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Re: But...but...

As a professional writer I can assure you that using lots of words is a hell of a lot easier than using only a few. "Lots of words" is largely a stream of consciousness thing. There's no editing for brevity, which takes rather a lot of bandwidth. I can cheerfully knock out a 5000 word paper on a given topic easier than I can write a 500 word summary blog. Human minds are funny.

As for "quoting my importance in general", where exactly did I do that? I don't particularly view myself as important. Indeed, a critical part of studying businesses the way I do is realizing the irrelevance of the individual, especially the pundits. So if you somehow took something above as indicating my 'importance', I'd love to know what it is.

Perhaps more to the point on all of this, I don't care about NetApp in the form of the company, the products or most of the individuals who work there. I only have couple handfuls of friends there, and they are decent enough at their jobs that if NetApp imploded tomorrow they'd be employed again by the end of the day.

What I do care about is NetApp in the form of the effect it has on the industry as a whole. NetApp is a large company with many customers and a history that once upon a time made it an important disruptor in the storage space. Who are they now? How did they get there? What will they become?

The evolution of companies and, more specifically, the reasons that companies evolve in that fashion is of immense interest to me. Again, very much like the Great Red Spot on Jupiter: it is something I find incredibly interesting from a purely scientific perspective.

My primary interest is not merely in the facts of a puzzle. Facts are a means to an end; a tool to explore the real curiosity: in all things I enjoy studying how and why people (and animals) delude themselves. Why to we reject objective truths? Why do we discount the lessons of history? Why do we cling to hope, to faith, to an employer and - above all else - why do we champion vendors from whom we have purchased goods, even when there is no reason to champion that vendor other than to justify our own purchases?

Why do we wrap our identities up in products, brands...even chosen interpretations of scientific evidence? Why does science proceed one funeral at a time? Why do cults of personality form and vendor reality distortion fields exist?

NetApp is a truly fascinating topic for someone who studies the above. Not because NetApp itself matters, but because of the socking depth of the dichotomy between objective reality, what history has to teach us and what the True Believers believe. Cisco and Apple are probably the only two other companies in Tech that have reality distortion fields anywhere near as strong. I find it utterly fascinating.

What's even more fascinating is how much is the result of fear. I love talking to NetApp employees in private conference, because when you've earned their trust and they are convinced you'll never tell a soul their name or what they said, the truth simply pours out.

The fear and terror of speaking out of turn that exists day after day until it simply fades into the background, a dull part of one's consciousness, but a very active and real constraint on not only speech, but thought itself. There is clear evidence from multiple individuals that the pressure to conform one's very thoughts to "the message" is so intense that it creates a demonstrable strain; physical tension builds up not unlike that seen in PTSD clients.

When the barriers are removed, however, and a "safe space" is provided...the sorted details that are made available! Pouring out the naughty bits is more than a little confessional. The individuals in question are visibly less stressed than before. When they're done, they put their psychological armour back on and ride once more into the breech.

None of this is shocking or abnormal. This is - to a greater or lesser degree - simply how Big Business is done in the grand of US of A. I am positive that not everyone feels as constrained as those who pour their souls into a handful of beers. Indeed, it's those who are most ethically or morally compromised by the constraints of their position are most likely to experience this stress, and probably should be looking for a more fulfilling career.

But why do they stay? Why do they parrot the party line? How, exactly, do they succeed in convincing themselves of the lie when, if given time to reflect, what they believe is obviously quite different from what they espouse for their job?

Personally, I can't understand how the above sorts of things don't absolutely fascinate everyone. There are simply so many data points to collect, and there's so much analysis to do! NetApp is a company with so many different groups - both internally and externally - intersecting with so many different agendas...it's just brain candy to puzzle types like myself.

Maybe you'd care to contribute data of your own? Starting with why you choose faith in "the message" and in business/economic choices that have proven time and again to be unlikely to succeed? Or is it that you have faith in individuals? Perhaps that new individuals doing the exact same thing as the previous individuals will somehow net a different outcome? I'm sure your input would be fascinating.

As to the other anonymous coward who felt that posting my upvote/downvote data was somehow "bragging": I'd love to know why you feel that way. I posted raw data. I am unsure why raw data is "bragging".

What about it seems worthy of bragging to you? Previous commenters have indicated that they feel the upvote to downvote ratio is wholly inadequate. You seem to indicate that you feel differently. What is the numeric threshold for your belief that those numbers constitute "bragging"? Is it the volume of votes (which should only be indicative of number of posts over the years) or the ratio? If the ratio, what ratio of upvotes to downvotes do you consider brag-worthy?

I think we've stumbled upon another fascinating topic!

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Trevor_Pott
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Re: But...but...

No, I used humour on the internet. I realize that for some, humour is a foreign concept, but do try to keep up.

I have no beef with NetApp. In truth, I it would be hard to care less what happens to them one way or another. Their fate is to me no more or less interesting than the fluid dynamics of the Great Red Spot on Jupiter, or examining the structural evolution of microbial mats as they grow in my fishtank.

NetApp is an ephemeral concept. It is disconnected from me and my life. The study of NetApp and those who work there is scientifically interesting, but not remotely relevant to me in any way. NetApp is nothing more than points of data to be analysed.

While I find it amusing enough to joke about - much in the same way I like to make jokes about the more interesting fluid dynamic discoveries of the Great Red Spot - NetApp is really just one more company to analyze. One more set of people to observe. One more exercise in social interaction, group dynamics and economic theory.

As for being downvoted, go right ahead! Currently I am at "upvoted 21936 times and downvoted 4159 times". Feel free to add more data points to that analysis in whichever fashion moves you. The more data, the better.

Always, the more data, the better.

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After all the sound and fury, when will VVOL start to rock?

Trevor_Pott
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Re: Customers are testing VVol water .. ready to go big

hds.co/ck

hds co/ck

HDS cock

B-e-a-utiful.

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How tech firms can drive growth without making inequality worse

Trevor_Pott
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Re: @Trevor_Pott There is no skills shortage

I read the article. I also read the bit where apparently we're supposed to 'train up the proles' because 'there's a perpetual skills shortage in tech'. Both ideas are bullshit.

First, there is no skill shortage in tech. There's just a lack of companies willing to actually pay a living wage. They whine and cry and carry on about how expensive nerds are and could they please, please, please import some cheap labour.

Secondly, if you train up the proles to fill this non-existent skills shortage what you're going to do is create massive downwards wage pressure on a sector that already isn't paying well enough. It sucks that everyone else has shit or no jobs, but flooding them all into tech is just going to destroy the economic benefits of tech, it isn't going to help the downtrodden at all.

This creates another problem: training people to do tech is expensive and time consuming. It has a cost. If you drive the wages for tech workers into the ground then who is going to want to spend their own money on this?

That means that people choosing tech as a career because it is what they love (and hence are willing to pay for the education themselves) basically evaporate. In relatively short order you can only get bodies into the now-prole-class-wages tech sector by spending muchos government wonga on training up people from other failed sectors, and that stops delivering a return on investment fairly quickly.

Look, I am not remotely against spending money training the proles up so that they can (hopefully) get better jobs. I just don't believe tech is the sector to target. Wage pressures in tech are already downwards and both political and economic forces are aligned to increase that downward pressure. Worse, tech doesn't tend to benefit the actual economy all that much, unless you happen to be the US of A.

No, if you want to train up the proles and jumpstart the economy Look for post-tech sectors. Specifically I am thinking here nanotechnology, genetics, applied biology and robotics. These fields need massive amounts of technicians and there are never enough available.

What's more, the UK, Canada or any non-US location has a very real shot at creating centers of excellence. If we start now, we could end up with a trained workforce large enough and with an early enough head start on what promise to be the next economic sectors driving the global economy that the Americans don't get to sit on the top of the mountain.

Tech is dead. We are well down the path towards industrializing code development, automating systems administration and otherwise reducing the need for bodies, even as we are churning more of them out of educational facilities than are needed. Don't doom the proles to spend the rest of their careers in another mediocre, failed/failing sector. Give them a real chance by pointing them in the direction of the next big thing.

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Trevor_Pott
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There is no skills shortage

There's just a shortage of companies willing to pay a living wage.

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Hey virtual SANs – say hello to a virtual filer

Trevor_Pott
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Re: How did you get that?

"Honestly, I prefer...system Center Orchestrator or UCS Director"

That's just messed up.

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Trevor_Pott
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Want.

Edit: assuming that it's a single global namespace, then I want. If it is another Teamdrive with an overly complicated management and assignation structure for shared storage, no thanks. (We already have Teamdrive for that.) But "Datacore for file storage" with a CIFS sharing mechanism no more complicated than a Synology - which is sort of what I read this as - THAT I most definitely want.

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