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* Posts by PC1512

54 posts • joined 25 May 2010

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Does Apple's iOS 7 make you physically SICK? Try swallowing version 7.1

PC1512

Re: Doesn't fix inheritence

Nope - if they could wipe it (which I don't think they can if they can't get into it) that wouldn't actually help anyway, since when they tried to activate it again Apple's servers would recognise the device ID and insist on the mother's username and password anyway. That's the extra security that apple put in with IOS 7 designed to really clamp down on theft - and in fairness it's a good feature as long as you don't unwillingly end up on the wrong side of it, as this family have.

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Apple iOS 7 security bug allows fiendish wags to easily empty your wallet

PC1512

Re: I recall the 90's

Andy, I'd say the "truth" is that now Apple have very significant market share in both phones and tablets, their security is proving extremely robust. Next to their nearest competition (Android) there is next to no malware, have been virtually no successful attacks, just a handful of bugs that have routinely been squashed long before anyone was able to exploit in the wild.

Compare that to Microsoft in the 90's - or even now - and it's chalk and cheese.

Macs too have expanded their market, although to a much lesser degree. They're a far bigger and juicier target for hackers and yet.. What has happened? There was the rapidly shut down flashback Trojan a year or two ago (exploiting a java weakness that lead to a complete rebuild of how and even if Java is included in Mac OS) and then... What? What happened to the security apocalypse that people like you have been predicting all these years? As a mac user I certainly haven't seen it.

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Foxconn-rebrander Apple to rebrand hardware from other Taiwanese firms, too

PC1512

Re: Couldn't agree more.

The reg would love to be seen as the Daily Sport. It isn't.

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PC1512

Couldn't agree more.

This place really has become the Daily Mail of tech news - the agenda is different, but the methods pretty similar. It's sad to see. I feel insulted whenever I come here now, and not because I happen to be an Apple user, but because the lame digs and bitterly slanted reporting (against all manner of people) would insult anyone's intelligence.

I know it's all linkbait, I know this place exists solely for the clicks and the more outraged comments like this the better, but still. Really, Reg? Is this what you want to be doing?

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First look: Apple iPhone 5S and 5C

PC1512

"One of the 5's flaws was its sharp edges that just weren't much fun to hold and sometimes wore down to bare metal. The 5S' “chamfered” edge fixes that problem and makes the phone more pleasant to hold."

Eh? The body of the 5S is identical to the 5, they both have chamfered edges (and arguably they're both slightly less comfortable in the hand than the rounded plastic 5C). Still an improvement over the square edges of the 4 and 4S though.

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Rotten Apple iOS 7 fury: Glitchy audio or is today's music really that bad?

PC1512

Audiobus

So, Audiobus's product is potentially rendered obsolete by IOS7.

But wait, in other news, Audiobus have announced that IOS7 is no good and stressed the importance of everyone staying on IOS6 for as long as possible! Well done Reg for alerting us to this very impartial discovery!

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Peak Apple: Has ANYONE at all ordered a new iPhone 5c?

PC1512

Good grief.

This whole article and most of the attached comments are so moronic it beggars belief. Reading this drivel has actually made me stupider.

Just put the apple loathing to one side and try to apply some rational thought to this, if all the butthurt allows you to. The 5C is a new iPhone yes, but it's not THE new iPhone. It's launch was never going to be on anything like the scale of an actual new generation iPhone, which is what the article is trying to draw a comparison with.

The 5C is a new product but Apple have been transparent about the fact that it's an iPhone 5 - last years phone - they constantly referenced that in the launch. And then of course they went on to launch the 5S as the new flagship. THAT is the phone they'll shortly be boasting opening weekend sales for.

The 5C will sell fine too, just like the 4S did last year after the 5 was announced, and all previous "now just $99" iPhones before that - but since it's based on older parts the supply will be plentiful and it's unlikely to ever sell out. It's not expected to.

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PC1512

Re: I've ordered a 5C

"I would rank <snip> that's objective too"

No, very clearly it isn't.

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Galaxy S4 way faster than iPhone 5: Which?

PC1512
Facepalm

Re: "fast enough"

Re the comment about the "myth" of iPhone updates - no, sorry, not a myth. It's true that not every iPhone gets every new feature, but it's also true that many new features do come to older iPhones via updates, along with a continual stream of improvements and security patches etc. Look at ios7 - literally the biggest overhaul to the platform since the first iPhone, with major changes not only to the look and feel of the UI but also the background stuff like multitasking, power management, networking etc - it'll come out on the inevitable iPhone 5S, but not only will it also be downloadable the same day for the iPhone 5, but the 4S from 2011, and even the 4 from 2010. What new OS will be released to the Galaxy S3 this year, let alone the S2 - and how about the Galaxy S, what update is that getting? Jack Schitt, that's what that's getting.

Personally I find it a bit laughable that a supposedly reputable review mag like Which would try and build a review based on some meaningless abstract benchmark that anyone could run - surely there's nothing here that isn't all over the web anyway. To the average Which reader (and in fact the average anybody) the raw CPU performance of these phones, which is all that's being testers here, is utterly meaningless. What happens is how quickly, and how well, the device actually performs its tasks as a smartphone - and a LOT of that has nothing to do with the CPU and everything to do with the software and the rest of the hardware package.

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Apple cored: Samsung sells 10 million Galaxy S4 in a month

PC1512

Right - so in a full month, Samsung have only managed to double what Apple sold in the first two days of their own launch.

And ok, Apple's quarterly figure includes sales of the two older iPhone models still on the market - but still show they're selling more than 10m per month long after the iPhone 5 could be considered new.

Yes, what a knockout success for Samsung. The boys at Cupertino may as well pack up now.

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NEW ITV Player app IS HERE ... for Samsung fandroids only. Ha ha

PC1512
Thumb Up

Odd

This apps always worked nicely for me, through successive versions. Never had a problem with it.

I'm pretty sure I'm running the latest version now, but I haven't got a Samsung.

Anyone want to guess what phone I'm using? ;)

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PC floggers scavenge for crumbs as Apple hoovers up profits

PC1512

Ah yes, the idiot tax

That's clearly the best way to describe the perceived premium on a product that more people want to buy. There can be no other explanation for people paying that "tax" other than that they're idiots. And of course no other explanation for the tax itself, since Apple's products are *exactly* the same as all the Windows-toting machines they compete with - right? Amazing that so many people keep missing that. Idiots! Happy, satisfied, productive, idiots.

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Samsung shoots Galaxy S III with shrink ray, unveils 4in Mini

PC1512

Re: Disappointing

To be fair this doesn't even compete with the 4S, which has a higher res screen, better camera, and far stronger processor. Plus iOS and much better build quality of course.

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Zuckerberg blew $1bn on Instagram 'without telling Facebook board'

PC1512
Thumb Up

Re: Fanboy chagrin?

Ah, I see - a total of three people on twitter didn't like it. Yes, that sounds more likely.

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PC1512

Fanboy chagrin?

"Instagram... saw a successful launch on Android, much to the chagrin of many an Apple fan."

I keep seeing statements like this, but where are all these heartbroken "Apple fans"?

I have an iphone, I've never actually downloaded Instagram, but it never occurred to me that it was Apple exclusive, or likely to stay that way if it was popular.. it's no secret that there are more Android handsets out there than iphones, so it seems a bit unlikely to me that anyone would be that upset or surprised by a social network expanding on to both platforms..

This supposed upset wouldn't be a little bit projected on the part of others, would it?

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Yet another OSX/Java Trojan spotted in the wild

PC1512

Re: There is some progress though

I'm still fan enough to point out that the cleaner for 10.6 came out last week.

Also, let's not pretend "the poor anti virus companies" aren't whooping for joy over this, after failing to peddle their wares to the mac community for a decade now. Regardless what's happened over the last month or so, it follows ten full years of corporate scaremongering over menaces that really didn't ever transpire, until now. Sophos, Kapersky, Norton et al will now, finally, do very nicely out this - whether or not any of their products would actually have prevented it..

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PC1512
FAIL

Re: Oh boy, here we go again.

I like my Mac, and OS X, and I think any sensible person (without an agenda to push) would concede that Mac's are still considerably more secure than Windows - but regardless of that, you sir are an embarrasment.

If you truly knew "how things worked" you'd know that these last couple of trojans are exploiting a weakness in the Java engine *built into OS X* - and it's OS X that's getting infected as a result. This is nothing whatsoever to do with Windows or "Lunix", whatever that is.

Up until last week, any perfectly stock Mac running Leopard, Snow Leopard or earlier, or a Mac running Lion but with the optional Apple-supplied Java runtime installed, was wide open to the Flashback trojan. No other software from Microsoft or anyone else needed to be installed. The result was a botnet of around 500,000 Macs, all running OS X just as Apple intended, and all infected.

This was only possible because Apple sat on the knowledge of this Java weakness for 6 weeks, before finally passing the update on last week. There's no question that they've completely ballsed this up for themselves, and all Mac users, and they need to learn from their mistakes quickly. I personally don't want to end up resorting to the Windows route of antivirus, but with this cock-up Apple are pretty much handing users like us to the likes of Sophos and Kapersky on a plate.

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Apple: We never said Siri would actually work in the UK

PC1512

I understood, like most "early adopters" at launch, that siri was in beta and not all features were in play yet. The only problem is, that was October, and since then we've seen zero progress - no further "beta" releases, no opportunity to feed back on the current beta, no road plan or indication of when we'll see a final product. So on balance, yep, Apple have disappointed me on this one.

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BUSTED! Secret app on millions of phones logs key taps

PC1512

Pretty typical fandroid response there - millions of Android phones potentially compromised and the first thing you can say is "ah, but the evil iPhone must be MUCH worse.."

Of course it must. Google is your best pal after all, I'm sure this is all just some misunderstanding... Just thank god you don't have one of those AWFUL iPhones eh..

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BlackBerry nicks iPhone's UK smartphone crown

PC1512

These figures predate the 4S launch, so your first paragraph is a bit irrelevant. Also early indications (4m sales in the first weekend alone, record launches for all carriers etc) don't really support your theory, despite all the supporting "fanbois" you may claim as friends.

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Vulcan bomber lives to fly another day

PC1512

Not so

British Airways made the necessary modifications to its fleet after the Paris crash cause was clear, lining the fuel tanks with Kevlar - they then relaunched the Concorde service to much fanfare. What eventually stopped it was not safety concerns or any enforced grounding, but the terrorist attacks of 911, which not only massively increased costs and suppressed air travel generally, but killed off several of concorde's most loyal transatlantic customers.

So in short, a wholly commercial decision on the part of BA, which had little to do with the Paris crash in the end.

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Apple iOS4 upgrade adds multitasking, folders... and pain

PC1512

Of course not

You, me, and many million others are just fine thanks - but the Register (and its commentards) don't want to hear about that.

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Apple iOS 4 update frustrates iPhone 3G owners

PC1512

User error

You'd have to ignore a warning not to sync, and if you didn't sync (and don't have it set up to sync and backup on each connection) then it's pretty much a given that you're going to lose your stuff. I doubt the installer "borked" anything, it just did what it said it would do.

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Apple Mac Mini 2010

PC1512

There is a fan

In fact you can see it quite clearly in the underside picture on page 2. One internal fan.

Despite that, I too would have some concerns about the heat... I'm not a big fan of Apple's preference for building in the PSU, I think there's a lot to be said for a separate power brick that (a) keeps its own heat to itself rather than the unit, and (b) can be replaced cheaply and easily when it inevitably fails. And Apple's internal PSUs do fail, unfortunately - just ask the owners of Time Machines of a certain age.

At £649 I'm just not convinced by these. A small, cheap Mac where you provide your own screen and keyboard is one thing, but this now isn't particularly cheap, and the crammed-in PSU creates an unwelcome point of failure.

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iPad gouges netbook sales

PC1512
Stop

Comment Fail

As claimed by Jobs and others, the iPad *is* intended to replace netbooks. It fits the gap between smartphone and (full blown) laptop, quite literally in Apple's lineup, and is the company's answer to the stripped down cheap laptop that everyone else has been selling in that space - aka the netbook.

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PC1512
Pint

So in other words

The industry pundits (including every other comment or article on the Register) got it wrong, and Apple didn't.

What a shocker.

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Hands on with Nokia's flagship N8

PC1512

Nokia with stopgap OS shocker

Seriously, isn't it about time Nokia stopped reeling from the appearance of the *2007* iPhone and actually produced something with a decent UI? From this review it's obvious that after all the excuses, this is just another stopgap phone with an inconsistent mess of old patched-up S60 still flopping all over the place. How much longer do they expect anyone to care?

One of the posters above tried to justify S60 on the basis that people put up with XP on their desktop. Here's a newsflash - XP is obsolete. People use it because they have to, but nobody *has* to use S60 on a new smartphone. There's simply nothing that it does that isn't done better, more easily, and more productively on other platforms.

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Apple store flakes after iPhone 4 price reveal

PC1512
Thumb Down

@Parsifal

"Of course since the majority of Articles of the Reg don't involve Apple"

How sure of that are you? Honestly?

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PC1512
Dead Vulture

Sigh

"Either way, surely even the most hardened fanboi will eventually get fed up of being either manipulated or simply forced to wait to order the phone of this year's dreams."

Or they'll, you know, try again later. Because they're normal.

Hands up who's tired of the Register's relentlessly bitter, self-defeating, reality-distorted and immensely boring coverage of every single iota of anything Apple related? For a company you profess (repeatedly, endlessly, in every preachy opinion piece and snarky comment) to dislike, you really are slavish in your attentions.

I don't know if you've noticed yet, but all the negative coverage you've been heaping on Apple for the last few years hasn't actually hurt Apple. They're doing fine and quite enjoying all the endless free publicity thanks very much. Meanwhile, I've no idea who the Register are anymore, or what point you serve.

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Buyer's Guide: Freeview HD TVs

PC1512

Alternative Freeview HD buyer's guide

1. Do nothing.

2. Ignore all the hype over a range of products that will be half the price and twice as good next year.

3. Buy an HD recorder with the money you save on your next telly.

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Apple debuts Safari 5 for Mac and Windows

PC1512

Webkit

As I understand it, although the Safari app itself isn't part of the Mac OS foundations (in the same way that IE is to Windows), the Webkit web rendering engine is, and updates to that generally come bundled with updates to Safari.

For the most part reboots are rare in Mac OS as the OS has the ability to safely overwrite files that are in use - something that Windows lacks. Safari (or more specifically Webkit) updates are one of the few exceptions to that.

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Mac spyware infiltrates popular download sites

PC1512
Pint

Yeah

The thing is, before you spout on even more about blind ideology getting in the way of the "truth" and the "facts" you really might want to take a gander at that Guardian article, the screenshots, think about how users downloading these screensavers are actually being expressly told that the screensavers come courtesy of them installing separate software called "PremierOpinion", and that said PremierOpinion is expressly designed to monitor and collect information about them and their habits, and that it won't be installed unless they say yes, and PremierOpinion (not the screensaver) would like your admin password please... and then tell me again that common sense won't protect you from this "trojan".

One of us is letting our personal bias colour our understanding of the actual story here, and it ain't me.

I'm not a sysadmin so I don't generally assume that all my fellow human beings are stupid. For those that are, yes, anti-virus can help - and it's even suggested by Apple on their security pages now, which I'm sure will have you positively frothing with delight. However, in this case I don't believe any competent computer user would have benefited from it at all since they would have seen this dodginess coming a mile off - in fact it announces itself quite clearly, which is probably why "reputable" download sites and software vendors didn't have a problem with its inclusion. By contrast, the lesser able user with anti-virus installed is probably far more likely to OK everything on the assumption that the anti-virus would stop anything bad, when in reality there's always a distinct possibility that it won't at all.

Speaking personally - and my Mac is my personal computer after all - I know that PremierOpinion would never have gotten on my computer since Mac OS X would have given me more than enough warning that it, and not some screensaver, was the app trying to gain admin rights.

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PC1512
Headmaster

Incidentally

Before I go, have a bit of perspective - here's the Guardian's report on this yesterday, which helpfully includes a screenshot of the agreement required to install this spyware - http://www.guardian.co.uk/technology/blog/2010/jun/02/apple-spyware-intego-discovery - as nasty as this all may be, that screenshot does explicitly state that "PremierOpinion" will be installed if the user agrees, and - if you read the blurb in full - explains that the software "monitors and collects" information on browsing, purchasing, hardware etc. And this is all presumably *before* you're subsequently asked for your admin password in order the software to install as root.

It may be a litlle sneaky, but it's not exactly a drive-by attack, is it?

You can even read all about PremierOpinion on their site here - http://www.premieropinion.com/FAQ.aspx

Oh, and it turns out that the complicated way you remove this evil malware from your compromised Mac is... by running the uninstaller provided. Or dragging and dropping the PremierOpinion folder in the trash (yes, it installs as a perfectly visible application in your applications folder - how sneaky is that?)

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PC1512
Heart

<<stupid things>>

Forgive me for not being wrong, but the clear inference in your previous post is that anti-virus will save us all from this terrible threat - when actually in this instance, as in most instances of a Trojan, it's actually a little common sense on the user's behalf that's key, and in fact the only certain way to avoid getting stung.

Ironically, you're busily perpetuating the myth of dumb, helpless Mac fanbois whilst pushing a failed security model that encourages users to absolve themselves of responsibility and put all their faith in a third party (antivirus vendors) that can and do get it wrong on a regular basis, and whose whole business case relies on the continued proliferation of these threats. Meanwhile, the level of "outbreaks" amongst those oh-so-dumb Mac users is infinitessemally small, while malware is practically pre-installed on the average Windows machine.

If you'd bothered to read anything I'm saying, you'd know that like most Mac users I'm well aware that my computer isn't "invulnerable", because like any computer it's at the mercy of its user - but without the entirely false sense of security provided by the likes of Norton peering over my shoulder and eating up my processor cycles 24/7, I actually take care over what I allow onto the system and pay attention to what the system's telling me, all of which would prevent this trojan and any others like it. Mac OS X certainly does alert me and ask permission about any applications asking for network access for the first time, and that alone would set off enough alarm bells over a screensaver.

Now I suggest you try balancing that massive chip on your other shoulder for a while, while I take my leave of your timewasting nonsense.

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PC1512
Coffee/keyboard

Oh dear

So it's ok to give a screensaver admin priviledges on your system, despite warnings from the system itself, as long as you've got antivirus to protect you right?

As long as the antivirus says it's ok, you'll just go ahead and run it. Yeah, that's security. Because antivirus is never wrong, and antivirus always knows how to recognise the latest malware before you install it, doesn't it.

Yup, must be a sweet deal running Windows. I guess that's why so few windows machines have malware installed, and Macs are so notoriously riddled with it.

One thing though - Mac OS X would not allow a screensaver to download anything by default (and I don't think that's what the report is suggesting happens either) - if it is, then that's just one more permission that the user has to expressly grant before this oh-so-dangerous attack gets to have it's wicked way with us defenceless fanbois.

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PC1512
Dead Vulture

Yawn

So once again, it's not a virus, or a worm, but a trojan. In other words, the one form of malware that could infect ANY system, as it relies on user error in order to circumvent any and every check and balance that could possibly be built into the OS.

In order to infect a Mac it requires an admin to enter their password (and not as some are inferring to steal that password, which it cannot do, but simply because OS X will identify it as potentially harmful and prevent it from installing until that password is entered). Heavy duty installation for a simple screensaver. I'm almost tempted to download and attempt to install one of these just to see exactly what warnings are given - I suspect they're ample.

The wintards leaping on this as proof of some form of vulnerability in Macs should ask themselves - what flaw needs patching? What security update is needed? What should Apple "fix" here? The truth is, there's nothing to fix in the system, since this "issue" is completely user-related. Unless you lockdown the computer entirely and "whitelist" apps, as per the iPhone and iPad, there's no defence against a *user* of any machine choosing to install a Trojan.

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Steve Jobs talks Flash, 'lying S.O.B' devs, sex, and Gizmodocrime

PC1512
Thumb Up

Yes

And that's why they were such a commercial failure.

Oh, wait...

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PC1512

3 years of iPhone flash denial

Show me a phone that was doing flash at all *well* during those three years of "denial".

Ask yourself why such a big deal is being made of the arrival of Flash 10.1 on the very latest Android phones. Has Android been "denying" flash previously?

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Steve Jobs beheads iPad apps for acting like desktops

PC1512

Hmm

I think you might be at more danger of people-who-understand-how-a-joke-works down votes.

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PC1512
Headmaster

1993 Factoid

UNIX != Linux, whether you care about that or not..

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PC1512

Widgets ahoy

There's something hilarious about this article, which is full of incredulity about how this app could possibly be described as "widgety" or as a "desktop", and is then capped off with a screenshot of the most widgety, desktop-like app you can imagine.

I mean seriously, it's a "photo frame" (because obviously neither the iPhone or iPad have a means of viewing a full screen photo built in) which just happens to overlay said photo (or "wallpaper" if I might coin that term) with a bunch of "layers". Only those layers are actually, very obviously, all the usual widgets you'd expect on a desktop replacement - which is exactly what this is.

How mysterious!

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PC1512

Nope

It's certified UNIX, nowt to do with Linux (aside from the fact that Linux is a cheap copy of UNIX).

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Windows Mobile Trojan frags gamers

PC1512

Proof?

You posted "proof" that Admob allowed some dodgy advertising through and that clicking on said advert could cost you money - the thing is, that's not malware, it's advertising. Advertising that could be inserted at anytime into any advert-supported app, regardless of the platform or appstore/vetting process (if any). Advertising that was in contravention of Admob's own rules, but was still not going to cost anyone anything if they didn't click on it.

You've proved that iAds might actualy be a great idea, but you haven't come up with any proof of malware being distributed by an appstore.

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PC1512

@ AC

Those that repeat a senseless mantra over and over without justifying it, look stupid. And a little paranoid if you don't mind me saying.

The truth is that in any and every civillised society we *do* sacrifice some liberty and *do* gain some security from that - it's called having government, and police, and a judicial system. Maybe you're not keen on them, but I think most people are probably generally in support of those concepts.

From where I'm sitting, those that give up their "liberty" by having an iPhone are perfectly secure, while those that insist on their "liberty" by jailbreaking their iPhones are less secure, and have been known to fall foul of malware. I don't really care who deserves what by your definition, I can only go by what I see

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PC1512

Eh?

What?

You're aware of an app distributed via a locked down appstore that has contained malware?

Do tell.

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PC1512
FAIL

Oh dear

I realise you're desperate to draw some kind of parallel, but if you read to the end of that blog post from *2007* -

"UPDATE: Apple has since added the ability to switch off "Data Roaming" for International travelers. See Settings -> General -> Network -> Data Roaming."

So basically we're talking about a missing feature that (a) has nothing whatever to do with appstores or third party apps, and (b) got fixed within months of the phone's release three years ago. Call the feds!

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PC1512
Happy

This gives an idea

You know, it's a shame nobody's come up with a way of validating apps before they can be run on a mobile phone - perhaps limiting access to them through one central "store" perhaps. That way the user could feel safe in the knowledge that those apps aren't going to do anything bad like this, and legitimate developers wouldn't have their good name tarnished by rogue apps like these.

Just a thought.

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Queuing for an iPad? Why?

PC1512
FAIL

hmm

So you bought an incompatible device thinking it was 50% larger than it is, despite the copious amounts of information available from Apple and elsewhere, numerous reviews, and the fact that where you are (in America) it's been available to view and play with in shops for a month or two already.

Yeah, that's Apple's fault. Stupid Apple.

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PC1512

Well not so much

As I said above, I haven't bought one because I can't afford it, so I'm neither "buying shit I don't need" nor spending "money I don't have".

If I spent the money I don't have on a netbook I don't really need instead, as I'm sure many have, presumably that would praised as a "wise" purchase?

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Regent Street blocked by iPad fanboi swarm

PC1512

@John 62

No it didn't, the first Spectrum had a rubber keypad with "proper" buttons, not touch sensitive by any description.

It's much more basic forerunner the ZX81 (and ZX80 before that) had "flat" keyboards using membranes for keys. Not really touch sensitive either by any definition we'd recognise now - they were physical buttons that you pressed, just not very hard.

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