* Posts by adrianrf

15 posts • joined 22 May 2010

Microsoft Surface: Designed to win, priced to fail

adrianrf
Facepalm

Re: Business

sales tax = 0% here in Oregon, too.

0
0

RIM share price nosedives following stinky numbers

adrianrf
Trollface

don't worry - they both upvoted your comment...

...so that's all right, innit.

0
0

Google unleashes (another) Facebook knock-off

adrianrf

indeed...

+1

(The post is required, and must contain letters.)

3
1

Apple tightens screws on hardware hackers

adrianrf
Grenade

hah! Apple used Torx fasteners over a decade earlier

"I've had a set of T6-15 bits since at least 1995"

sigh.

just another Johnny-come-lately to Macintosh…

my 1986-vintage Mac Plus used Torx screws to secure the case halves; and I strongly suspect so did the original 128K and 512K Mac cases going back to 1984.

(I myself got my first Torx driver in about '92, so I could crack the case of my Plus to install a rip-roaring 40MHz Total Systems Gemini 68030 accelerator card, with its gob-smacking 4MB of 60ns RAM.)

0
0

OOo's put the willies up Microsoft

adrianrf
FAIL

full-justification? seriously?

are you one of those duffers who still types two space chars after a period, too?

fully justified text is for the clueless, only; it markedly and obviously diminishes legibility.

<a href="http://www.amazon.co.uk/Mac-Not-Typewriter-Robin-Williams/dp/0201782634">Here's a book</a> you might benefit from reading.

(despite the title, the typographical content thereof isn't platform-specific; the Mac was simply the first platform to deliver routine, consistent access to sophisticated typesetting concepts previously the sole domain of graphic design and print production professionals.)

0
1

Fear as motivator: why Intel acquired McAfee

adrianrf

most of the eleventy-squillion was wasted...

the "Intel Inside" campaign is one of the biggest, lamest marketing flops of all time.

what's the unique brand promise that it's ever successfully established?

the Intel "experience" is for the vast majority of people really the Windows experience: vulnerable as hell; grinding to a halt after a few years of accumulating viruses etc., so you just go buy another box.

3
0

Apple iMac 21.5in 2010

adrianrf
Thumb Up

why on earth doesn't Apple try harder to…

cater to potential customers like Dead4Ever?

never mind; self-answering question.

0
0
adrianrf

"the price point for what you get doesn't seem justified" — sure; that must be why…

…Apple's repeat sales to existing customers keeping tanking, their brand is so universally reviled as a promise of post-sales remorse, disappointment and abandonment; and they're struggling not to be de-listed on the stock exchange.

because the post-sales value experience is so disappointing.

thanks for the insight.

1
2
adrianrf
WTF?

why would you go to the manufacturer for OoW repair?

you surely wouldn't be silly enough to do that with a Dell or HP box, would you?

the economics of the entire personal computer biz have long militated against that idea, for individuals.

all dis-/re-assembly procedures are well-documented on the the web: e.g. see iFixit.com. we're talking step-by-step, screw by screw, copiously photographed; complete with effective tips & tricks and warnings wherever needed about the odd lurking mechanical pitfall.

all recent (i.e. this millennium) Macs use commodity parts, just like PCs.

so buy a replacement/upgrade component, and put it in there yourself. it's not exactly hard.

1
0

Short passwords 'hopelessly inadequate', say boffins

adrianrf

Illegal account/password combination.

lol!

according to your mnemonic, you ain't getting in.

would

IomawSSBwwliMK.Iwi1990;i'snb

be what you meant, instead?

0
0
adrianrf

LastPass works pretty well for me

browser add-on in Firefox/Chrome/WebKit, supports OSX *and* that toy OS from Redmond WA.

took a while to get comfortable with their architecture and with them; but it's been working well for a year now.

makes it easy to end the password-reuse trap even the best of us are prone to; its generator supports arbitrary password length and character-set options; system has as export facility for local backups.

what I really want, though, is an end-to-end idiot-proof simplified UI for setting up SSH authentications. the infrastructure mechanism for creating and using great big digital keys obviously works well enough for people with the technical knowledge to configure and maintain their own server accounts, but is nightmarishly incomprehensible for the majority audience. it shouldn't be that way, and it doesn't have to be.

OpenID was/is a well-meaning effort to simplify things, but it of course has its own issues; its adoption ramp also seems to have stalled.

1
0

Tesla Motors: Elon Musk's divorce won't sink us

adrianrf

codswallop; lots of people have the "infrastructure" already

a significant majority of people in the US do a daily commute that's substantially shorter than the range of most of the recent EVs that are appearing on the market.

you drive your 'leccy barrow to work. you park it.

you put in your BOfH stint for the day. when the Boss's last twitches have subsided, you pop your cattleprod back into its handy holster, and pop back to the car park.

you commute home; when you arrive, you note there's easily enough charge left run a quick trip to WalMart for another case of Doritos, and and a swift pint or two down your local.

however, you decide to earn some much-needed Brownie points with SWMBO, so you park the heap inside your nice attached garage, and plug its cord into the wall socket.

finally, you go inside to irritate your spouse, hassle the kids, and doze off in front of the telly.

rinse and repeat.

the price of off-peak electricity is negligible by comparison with current gasoline prices. and with US offshore drilling frozen for a good long while to come, it's pretty easy to guess which way the trend will be heading from here on.

now, what with:

* the ever-declining cost of solar panels;

* the pretty hefty federal and State tax credits that offset the money-down lump you'll have to wave a fond goodbye to;

* the better-than-net-billing tariff which you can now count on in many States;

-- and your actual cost per mile driven is going leave you feeling pretty chipper.

1
1
adrianrf

yeah; yer man Lewis is trying much too hard to pee on electric cars

mechanically, the drivetrain of an electric vehicle is probably going to be in significantly better nick than yer bog-standard oil-guzzler at 100K miles; fewer bits whizzing around and vibrating and banging together; fewer bearings to wear out; less heat generated by bearing friction, etc. etc.

so you may well prefer to just refresh the batteries and press on.

I'm guessing we'll find that 250K mi becomes the new 100K mi ceiling: the point when you get that inner voice saying, "I think I'd better sell it before something expensive breaks".

not to mention, none of us knows what new battery tech will be available in another decade.

or, how much cheaper that tech may be, given that manufacturing volumes are clearly going to rocket up as essentially everyone switches to EVs, which should drop the marginal costs of batteries.

4
0
adrianrf
Big Brother

nothing useful in Afghanistan? you reckon?

hmm.

I'm sure the $100M Special Forces base that I just read today that our wonderful Murk'n gubmint is planning to build there must have *absolutely* nothing to do with oil anywhere close.

sure.

1
0

German boffins develop sharkskin paint for ships, planes

adrianrf
Alert

nope, that's the debunked Bernoulli effect myth

see http://danielmiessler.com/blog/what-you-learned-in-school-about-how-planes-fly-was-probably-wrong

0
0

Forums