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* Posts by chris lively

399 posts • joined 19 May 2010

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NASA finds ancient films that extend Arctic ice record by 15 years

chris lively
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Don't worry. The models will be retroactively changed to fit the picture.

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Is there life on Mars? Cloud-gazing Curiosity accused of lacking scientific focus

chris lively
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Heck, I'd be happy if they got some better picture of those "rocks". Like the one that looks like a skull or the engine looking thing from the initial landing.

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Dodgy Norton update borks UNDEAD XP systems

chris lively
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Bad Virus Updates vs Viruses

Isn't it time for someone to do a study that shows the number of computers killed by bad virus scanner updates vs the things they are supposed to be protecting us from?

It seems to me that we see more articles talking about virus scanners killing computers than we do viruses causing issues.

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Netflix releases home-grown DDoS detectors

chris lively
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Re: Unexpected consequences...?

Somehow I think carrying out an effective DDOS against Google and FB would be a tad difficult.

Also, I get the feeling that tools like this could be used for FAR more than just seeing if a group is considering performing a DDOS. Corporate people could use it just to monitor how they, or their products, are being spoken about...

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Oz fed police in PDF redaction SNAFU

chris lively
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Security by Obscurity...

Security by Obscurity fails again.

Shouldn't they have a training class on this by now?

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YES, iPhones ARE getting slower with each new release of iOS

chris lively
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I don't think the researchers went quite far enough in their "research". Counting google hits for search terms isn't good enough.

First up: not everyone updates their iOS immediately upon release. I don't have exact numbers but I don't know a single person who does it within the first month.

That said everyone I know experiences this slow down. It happens shorty after a new iphone is released and lasts for a few weeks. Then everything goes back to normal. This is without upgrading the apps or iOS on the afflicted devices. I think apple ( or the providers ) slows some services down, whether intentionally or not remains to be seen. Honestly, as I don't watch ads and never visit the apple site the way I know a new iphone is being released is when my phone starts slowing down.

As far as how they do it: these phones communicate with iCloud a LOT; far more than you would guess - and that doesn't show up on your phone usage bill. It would be trivial for someone like AT&T or Apple to slow down the traffic to those service points. Not enough to piss people off, but certainly enough to make them wonder if it isn't time to upgrade the phone....

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PCI Council wants YOU to give it things to DO

chris lively
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I propose that the PCI group just go ahead and disband. It's pretty worthless as it stands.

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GitHub.io killed the distro star: Why are people so bored with the top Linux makers?

chris lively
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Re: Booths?

I'm pretty sure that the only reason for trade shows anymore is as an excuse for people to not be at work.

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chris lively
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Re: DDG?

You know that DDG is based in the US? That it has to comply with US laws? You know, ones like "Do what the NSA says and you're not allowed to ever acknowledge it." Like, oh just pulling a random one here: tracking all your users and sending that data directly to a TLA (three letter agency)?

Please stop drinking the kool-aid and pay attention.

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Netflix swallows yet another bitter pill, inks peering deal with TWC

chris lively
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Re: I'm so confused

Yep, you are really confused with how business works.

Netflix has demonstrated that their data is being slowed down by various ISPs. To combat this they are doing two things. First, they are trying to get net neutrality signed which would prevent ISPs from intentionally screwing with traffic based on source. (It's common, easy to demonstrate and completely denied by the lying bastard ISPs) Second, they are signing deals with ISPs that will prioritize their traffic.

In other words they are trying to get the legal framework put in place so they don't have to sign these deals. While knowing that getting the laws passed is going to take quite a bit of time they are doing the only other thing they can for their customers which is to pay the bridge trolls.

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Stand clear! Will HTC's One act as a defibrillator for Windows Phone?

chris lively
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Yawn

Microsoft has a serious problem with staying on course while delivering fundamental functionality that shouldn't even be a question mark. Having issues playing audio is beyond stupid.

Does Microsoft know how to hire people that can manage and work in large teams? Or is it that they don't know how to hire programmers anymore? Seems like their development teams have been on a downward slide for a decade.

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SynoLocker Trojan crime gang: We QUIT this gig

chris lively
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Re: put your hand in your pocket, synology

Regardless of who is at fault, seems like a small price to pay for a NAS company in order to bail out your clients.

It would certainly leverage a tremendous amount of good will.... At least until you became a target again. Hmm. No wonder we don't *normally* negotiate with terrorists.

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chris lively
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Re: Scam?

Probably easier to get a hold of than the phone company as well.

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Govt control? Hah! It's IMPOSSIBLE to have a successful command economy

chris lively
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I think some of you, article writer included, are looking at this the wrong way.

A command economy doesn't need to account for left hand screws being different in different towns. That way lies madness. Instead a command economy says THIS is the screw for the people.

When you are trying to align everyone into a short list of goals then a command economy is perfect. For example, fighting WWII. However, if you are trying to empower people to live their own lives in the way they see fit, then a command economy is the worst possible thing as it removes personal choice.

Trying to shoehorn the idea of personal choice into a command economy is just moronic.

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Hello, police, El Reg here. Are we a bunch of terrorists now?

chris lively
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Re: Ask a policeman

I'm not sure I would call cops the "executive arm" of the justice system. They are the enforcers. If it looks like a crime is going on then it's their job to arrest (and/or shoot [depending on your country of residence]) everyone involved. Then they let the prosecutors (or whatever you call them) deal with it.

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chris lively
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"Sedition" isn't as catchy a phrase as "terrorism". I'm not convinced most people would know what sedition even is.

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Heartbleed implicated in US hospital megahack

chris lively
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Wrong culprit identified

At what point do we stop blaming a bug which PATCHES HAVE BEEN RELEASED FOR and start blaming the idiotic network admins who fail to apply said patches?

The title of this story should be: "Dereliction of duty by Network Admins implicated in US hospital megahack"

They said the attacks occurred between April and June. The patches were released on April 7. I'll grant them 3 days to do emergency testing and patch their systems (which is way too much). That leaves approximately 80 days of time in which these attacks should have been stopped cold.

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UK government accused of hiding TRUTH about Universal Credit fiasco

chris lively
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Re: Are there ANY success stories?

I disagree. Having a third party design the software is usually a bad idea.

The answer is to make sure that any given project doesn't exceed about 6 months worth of work, a year at the absolute most. As each piece is completed, let the consultants bid for the next piece while everyone, including the public, has total access to the source code. When sending in their proposal each company should be allowed to identify an area the want to recode along with the reasons for it.

That would solve a majority of this.

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Know what Ferguson city needs right now? It's not Anonymous doxing random people

chris lively
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Re: Postmortem shows killing shot could not have been delivered from behind.

Excellent right up.

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chris lively
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Re: Anonymous Fools ...

The problem is I'm not sure which store I'm supposed to loot from and burn down. What's the racial identity of the anon member that posted the wrong name?

As you can tell I'm ill informed but trying to make sure I hit the right target - probably means I'd be a lousy rioter. Maybe I should just stay home.

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chris lively
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Re: CaptainDaFt Meh

I agree with the sentiment, but what qualifies as a proper journal report?

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chris lively
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Re: Ahh, vigilante "justice"

Oh, I don't know, probably because it's highly likely to have occurred. People get death threats for just posting contrary views on the net. I'd bet my house that death threats, yes more than one, were sent shortly after a target was identified.

Unfortunately that's the jacked up world we live in. Anonymous had no business releasing that info. Especially considering it was wrong and very easily identified as such.

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Visual Studio Online goes titsup as Microsoft wrestles with database

chris lively
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I bet they were using LINQ. That stuff is garbage.

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Fifteen countries KO'd in malware one-two punch

chris lively
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Nations spend hundreds of millions, and in some cases billions, of dollars to secure their networks.

At what point does it make financial sense to code your own operating system and application suite that instead of using consumer grade crap?

None of the current vendors have shown that device and network security is the most important item. For anyone that thinks network security isn't possible: you're delusional because it is. What isn't possible is leaving it up to entities that base decisions on how much it costs them to clean up afterwards.

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Canadian ISP Shaw falls over with 'routing' sickness

chris lively
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Sounds to me like they are doing DPI and playing with how to throttle certain traffic. They should probably call verizon and time warner to get some help

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IBM boffins stuff 16 million-neuron chips into binary 'frog' brain

chris lively
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Expand / Refine / Sustain

In the timeline, it's the Expand, Refine and Sustain parts that worry me. Well that and the part on the right that looks a bit incomplete.

I suspect they are hiding "Phase 5" which is when they take over the world.

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Americans to be guinea pigs in vast chip-and-PIN security experiment

chris lively
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This is all about liability.

If I enter a PIN code and that code is stolen ( incredibly likely given the complete lack of security for most retailers ) then it is far easier for a thief to drain my bank account (debit card). Which can cause a lot of issues.

If I choose to do a signature and the card number is stolen, then it's all on the bank(s) to figure out what's going on and the money doesn't leave my account.

I just can't see a situation in which using a PIN code is a worthwhile idea.

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Wait, an actual QR code use case? TGI Friday's builds techno-restaurant

chris lively
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I honestly don't see how TGI is still in business. The food is horrible, why do people subject themselves to that garbage. If it was horrible AND cheap then I might be able to understand.. but it's not.

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London cops cuff 20-year-old man for unblocking blocked websites

chris lively
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Re: even if he did...

Did you run a background check on the individual to make sure they haven't already bought 10 hammers?

What did you do to ensure that they haven't been accused of participating in a violent crime in the past?

Did the individual say anything you thought was suspicious?

If the answers to the above questions aren't satisfactory then, yes, you have committed a crime.

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Now even Internet Explorer will throw lousy old Java into the abyss

chris lively
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Re: pretty big peg

Please do tell.

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chris lively
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" Internet Explorer will begin alerting users when web pages try to launch ActiveX controls that are considered out-of-date and potentially insecure."

All ActiveX controls will be blocked by default? Woot!

"Microsoft will maintain the list of verboten ActiveX controls itself and will update it as new versions are released or new vulnerabilities are uncovered."

Oh... So typical Microsoft crap. They have a good idea and, as usual, barely implement the important bits.

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China cracks down on instant messengers: Users must hand over REAL NAMES

chris lively
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Coffee/keyboard

Wouldn't it be better if we just disconnected that entire country from the Internet already?

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Microsoft throws old versions of Internet Explorer under the bus

chris lively
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Re: I only wish....

Sounds like you are working in a place whose only real answer is to fire IT administration. I'd leave

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Intruder alert: Cyber thugs are using steganography to slip in malware badness

chris lively
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Re: So how do current versions get installed?

This is what I was wondering as well.

Who cares if updates are hard to detect. It still requires a program on the infected computer to receive and process the image correctly. THAT should be detectable; evidenced by the fact they say 350k computers are compromised.

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US cyber-army's cyber-warriors 'cyber-humiliated by cyber-civvies in cyber-games'

chris lively
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Re: Maybe they have the wrong concept?

If you don't know the myriad of ways that something can be taken down and, more importantly, the principals of how those ways work, then you will never understand how to put up a defense. Period.

Yes, there are lots of ways to configure networks and "secure" applications. There are even plenty of industry "standards" for what you should do. What's lacking are people who understand WHY those standards exist. If you know WHY, then you can make an informed decision on how to lock things down while understanding the areas that are just completely missed.

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Windows 8 market share stalls, XP at record low

chris lively
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The whole Touch Screen paradigm is not for normal desktop use.

The top applications for a regular computer is email, word processing and web browsing. Two of those require lots of keyboard input. Although the last one doesn't, holding my arms in the air all day just isn't worth it. Never mind that most of us have dual monitors and probably have a dozen applications running... So, what's the solution? Simple: have an interface that works well with keyboard and mouse control... Win7 did this.

I worked on touch screen apps in the mid 90s, there is a purpose, but it's not general computer use. If you have one application, whose operation is limited to a small set of actions then touch screens are perfect. Beyond that: waste of money.

Finally, whoever thought that a single OS INTERFACE across mobile, desktop and server usage was a good idea should be flogged. That wasn't what developers wanted. We wanted a single OS under the covers so that we didn't have to know 3 different APIs to build programs. They missed the entire point. Again.

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Lawyer for alleged Silk Road kingpin wants all evidence thrown out

chris lively
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Re: Verdict decided then

Let's say it was caught on the neighbors video camera. And let's say the Police then broke into the neighbors house and took the video. No search warrant, no notification to the owner. The owner comes home to see his door smashed down.

Now, should that evidence be admissible? No because it was not properly obtained. The entire point of those "technicalities" is to ensure that those enforcing the law are behaving correctly. If it was admissible then the police could, at any point, decide to break down your door and search your house just looking for something to charge you with. There is a reason these rules and laws are in place.

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chris lively
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In a society ruled by law it is imperative that the ones sworn to uphold it are held to at least the same standards as everyone else. If the agencies responsible for collecting the data they are prosecuting him with have ignored, broken or even just "bent" the laws then the entire case needs to be thrown out.

I don't care what this guy did. If our society is hell bent on prosecuting people without following the rules then we don't have much of a society.

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65 patches later and Java STILL breaks stuff

chris lively
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Instead of comparing the update schedule of an entire operating system to java, it would probably be better to compare the update schedule of the .net framework. I'm pretty sure there is an order of magnitude difference between them.

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chris lively
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Another day, another java problem. ho hum.

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Brits STUNG for up to £625 when they try to cancel broadband

chris lively
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Isn't this the sort of thing the regulators are supposed to fix?

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Plane grounded so cops can cuff semi-legless passenger

chris lively
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Why is it important to the story that she was unemployed?

Lots of people are unemployed, that doesn't mean that you should be afraid of them.

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Thirteen Astonishing True Facts You Never Knew About SCREWS

chris lively
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Re: The simple answer is usually the obvious one

And here I thought it was the Minutemen just screwing with us...

( http://en.wikipedia.org/wiki/A_Matter_of_Minutes )

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Philip K Dick 'Nazi alternate history' story made into TV series

chris lively
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I don't see how this will go over well with the public.

Just mentioning the word "Axis" and most movie goers at this point will have no clue what you are talking about. Throw in a setting of an alternate reality in the 60s and I think the public won't know what to make of it.

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US Social Security 'wasted $300 million on an IT BOONDOGGLE'

chris lively
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Okay, I read the document. Just wow. They had an example of something that should be a quick fix: "user should be able to hit the ENTER key to activate the "submit" button function." Seriously? That isn't a given? That doesn't bode well for how the rest of the system works.

Also, what's up with the blacked out pages? What could be more damning of the SSA's handling of the project that it needs to be hidden from public view?

I have to say that the auditor did a great job though. Looks pretty thorough. Page 20 summed up my previous comment here nicely.

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chris lively
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Having worked with many government and IT entities, the break down here is obvious:

1. Large company uses time and materials method for project billing.

2. Large government entity with mass of people each of whom have near equal say in project requirements that are often contradictory and certainly changing as they think of new things.

3. Profit until someone gets mad.

You need competent leadership when dealing with time and materials projects; preferably the person holding the purse strings will do nicely. The IT company will certainly not stop you from changing your mind a dozen times for the color scheme alone. Happily charging you for every little thing. So, it's best to know exactly what you want before you engage.

Now if the contract is on a fixed bid, it is in the IT company's interest to freeze the requirements they bid on and say no to all the changes. For these projects you want to have clear timeframes for delivery which include penalties for being late and bonuses for completing early.

Honestly, I have no idea why anyone agrees to start projects that are in that price range. As failure is the most likely outcome. If you want to be successful, then you make a road map of where you want to be and lay down the foundation for getting there: one piece at a time. Where each piece is bid on (fixed), and achievable within 6 to 9 months. Any project that takes longer than that is just too much.

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MARS NEEDS OCEANS to support life - and so do exoplanets

chris lively
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Re: Man's gotta know his limitations.

Just means they didn't pack enough Alcohol.

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Lawyer reviewing terror laws and special powers: Definition of 'terrorism' is too broad

chris lively
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Re: I have argued for many years

You should drop the word "intelligent" when applying that to a teenager.

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You! Pirate! Stop pirating, or we shall admonish you politely. Repeatedly, if necessary

chris lively
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I think I know the answer here.

Just tack on a "media tax" to the VAT. Then, have the UK government set up their own TOR feed that the creators post to. Whenever it's downloaded the treasury can pay them accordingly.

No need for lawyers or useless ad campaigns. Just let your government take care of it like everything else.

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New BOMB detect-o-tech 'could give sniffer dogs competition': TRUE

chris lively
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Great article. As each paragraph unfolded I found it answering the various questions I had and addressed my thoughts around the feasibility of the tech. Keep it up.

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