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* Posts by Bernard M. Orwell

426 posts • joined 12 May 2010

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Oi, London thief. We KNOW what you're doing - our PRECRIME system warned us

Bernard M. Orwell

Re: More like…

It's a reference to "WatchDogs", but your definition is close enough, Irony.

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Bernard M. Orwell

More like...

...CtOS than Minority Report...?

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Israeli spies rebel over mass-snooping on innocent Palestinians

Bernard M. Orwell

How About...

.... we make Jerusalem an independant city state, like the Vatican City....

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Virgin Media blocks 'wankers' from permissible passwords

Bernard M. Orwell

Re: "at a company i used to work at"

I believe its entirely possible that I've not long finished working for that company, and yes, they did encrypt everything. I don't recall a message about "top management" however, but they were certainly big enough tossers to do something like that.

It was clear, each and every day, that they trusted management, demanded results without resources and wanted to reduce technical headcount constantly.

A**s....sorry, *they* were deeply stupid as a company and that probably explains why they've been losing contracts hand over fist of late and are not long for the UK market.

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GCHQ protesters stick it to British spooks ... by drinking urine

Bernard M. Orwell

Re: Fed the scum?

Is that troll I scent? :D

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Rickety rock deemed unworthy of Curiosity's drill

Bernard M. Orwell

Re: A stone?

...they'd say it was clearly for ritual purposes. It's what they say when they don't know.

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Video of US journalist 'beheading' pulled from social media

Bernard M. Orwell

Re: Western morality

There is no greater evil than wilful ignorance.

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Bernard M. Orwell

We go to war for many reasons....

...but usually for unjust ones.

"..a convert to Islam who describes himself as "anti-democracy, loyal to the Caliphate, harsh on kuffar".

In other words, a complete idiot, poorly educated, gullible and misled. A worshipper of sky-fairy #117, a murderer, unrepentant for his crimes and willing to commit more unless his personal demands are met.

You want an enemy? Here it is. A war worth fighting or we will all be consumed by its mad-dog philosophy.

Israel? Hamas? More sky-faires. Just as bad. We need to stop respecting religion and treat it like the wasting sickness it has clearly become.

It needs to be excised and cured.

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MPs to sue UK.gov over 'ridiculous' EMERGENCY data snooping law

Bernard M. Orwell

Re: Boring Bernie Erroneous Cowherd Contempt

I'm not debating with you, Matt, for precisely the reasons I have stated elsewhere. Instead, I am planting a warning for others who might think it's worth their time engaging with you.

As I have gone to quite some lengths to explain, I don't call you a troll because you have opposing views to mine on many subjects, but because you are verbally abusive to everyone who disagrees with you, or even to those who agree with you but whose posts you have failed to comprehend.

As I have said, elsewhere, I value well considered and researched opposing views; they assist in refining my own thinking. You, however, are deliberately and consistently abusive in your debating, therefore you are a troll.

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Bernard M. Orwell

Re: Conspiracy Theory

"There is actually an extensive, ongoing, developed monitoring of a specific known threat. Why else would ALL parties agree to this rushed legislation."

Yes, it's called The Public.

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Bernard M. Orwell

Re: Erroneous Cowherd Contempt

"I am a British voter that was quite content to see the bill passed, if you think I am in some tiny minority then it seems the majority of MPs from all three parties did not."

Don't feed the troll.

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NSA man: 'Tell me about your Turkish connections'

Bernard M. Orwell

Salient Lesson....

....don't bother going to America unless you have to. They hate our freedoms.

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NSA dragnet mostly slurped innocents' traffic

Bernard M. Orwell

Re: Boring Bernie Roominant Anon Cluetard Roominant

"gat a real" - I don't know what that means.

I shall clarify; unlike some I am always prepared to listen to reasoned argument and examine evidence. If swayed, my opinion will change. I have no place for "faith" in my thinking. I would be interested in hearing more from you, but only when, and if, you stop being personally abusive to anyone who disagrees with you. In the meantime I won't debate with you at all.

Act like a reasonable adult, or be ignored.

I trust that is clear enough this time.

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Bernard M. Orwell

Re: Boring Bernie Roominant Anon Cluetard Roominant

No, I won't.

Because you are self-righteous, arrogant and offensive in manner.

If you look back, you will find posts from me praising your ability to uncover information and provide argument backed with citation. You have often caused me to review and even revise my opinions, but only when you are being civilised in your discourse.

I don't have a problem with your point of view, though I feel it is misguided and almost certainly the acitivity of a habitual troll, but I do have a problem with how you address people in general.

When you are able to debate in a grown up fashion, I may reconsider.

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Bernard M. Orwell

Re: Boring Bernie Roominant Anon Cluetard Roominant

My post wasn't intended for you, Matt. I am uninterested in your opinion and will not engage with your abusive manner.

TTFN.

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Bernard M. Orwell

Re: Roominant Anon Cluetard Roominant

On the subject of Evidence of Harm.

There can be little doubt that the NSA and its TLA allies are very good indeed at keeping things secret, including statistical evidence of the effectivness of their methods and activities, both positive and negative. Whilst it is not unreasonable to ask for evidence of harm, it would also not be unreasonable to ask for evidence of success equally. I'm afraid that asking for evidence of no harm is indeed asking for a negative to be proven and that, whilst possible, can be difficult to do.

[http://en.wikipedia.org/wiki/Proving_a_negative]

Furthermore, quantification of harm seems to be a question here; are we looking for examples of harm to specific individuals, movements or groups or are we seeking a broader image of what harm may be? Given the TLA's ability to keep the specific details of specific incidents under wraps, I am going to address the second point: broad-brush harm to people as a whole, and it would appear there is certainly a measure of evidence of such.

Firstly, lets look at the easy one: the dissolving and undermining of trust in Government. Whether or not the allegations are true, it is hard to disagree that covert actions were taken against civilian populations by their elected governments and without their specific consent. The revelation of these activities has vastly eroded the trust of the average citizen in their government process. We are less engaged and more hostile towards the function of government and that is not conducive to a balanced and progressive society. Government has forgotten who it serves, and the populace have forgotten that they need to trust Government for it to function. That damage to an important relationship has severe repurcussions for society as a whole, restricting innovation, business, economics, social pyschology, advancement and mobility.

http://www.theguardian.com/science/head-quarters/2013/aug/26/nsa-gchq-psychology-government-mass-surveillance

http://www.lewrockwell.com/lrc-blog/the-nsa-spying-on-americans-violates-the-fourth-amendment/

Secondly, mass surveillance is divisive and causes distrust and hate amongst communities. It can be argued, fairly easily, that the monitoring of certain social groups causes widerspread distrust of those monitored groups in general. This, in extremis, could be viewed as "hate speech" or "incitement to racial hatred". I hate to use a hitler reference, but this demonisation of certain cultural groups is reminiscent of how the jewish population were portrayed in 1930's Germany. These days its protestors, atheists, socialists and muslims.

Additionally, the monitoring of these groups can reinforce the opinions and preachings of radical elements, leading to a galvanising of opinion against the government by these groups. In short, telling everyone they are dangerous terrorists and they are being watched is likely to increase radicalisation which in turn exacerbates the issue.

http://www.newyorker.com/online/blogs/closeread/2014/07/the-nsas-spying-on-muslim-americans.html

Next, it can be shown that mass surveillance harms the economic welfare of the state in question. In a capitalist country, where the health of the free market is of paramount importance, anything that undermines it is clearly anathema to the well-being of that state. It can already be seen that some corporations are taking a financial hit as a result of surveillance, either against them or as a result of their own participation, forced or voluntary.

http://www.nytimes.com/2014/03/22/business/fallout-from-snowden-hurting-bottom-line-of-tech-companies.html?_r=0

http://yro.slashdot.org/story/13/11/15/159220/how-the-nsa-is-harming-americas-economy

It can also be argued that the surveillance programs undermind the political integrity of a nation, damaging its reputation at both a domestic and international level, placing the power of political capital into the hands of unelected and unaccountable NGOs and covert bodies. In turn, this could be used to sway politics to suit the interests of specific groups, rather than serve the democratic process as a whole.

http://www.theatlantic.com/politics/archive/2014/01/the-danger-of-nsa-spying-on-members-of-congress/282827/

http://reason.com/archives/2014/03/31/nsa-surveillance-and-the-dangers-of-power

My penultimate point adresses the harm to the legal process, to justice and to the rights of the individual to defend themselves against accusation. Destruction of evidence, covert surveillance and secret courts and not conducive to an open and transparent judicial process. Undermining the tenets of fair and equitable justice leads people to distrust and dismiss those processes, which in turn has, throughout history, led to massive civil unrest and thats no good for anyone, government, business or population alike.

https://www.techdirt.com/articles/20140605/17055527488/doj-admits-its-still-destroying-evidence-nsa-case-judge-orders-them-again-to-stop-doj-flips-out.shtml

https://www.eff.org/press/releases/eff-court-theres-no-doubt-government-destroyed-nsa-spying-evidence

http://arstechnica.com/tech-policy/2014/06/court-terror-suspect-cant-get-nsa-evidence-gathered-against-him/

Finally, I would like to ask about the cost/benefit ratio for these programmes of surveillance. We can see, from public records, that the cost to taxpayers of these systems is extremely high, often rivalling military spending or welfare spending in the countries that operate them. Are they effective programs or is harm being done to the taxpayers project just because tech. companies have successfully cajoled and lobbied their way into large, expensive contracts? Can we prove that either way? Do these systems actually work? Do they do what we are being told they do, or are they used for other purposes? Without clarity on these things there will always be large sections of the population who simple will not, and should not, trust the words of mere "talking heads" on the matter. Let's see some evidence of success.

http://gizmodo.com/nsa-phone-spying-is-useless-in-preventing-terrorist-att-1500194959

https://www.schneier.com/blog/archives/2014/05/the_nsa_is_not_.html

http://thinkprogress.org/security/2014/01/13/3153201/nsa-america/

In closing, I would like to reinforce that I am not presenting any of these arguments or articles as evidence of harm to specific individuals or groups, but as discussion of the potentiality of such harm to society as a whole. I look forward to a reply showing, as clearly, the benefits of mass surveillance to us all, making the costs to political integrity, national economy, trust in public bodies, de-radicalisation of extermist elements, strengthening of foreign and domestic relations and reinforcement of a transparent and fair legal system all worth it.

My thanks to those of you that have read the whole post!

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Bernard M. Orwell

Re: A small fly in the ointment

You may commit a crime tommorow.

Best arrest you today then.

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Bernard M. Orwell

Re: Oh, well...

To be fair, and speaking as one who has undergone such a process, these kind of risk are normally very carefully managed and each analyst will be subject to an extensive vetting process that will determine their independant level of risk. Duties are normally assigned in accordance with those findings.

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Bernard M. Orwell

Re: Dan 55 mooooooity OMGeeez!!! What a DISASTER!!! We're all DOOOOMED!!! Etc.

If we're of no interest, then they can stop gathering data on us.

Pretty simple.

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Battle ready: Valiant Hearts and Company of Heroes: Western Front

Bernard M. Orwell

Re: > it's => its

One should perhaps try to understand some popular sub-culture....

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What is ex-NSA spyboss selling for $1m a month, asks US congressman

Bernard M. Orwell

Re: Boring Bernie Roominant Apdsmith AC Military Industrial Congressional Complex

I believe I am free to use the same argumentative methods as you, Mr By Rant. Go away and bleat elsewhere please.

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Bernard M. Orwell

Re: Boring Bernie Roominant Apdsmith AC Military Industrial Congressional Complex

Which, of course, you never do.

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Bernard M. Orwell

Re: Roominant Apdsmith AC Military Industrial Congressional Complex

Iraqwatch is one site of several maintained by Wisconsin Project on Nuclear Arms control, a not-for-profit NGO.

The Wisconsin Project receives financing through grants from the U.S. government and from several private foundations, the identities of which are undisclosed.

Draw your own conclusions.

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Facebook goes TITSUP across WORLD! Who will look at your cousin's baby NOW?

Bernard M. Orwell

Re: 'Anonymous' DDOS?

Someone needs to read some Tsun Tzu, or read some history about the fall of the Roman Empire. It's not wise to underestimate the enemy, even if they are barbarians.

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Snowden shoots back: 'So you DO have my emails, after all'

Bernard M. Orwell

Re: Sir Rediculous Loon Marsbarbrain Oh Boner "the potential source...."

Good try, mr Spoon, but you half to remember you are dealing with a halfwit.

My advice is to not engage with a moron.

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NSA: Inside the FIVE-EYED VAMPIRE SQUID of the INTERNET

Bernard M. Orwell

Re: Outrage

"There is no way of intercepting (say) an email from Boko Haram giving the location of the Nigerian girls, without intercepting everybody else's email as well."

Even with all of this surveillance infrastructure, nothing could be done to locate these girls. In fact, I *keep* seeing incidents of "terrorism" of this nature happening. I thought that empowering the TLA's was intended to protect people? If thats so, then the system they've designed IS NOT WORKING and is therefore just a collosal waste of money... ...unless it has another purpose of some kind?

7/7, the murder of Lee Rigby, the time it took to find Bin Laden (Eventually found after an informant changed sides), the rise of Boko Haram, even 9/11 itself have ALL occured since the founding of 5i, Echelon and many of the systems and methods described by Mr Snowden.

If nothing else, surely this indicate that the system is simply not fit for purpose and is a burden on taxpayers that need not exist?

On a closing note; can all of you saying "well, we all KNEW they were spying, why are we suprised?" just shut the hell up? Some of us have been warning of mass surveillance and government cover-ups for years...

....you called us "Conspiracy Nuts" and dismissed us as "tin foil hat wearers".

Finding the Red Pill a little more tasty now are you?

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Tennessee bloke cuffed for attempting to shag ATM – police

Bernard M. Orwell

But....

Did the police hang around in hope of seeing the Money Shot?

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Parent gabfest Mumsnet hit by SSL bug: My heart bleeds, grins hacker

Bernard M. Orwell

I didn't realise that you all went to MumsNet to find a shag.

Explains a lot.

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Labour calls for BIG OVERHAUL of UK super-snoop powers in 'new digital world'

Bernard M. Orwell

Translation

"At one point, she noted that master NSA squealer* Edward Snowden had damaged the image of national security by exposing the scale of surveillance being carried out by spooks on both sides of the Atlantic."

Translation: "Oh god! We got caught! We're sorry we got caught! We'll make sure we don't get caught again! It was so bad of us to get caught! We look soooo bad because we got caught!"

*I doubt the minister used the word "squealer". I suspect that someone else applied that particularly choice term for some other, unbeknown reason.

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Snowden documents show British digital spies use viruses and 'honey traps'

Bernard M. Orwell

Re: BlueGreenLoser ObnoxiousLiar Boring Bernie Pseudointelligence Coward

I agree entirely, Pseudo.

In the past I have enjoyed debate with Matt Bryant, even though he has opposite views to my own. He often appears quite well researched and on many occasions has caused me to question and inspect my own views and evidence. I come here for rational and reasoned debate and the Register forums rarely disappoint.

Recently, however, he has become aggressive, illogical and personally insulting and I can't debate anything with that.

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Bernard M. Orwell

Re: BlueGreenLoser ObnoxiousLiar Boring Bernie Pseudointelligence Coward

I've not been attacked by wolves recently either.

Gents, (I exclude Bryant from that collective), I suggest we stop feeding the troll as obvious troll is obvious.

I, for one, am no longer going to respond to his illogical, ill-informed, abusive ranting.

Care to join me in allowing him to piss into the wind alone from now on?

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This post has been deleted by a moderator

Bernard M. Orwell

Re: Boring Bernie Pseudointelligence Coward @Matt Bryant "clutching your little red book"

Wow! yeah! they REALLY stopped him from carrying out his mission didn't they?! Let's take a look at the text of this news report....

"The 41-year-old, from Crawley in West Sussex, is *believed* to have carried out a suicide truck bombing in the city of Aleppo last Thursday."

So, our airport checks really worked well there. They must've forgotten to tell him to take his shoes off or let him take a bottle of water onto the plane headed for Syria! It's not like they had clues that he might be a suspect worth watching....

oh. Wait....

"The BBC understands the suspected bomber was part of a study circle in Crawley, which also included Omar Khyam, a man jailed for life in 2007 for a bomb plot."

I think even Scooby and Shaggy might've seen that one coming.

"Officials have not confirmed his identity, citing lack of DNA evidence.".

Couldn't find any in the house? couldn't scrape enough off the ground in the target site? Bravo, police, bravo!

"Anti-terror police are searching a house in Martyrs Avenue, Langley Green, as part of the investigation."

Martyrs Avenue? Really? Think GCHQ spooks may have missed a vital clue there. (Comedy value, rather than real observation.)

"The suspect is believed to have been responsible for a bomb attack at a prison in Aleppo that resulted in inmates escaping."

Believed? By whom? The newspaper? Citation please.

"The bombing, in the north of Syria, is thought to have been the first to be carried out in the country by a Briton"

We don't know who did it. We don't know if they were a Briton. We don't know if any Britons have done it before.

I'm so glad they are spending so much time and money on SigInt. For our safety. Pretty sure Lee Rigbys family would agree.

Got anymore examples or evidence of success, Matt? You might want to read the article first this time.

PS. I'm unfortunately unable to discuss my current job publicly so I can't answer your rebuttal as to my experiences as much as I would love to, but I will say that I am fairly certain I have more first (and second) hand experience of these things than most do, though I don't know what you do for a living so won't compare my experiences directly to yours nor make assumptions about them.

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This post has been deleted by a moderator

Bernard M. Orwell

Re: Pstupidlyevaisve Reality check for Mr Snowden....

"So you want to try switching attention by suggesting spelling mistakes by highlighting a part of my post with no spelling mistakes?"

I think it was you that started that particular bun fight, Matt, with the quote below:

"please do check your "Idiots' Guide to being a Revolutionary" for the correct spellings of such terms as lackey, Imperialist running dog, etc."

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Bernard M. Orwell
Trollface

Re: Reality check for Mr Snowden....

Shows that he is typing quickly; Probably with a sweat, flushed cheeks and occasional twitches in his chair.

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This post has been deleted by a moderator

Bernard M. Orwell

Re: Pseudointelligence Coward @Matt Bryant "clutching your little red book"

I do enjoy it when you are called out on a point that you have trouble defending and have to resort to saying "Duhhh. I was being sarcastic" or "Duhhh. Don't you know when to take a joke."

My children do that too.

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CCTV warning notices NOT compliant with data protection laws – ICO

Bernard M. Orwell

Re: What about Bus Lane cameras

What about *all* CCTV cameras? If you're recording me, my actions or my movements, even passively, then surely I should have a right to know who you are and what you are doing with my data? Or does this fall under the same "Expectation of Privacy" rules we apply to photographers?

I fear we can't have this both ways....

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Fancy a little kinky sex? GCHQ+NSA will know - thanks to ANGRY BIRDS

Bernard M. Orwell

Is it just me.....

...that finds the idea of the NSA collecting Intel via an app wherein little black birds are propelled at buildings to demolish the defences of the fat, greedy piggies to be more than a little ironic?

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Valve gives Oculus Rift a whirl with SteamVR mode

Bernard M. Orwell
Trollface

Re: Can you ask VALVe about the State of SFS

*Murphy's

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'You win, Kanye': Coinye creators throw in towel after rapper sues

Bernard M. Orwell

It's clearly true...

....he loves fishsticks.

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Snowden docs: NSA building encryption-cracking quantum computer

Bernard M. Orwell

Re: Boring Bernie None of this...

It is highly naive to believe that our "current situation" is driven by any need other than profit.

But I expect nothing less from you MB.

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Bernard M. Orwell

None of this...

...requires any deep "conspiracy theory"

During the Cold War, spying was big business. A lot of money was spent by nations in the interests of "national security". Whole entities came into being as a result; GCHQ, MI6, NSA, etc etc, along with a vast industry to provide and support those services.

With the end of the Cold War, those financial interests were staring at The Wall and seeing their end in sight. With the events of 9/11 it was easy for those interests to create lobbying to convince a weak and ill-informed government that the threat was much larger and more cohesive than it appeared. Systems, technologies and methods were sold on the basis of that threat.

As time passed more systems were created, threats were expounded upon by NGOs, lobbyists and public groups that had all bought into the expertly created "null scenario" and the market expanded. New investment opportunities appeared and new business was created to take advantage. In an era of financial instability ANY new business was good business, even if it were founded upon complete nonsense. What was important was that money could be made.

Not only was it a "good day to bury bad news" but also a good day to turn a profit. Create a new tech, lobby the government to buy the tech, convince everyone that they need the tech to keep them safe, get the gov. to buy new, better tech and keep up the tales of imminent destruction and the need for security, pay for "research" to support that market, develop new tech..... repeat ad nauseum.

This is not without precedent, take a look at the drug industries and see how they "remap" pharmaceuticals every year to expand potential markets without the need to create new drugs. They just create new "conditions" that old drugs, it just so happens, treat.

No conspiracy required, no evil cabal plotting world domination, just day to day business-as-usual. Everything is exactly as it always is and all is driven the Great Good that is Profit.

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Bernard M. Orwell

Re: skelband Anyone remember "Freedom is the right to be uncomfortable."

So deeply retarded a response I can't even be bothered to downvote it.

Your standards are dropping, MB.

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Snowden to warn Brits on Xmas telly: Your children will NEVER have privacy

Bernard M. Orwell

Re: Boring Bernie Yawn

Well, I am very happy that the methods created by the NSA are working so well, as you have explained.

No need for any MORE measures to limit our freedoms then.

P.S. Could you learn to use paragraphs please? It'd make your nonsense easier to read, if not digest.

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Bernard M. Orwell

Re: An Alien XSSXXXX Concept or SMARTR App .... for Clouds Hosting Advanced Operating Systems*

I'm almost willing to pay to see a debate between AMfM and MB....

...they are about as coherent as each other. Of course, AMfM is far more polite.

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