* Posts by Linker3000

107 posts • joined 7 May 2010

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Is uBeam the new Theranos?

Linker3000

Re: Worzel Gummidge Technology

Catweazle holds the patent on electrickery:

https://en.m.wikipedia.org/wiki/Catweazle

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Salesforce.com crash caused DATA LOSS

Linker3000

Re: Oh well, these things happen ...

> Of course not: all in-house IT systems have their DR plans fully documented, with a test failover performed monthly.

Actually we did a failover every two months on our in house system.

Yes, in-house IT can be a mess in many cases, but for any organisation with mission-critical parts kept in-house, *you* retain control of the specification and management of your live and redundant resources and can plan for business continuity and failover under your control and to a budget and resource pool that meets your requirements; perhaps even considering worse-case scenarios like hiring a shipping container data centre or, as in our case, being able to cannibalise other, less critical services, for parts while we wait for spares and an engineer to turn up within their 1/2/4/whatever hour response window.

As an example, we specced a standby system running a single unit tape backup/restore function (in case our autochanger failed) to have the same hardware as one of our primary servers. One day, the HP SAS caching controller on a live server failed and brought down the ERP system . While we were on the phone arranging a service call-out, another team member replaced the controller with the one from the 'spare' system. Total downtime was 12 minutes - and that was our only service break on that system in about 3 years.

When you rely on DR in a SAAS cloud-based environment, you won't likely have a dedicated engineer thinking about what they can do for you and your service - they will be taking a holistic view across the entire failed infrastructure and the solution will most likely take longer to implement unless its something simple like failed switch or router because whole systems/backups (ha - if they exist) will be being restored rather than just *your* systems and backups.

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Marc Benioff apologizes as Salesforce NA14 instance goes TITSUP

Linker3000

Re: Autoplay ** ad top of page

Readers with corporate phones who aren't allowed to install adblockers disagree.

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Linker3000

Re: Autoplay MS ad top of page

Adblockers not allowed on corporate phone. Believe me, I tried (physically and trying to get approval).

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Linker3000

Re: Autoplay MS ad top of page

Autoplay MS^H^H ads top of page.

FIFM.

Please at least detect mobile browsers and replace auto play ads with a static image.

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Linker3000

Autoplay MS ad top of page

Fkn annoying on my phone on train on way to work. Please stop this crap.

Thanks.

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Siemens Healthcare struck by rebranding madness

Linker3000

Learn from history

Many years ago, there was an attempt to give electronic engineers a shorter, snappy title akin to those what call themselved "electricians". The best anyone could come up with was "electroneers".

Remember that?

Thought not.

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F-35s failed 'scramble test' because of buggy software

Linker3000

Re: Stability Event

Whoa, your post had 1 stability event in 2. That's awesome!

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Logging on to United's frequent flyer site might take longer than a flight

Linker3000

Re: Post-Its

> United, are your security people listening?

Nah, they are all stuck in a departures lounge somewhere on their way back from a conference because their flight was delayed/cancelled.

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Linker3000

That long eh!?

So...longer than an 8 hour wait at SFO before your flight to LHR is finally cancelled and you have to fly to Dulles and eventually arrive back home over one day late...and no you can't use our lounge while we dick around trying to work out how to get you home?

I refuse to fly United now .. all subsequent business flights have been with Virgin Atlantic.

/bitter? Much!

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HGST has an entry-level 14PB archive box... is that enough for your, er, home collection?

Linker3000

Re: 15 9s

Important notes:

This is not an HDS system; it's from HGST - totally different organisations.

These systems use Erasure Coding to scatter elements of the stored objects across multiple disks (or sites, if you have more than one system), and rebuild times are based on the time taken to reconstruct the elements stored on one disk.

There are boxes out in the field (previous generation ones) for which reliability data is available, plus there are the ones in the labs and development centres. Overall, it's possible to calculate reliability figures based on the MTBF/AFR and other parameters for individual components.

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Linker3000

Re: "Binary"?

These systems don't use RAID. Check out 'Erasure Coding'

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Linker3000

Exactly! The storage policies which determine how objects are stored, how many parts they are spread across on the disks and how many parts we can afford to lose (the 'safety') is customer configurable and determines the effective storage size.

/Currently sitting in a training course at HGST for this, so getting a kick etc...

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Toaster cooks network and burns 'expert' user's credibility to a crisp

Linker3000

Daisychained Daisys

It was the mid/late 1980s and we'd just installed a row of spanking-new IBM PC-AT computers (286 processor, no less) running a CAD application called Daisy on a *nix OS called Daisy-DNIX. In those days RAM was very expensive so not a lot was fitted and the systems swapped to disk constantly.

Everything was going swimmingly until some electronic-engineer-who-should-have-known-better fancied a brew-up and plugged his electric kettle into the end socket on a run of daisy-chained (heh!) extension leads. Of course, the fuse blew in the FIRST plug and all the computers went down.

The resulting mess caused by machines that were shut down incorrectly while busily swapping took a couple of days to sort out.

Those machines swapped so much that we were forever replacing busted disks.

Happy days. Have a read: https://en.wikipedia.org/wiki/Daisy_Systems

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Reg readers battle to claim 'my silicon's older than yours' crown

Linker3000

Acorn System 1

Just have to mention my Acorn System 1 from 1979; this was Acorn's first commercial computer. I received it about a year ago from someone who had it 'in a box under my desk somewhere'. The unit needed some TLC, but after a few PCB track repairs, a couple of replacement logic chips and some rework on the LED display ribbon cable it's up and working again - although I have to admit that I don't run it 24/7 and the display is not up to email or surfing the 'net.

You can see a pic of the unit here: http://forum.6502.org/viewtopic.php?f=12&t=3286&start=15

It's sitting on a pile of parts I have ordered so I can make a replica (when I get round to it!)

More info here: https://en.wikipedia.org/wiki/Acorn_System_1

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Press Backspace 28 times to own unlucky Grub-by Linux boxes

Linker3000
Pint

Re: Almost possible to use grub password

Um..OK...you carry on there. We all went down the pub about 3 hours ago.

Cheers!

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Cisco forgot to install two LEDs in routers

Linker3000
Boffin

Meanwhile: anonymous faux engineer in stock shot burns the crap out of C109 for no apparent reason.

/Claims: "I was told to make sure the cap was on the hot side"

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Mostly harmless: Berlin boffins bleat post epic TrueCrypt audit feat

Linker3000
Headmaster

Nammar Grazi

"The 77-page report dug up extra vulnerabilities in the once-popular encryption platform but say none are sufficient to undermine the jettisoned software."

...none IS...

/You're welcome.

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How TV ads silently ping commands to phones: Sneaky SilverPush code reverse-engineered

Linker3000

Re: Surreptitious DMTF?

"Sure, but then what do you do when this technology gets used out on the street or in shopping centres?"

Then it will be OK, because we will be reassured that, just like MAC address wifi tracking, it's being used to 'enhance our shopping experience'

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Remember Windows 1.0? It's been 30 years (and you're officially old)

Linker3000

Yeah - old stuff

I remember it well. I had a day job, but also worked on a freelance basis for PC User Magazine (RIP). I was sent 'something-or-other-utility' to review, only to discover that it needed Windows to run. I spoke to the editor; one quick phone call to Microsoft and a few days later, a stack of 5.25" floppies arrived containing Windows 1.0. Might still have them somewhere.

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Telecity London data centre outage borks VoIP, websites, AWS...

Linker3000

Payment processing?

Could this explain why Paypal is borked for me and the missus had issues with our Santander card in M&S?

/Yes, we checked our balance.

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Amazon Echo: We put Jeff Bezos' always-on microphone-speaker in a Reg family home

Linker3000

Re: "Alexa, where is my bicycle?" - Parenting 101

At least the answer isn't (yet), "Can't find your bicycle? We have a great selection of bicycles; say 'yes' and we'll have a replacement with you tomorrow."

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Seagate sales droop: It was a nearline miss, says CEO

Linker3000
Headmaster

Re: Ethernet filling

8000GigaBaseHe?

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Hurrah! Doctor Who brings us a bootstrap paradox treat in Before the Flood

Linker3000

Amping it up

Did ya spot the logo on the front of the case?

So, did the Doctor pay for that guitar amp, or did he nick it from Magpie's electrical shop?

http://tardis.wikia.com/wiki/Magpie

Edit: Aha.. I must keep up...

http://tardis.wikia.com/wiki/Magpie_Electricals

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Here are the God-mode holes that gave TrueCrypt audit the slip

Linker3000
Boffin

Re: Let me note that these vulnerabilities are Windows-only

You mean you stopped at Z??

C:\Users\NK>subst [: c:\temp

C:\Users\NK>[:

[:\>dir

Volume in drive [ is Windows

Volume Serial Number is 2CE3-394D

Directory of [:\

25/09/15 15:38 <DIR> .

25/09/15 15:38 <DIR> ..

06/08/15 03:48 <DIR> DCIM

09/09/15 07:53 25,385 draytools-master.zip

21/08/15 15:01 77,824 212 - Expenses Reimbursement Policy (UK).doc

08/09/15 17:03 1,217,081 Fast Serial Debugger Drivers.zip

** SNIP **

15 File(s) 13,082,375 bytes

4 Dir(s) 60,633,071,616 bytes free

[:\>

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It's alive! Farmer hides neglected, dust-clogged server between walls

Linker3000

Re: Paving Slab Construction

I had a similar experience with some of the computers at a cement factory in Wellingborough. They were pretty wrecked.

One of my engineers serviced a machine that came back from a local farm's milking shed. The machine needed a complete clean out and the floppy disk drive was replaced. The engineer wrote up the repair description as "Half a field removed from computer".

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Linker3000

Sssh...Top Secret

In the early 1990s, I turned up at a Ministry of Defence (MoD) site in the UK to load some software updates onto a Netware server. Having duly passed through all the security checks, I was led to a busy office that looked like it was last refurbished in the 1950s.. "It's in the corner..' I was told. After about half a minute of trying to locate aforementioned server, I asked for some guidance..."Oh, filing cabinet - bottom drawer.. I'll remove the padlock." The padlock came off and a solid steel strap that ran from top to bottom through all the handles was withdrawn like Excalibur from the stone. There it was - a Toshiba T3200 with orange plasma screen running Netware and hosting who-knows-what secrets on its hard disk. A hole had been cut out of the back of the cabinet to poke through the power and data cables. "Most secure server in the building, I was advised".

So I got to work, crouched down in front of the filing cabinet. About 10 minutes later, a phone started to ring in the next drawer up - a muted bell, it's ring deadened by something..a war surplus sock maybe!? "There's a phone ringing in here", I volunteered. "Oh,we don't answer that one", came the reply.

Funny day.

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Brown kid with Arab name arrested for bringing home-made clock to school

Linker3000
Mushroom

I'm scared

If the UK authorities adopted the same mindset and paid a visit to my spare room (aka 'workshop'), they'd find several Raspberry Bombs, Arduino-grenades and nano-grenades, ESP8266 IoT wifi remote detonators, antistatic bags full of I/O bombshields, trays of PIC Microbombs, Serial Flashbang RAM, 7-segment LED countdowntoarmageddon indicators, LCD bomb displays ('your bomb temperature is ...nDegC'), USB-Serial TTL bomb interfaces, a 1979 Acorn System 1 6502-trainer-cum-bomb, some old EPROMS (EBOMBS, more like, eh!), ultracapacitor detonators...

The other week, while browsing through a computer and electronics surplus warehouse (aka bomb factory), I even picked up what can only be described as a hardly-used Sinclair ZXeightybomb.

The dead giveaway is the storage drawers containg piezo sounders and LEDs, which I use to make sure that all of the IoT...er...bombs that I construct make a telltale bleeping sounds accompanied by blinkenlights to ensure that they can be easily spotted under vehicles and in the noisewheel compartments of passenger aircraft. Hell, I even have WIRE.

I'll get me coat and turn myself in right now.

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Get whimsical and win a Western Digital Black 6TB hard drive

Linker3000

Get it from the Ape Store

Sure, I'm delighted with the next-day banana delivery service from Amazon Primate.

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Microsoft will explain only 'significant' Windows 10 updates

Linker3000
Alert

Dear Deirdre

Darling,

I have something to tell you...I...I...signed up for something on my computer...and...I ended up getting fucked by people I'd never met before...I couldn't help myself...the thought of something new and different was so attractive I just had to give it a go...but now I feel like I have given away my soul and my private affairs are being exposed for others to pick over...Oh darling, I have made a terrible mistake and I feel there's no going back...everything that was private is now in the hands of others.

Dearest, please don't tell me you signed up at Ashley Madison!??

Oh no, dear - I...I installed Windows 10.

Darling, HOW COULD YOU!!??

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IT jargon is absolutely REAMED with sexual double-entendres

Linker3000
WTF?

Dick message

"Richard Kiel Memorial Abend # 27"

Netware admins will know what I mean.

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Boss hands dunce's cap to chap who turned off disk monitor

Linker3000

rm -rf

No, not *that* classic use of rm -rf, but..

The Financial Director where I worked a bazillion years ago needed to restore from tape the (b)ought ledger files to our SCO Unix box.

Unfortunately, he restored the files to the root of the server's disk, and rather than move them into place, he restored them again - correctly - and then issued rm -rf b* from the root folder.

Things were hunky dory for a few weeks until we rebooted the server during overnight routine maintenence and it didn't come up again.

One trip to the office later and I'd discovered that /boot was missing. Two hours pass and we were OK for the morning, but I had to wake up the MD to open the main office where the master tapes for the OS were stored in the safe.

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A close shave: How to destroy your hard drives without burning down the data centre

Linker3000

Lazy people's problems

For when you're hyped up over data security, but can't be arsed to buy drives with instant secure erase (ISE).

/I just know you're convinced the NSA has cracked that eh!?

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Let me PLUG that up there, love. It’s perfectly standaAAARGH!

Linker3000
Happy

Re: XML is so 1990's

Having just written a full JSON string parsing routine in bash, and then done the same in DOS BATCH to produce a pair of Linux and Windows plugins for Nagios that need no additional support libraries or installed tools or apps, I am getting a kick...

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Finally! It's the year of Linux on the desktop TITSUP

Linker3000

Re: Reg's sense of humour has gone TITSUP

Yeah, I read El Reg reluctantly - I respect its pedigree and it does publish some good news/articles, but the puns (or poor attempts at puns) and stupid, random, CAPS in the headlines really take the shine off the overall experience; it's all totally unnecessary. I feel like I should wash my hands and sanitise the keyboard after a site visit.

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Samsung debuts Artik, its new software n' chips for the Internet of Stuff

Linker3000
Headmaster

Welcome to an increasingly crowded scene

>> The tiniest of the three, the Artik 1, is just 12mm square, which Samsung says makes it the industry's smallest IoT module.

Um, wouldn't that be something like an ESP8266-based module? The -09 variant is 10x10mm. Admittedly, it doesn't have a display output, but if you're an IoT sensor module why would you need that? The entire ESP8266-range does, however, have a full wifi stack and Tx/Rx module in silicon.

http://l0l.org.uk/2014/12/esp8266-modules-hardware-guide-gotta-catch-em-all/

Don't get me wrong - Sammy can send me some free samples if they wish!

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Relax, it's just Ubuntu 15.04. AARGH! IT'S FULL OF SYSTEMD!!!

Linker3000

Re: systemd? Do not want.

'sabout now the EPROMs (if any) start dropping the odd bit.

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Take time to get to know the flash you think you love

Linker3000

Re: Kinvig

Yeah, about that: http://www.korg.com/us/news/2015/012212/

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The Internet of things is great until it blows up your house

Linker3000

Here's a idea

How about a barcode against every El-Reg article which we can scan with a smartphones to get an instant score of the amount of bullcrap in aforementioned article.

The IoT article would probably result in an integer overflow.

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BBC: We'll give FREE subpar-Raspberry-Pis to a million Brit schoolkids

Linker3000

UK Digital Initiative - remember that?

Someone PLEEEEASE give one of these to Lottie Dexter.

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Reckon YOU can write better headlines than us? Great – apply within

Linker3000

You FORGOT to mention

Applicants must be prepared to break or STICK the CAPS LOCK key on their PC or laptop keyboard

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‘Get off of my Cloud’ Verizon tells users ahead of 48-hour maintenance outage

Linker3000

Someone wrote down the wrong notes in the meeting

Tell the system architects we're aiming for SIX NINES, not NINE SIXES.

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Toshiba joins the exclusive, three-member 6TB disk drive club

Linker3000

Re: exclusivity

Nope - swallowed by Seagate,

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Judge spanks SCO in ancient ownership of Unix lawsuit

Linker3000

Re: Zombix

Which disk have you made it to as of now?

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Disk drive BIGNESS is back: Seagate revenues and shipments surge

Linker3000

Re: Seagate is big in arrays... Because you need RAID for reliability

"Hitachi is now the reliable-drives arm of Western Digital"

Sorta, but Hitachi sold the business and it became HGST (a Western Digital Company) and it's totally nothing to do with Hitachi any more.

Also, WD and HGST's drive plants and designs are completely separate and can really be counted as two separate manufacturing entities.

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Ada Lovelace Day: Meet the 6 women who gave you the 'computer'

Linker3000

The two ladies in my life

My primary test servers are ADA and GRACE

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XBOX One will learn to play media from USB and DLNA sources

Linker3000

Re: PS3?

I have a home Linux server running Serviio and we've been streaming to my son's PS3 since we bought it when it first came on the market - it sees Serviio as a regular UPNP/DLNA server. Never had an issue with it.

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Maplin Electronics sold for £85m to Rutland Partners

Linker3000

Re: Hobbies are changing back

Not quite - The Arduino generation can cobble together a bit of code and do a fair amount of simple analogue and digital interfacing, but ask them to throw together a Wien bridge oscillator, whip up a sensor interface with an instrumentation amplifier, generate a sawtooth with a UJT, or calculate the resonant value of an LC tuned circuit and you'll often get a puzzled look, followed by a quick trip to ebay to see if there's a shield for that.

It's modular hacking and not pure electronics - not that there's anything wrong with that.

Hobbies are changing - but not quite changing *back*.

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Linker3000

Re: I knew that had got expensive... but not THAT expensive!

True - I have just bought 100 x 220 ohm 1/4W 5% resistors from another UK supplier for £1.30

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