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* Posts by Phil from Raleigh

55 posts • joined 24 Apr 2010

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BlackBerry ditches T-Mobile US after iPhone advert spat

Phil from Raleigh

Really?

"Great deal for Blackberry customers". Really? The guy who decided this was OK must be related by blood or marriage to a founder or major stockholder, right? Because no actual business person with a shred of sense would ever do something like that without some guarantee of personal immunity. More evidence that many of the people running these big companies are "bubble boys" with very little idea of how the real world works. I give a pass to the 20 or 30-somethings in marketing who came up with the idea in the first place. Their absorbtion with all things Apple is well known, and their bosses should factor it in when considering their advice. How does the old joke go? "If you took a brick, painted it white and called it an iPhone, they'd buy it." Good for Blackberry, putting up a fight. Maybe they're not doomed after all.

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5 Eyes in the Sky: The TRUTH about Flight MH370 and SPOOKSATS

Phil from Raleigh

Not surprised, but still skeptical

The real story here is that even with trillions of dollars in aggregate spending by major players, both government and private, over the last couple of decades, that surveillance capability is just not that good. There are enormous gaps in coverage, and significant inconsistencies in quality over time. The capabilities of these systems have been oversold by those with an interest in keeping their highest bidders paying. One former intelligence analyst once remarked that the reason many top secret assessments were kept classified was to hide the poor quality of the product from the public that paid for it.

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Fee fie Firefox: Mozilla's lawyers probe Dell over browser install charge

Phil from Raleigh

Senseless Carnage

What really ticks me off here is that Mozilla, by taking such a ridiculous position, is forcing so many of us to have to side with (the undeniably always without exception evil) Dell in this dispute. Frivolous claims like this actually undermine the force of open source licenses because they lead people, especially the (mostly) hopelessly clueless leaders of most firms, to discount their force in the future. That means establishing a culture of compliance will require an expensive campaign of legal action with its attendant metaphorical carnage. For the love of Pete, have the interns taken over even the legal department at Mozilla Foundation? This was a stupid, senseless move that has all the hallmarks of an outburst by some self-important snotnosed kid who somehow got hold of the company megaphone. In addition to sewing together the fingers of anyone who can't install Firefox themselves as Joe User suggests, the moron who approved the original complain to Dell should have his/her fingers sewed to their toes so that they're forced to look where they're walking from now on.

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Prez Obama cyber-guru: Think your data is safe in an EU cloud? The NSA will raid your servers

Phil from Raleigh

Message to the US from the US

For me moving what tech I had from US to EU cloud providers wasn't ever about escaping illegal US military surveillance. It was about not rewarding US companies for aiding the military in their effort. To be blunt, it was about punishing those companies for betraying my trust by "voting with my feet". If some of the largest and most politically influential companies on the planet can't be bothered to bring that influence to bear in curbing abuse of their customers by the US military -- especially when it is clear that they would almost certainly suffer financially when their complicity became public -- then it seems to me that the only thing left for any of us to do is everything we can to make that worst case economic scenario a reality for them in the hopes that it will deter them from future bad behavior.

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Microsoft: NSA snooping? Code backdoors? Our hands are clean!

Phil from Raleigh

From $260 bn to zero overnight

"...put a backdoor in our product, our market capitalization goes from $260bn to zero overnight."

This is only a persuasive argument if you're dealing with a board of directors and company executives who don't believe in gravity-free zones.

That's certainly not Microsoft (or almost any other big tech company you can name).

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Red Hat Enterprise Linux 6.5 ships, but still no RHEL 7 in sight

Phil from Raleigh

Major changes

Delaying the release to Q1 next year won't be a serious problem for most customers. RHEL 7, based on what Fedora 18 and 19 look like, will introduce significant changes in how "things get done" from an operational standpoint (for example, replacing System V inits with systemd, as well as the ability to finally do in-place major version upgrades). As a result people are going to need to take some time to adapt their existing processes and procedures to accommodate those changes.

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NSA: Yes, some of our spooks DID snoop on overseas lovers

Phil from Raleigh

Generational change

This sort of thing used to be called command or "management" failure (the latter by those career officers whose real mission was to remake themselves as highly paid corporate executives after retirement).

There when that sort of thing used to get you fired, court-martialed, or both.

So much for military discipline.

Accountability has been completely banished in the interests of the stupid, the lazy and the downright evil.

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Yahoo! web! traffic! BIGGER! THAN! GOOGLE! in! July!

Phil from Raleigh

Is this even believable?

I'm finding myself in doubt about the veracity of those numbers. Sure, I'm one of the people who stopped using Google (at least directly) this July. But I also taught my kids how to completely remove the Yahoo! toolbar from their machines when it gets stealithy installed during each Java update*. So these stats are really inexplicable, and more than a little suspicious to me.

*What, you thought Yahoo! got on your machines via the CNET download site? Au contraire, mon amie. It was actually Oracle who acted as the Trojan Horse for the big Y! Seems while all of us were fretting over the latest zero-day exploit our friends in the Big Silo were turning what should have been a crushing embarrassment into a golden business opportunity.

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Legal bible Groklaw pulls plug in wake of Lavabit shutdown, NSA firestorm

Phil from Raleigh

Re: I' not buying the Groklaw arguments - see the evidence..

Not sure "Google has always made it plain that there is no expectation of privacy for GMail" is an entirely accurate statement. In fact for a long time Google led people to believe they could be trusted because they "were not evil" -- except, of course, in the fine print.

I think PJ wanted to make a statement, pure and simple. While I'll miss Groklaw I think she's got every right to do what she did. It's her damn site, her legacy, to manage as she wishes.

The degree to which we've all been exposed to surveillance both by private business and the government has not always been clear to most people, even those working in the tech business. But what's really got a lot of us concerned isn't the fact that we're being watched, but how carelessly the results of that activity is secured. It seems that the contractors have been given run of the whole show, meaning that a lot of people should be worried that their proprietary business secrets are probably up for sale to the highest bidder. If I were a member of Congress or an executive at a big company that's what would be keeping me up at night -- unless I was already a consumer of that stolen info and using it in my own personal financial planning.

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Screw you, Brits, says Google: We are ABOVE UK privacy law

Phil from Raleigh

The Irony

So here we have Google, perhaps the most monumental exploiter of personal information on the planet, up against the principled British government. The same British government who yesterday sought to demonstrate the sincerity of their commitment to basic human rights, like the right to travel, by holding the domestic partner of the journalist at the center of the Snowden leak case incommunicado for NINE hours -- thereby making Heathrow the kind of gauntlet Sheremetyevo was only 30 years ago. It's hard to imagine a more striking irony than that.

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Phil from Raleigh

Re: You could try 1and1

Try runbox.com, so far I've found them to be competent, efficient, and most important of all, NOT EVIL (they're also very nice people). Servers are located in Norway. Sure, I know my country's (I'm a US citizen) leaders thinks that gives them license to slurp up every connection I make to my offshore mail server, but this isn't about asserting my Constitutional rights any more, but instead about reducing the degree to which my personal communications are exploited by both public AND private entities.

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Happy 20th birthday, Windows NT 3.1: Microsoft's server outrider

Phil from Raleigh

Re: Linux graphics runs in the kernel, too.

NT 3.51 was very much like Linux is today in that respect. GDI was in the kernel, but it was pushed out to ring 4. With 4.0 it moved to ring 0, making the stability of the whole O/S vulnerable to bad graphics driver code -- there was a fallback to the generic driver available, but on first boot you could certainly be treated to a horrible surprise. Which kind of reminds me of the experience I had just a couple of days ago bringing up Fedora 19 after installing the latest Catalyst drivers for an add-on AMD card (did I mention yet that I think systemd sucks?).

GDI issues aside, NT 4 was a real boon to most of us because of the then awful state that both Netware and Unix were in. Novell was a nightmare to deal with, at least for junior sysadmins like myself (trying to get the product code to do an emergency 3 AM re-image of a key file server whose backups had too long been neglected). The Unixes of the time were creatures of the hardware they were included with (e.g. Solaris ran on Sun hardware, AIX on IBM, Irix on SGI, etc.). When it came to deploying individual file servers across a continent (a strategy mandated by the then current cost of network bandwidth) those cheaper Intel boxes were really the only way to go, and that's where NT 3.51, and later, NT 4, kind of saved the day.

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Microsoft splurges on single sign ons with Active Directory update

Phil from Raleigh

Serious Question: What is REALLY different here?

MS has supported SAML federation for awhile as an add-on to their base AD product. I think this also included templates for hooking into 3rd party services as well. What is really so different about this new push? Is it the names of the targets (Facebook, etc)? Others have made the case for/against using MS for your base IdM infrastructure, but I don't think that anyone will disagree that the ability to federate is an absolute minimum requirment today. The big problem I've always had with MS has been their refusal to adhere to standards, and even worse their willingness to mutate them in order to facilitate lock-in. If they're steering away from that now it would be good news for all of us. P.S. Well, actually Oracle is moving away from OID. The new kid on the block is OUD - Oracle Unified Directory, a/k/a OpenDS (which was also forked in ForgeRock's OpenDJ).

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Security bods boycott DEF CON over closed door for feds

Phil from Raleigh

How stupid do things get?

Ban the feds from a security conference? Really? This is just plain stupid. If you have something serious to say to those guys (e.g. "Stop spying on our clients or we'll have to out you") what better place than at this kind of conference? Comparing the alphabet soup agencies to ALQ is not helpful at all, either. Maybe instead of pulling publicity stunts like this organizers could work on ways to engage the government types in a real dialog where they have to explain themselves. Did anyone catch the exchange between the NSA recruiters and some U. Wisc. language grad students? THAT is the kind of thing you could do at one of these conferences in a limited capacity roundtable setting (first come, first serve). "Engage, don't just enrage!"

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37,000-machine study finds most reliable Windows PC is a Mac

Phil from Raleigh
Boffin

Re: Whatever.

That's not a fair comparison and you know it. Windows is so tightly coupled with its graphical environment that it's nearly impossible to recover from a fault arising out of an issue with the gui. All distributions of Linux share the same alternative architecture where the gui rides on top of the O/S and can be separately reset without risking a full system crash. Even the occasionally bad video driver won't bring down a Linux system, while the same would bring the average Windows PC user to tears. In almost 15 years of running various Unix-like O/S variants (FreeBSD, Red Hat Linux, Ubuntu, Fedora) as my primary desktop at work and home the only time I ever had a system lock up was due to a short circuit in a keyboard (brought on by an ill-fated bath from my morning coffee). As a mere sysadmin I've never had the wizadry to send a Unix system over the edge the way some of my developer colleagues have, although I have stood by in wonder to witness the fun (that's right, I've never run NIS in production, and have always managed to be out of the room when an NFS mount went south). From what I've seen it usually has something to do with really badly designed PL/SQL queries.

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Mosaic turns 20: Let's fire up the old girl, show her the web today

Phil from Raleigh

Ah, the memories

Win32s, my first foray into truly insane software. Working on one in a line of boxes I put together myself sporting an AMD 386DX-40 with a paper white monitor and Windows 3.1 with Win32s. The hours I spent debugging random race conditions! The later released Windows for Workgroups (which had 32-bit support built-in) would be much more stable, and after all that switching to NT 3.51 as my personal desktop O/S would be a no-brainer. Netscape's browsers were much better than what Spyglass, and later Microsoft, released, but at least here in the U.S. the momentum was behind the "free" browser from Microsoft. Regrettably I happen to have been the guy at my company who figured out how to successfully deploy IE using the then newly released IEAK. My guilt over that is something I've learned to accept over time.

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Corporates! Bring in all-purpose filler for IT skills gap, thunders Steelie Neelie

Phil from Raleigh

Bottom line

There's no way I'd encourage my son or daughter to pursue a career in IT. The tech profession has been wrecked beyond repair by a decade of gutting by the very business leaders the commissioner is appealing to. The impoverished (both in experience and pay) tech labor pool we've got left in Europe and America is exactly what those leaders aimed for, although I suppose that they, like many others who believe in gravity-free zones, will continue in the delusion that they'll be able to just snap their fingers and turn it around at this late date.

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Big Windows updates may ship this summer – and every summer

Phil from Raleigh
Facepalm

Of course! THAT will fix everything

A really unbelievable head in the sand approach to the problem, don't you think? Can anyone image what would have happened had the Windows 8 "feature set" been rolled out, without advance warning, on a regular Patch Tuesday? Stunning.

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Dell finally takes Dell private - with $24bn and help from Microsoft

Phil from Raleigh

Dell is done

Dell has been on the decline for awhile. It's just a matter of time before the chattering class realize it. Eadon is right, they're definitely on a Nokia-like glide path to oblivion. Still, I've got no problem with MS getting the blame.

As for open source, Dell has always been ambivalent about it. Up until a week ago my main workstation at home was an old Dimension 5150n running Scientific Linux. They had a great idea with the n series machines but obviously caved to pressure from MS as the whole netbook industry did. That's now been replaced by a Lenovo ThinkCentre that really is a well designed piece of kit. When time comes to refresh the kids' machines I'll probably go with Lenovo, particularly if I can pull off getting them to accept Linux as their primary OS.

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HP: AUTONOMY 'misrepresented' its value by $5 BILLION, calls in SEC

Phil from Raleigh
FAIL

US should refuse to intervene

Given the long succession of HP CEOs (including Ms. Whitman) and board members who have railed against government regulation I think this would be the perfect opportunity for the US government to tell HP to go pound sand on their request for government action here. There IS precendent for this, of course. No one was prosecuted for the financial meltdown of 2008, it was all about "moving on", and "going forward". Same here. If HP's shareholders want to take the obviously seriously overdue step of sweeping out the present board and executives, then that's up to them -- but I'm not sure I want my tax dollars to go towards cleaning up a mess that they all made through their own negligence and refusal to acknowledge reality (as others have pointed out the numbers in this deal never made any sense, a moderately intelligent child could have figured out they were being defrauded -- more proof that most of those complaining now are just a bunch of not-too-bright spoilt children after all).

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Forstall ousted from Apple after refusing to apologise for Maps

Phil from Raleigh

Dictation

Dictation is for stuff that doesn't deserve the effort needed to get to a keyboard. Biggest drawback to tablets and smartphones for me is the input interface. My first dictation experience was with an old dictabelt machine back in the early-80's. Like a lot of professionals. keyboards finally showing up on our desks almost 10 years later felt like freedom. Finally we had complete control over our output, and could see what we were writing in context (for awhile scrolling back and forth through documents was an almost hypnotic experience). Since I'd also had the good luck to grow up alongside people who thought 60 wpm was some kind of minimum threshhold for competence, I was still able to bang out what I was trying to say as fast as if it was dictated. For me trying to negotiate the soft keyboard on a phone or a tablet is like taking a step backwards. "Real" fold out keyboards, even when the software responds to them properly, are a cramped compromise. Still, getting voice recognition right would be a huge benefit, especially when trying to set up a navigation session with Google Maps (which really is very good and continues to be the most valuable app on my ANDROID phone).

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Privacy group damns Ubuntu's Amazon search marriage

Phil from Raleigh
FAIL

Gnome 3 started this

Trying to out tablet-os Apple, Google and Microsoft. Tile interfaces are for teenagers looking to "consume multimedia content", not for adults who have to get actual work done throughout the day. As for the privacy issues, invasive schlockware for Linux was actually long overdue. It figures that we'd see it first from Ubuntu, because they're the most prone to "Windows envy". Of course I never really thought much of the "Linux for the masses" thing. Most people actually don't have a clue what to do even with the limited computing power in their smartphone or media tablet. I've come to the conclusion that they must really like the flashing lights and shiney widgets that only ask that they "click and swipe". I use RHEL at work because that's how we deliver the power of a few thousand servers to the business. I use RHEL clones at home because they're rock solid stable and don't turn the world upside down every few weeks. If everyone else wants to continue running the Windows treadmill, they're welcome to it. If Ubuntu wants to morph into Windows with a Linux Kernel that's their business.

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Bond's Walther PPK goes digital: A civilized gun updated

Phil from Raleigh

Back in the mid-1980's there was a front page article in the NY Law Journal featuring judges and their guns. Turns out the PPK was the the most common. I was never a fan, mostly due to my doubts about the effectiveness of the .380 cartridge. My preference was a S&W J-frame Model 36 with .38 +P+ hollow points. Problem, of course, is that +P+ really does a number on a light framed gun like that, so target practice inevitably winds up being less realistic but still expensive. Also, even though it was much smaller than a full size service pistol, carrying the thing was damned inconvenient. I'm glad I don't have to anymore. Lots of ex-law enforcement in the US don't bother getting a carry permit after retirement and the same is true of this ex-lawyer as well. It's actually too bad that Flemming gave into the "experts" on his choice of sidearm for Bond, there's something that really rings true about the meme "Bond wanted to carry the most useless hint of a gun he could get away with" for some of us.

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Feds charge US firm with smuggling illegal military tech to Russia

Phil from Raleigh
Headmaster

"The Capitalists will sell us the rope with which we will hang them."

-- Lenin

But he's dead now. So are Stalin, Menlenkev, Khrushchev, Brezhnev, Andropov, Chernenko.

The last guy in charge there sold *us* the rope we nearly used to hang *him* (recall the quality of support Gorbachev received from the US during the coup in 1991).

Why do we keep these restrictions in place? That's easy. Supply and demand. Restricting access to any technology makes it cost more. And *that* is in the interests of the industries that make this stuff. It's *those* interests that drive this. Why else do we have a 3/4 trillion dollar a year military "20 years after the Cold War ended"? (the Chinese have a single, thus far non-operational, aircraft carrier of questionable vintage -- it's really their ICBMs, land-based aircraft and ship borne missiles that are a threat to US forces in the Pacific, but only if the US continues to insist on bigfooting its way around the world it has since the latter half of the 20th century when there was at least a theoretical threat of Soviet aggression to justify it).

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'Google's crap for business' - CIOs give ad giant dose of reality

Phil from Raleigh

Fair enough

Google does have an enterprise penetration problem, mostly based on the fact that their product wasn't around at the dawn of the PC age and so decision making executives didn't first experience it through their kid's computers or incessant sales calls by Microsoft partners. I say "mostly", because the fact is, as others have pointed out, Google Docs is still not ready for prime time and even Gmail continues to be subject to flux based on the whim of its UI designers. Yes, Gmail is miles ahead of OWA -- but that's setting the bar awfully low, isn't it? But seriously, Google's main problems are in fact those niggling contract provisions regarding security, privacy and price. Cloud-sourcing big company data and transactions isn't ever going to take off until those issues are addressed, no matter what else Google, Microsoft or even Apple do to improve the functionality of their cloud-based products.

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Child support IT fail: Deadbeat mums 'n' dads off the hook

Phil from Raleigh
FAIL

It's all about the design

Of the hardware, the software, but most importantly THE PROCESS. These systems could be designed to work and their execution successful if you get the preliminaries right. The problem is that those who oversee things don't even know the right questions to ask, and decision-making is dictated more by public relations and crony capitalism than by actual requirements. That's something that government IT shares with its private sector counterparts. High incidences of project failure are endemic in the private sector. We just don't hear about them because they're ... private.

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Antitrust probe looms over Windows RT 'browser ban'

Phil from Raleigh
Mushroom

Same old, same old

Prediction: Microsoft will fight to the bitter end on this. As with the netbook market, they'd rather see ARM die as a platform than concede any ground to their competitors on a key desktop component like the web browser. It is the ARM manufacturers, and government, that need to step up here. But I wouldn't hold my breath.

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Billion-dollar high-tech ghost town to run itself without humans

Phil from Raleigh
Childcatcher

How long before they start offering vacations?

I can't be the only one thinking this.

http://en.wikipedia.org/wiki/File:Westworld_ver2.jpg

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Six of the best ways to mess up IT change management

Phil from Raleigh
Thumb Up

Good take, just multiply by 100

Everything pointed out in the main article is true, especially in large organizations (200+ IT staff and 10 times that in users). In fact the bigger the IT org gets, the more applicable Moore's law applies to things like change (and configuration) management. It's not the number of physical or virtual devices, servers, etc. alone, it's the processes used to manage them, and more importantly the quality of communications between the "managers" (or should I say, "individual contributors").

Not that anyone who counts is listening...

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Megaupload case near collapse: report

Phil from Raleigh
FAIL

How long does it take to forget how to do due process right?

Well, I guess this was a test case of sorts. So used to circumventing and skirting due process requirements in other cases, it seems pretty obvious that U.S. authorities have forgotten how it's done. Although you'd think even a few of those involved might have recalled something from their first year civil procedure class... apparently not.

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Laptop computers are crap

Phil from Raleigh

Finally

Finally someone has acknowledged the awful truth. I post this 3 days late because I was holed up in a disaster recovery exercise all last week and forced to use a laptop for all non-DR related computing -- which got old really fast. One point can't be repeated too many times though: as bad as laptops have always been, the imbecilic decision to force wide screen displays down all our throats was the final straw for me. Wide screen displays are not just useless for those of us who have to do *real* work with computers, they're debilitating. Of course the work desktop I'm typing this came with a 19" wide screen display as well because "that's what our vendor offers".

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Windows Phone armed with 'military-grade' email upgrade

Phil from Raleigh

Have to wonder

if this is the same "military grade" software US Defense Sect'y Bob Gates was running when his mailbox was hacked by the PLA -- oh wait, that's right, wasn't it the back end servers that were compromised? As others have said above, US security standards, military or commercial, are a joke because security always takes a back seat to user convenience and the government is actually afraid that a really serious effort to improve security would threaten their ability to eavesdrop. That second reason is somewhat understandable, but the first should get every CIO and the CEOs who employ them booted for dereliction of duty.

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US adds more jobs than expected in January

Phil from Raleigh

Insourcing?

So it looks like jobs in IT were added while at the same time jobs in IT were ... lost. A deeper dive into the actual numbers might be interesting, but I wonder how many jobs were added/lost to direct employment vs. contracted services?The average hourly wage/weekly earnings numbers don't seem quite right though. I mean, how many people in IT do you know that work only a 40 hour week?

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NASA rover finds evidence of water flowing on Mars

Phil from Raleigh
Thumb Up

Sheetrock!

So we now know we'd have one essential component to build suburbs on Mars. All we need now is to find some lumber for framing. We also learn that nukes are good for powering around faster and further, but in the end good old solar buys you upwards of decade in staying time.

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Kindle Fire: An open letter to Jeff Bezos

Phil from Raleigh
Happy

A poverty of knowledge

Let me start off by saying, "longtime subscriber, not a first time poster." I also don't have a dog in this fight because I don't own a smartphone or tablet of any kind. After 60 or more hours a week tending multiple application server farms, installing and using Java apps on electronic devices is really not high on my list of things to do. To me even myhumble feature phone is just another tether work can use to reel me in on a moment's notice (when I get home the cell gets turned off and thrown in a drawer).

This was a very well-written and entertaining article. A real testament to the literary talent of the author. Unfortunately it is also factually ... incomplete. Not sure exactly what link jcurtis01 intended to share (it is cut off in his comment) but there are a number of threads over on the XDA Developers forum that discuss how to get it done without having to root the Fire. So it is doable, although not without some effort to initially learn the technique and track down sources. But that's not nearly as amusing as the story in the article.

0
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ICANN rescues time zone database

Phil from Raleigh
Thumb Down

No man's property is safe while the legislature is in session

The whole point of copyright was to encourage the people to publish art and useful stuff by giving them the ability to make a living at it. Here that original purpose has been twisted until it is unrecognizable. If we continue down this road no one will be able to publish except those with the wealth to engage in courtroom trench warfare -- and many of those people are not the sharpest knives in the drawer, having come on their wherewithal by the smarts of those around them (who they change as often as they do their own socks). Perhaps the question should be put to Astrolabe as to what value they put on their copyright "rights" here: for example would they be willing to trade them to continue to receive access to the public Internet for the brief time their company will continue to exist before it collapses on itself through stupid business moves like this?

They (Astrolabe) would also do well to heed the wise saying in the title of this comment.

0
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Virus infects killer US air drone fleet

Phil from Raleigh
FAIL

Windows Everywhere!

n/t

0
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Netflix: How to completely screw up

Phil from Raleigh

No, you didn't miss anything

Netflix, or rather Netflix management, has finally jumped the shark.

Back when they announced it the price hike actually made sense to me. The streaming service was a significant value-add to the proven basic disc-by-mail service.

*Because it was a bundle*

I wanted Netflix to survive because they provided me with *choice*, something almost no one else did.

*Because it was a bundle*

The strategy would let Netflix not only survive, but also thrive enough financially to continue growing.

*Because it was a bundle*

Many businesses have learned the hard way how important it is to diversify, to be invested in multiple channels so that when lean times come in one, steady business from the other can carry them. It looked like Netflix actually understood this.

*Because it was a bundle*

I clearly misread what was really going on inside the Netflix boardroom.

3
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DigiNotar hacker says he stole huge GlobalSign cache

Phil from Raleigh
IT Angle

on state sponsored

Remember, to a CEO, any computer user that knows WinKey+R opens Run dialog and "cmd" is the shell executable is "sophisticated".

***

Really priceless quote.

PKI has been hamstrung by the "good enough" approach long enough, as have been most parts of the Internet infrastructure. The mere mention of "you also have to bend DNS" immediately brought to mind the cache poisoning exploit discovered 3 years ago. In that case the most troubling quote I saw was from Kaminsky himself, when he said, "this is how the Internet works."

1
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Galaxy Tab 7.7 pulled from IFA after new Apple moves

Phil from Raleigh
Boffin

Courts are at fault here

Really. Unlike the court in this case, my memory is slightly better than that of a 9-year old.

The tablet computer is as old as... Arthur C. Clarke's "2001: A Space Odyssey", published in 1968. I know, I was 11 years-old when the book and movie came out. Apple founder Steve Jobs, who is 2 years older than me, should have an even clearer memory of it.

"When he tired of official reports and memoranda and minutes, he would plug his foolscap-sized Newspad into the ship's information circuit and scan the latest reports from Earth. One by one he would conjure up the world's major electronic papers ... Switching to the display unit's short-term memory, he would hold the front page while he quickly searched the headlines and noted the items that interested him. ... the postage-stamp-sized rectangle would expand until it neatly filled the screen and he could read it with comfort."

http://www.boingboing.net/images/newspad.jpg

Of course this had been mentioned by others before, and I think has been submitted by Samsung in at least one of its responses to Apple in the multiple cases the latter has brought against the former on this issue.

Apple should have been laughed out of court on this one, as should anyone who claims the intellectual property rights to concepts like this that have been in the public domain for *decades*. Unfortunately, ignorance of prior art like this seems to have been epidemic among patent authorities for at least a generation -- to the point that you have to wonder what alternate universe they grew up in.

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1

All WikiLeaks' secret US cables are on BitTorrent in full

Phil from Raleigh
Thumb Down

no place for amateurs - but that's all there is

Here we now have conclusive evidence, if any was needed, that everyone involved in this whole cablegate this is a moron. From US gov't executives who cavalierly dumped those secret cables on a clearly insecure network, to news editors who stupidly mishandled the keys to the kingdom, to Assange [TM] and his cohorts of private actors whose megalomania has sealed their own sorry fates. People should wake up to the fact that the "experts" they've entrusted their lives and livelihoods to are a bunch of frauds who really need to be shown the door -- of a prison cell.

7
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Cisco may slash 10,000 jobs

Phil from Raleigh
Meh

American software?

Sorry, but we don't make that here anymore. Like Anonymous said, the big guys have mostly managers here now -- and even those are getting scarce. But I think AudiGuy is on to something, this isn't really about *needing* to save money -- it's just that the corporate brain trust either can't or won't look to any other metric for executive performance (you know, like organic growth in market share as opposed to growth by acquisition). It's a failure of imagination on the part of the guys who make the big bucks to spend all day thinking about these kinds of things, which is ultimately they are doomed as well.

3
0

LG dooms then un-dooms portable games consoles

Phil from Raleigh
Big Brother

Executive delusions

Not to pile on Dr. Park, whose name now gets about a gazillion non-so-flattering hits on Google, but you have to wonder if he also believes in gravity-free zones like the rest of those who live up in the rarefied air at the top of the corporate ladder.

0
0

Kindle Store awash with auto-generated crap 'books'

Phil from Raleigh
Thumb Up

$10

Whitter is right, you'd only need something as little as $10 to stop this nonsense. Small enough to avoid hurting struggling authors (they pay more than that for monthly Internet access, or even lunch on a trip to meet with those brick-and-mortar publishers they're also pitching too) but more than enough to trash the business model of the spammers.

1
0

Red Hat: 'Yes, we undercut Oracle with hidden Linux patches'

Phil from Raleigh
Go

Not a big deal, unless it helps RHAT survive

We run RHEL at work and I have a personal license of my own for home, even though I actually run CentOS on all my test machines there. For me this isn't a really big deal, because I'm using the centosplus kernel anyway. It *will* make things harder on the CentOS guys, and that's regrettable because they really do provide a tremendous service to the FOSS community. But if this change helps Red Hat survive, then I'm going to have to support it -- because as someone else mentioned *Red Hat* is the one who has invested in paying the salaries of hundreds of engineers who contribute back to FOSS every damn day. They're a resource I don't think we can afford to lose.

Of course I'll have to eat those words if RHAT winds up selling out to ORCL or another big player that then leeches off open source until there's nothing left to save.

0
0

German Foreign Office kills desktop Linux, hugs Windows XP

Phil from Raleigh
FAIL

This is a good thing, really

It will be so much easier for US and UK intel agencies to hack into German Foreign Office systems now -- not to mention open a plethora of attack vectors by bad guys deploying the latest worms, trojans, and bots for Windows. Of course German government officials will seek to suppress, deny or minimize future evidence of increased compromises of their systems, just as the the US DOD did when their inherently insecure MS Exchange mail system got hacked by Chinese script kiddies.

3
0

What sealed Nokia's fate?

Phil from Raleigh
FAIL

The REAL Unpopular Opinion

"Elop's problem is that historically you can't really take a large bureaucracy and expect a lean, mean fighting machine to emerge. You usually just get a smaller bureaucracy."

The is that Elop is not alone in his delusion. It is shared by executives in most (if not all) big companies around the world. It is this single delusion that is the reason they fail.

8
0

Feds seize 10 domains accused of illegal sports streaming

Phil from Raleigh
Thumb Down

Priorities

Because protecting the intellectual property of the big sports franchises and their mega-media partners is SO important to the health, safety and welfare of the United States. Half the world wants to kill us and they're out chasing after pirate video hackers? You know what, the companies whose profits they're protecting here can afford to go out and hire their own private army for this.

Of course that's exactly what they consider the U.S. government to be.

4
0

US lawmakers eye internet 'kill switch'

Phil from Raleigh
FAIL

Yes, my "leaders" are morons.

There are days when I really wish I'd been born Canadian.

0
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