* Posts by Roland6

1525 posts • joined 23 Apr 2010

Sky sidles up to O2, whispers: 'Fancy a little FOUR-PLAY?'

Roland6
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Re: Past Form

>Honestly, I'm surprised Sky didn't just counter-bid against Three.

I'm not!

Look at Ireland and Three's takeover of O2-IRE, specifically the EU competition decision and the requirement for network sharing. What the Sky deal almost certainly does is to make any competition review of the Three takeover of O2-UK a formality; something that could not be said if Sky were to directly approach O2-UK.

From a technical perspective it would also put Sky in a similar position to BT with respect to EE and the merger of Orange-UK with T-Mobile-UK, namely Sky will benefit from (and encourage) the merger of O2-UK and Three-UK into a single entity without directly incurring the costs and effort involved.

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Man trousers $15,000 domain name for $10.99 amid registry cockup

Roland6
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Pint

Re: Is ifyoulikealotofchocolateonyourbiscuitjoina.club still available?

Yes, but ifyoulikealotofchocolateonyourbiscuitjoinour.club isn't!

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HMRC fails to plan for £10.4bn contract exit... because it's 'too risky'

Roland6
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Re: £200 a head

Just adding to my previous comment:

Given HMRC's submissions to PAC indicated that by taking ASPIRE back in-house savings of up to 25% were deemed feasible, it doesn't seem that taxpayers have been ripped off by ASPIRE.

Aside: Full PAC report published today here: http://www.publications.parliament.uk/pa/cm201415/cmselect/cmpubacc/705/70506.htm

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Roland6
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Re: £200 a head

>The figure is over £350 per taxpayer. There's only 29.3 million UK taxpayers (HMRC).

Also the contract began in 2004 (not 2014), so that's circa £350 over nearly 11 years...

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Data cops in charge of Facebook, LinkedIn, Google get a new office

Roland6
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Re: Spend more or else

Actually my first thoughts on seeing the picture, was why haven't we located OFCOM's HQ somewhere similar, it might help them to be more proactive...

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Hoaxer posing as GCHQ boss prank-calls PM Cameron

Roland6
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Re: Optional

Actually what I find interesting is the coincidence of these prank calls being announced and Theresa May’s Counter-Terrorism and Security Bill (aka Snoopers’ Charter) is due to return to the commons after being discussed in the Lords. I suspect that once again the UK press are being manipulated, just as they are with respect their other current hobby horse NHS Accident and Emergency service levels.

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Roland6
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Re: direct call

If the PM and the Director of GCHQ need to talk 'business' they have a secure line. I would assume that as the phones that were accessed were not secure lines, they were effectively for normal business calls.

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Free Windows 10 could mean the END for Microsoft and the PC biz

Roland6
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Re: Long Live Win XP & Win 7!

>Even if a big-time remote exploit appears for XP which, due to its EOL status, will never get fixed?

Even with this!

The type of exploit needed to totally render XP totally insecure I suggest would have to be equivalent to the router one of public ports being open by default and permitting login using admin/admin...

No the exploits that really matter, once you put XP (or any system behind a NAT router and enable a host-based firewall) are those that live in the web browser.

The exploit(s) that will matter will be those that are discovered after the security vendors stop updating the XP versions of their products, because then there will most probably be no workaround.

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Roland6
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Windows 10 is going to be free – for a while. That’s really bad news for PC makers and channel partners

Not sure if that really follows. If you need a new PC, you'll buy it with the OS you want on it. Some may be happy to buy a system running 7 or 8 with "rights to upgrade to 10", others will simply buy 10 from the outset.

No the big thing that is impacting the market is the change in longevity of systems and hence enterprise refresh cycles. What has been successfully demonstrated is that business don't need to do a 3 year desktop/laptop refresh, they can get away with a 5~6 year refresh, which in the current business climate can make a big difference to a company's cost base. In fact with MS saying that 10 will run on the same platform as Vista, some may even try and extend the life of their desktops even more.

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Roland6
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Re: If Win7 is "OK" till 2020

Depends whether the update process can be expertly controlled, like the Win8/8.1 was... Remember with a little care it was possible to download a full ISO (complete with its own licence key) without having it install all over your working system, enabling you to install at a later date or install in a VM.

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Roland6
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Win10 Hardware Requirements

Microsoft hasn’t said what PC hardware you’ll need to run Windows 10

Whilst they haven't posted the final platform requirements they have posted the platform requirements for the Technical Preview where they have given a minimum platform specification of a single-core 1GHz, 32-bit CPU and 1GB RAM - namely the same as Windows 8.1, which was the same as Windows 8, which in turn stuck to the Windows 7 specs, which was the same as Windows Vista...

Whilst I suspect you wouldn't actually want to run it on that minimum platform (unless 10 is even more performant than 8), that does serve to indicate that practically any post P4 system hardware will be able to run 10, albeit some features will not be available (just like Win8.1 where Hyper-V isn't installed as standard due to its CPU requirements).

What I find interesting is the continuing support for the 32-bit architecture, I wonder whether this is because of its usage in mobile devices?

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Roland6
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Windows Revenues

No upgrades mean no new Windows license revenue and Windows licenses account for $18bn of annual revenue for Microsoft.

However, from what I can ascertain, this figure is total Windows licence revenues, hence includes volume licencing subscriptions, which MS receives largely regardless of which version of Windows a license holder runs. Likewise, as MS demonstrated in spades with XP, people will buy a new PC either when they actually need one or they feel the need to upgrade, but in both cases people tended to stick with XP rather than switch to another product. However, as we saw with XP, because MS weren't investing in new functionality it became dated and thereby made the competition's offerings more attractive.

So I suggest, MS doesn't actually need to upgrade Windows to maintain revenues, but does need to upgrade Windows to keep it current and prevent customers drifting away. It would seem with the Win10 announcement MS understand this and hence the words being used about how Win10 will be maintained and upgraded.

Given how cash rich MS are, it would not surprise me if they effectively adopt the same (and successful) sales strategy of many other companies, namely give out a free version (why not go back to the Win3 level of anti-theft protection?) then have premium and business versions that both cost - Office Starter doesn't seem to have dented MS's Office revenues...

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Telefónica to offload O2 to Three daddy Hutchison for £10.25bn

Roland6
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Re: So the UK once had the most competitive mobile markets..

CMA - Room for some confusion here...

Competition and Markets Authority (the reborn and merged OFT and CC)

Communications Management Association (part of the BCS)

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Microsoft will give away Windows 10 FREE - for ONE year

Roland6
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Re: I'm free! No, you're an idiot: Re: Subscription

"2:24PM

Q: Subscriptions?

A. Nadella: There is no fundamental shift to our business model....We want to be able to service our customers more like an Internet service. (So, emphatically NOT subscription Windows.)"

[Source: http://www.businessinsider.com/windows-10-live-blog-2015-1#ixzz3PUnIswAv]

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Roland6
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Re: Will it be an in-place upgrade?

>Imagine how well things might go if relatively significant 'OS Upgrades' are automatically installed onto your system.

Don't need to imagine - I know the pain from having to do a WUP enforced W8 to W8.1 update...

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Roland6
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Re: Where's the profit for Microsoft then?

>It also raises the interesting question of how long software developers will continue to support Win7.

Do you want to sell to enterprise? if the answer is yes then you will be supporting Win7 until at least 2020.

The main beneficiaries of the 'free' upgrade will be consumers, so your decision to rush to support 10 will be driven more by whether you are developing consumer software (eg. games) or business software.

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Windows 10, day ZERO ... Will Nadella be the HERO?

Roland6
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"Perhaps if they'd learned from Windows 8, that for a desktop the UI needs to be different to that on a keyboardless and mouseless tablet"

Interestingly, MS obviously also didn't learn from it's experience with Microsoft Pixelsense (formally known as Microsoft Surface) unlike Lenovo who obviously did with their Horizon and Flex AiO series of systems and supply them with a "tabletop" UI into which Windows automatically switches when the device is laid flat.

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For Windows guest - KVM or XEN and which distro for host?

Roland6
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Re: Are you looking at the problem the right way?

>I know this sounds strange but have you considered putting 2 complete computers in the same case

This was an option I've been considering. Back in the 80's there was a UK company that sold PC motherboards that were expansion cards - they sat on the EISA/ISA bus with some software running on the motherboard to co-ordinate disk and network access. Obviously each PC required a keyboard, mouse and monitor (not forgetting licensed software).

Looking around the web there are companies that offer multi-seat solutions that provide additional hardware so each user has a dedicated graphics adaptor but share the host motherboard and OS (eg. Buddy B-680 Premium/Lite, NComputing, SoftXpand.

Obviously with Windows MultiPoint Server, MS also have an offering in this space. This planning guide might be useful: https://www.microsoft.com/en-us/download/details.aspx?id=18482

But I've not been able to find any recent products, although perhaps someone sells a small blade enclosure into which you could slot server blades...

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Roland6
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Re: Sorry, but I do not nderstand.

Serious use can be at home, that's what my children call "work" when I'm doing such things as trying to write nice but tricky lockfree data structure or write another gcc patch.

Finally starting to get some of the real needs and requirements out. So you have a family and live in a tiny London loft that doesn't have space for a large book. Whilst there is nothing we can offer about the space constraint other than to suggest you move, we can offer some guidance on the IT.

Firstly, sharing a PC for (paid) work and family (ie. children) doesn't work long-term. Save yourself a major headache and determine how to get yourself the equivalent of a machine per person, so that ALL of you can do your favourite thing (or important stuff like homework) at the same time and be able to keep working (albeit at a reduced level) when something goes wrong. This obviously means that you will need to also address the keyboard/display issue, which comes back to your space problem.

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Roland6
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Re: Space

>If you have better workflow for making gcc changes

If this is your main requirement then as this is a batch job then it would seem to be an ideal task to off-loaded to the cloud ie. off-site...

Whilst this might at first examination seem to be expensive, remember the size of system you are intending to build won't be cheap and that is before we consider the heating and ventilation requirements and the noise of fans.

Personally, if you have space for a tower system that can support 8 HDD's plus all the other stuff, you've got space for a small cluster of blades, which might be a better solution to your family's computing needs.

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Roland6
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Re: Hyper-V Server 2012

I'm a little surprised that this hasn't been mentioned before, particularly as it is a free download from MS.

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Microsoft wants LAMP for wireless mobe charger

Roland6
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Re: Do I smell bbq?

So do we take it that the MS researchers previously worked on the Star Wars Initiative and have been trying to come up with a commercial application for the technology?

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'Things' on the Internet-of-things have 25 vulnerabilities apiece

Roland6
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Re: Remind me again why we "need" this BS?

>Now, a machine that could spin near-silently at 1200rpm, that would be worth having!

They exist, I brought mine with a 1400rpm quiet spin from John Lewis back in 2004 and after a free manufacturer's service a couple of months back, I expect it to run quietly for another 8~10 years...

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Roland6
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Re: Use case?

The use case is obvious: single technology obsessed males who have no meaningful social life, real world social networking skills and only occasionally use domestic appliances and probably only wears faded 'grey/brown' clothes.

As soon as you introduce a woman or family into the equation the use case goes out the window...

Take the washing machine for example, in my household with 2 adults and 2 children, we typically have 4~7 washes per week; the idea that somehow being able to control my washing machine (and tumble drier) via the web is total stupidity: the washing machine doesn't load and unload itself and neither does the tumble drier (or washing line if weather permits); and lets not forget about the ironing...

No the much cheaper and simpler solution (compared to IoT style solutions) if you are time constrained is to employ a laundry and ironing service: here dirty washing gets magically removed from the laundry basket and transformed into clean clothes hanging up in the wardrobe. The service can work well with only occasional out-of-band communications needed to handle exceptions.

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Migration skills shortage looms as Server 2003 DEATH DATE approaches

Roland6
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Re: Really?

so step one is a huge discovery

My thoughts exactly! And expect the unexpected as things break when you actually start switching things off.

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Buggy? Angry? LET IT ALL OUT says Linus Torvalds

Roland6
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>"There are established market places for information like this, which wouldn't be the case if it all came from public disclosure reports."

I think the main effect of encouraging quicker public disclosure will be to reduce the value of a known loop hole. With companies quietly sitting on bugs, they create a blackmarket for known exploits: So if I were to discover a vulnerability, it is probably in my interest to sell it on the blackmarket and the longer the bug goes unfixed the greater (hopefully) my return.

With public disclosure however, we significantly increase the exposure of a bug, making it much easier for "script kiddies" to hack something together "for a laugh" (remember the early PC virus's?).

Additionally, just as we've seen with services such as Virus Central, a public list permits the holder of an exploit to firstly assess whether anyone else has discovered the exploit and secondly to track it's closure; knowing these contributed to the value and hence price placed on an exploit.

Whilst the effects of this might be to make major companies such as MS et al. to be more pro-active on fixing bugs, I suspect a knock-on effect will be both an increase in price and a reduction in the current included service level, due to the additional costs being incurred in maintenance and support.

So I think that we need to be sure that bugs are 'publicly' disclosed in a way that facilitates their distribution to those who wish to guard us against their exploitation and those who will ulitmately fix the bug itself, but discourages/minimises disclosure to those who wish to exploit the bug.

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Facebook poaches design talent from Toronto firm – fate of staff unknown

Roland6
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Re: I don't thnk so

Depends on how motivated the staff are...

From the blog, it seems that the three partners are effectively resigning from Teehan+Lax. Ie. Facebook hasn't brought out the partnership, just the named individuals, who happen to be partners and no longer want to be partners...

This suggests that the staff stand a very good chance of simply creating a new company that just takes over the business of Teehan+Lax, something that the existing partners would be powerless to do anything about, unless they intent to keep Teehan+Lax trading in some form...

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BT bemoans 'misconceived' SUPERFAST broadband regs

Roland6
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Joke

Re: ugh just re-integrate BT and tell the rivals to build their own damn networks

>Why should a bunch of johnny come lately parasites be allowed to destroy the system that created it?

Because it's not fair! why should they have the first mover advantage and not us (ie. the bunch of johnny come lately parasites) !?!!

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Roland6
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Re: This sort of crap

The infrastructure costs are insignificant. ... all subsequent revenue is pure profit.

Whilst the 'infrastructure' costs in the grand scheme of things may be relatively small, you will be surprised at just how costly the OSS systems are and specifically the costs associated with customer billing...

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Crap broadband holds back HALF of rural small biz types

Roland6
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Re: Rural areas no place for business?

It would not surprise me to find that many 'townies' who are dismissive of 'rural' internet, are among the first to complain about mobile coverage when they venture into the great outdoors...

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MAINFRAMES are SO NOT DEAD: IBM's launched a new one

Roland6
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Not a true IBM system!

No vertical red strip!

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Roland6
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Re: and the cost of the software licenses?

It's IBM, the cost is in the services and support contract...

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Global PC market's not dead, it's just resting – Gartner

Roland6
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Also, even before the explosion of smartphones and tablets, the PC market was maturing, so growth was going to level out; just that with smartphones, tablets etc. that level would seem to be lower than the analysts originally projected.

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Should spectrum hog TV give up its seat for broadband? You tell us – EU

Roland6
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Re: Link?

>UHF antennas on 6 metre poles are far uglier than a sat dish mounted lower down

i would agree, however, what amuses me is my neighbour uses such a pole ("professionally installed") - which gets blown about and has reception problems, but I've placed my aerial in my roof space (DIY install) and have no reception problems...

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Roland6
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Re: No. @Lusty

> But those dozens of transmitters use massive power output to achieve that.

Yes, I didn't really get the need to massively increase the transmission power after the switchover, given aerials etc. were installed based on the much lower (pre-switchover) power output and each product release seemed to offer better receivers. However, I'm not an RF engineer, but do remember reading that transmitter Watts are different to Watts of power from the electricity supply.

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Roland6
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Re: Link? / Whoops!

For those who want to respond online I recommend the following:

1. Open page https://ec.europa.eu/eusurvey/runner/PublicConsultationLamyReport2014

2. Under languages in the right hand column select the language in which you wish the page contents to display.

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Roland6
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Re: No. @Lusty

"Using the spectrum freed up, the not spots which don't get wired broadband or mobile signal would be much easier to provide for. This is entirely because the TV spectrum travels better than current mobile phone spectrum which in turn travels better than wifi spectrum. That's why they chose it for TV broadcast."

In your answer you've missed the obvious reason why the use of the Broadcast TV frequencies for mobile on demand data is daft!

The reason this spectrum is used for mass market TV broadcast is because it travels well - hence why the UK only needs a few dozen TV transmitters to (mostly) cover the entire country. However, mobile on demand data doesn't need very large cells, it needs small cells (each with it's own masts) to deliver service to the mass market. So to use spectrum that travels well over large distances (ie. 50~100 miles), for services that only need to travel well over small distances (1~2 miles) is pointless and wasteful, particularly as the solution to the current mobile not spot problem is to deploy a few more masts on existing frequencies.

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Roland6
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Re: No.

This intended redeployment of broadcast TV frequencies to mobile internet providers seems to be an old school anti-competition move, disguised as something that will benefit consumers by giving them exactly what they want. From the way this is being presented it would seem that the intention is to effectively take from the existing broadcast TV network operators and give to the mobile providers (well those willing to hand over bags of gold) and in so doing reduce the number of independent routes to market for TV content.

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Windows 7 MARKED for DEATH by Microsoft as of NOW

Roland6
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Re: @Roland6 - A definative date @AC

Yes I know various distro's exist that are targeted at the enterprise, but as we all know the enterprise desktop is a lot more than just the Win/Linux distro, which is why a desktop OS refresh requires a little forethought.

Personally, I would hope that those in the Linux Enterprise Desktop space will be using the 2020 opportunity (and the pain enterprise have/are experiencing in migrating off XP) to lighten the wallets of VC's et al, because I believe there is a real opportunity (particularly in budget constrained government departments) for the largescale deployment of open systems.

(@AC: Up voted because your comment did contain constructive information.)

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Roland6
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Re: 711

>one good UI - for everyone, please

That will be Motif then...

However: Motif was based on IBM's Common User Access (CUA) guidelines (as were Microsoft Windows and OS/2) and so had a visual appearance and mode of operation similar to that of Microsoft Windows (Classic) and OS/2. This, deliberate strategy, was to facilitate users using both Windows and Unix workstations and applications. I suspect MS decided that with the improvements in Linux, the Windows Classic UI/UX potentially made it too easy for users to switch to Linux, thus the Win8 UI was more an attempt to be different (as are the changes introduced into the MS Office UI).

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Roland6
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Re: A definative date

Yes, 2020 is the year of opportunity for the Enterprise Linux desktop.

However, the question is whether the Linux community can seize the day and deliver a true Enterprise ready desktop and applications suite in time to take advantage of the Windows 7 end of life...

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Roland6
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Re: WTF?

But that's why you're deploying it - W7 is now stable so you can lock it down!

MS have effectively promised there will be no new functionality in W7, so there is little risk of MS now doing a 8->8.1 style and level of change.

The downside as we saw with XP (and previous versions), MS refusing to put key new functionality into XP such as: SATA drivers, Fully fledged WiFi client ...

Given the mess up with 8, and the delivery timescale constraints on 10, I expect 10 to contain little new real functionally with much being reserved for 11. Which is just fine, provided it ships in c.2017, as I suspect few enterprises will contemplate a wholesale upgrade from 7 anytime before then.

A real question is when will MS stop selling a 32-bit desktop OS, my money is 11 coming in a 64-bit version...

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Roland6
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Happy

Re: 711

Fine, when I buy my first driverless car (sometime in the 2040s) THEN I'll expect a radical change of instrument layout, but only because the function has changed!

Fine until you discover the trolley problem resolution mode/emergency mode is "over to you" - a fall back to full manual control...

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What do UK and Iran have in common? Both want to outlaw encrypted apps

Roland6
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Re: This isn't about instant messages

Don't you mean: invisible e-ink?

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Roland6
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Re: Risk vs benefit

All very logical, however, politics has gone way beyond logic, particularly over saving 'lives'.So politicians et al jump up and down if the total number of deaths go up, but ignore the data which shows that this is simply an effect of a larger population and in fact the number of deaths per 1,000 may have gone down.

So what will happen is that encryption will be banned and all bank transactions will be conducted in person over the counter, progress!

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Police radios will be KILLED soon – yet no one dares say 'Huawei'

Roland6
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Re: Nuremberg Code

the peer-reviewed clinical studies that can prove these effect

Not everything requires a full blown clinical study...

From memory, during the 90's when TETRA(UK) was being debated and evaluated, medical concerns around radio energy exposure did get a lot of attention and experiments conducted. The risks were assessed and although it was unlikely that emergency services personnel would be wearing pacemakers or have heart problems, guidance was put out to avoid putting handsets in shirt pockets ie. near the heart. Hence why you will see police wearing handsets on the shoulder or on the waist...

Sometimes, the simplest approach isn't to try and disprove something but to work around it, particularly if experts can show there is a possibly of the effects being encountered outside of the lab. (A bit like crossing the road, most of the time you can cross one anywhere, but in generally it is safer to always use a pedestrian crossing.) Given the lack of any subsequent exposé in the media or medical cases being raised by the emergency service's unions, it would seem the advice was sufficient.

Because TETRAPOL has a different radio energy profile, it doesn't have the same potential side effect.

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Roland6
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Re: Drop in the Ocean

There is a good (short) article giving an overview of the state of the UK's Emergency Services and related services mobile communications here, albeit it is nearly two years old: http://www.wireless-mag.com/Features/25368/What_are_the_options_for_ESMCP.aspx

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Roland6
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Re: Why change the system?

Which is one of the (many) reasons why Airwave TETRA is different to TETRAPOL as deployed in many countries.

These differences contribute to why the UK system is a little more expensive than it probably needs to be.

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Roland6
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Re: Nuremberg Code

There are know bio effects attributable to Tetra (hence why you don't put a handset in your shirt pocket or near a pacemaker), but these are to do with the way signal power is handled. It was one of the pro's and con's of adopting Tetra(UK) v. TETRAPOL (as used in many European countries).

As for mass market mobile phones, we still in the trial phase and so there is a (small) possibility that like cigarette smoking we may discover they are in fact dangerous. However, if you are using a WiFi connected device you are exposing yourself to higher levels of radio energy from the WiFi adaptor in that device and for longer than from the GSM phone...

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Roland6
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Re: Huawei

>I suspect the real reason for the scare stories about Huawei is that they are now making stuff that is good enough to put Western suppliers out of business.

It should be remembered that Huawei do have a UK operation, to which GCHQ et al have had full access to for many years now...

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