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* Posts by Roland6

1331 posts • joined 23 Apr 2010

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PEAK IPV4? Global IPv6 traffic is growing, DDoS dying, says Akamai

Roland6
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Re: @intrigid

>I thought that IPv6 networks were completely isolated from the IPv4 internet, and that switching to IPv6 would basically require building a brand new internet from scratch

Basically there are many 'hoary' problems to be overcome for an IPv4 end system to talk with an IPv6 end system. However, the use of IPv6 as a carrier service for IPv4 has been working for many years and has been slowly deployed by the carriers. Reading Akamai's report, it seems that they noticed a slight decrease (0.9%) in the number of requests received from IPv4 systems, but a more significant increase in the number of requests from IPv6 systems. What Akamai don't go into is whether the IPv6 requests are actually IPv4 requests or pure IPv6 requests. Given that Akamai's main customers are the providers, I suggest it is more likely that what Akamai are reporting is that more carriers and providers are switching to an IPv6 backbone infrastructure, even if they are publicly still presenting a pure IPv4 service.

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Windows 10: One for the suits, right Microsoft? Or so one THOUGHT

Roland6
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Re: Peak operating system?

>I can see a time when the only time you pay for an OS is when you eventually buy a new computer.

Where have you been all these years! for many users that has always been the case. Remember one of the common statements made by people running XP was that their n-year old system still worked and they saw no reason to mess around upgrading the OS, they would simply wait until the hardware died.

Outside of the MS tech crowd the only people who were into OS upgrades were businesses, where being able to reuse a few thousand systems purchased in the last year or so, rather than simply replace, was cost effective.

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Roland6
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Re: testing procedure.

And none of those options worked on a system MS 8.0->8.1 update crippled. The solution that worked was shutting down via the 'charms' menu. I've no idea why that should be any different to any of the other options, but it did the job...

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Roland6
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Re: The numbering makes sense now...

>Windows will be shite until they go to 11.

Don't you mean 11-SP1 ?

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Roland6
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Re: Tiles should replace icons fully - everywhere.

>Why not having a mail or messagin app tile showing you incoming messages? Why not tiles informing you about an application running tasks and status? Why not an "icon" whose info displayed can be customized?

That's what the notifications area is for.

Some contradiction here:

"Microsoft should replace icons with tiles fully. I would like to have tiles which ... can look like simple icons ... Icons are a relic of the past..."

So when I first log on what should all the various icons on my desk display, given that at this time the system is idle? I don't need the Word icon flashing up all my recent documents. Yes it might be nice to be able to right click on a desktop icon and immediately see a list of recent documents, but that is very different to having lots of icons simply shouting "look at me".

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DVLA website GOES TITSUP on day paper car tax discs retire

Roland6
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Re: Something not entirely clear

You only needed to display a tax disc (real or fascimile) until midnight September 30th.

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Roland6
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Re: A little common sense is called for... @Martin

> it should not be that different with the new system.

Well yes, the old system was sized and so was probably over capacity for most of the month. The new system probably used that very in concept called "elastic" or "CPU on demand". The trouble is that elastic works well for gradual growth in load not for sudden large surges in demand, particularly if there isn't sufficient pre-primed spare capacity idling in the wings.

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Roland6
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Re: Why wait?

> Me, when I notice it's the first day of the month and suddenly think "Shit! I haven't taxed the bloody car yet"

And I bet the only reason why you noticed was seeing the tax disc on the windscreen (by seeing, I mean you only needed to glance at the back of the tax disc holder to be reminded of the car tax...) I foresee a lot of people will be getting fined for late payment because there is no longer a visual reminder on the windscreen.

Not having to tax my car this month I don't know if DVLC are still issuing "tax discs". When I taxed my car from 1st-Sept, DVLC had run out of official tax discs and printed (inkjet) tax disc on a letter explaining that I could cut out this facsimile and display it in my tax disc holder until 1-Oct.

Hence I see no reason why DVLC can't as part of their online receipt, provide a "tax disc" that can be printed off and used as an aide mémoire.

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Roland6
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"not true, it's the same as it is now."

Not quite true!

The new system (should) automatically refund the "unused tax" when the seller sends in their V5C to DVLC, previously you had to send in two sets of forms: V5C and V14.

The unsatisfactory part of the change is the whole transfer of ownership piece; the V5C still has to be posted to DVLC and their service guarantee is for a new V5C to be issued 2~4 weeks after they received the V5C from the seller. It seems that the only way for a new 'keeper' to tax a newly acquired vehicle is in person at a post office. However, this ignores why the car is kept, obviously when I drive the car away from the seller it is still legally taxed (until the end of the day on which the transaction occurred) however I cannot legally keep it parked on the road for several days until I get round to visiting a post office (which will be a city centre one which will require me getting the car out to drive to it...)

Tellingly, the DVLC website gives very few details around this side of the change and hence I suspect it wasn't totally thought through; if the DVLC website is to be believed, I don't need to produce a valid insurance certificate if applying at the post office...

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Lenovo to finish $2.1bn IBM x86 server gobble in October

Roland6
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Re: ODMs.

>Just look at Linux merely 10 years ago - no one even thought of using it in their data centres

AIX 5L was released in 2001...

IBM's adoption of Linux effectively rubber stamped RedHat's new business model (enterprise Linux), it is also another example that seems to indicate that IBM do seem to have a good grasp of where the market is going.

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Roland6
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>You get to provide business to American corporations.

You think American corporations will suddenly stop doing business with IBM?

I suggest IBM/Lenovo are playing the long game...

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Renault Twingo: Small, sporty(ish), safe ... and it's a BACK-ENDER

Roland6
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Re: Nobody will buy the smaller engine

The Twingo wasn't intended for motorway usage but for city usage, just like the original Fiat 500.

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Roland6
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Re: Great!

Yes I noted the engine removal challenge, something the Hillman didn't suffer from - a supermarket trolley could be readily re-purposed into an engine trolley...

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CURSE YOU, 'streaming' music services! I want a bloody CD

Roland6
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Re: My 500 CD Memorex CD robot works on the local network.

>I remember blind testing 4 CD players ranging from £200 to £2000

Yes I remember doing similar, I finally selected the configuration of CD player, Amp and speakers that I could afford, where the triangle in one of Mahlers symphony's actually sounded like a triangle!

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Roland6
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Re: Streaming wins

>"I envy the digital generations who have none of that."

Obviously totally out of touch ....

In the mid-1990's a friend of our's went through the process of minimising their possessions, due in part to the itinerant nature of their work - basically apart from the mountain bike, everything had to fit in a backpack. A very interesting challenge as this was before highly capable laptops, e-books etc.

It made us laugh when in recent years the press have latched on to a new generation of 'minimalists' who think that because they had a laptop and/or kindle, they have only one possession even though it's (1TB plus) HDD is cluttered (by volume) with vast library's of ebooks and downloaded music and video...

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Man, its smartphones are SQUARE. But will BlackBerry make a comeback with them?

Roland6
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re: Can you imagine the struggle to get that fucker out of a tight pair of jeans?

Well if you must wear tight jeans and put a phone in the pocket then there have been few phones that fit that use case since the launch of the iPhone. Really you are looking at phones like the old Nokia 6111 or 5300, which not only fitted comfortably in trouser pockets but also didn't stick out and so run the risks of being nicked or falling out without you noticing.

As others have pointed out, this is a phone for the jacket pocket/handbag or shirt pocket (tech's) rather than the trouser pocket.

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Turn OFF your phone or WE'LL ALL DI... live? Europe OKs mobes, tabs non-stop on flights

Roland6
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Re: Great...just what the world needs...

>So here's to ordering some low-cost data minutes during the EasyJet / Ryanair booking process.

Suspect they'll use a variable pricing structure just like their tickets...

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A Norsified Linux for Windows and OS X wobblers

Roland6
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Re: Bottom Dock/Panel (Like ones from the 1980's) @Mage

Strange, I don't understand why I didn't put the punctuation in - as I did it before having a few beers can't use that as an excuse... Any how a repost; hopefully with greater clarity:

I liked the guru site and particularly the article "Search Is Not Enough: Synergy Between Navigation and Search", which has applicability beyond websites. Without actually mentioning Windows 8, the article is a damming indictment of the obsession with search as the way to look up applications rather than navigation. It hence helps to explain why many users reacted negatively and sought out products that assisted navigation (eg. Classic Shell, Start8 etc.).

[Aside: I've withdrawn the original post, since it serves no purpose now.]

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Roland6
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Re: Strange habits

>IMHO, there is no need to MAXIMISE everything.

>I always maximise as much as I can.

I suspect people's preference is largely dictated by the combination of activity, applications, screen (aspect ratio, resolution and physical size) and device (laptop, desktop or tablet) being used. I certainly find that my normal mode of operation will vary, so on a 4:3 display I will tend to use Word in full screen mode, whereas on an 8:5 or 16:9 display I'll use a window that will comfortably display an A4 page at 100% scale, leaving space to the side for other key application(s) to be partially visible.

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Roland6
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Re: Strange habits

Minimizing predates Win3, it is the manifestation of the habit of a "clear desk" where everything is put back to its 'correct' place and so is to hand. The problem with "move along" is whilst some can handle it - try using multiple physical desks, many find it simpler to use just the one desk.

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Huawei prez: A one-speed internet is bad for everyone

Roland6
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The Fedex analogy is spot on!

Many here are mis-reading what Huawei are saying! The first sentence says it all: "When [YOU] try to send a letter in China it can take several weeks." (my emphasis).

What Huawei is talking about is the content originator's viewpoint. To some extent we already have a two (or more) tier/speed internet: A content provider can make their content available via the public access internet (ie. the Chinese post office service) or they can subscribe to a content delivery network provider (ie. Fedex). What Huawei are saying is they don't see why what is available in the world of "ordinary logistics" ie. different classes of delivery (at different prices) should not also be available in the internet world. Looking forward to the potential mass market demand for 4K TV streams, Huawei are clearly aware that the current Internet (regardless of IPv4/IPv6 and existing content delivery networks) will be found wanting. They clearly envisage that new backbone infrastructure and content provider upload connections will be needed and will be operated in parallel to the existing internet and content provider networks; hence why they are investing in relevant R&D and why they are against a single speed internet because they foresee their potential customers will want to recoup their overlay infrastructure investment.

From a net neutrality viewpoint, the Fedex example used still holds, regardless of how the content provider sends the package it is still delivered to your door, I (the recipient) don't have to pay Fedex or some third-party to have Fedex deliver the package to my door. Where the analogy falls down, is that with many special deliveries because they occur when most people are at work and they don't just push stuff through the letterbox, special arrangements have to be made to have the package delivered at a specific time...

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IT crisis looming: 'What if AWS goes pop, runs out of cash?'

Roland6
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Re: Yes they did

>I was listening to a Radio 4 program while waiting in a traffic jam in the spring before the meltdown happened

Yes 2007 was an odd year, with many people with a London financial services focus regarding the sub-primes being a wholly US problem and nothing to worry about, and were shocked when things started to crash around them in London ...

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BMC Software flings patent sueball at ServiceNow

Roland6
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Re: Sueballs can only mean a couple of things

Also they could mean that ServiceNow have technology that BMC would like to use but would rather access via a licensing agreement on terms that ServiceNow are not willing to agree to.

A quick look through the patents, seem to indicate that only one (US 8,674,992) could be regarded as new and novel (ie. a known information display method being implemented for the first time in a service management system), as the claims in each are very generic. So the question is whether a lot of developers moved from BMC to ServiceNow and hence SerivceNow have implemented these methods in an identical way to BMC. Given the amount of prior art (several of BMC's own products predate the patents being asserted) it will be interesting to see what happens, but don't be surprised if the outcome is a licensing agreement with token amounts of money actually changing hands.

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Heatmiser digital thermostat users: For pity's sake, DON'T SWITCH ON the WI-FI

Roland6
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Re: Not just once @Stoneshop

>[2] I have one from that year.

Don't expect a smart thermostat to be that reliable or last as long...

The laugh I have is that by using the controls in a basic way ie. set and forget, I've managed to keep my house warm through several winters at a lower level of energy consumption than I achieved using the controls in the way envisaged by the manufacturer...

For example there is little real point in dropping the house temperature over short periods of time, particularly if you have a well insulated house, because the thermal mass of the house will maintain the temperature and the controls won't trip unless the house actually drops a couple of degrees. In my house I can turn everything off and for most of the autumn/winter/spring the temperature will not drop below 14~16 C (today, no heating since Mar/Apr and the internal temperature is 20~21C with windows and doors open), even in with snow and minus temperatures overnight the coldest I got the house down to was 12 C after a week (but I didn't have the windows and doors wide open :) ).

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Le whoops! Microsoft France boss blows lid off 'Windows 9' event

Roland6
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@AC

>And you're also unable to google "windows 8 start menu" or "disable metro" and follow the simple instructions?

That was the catch-22 with Win8 - in order to be able to look up stuff on how to use Win8, a new user had to already know how to drive Win8 to a level that previous versions didn't demand (HP for example made a getting started guide available in the MS store, only you needed Win8 etc. to access it, thereby rendering pointless the first dozen or so pages of the guide). Okay once people found their way around they then got on with things however, that first impression has stuck and has been reinforced with the seemingly random stuff that keeps happening.

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Oh God the RUBBER on my SHAFT has gone wrong and is STICKING to things

Roland6
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Re: Cheap rubber

Do't know a bout Psion 3, but I've noticed that mobile phones suffer from it also: My Nokia 6310i suffers from it to a greater extent than the older 6210.

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Blood-crazed Microsoft axes Trustworthy Computing Group

Roland6
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Re: What is the ratio?

But in the TwC group the flacks probably left the programming to the engineers...

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Monitors monitor's monitoring finds touch screens have 0.4% market share

Roland6
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Re: Replacement cycle....

I'll have a look on my next visit, but doubt any are touch screen due to when they were swapped out...

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Roland6
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Re: Replacement cycle....

> 17" 4:3 1280x1024 monitors with DVI and hard glass are particularly difficult (anyone know a supplier?).

I've got six Compaq/Dell/HP monitors sitting in a clients store room - located in the Northampton area, if it's of any help.

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Amazon rekindles e-readers and Fire OS without weeks of whack-a-leak fun

Roland6
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>Kids can destroy anything.

Particularly micro USB ports...

But then the OAP's also find these difficult...

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Roland6
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Re: Children's one available in yellow?

>An android tablet that gets replaced everytime you drop it would be nice

If this is for work, I'd suggest investing in a D30 case (see T-Mobile's video! http://www.youtube.com/watch?v=BPEciw3cBss ) because at least it increases the chances of the device surviving the 'drop'. There is nothing more frustrating than dropping a device and then having to carry on for the rest of the day with a damaged/dead device.

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'Windows 9' LEAK: Microsoft's playing catchup with Linux

Roland6
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Re: at least half a decade??@Roland @AC

Thanks for the comment, next time I get a chance to play with a Win8 laptop I'll investigate. What really provoked my comment was playing around with 8" Toshiba Win8 tablet in it's out-of-the-box configuration - which is set to use the native 1280 x 800 resolution screen as if it were on a 19" display with no obvious way of changing settings using the fingers...

With respect to your comment about laptop displays, the issue I perceive is more about the dot/pixel pitch - something that doesn't get talked about very much. I suspect for most people for a work display, provided the raw pixel pitch is at least as good as an old high spec CRT then the overriding concern is the physical size of the display. Hence why on a modern 20" LCD display I like to see 1680x1050 or better, because I'd like those users who want Windows to display at 1280x800 (on a 20" LCD) to at least have a legible display that doesn't look like a game of pacman.

A secondary issue with display resolution, is what assumptions have developers made, remember the netbook problem: many Win7 control boxes were longer than 600 pixels and hence couldn't be easily navigated. I would hope with Win8 and/or 9 that specific problem has been resolved.

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Roland6
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Whatever X-based window manager I was running

I seem to remember there was an X-Window manager for Dos/Windows - DESQview and DESQview/X

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Roland6
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Re: at least half a decade??

Bet also Win9 doesn't have any concept of physical desktop size: so in sizing desktop display items it assumes that a desktop of 1600x1200 is on a 20" monitor and not on an 8" tablet...

Plus it is unable to understand that whilst the physical desktop may be 1600x1200 I actually want it to size display items as if I'm using a 1024x768 resolution display, but use the additional pixel count to anti-alias. (This capability is very useful to make displays readable to people with poor eyesight)

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Roland6
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Re: Hopefully they'll introduce tabbed Windows Explorer windows too

Hope they'll let me put the tabs where I want them, like down the side of the window (and allow me to have the text orient down the page) rather than across the top - just like a paper file, organiser and Lotus did years back.

And yes as a leftie who can use both hands! - I want to be able to organise the window furniture how I want it, and not have to constantly make allowances for the limitations of developers who is unable to think outside of the right-handed mode of operation.

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Roland6
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Re: Windows has had multiple desktops for bloody years

>I would suggest that anyone who *hasn't* found that probably hasn't been looking very hard.

Until reading these comments I had totally forgotten about the sysinternals 'Desktops' toy. I gave up on running multiple desktops under Windows years back, after playing around with them on various versions of Windows. With Win 3 and probably all versions of Windows including XP, whilst CPU performance and memory were major constraints. Additionally, I found the biggest obstacle was the stability of Window's itself - with multiple desktops on a single system, when Windows crashes which it frequently did it created a big mess. It was simpler and more stable to run several Windows boxes through a KVM or Remote Desktop - but then work was paying...

Obviously, with significant strides having been made in Windows stability (since XP-SP3) and platform performance, Windows 9 might just be capable of running multiple desktops in primetime.

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Every billionaire needs a PANZER TANK, right? STOP THERE, Paul Allen

Roland6
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Re: Mamaaaaaa!

Whilst I do agree with you, it does seem that this purchase is of a tank already in a (US) collection, rather than quietly rotting in some forgotten barn/field in Europe.

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Apple iPhone 6: Missing sapphire glass screen FAIL explained

Roland6
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Happy

Re: Vaporpus Sapphire @Ledswinger

>Not much use if you can't use the thing in daylight?

Ignoring specialist phones (£££), I've yet to come across a mass market smartphone that is as usable in daylight as a device with an e-ink display such as the Kindle...

But point taken, I wonder whether Apple compared sapphire with gorilla glass in daylight and decided that perhaps it was better to wait until suitable coatings were available...

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Roland6
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Re: Sapphire

>Maybe someone will develop a way to attach a thin sapphire glass face onto a tougher base, resulting in excellent scratch resistance and good toughness too.

Seiko did that years back when producing sapphire was less reliable and more expensive than it is now (google sapphlex). With advances in production technology they now only use their proprietary hardlex (mineral crystal) or sapphire crystals depending upon price point and market being targeted.

However, it is worth remembering that the sapphire screen on your 1000m divers watch will be a totally different level of quality to the sapphire screen on your idevice; this will be reflected in the price and guarantee...

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Roland6
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Re: Vaporpus Sapphire @Ledswinger

Yes yield definitely is part it. Also I note from other reports there is a general issue of there being sufficient sapphire being produced, which Apple were addressing by building it's own glass plants, which I suspect aren't ready for prime time just yet.

As for your test, a simpler one would be to take the phone outside - sapphire is more reflective...

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Roland6
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Re: Vaporpus Sapphire

>Maybe it's simply not possible to reliably make millions of perfect sapphire phone screens

Over the years there has been much debate around the various mineral crystals available for watch displays. I suspect that part of the problem is not that you can't reliably make millions of perfect sapphire phone screens, but whether it can be done at the required cost and whether such a brittle screen really is appropriate given the application (yes sapphire may be very hard and resistant to scratching, however just like diamond is brittle and subject to cleaving or shattering on impact).

Personally, having the choice between a sapphire screen or a slightly softer and flexible mineral crystal screen, I would go with the non-sapphire screen.

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Retailers toast welcome return of Back2School notebook biz

Roland6
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Re: laptops for kids

Even at 'refurbished' prices of around £200 they are still good value, particularly when compared to a sub-£250 device being sold in the "Back2School" category. It is scary to think that those new devices typically have a lower performance benchmark than a device sold in 2007...

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Smart meters in UK homes will only save folks a lousy £26 a year

Roland6
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Re: LED's

Whilst lighting is very visible (no pun intended) and hence a switch from conventional bulbs to energy saving bulbs/LEDs makes a big difference. The problem is that lighting forms only a very small part of my total energy consumption, the vast majority is on hot water and central heating...

In fact I suspect that for many people simply upgrading their ageing computer would save them more. For the past few years I've been supplying All-in-One desktop systems with a 25w PSU as a replacement for their 300+ w desktops running XP...

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Roland6
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Re: Idiots

> If the kettle takes twice as long to boil, then it spends twice as long at each temperature from its starting point to boiling, so it will lose twice as much energy to the surrounding air. It follows that a low-powered kettle uses more energy than a high-powered one.

But only if you're using a normal kettle... If on the other hand you were using an insulated kettle (eg. Zojirushi Micom Water Boiler) and so minimising heat loss you can get away with a slightly lower powered kettle.

The best way to save energy is to use a smaller kettle (eg. one cup), but whilst these are readily available in many hotel rooms I've not seen them on the high street.

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Roland6
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Re: My Electricity supplier

Be prepared to see a bill of the form:

Usage from n years back to the most recent price increase: 1 kWh

Usage since last price increase to date: 9999 kWh

And because you didn't have a supply contract these will be at their standard non-contract rate.

Note your meter readings will count for nothing, only the meter readings made by their contracted meter reader will be taken into consideration...

I know this because I'm still in dispute with my utility over four different bills they sent me at various times that covered the same metering period last year...

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Roland6
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Re: not smart

>It's seriously scary stuff.

But look on the bright side(!) your smart meter will support your alibi that you were watching Strictly Come Dancing - provided you remembered to set the time switch to operate the kettle etc. to co-inside with programming breaks.

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Roland6
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Re: Well, the non-smart meters last 20, 30 years or more.

It would be nice to think that way, but it seems current in the field experience puts the lifespan in the 12~15 year bracket. Additionally, I suspect that if smart tariffs do take off (ie. tariffs that can only be reasonably applied if a smart meter with smart communications is fitted) we will find that the current generation of smart meters (that are being deployed) aren't up to the job...

Actually from my experience isn't so much whether they still work but what happens when they go wrong. Currently if your smart meter fails the utility will try and bill you for the period between their last reading and when they replaced the meter based on their estimate. You may think that sounds reasonable, until you discover that the majors currently only read the smart meter on the same periodicity as the normal meter ie. every six months, and the fact you were abroad (and can prove this was so) for a significant part of that time is irrelevant...

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Would Apple godhead Steve Jobs have HATED the Watch?

Roland6
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Re: Would Apple godhead Steve Jobs have HATED the iWatch?

> Depends. Was it his idea?

One of the omissions from this launch seems to be the substantive reference to Steve Jobs. I seem to remember just after Steve died Tim commented that there was a pipeline of products that Steve had road mapped out that covered the next few years. So I suggest the absence of reference to Steve Jobs in the launch of the watch would seem to indicate that this was a project that wasn't on the roadmap and hence didn't have his backing.

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