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* Posts by Roland6

1367 posts • joined 23 Apr 2010

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Apple's new iPADS have begun the WAR that will OVERTURN the NETWORK WORLD

Roland6
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Re: Back to the eighties you go!

>Uh-oh. Where did I park my DeLorean?

1991, Munich in the visitors car park of Giesecke & Devrient ?

What do you mean your one wasn't fitted with the flux capacitor?

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Roland6
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I think the author is confused, concluding because Google own a fibre network operator (who is exploring wireless local loop connections) that Google are also actively seeking to become a global MVNO - whilst they might be the author presents no evidence to support his viewpoint.

I think the author only introduces Google so that the piece doesn't come across as being anti-Apple, because as you point out the only major player actively wanting to get rid of the physical SIM is Apple, which is a stance that totally contracts the author's statement "Apple just wants to sell you more stuff.".

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Same old iPad? NO. The new 'soft SIMs' are BIG NEWS

Roland6
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Re: Apple MVNO?

>Apple becoming a global MVNO

My thoughts exactly. Given the way they have negotiated with MNO's in the past over the supply of Apple devices, it would not surprise me that Apple makes support of the Apple MVNO one of the conditions of supply. From there it becomes a small step to invert the relationship whereby the customer is contracted to Apple and Apple then pays the networks - just like Amazon do today with Whispernet.

So effectively whilst Apple won't be the first global MVNO operator they will have taken what is currently a boutique service and made it mainstream.

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Microsoft, Docker bid to bring Linux-y containers to Windows: What YOU need to know

Roland6
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>Then an orthodox priest muttered a prayer in a mysterious language...

I wondered why all the Unix sysadmin's/guru's I came across in the 70's and early 80's who were worth anything, wore sandals, crucifix, had unkempt beards and long hair and often carried strange things such as a rabbit's foot and various (closely guarded) heavily annotated reference cards...

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Roland6
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Re: I wonder how the "allowed licensed usage" of this will go. Probably not well.

Re: SBS, Exchange, SQL_server, Sharepoint

Unfortunately, given the current limitations of App-V, namely it does not support "large server applications such as Microsoft Exchange Server, Microsoft SQL Server, and Microsoft SharePoint" [MS Technet gg703262], I wouldn't be surprised to find that you still won't be able to run these "large server applications" in MS Docker containers; these would still need to be run on a dedicated host.

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Kill off SSL 3.0 NOW: HTTPS savaged by vicious POODLE

Roland6
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Re: smug

Re: Poodletest doesn't always get it right

Tested Chrome again this morning with the command line switch --ssl-version-min=tls1 and it now gets it right.

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Roland6
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Re: smug

Follow up to my previous comment.

On Windows, it seems that whilst you can enter the command-line:

chrome.exe --ssl-version-min=tls1

and start chrome, it will still fail poodletest...

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Roland6
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Re: And here I was preparing for a massive round of patching..

Big-IP by any chance?...

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Roland6
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Re: smug

?Poodletest is reporting Chrome v38.0.2125.104 m on Windows - the latest available is vulnerable and requires Google to issue a fix... Whereas IE 8 (and probably earlier versions such as 6) whilst vulnerable in their default configuration, disabling SSL 3.0 is a user action...

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Roland6
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Re: From ISC

Interesting, well this is one instance where IE comes out looking good !

Whilst all my installed browsers (IE, Chrome, Maxthon) on Win7 & XP are vulnerable, it is only with IE that I can implement a workaround (disable SSL 3.0 in the advanced options).

Only concern with respect to depreciated protocols is with IE 8, as the only remaining option I've still got ticked is "Use TLS 1.0".

Aside: poodletest has obviously been updated in the last hour or so as when I first tested IE8 it didn't display an image, but now it does.

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Roland6
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Re: easy to perform

>1. A hacker sits in a cafe with a laptop, and injects an IFRAME into some plaintext HTTP data flowing through the airwaves.

Well the use of a public WiFi hotspot as an example is obvious as they don't typically use WiFi encryption. However, as most traffic isn't encrypted as it crosses the wider internet (and that includes traffic that gets encrypted to traverse a WiFi connection), the attack can be made anywhere, which re-opens the whole can-of-worms around the NSA etc.

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Martha Lane Fox: YEUCH! The Internet is MADE by MEN?!?

Roland6
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Perhaps someone should tell her that electronic voting systems were largely designed and built by men...

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Coughing for 4G, getting 2G... Networks' penny-pinching SECRETS REVEALED

Roland6
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Re: confused report @gazthejourno

I think the article and some of the comments show a large degree of ignorance about mobile comm's...

Firstly, what is totally missing from both the report and the article is any indication or consideration of the load on the cell and mobile network at the time of testing. Without knowing these it is impossible to draw any substantive conclusions about the usage of EHR codecs on GSM. Given the constraints on GSM connections, it would not surprise me to find that the network operators permanently operate their GSM spectrum in EHR mode in cells known to typically have high user densities and 'peaky' usage, such as at St. Pancras where with a train arrival you can rapidly gain a few hundred users, who then disappear again into the underground.

Going back to the beginning of 3G, the first usage to which the new spectrum was put was voice not data! This was because the networks 2G (voice) spectrum was reaching capacity, simply moving some of this traffic on to another frequency band improved the service for everyone (well not always for for those business users who's employer took the 3G discounted rate and discovered they were the guinea pigs...) With the uptake of 3G and now 4G, operators are being left with lightly used 2G spectrum (hence why some have made enquiries about converting the spectrum to 3G etc.), so it makes sense for networks in some areas to favour a "drop back" to 2G for voice traffic rather than put additional traffic on to the 3G spectrum, particularly for their 4G (data) users - I ask what is the real benefit of serving a 3G voice connection to a 4G data user? (Yes I know I'm looking at this more from the perspective of the network operator rather than the 4G user.)

So unlike Simon Rockman, I don't believe regressing "to the two-decades-old sound quality of EHR as a matter of course is penny-pinching of the highest order", quite the contrary, it shows they are optimising the usage of their existing assets, particularly as the operators are currently bound by Ofcom to maintain the 2G/GSM service.

Yes the article is lacking in clarity and understanding of how mobile networks work (wrt voice services) and hence is confusing.

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Roland6
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Not really sure what the article was actually saying!

Back in 2000~2002, when the 3G networks were being specified by the 3GPP, one of the differences between 2G and 3G was in the voice codecs. 2G supported a very limited range of codecs and bit rates, before it dropped a call. Whereas 3G took advantage of more recent developments to use a wider range of codecs and bit rates. Which meant that 3G could be both superior and inferior to 2G depending on network congestion, noise etc. before falling back to 2G.

Given 4G currently 'drops back' to the 3G/2G voice service as it has no native voice service, (yes I know one is in development) I don't see the point of the article unless what is being said that with 4G voice is being artificially constrained when there is no technical reason for a phone not to be using the better quality 3G codecs and data rates.

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Facebook, Apple: LADIES! Why not FREEZE your EGGS? It's on the company!

Roland6
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Re: That's not how it works

"Unfortunately the main limiting factor are not the eggs, it is the uterus. After reaching 40 or so, the chance that an egg nests in, decreases dramatically."

I just love the fact that everyone seems to be forgetting the elephant in the room... male fertility!

The biological clock is ticking just as much for men as it is for women. It many surprise some here that one of the major reasons why a couple receives IVF treatment isn't because of the woman but because of the male firing blanks!

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Need to switch from Windows Server 2003? Here’s a workshop just for you

Roland6
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Re: but I'm not having lunch that late!

Can't complain too much, at least they haven't time boxed lunch, putting the most important session directly after lunch...

My gripe is that there are no venues in the East Midlands, East Anglia etc. so I've got to add a couple of hours travel time each way, so a morning's workshop becomes an all day commitment and because all sessions start at 9:30, I will incur the cost of peak rail travel...

But as I said at least lunch is the last thing on the agenda, so if MS field's some technically capable people, I anticipate that several of them won't be leaving before 3pm...

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Mobile coverage on trains really is pants

Roland6
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"The testing throws down the gauntlet to the mobile operators."

BE interested to see the logic for this statement...

The current Ofcom/Oftel 3G coverage obligation is very specific:

" providing mobile telecommunications services to an area within which at least 90% of the population of the UK lives ... with a 90% probability that users in outdoor locations within that area can receive the service with a sustained downlink speed of not less than 768 kbps in a lightly loaded cell."

There is no obligation to provide coverage to people who are travelling...

The compliance verification methodology backs this up by assessing the services available at a single fixed point within a designated population area.

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Lenovo Yoga 3 Pro Ultrabook flexes new 'Watchband' BENDO hinges

Roland6
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Re: Fundamentally, it is a lovely piece of kit,

My negatives are that Lenovo seem to be playing down the touch capabilities. I would like to see this with a Wacom or similar quality pen option.

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No one wants iOS 8 because it's for NERDS - dev

Roland6
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@Sealand - They're losing the grip. I want iOS6 back, please.

I would agree and think the clarity of the iOS 4.3 UI style and experience has a lot to commend itself, particularly in the hands of someone with poorer eyesight. Every release since, like many other UI's released in recent years, has seemed like a step backwards; how many users use (or even remember) the default parallax motion effects in iOS 7?

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Roland6
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Re: Not the only reason to avoid iOS 8

>The main reason upgrade has stalled is simply because the download is so big

? The iOS 8/8.0.2 download is approximately 800MB, smaller than the previous downloads. However the reason why the automatically downloaded iOS 8 update is simply taking up space on my partners iPad is that it requires at least 4.5GB of free memory to install; something that requires some serious housekeeping on a well used 16GB iPad. So I would agree that few users will be rushing to make space for it.

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£150m, three years... TWO base stations. Gov.uk? You guessed it

Roland6
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Re: Operators - Pah.

I suspect that part of the problem is that the operators (particularly those who haven't supplied any data since 2005) would be wary of supplying any data to Ofcom, because Ofcom has had a public obligation to publish such data since 2007. I note that Sitefinder only carries data up to May 2012 and that is only from those operators who provide updates.

Perhaps the real problem is that Arqiva in their bid relied too much on Ofcom rather than include sufficient budget to build their own private database that incorporated not only data supplied directly from the operators but also data from OpenSignal etc.

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Redmond flicks switch on Dropbox for VMs

Roland6
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Re: Wait a minute ...

From my background I read the article slightly differently, I saw this as possible tertiary fail-over scenario. So once your primary and secondary sites die or go off-line, your cloud-based site goes live. This allows for two scenarios, a simple "sorry we are having problems please try later" service to a full tertiary DR which whilst not available immediately, once up and running does allow a level of business continuity - albeit with the fun and games of reverting back to the primary and secondary site configuration.

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Windows 10's 'built-in keylogger'? Ha ha, says Microsoft – no, it just monitors your typing

Roland6
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Re: Microsoft simply cannot afford this to happen

Re: Accounting software

If a client was using a "pre-release" for real production work then I'd be worried. But given the example, I expect the same client would be very grateful if you pointed out that the reason why they are having to always recalculate the VAT on orders is because they keep omitting to tick the "EU sale" box. But then it would probably be correct to regard all ERP systems as 'pre-releases' given the number of fixes the vendors keep sending out ...

However, I think the point you were trying to make was that with enterprise systems the data is being collected either within the organisation or by trusted third-parties, whereas with MS the data is simply being collected and dropped on to a faceless development team somewhere in the world. The interesting thing that arises from this is whether MS will turn this monitoring capability into an Enterprise feature and so create a market for the tools they will have had to develop to analysis this data.

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Roland6
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Re: Microsoft simply cannot afford this to happen

Given the up roar, just what exactly do people think all those android and iOS app's they download and install and okay the permissions giving access to device and personal data etc. are doing?

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Roland6
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Re: All the more reason...

>How come no one is giving ReactOS any love at all?

Well it isn't exactly progressing very fast...

I suspect a major reason why a major hasn't got behind it is that if ReactOS actually succeeded in delivering a product ready for prime time is whether MS would alllow it to continue or would commence a legal war of attrition, particularly if it showed any signs of becoming more widely used.

However, if the US government wanted, they could back ReactOS in the same way as years back they backed both Intel and AMD to ensure that they weren't dependent upon a single supplier for critical systems components. Such a move would be a game changer.

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It's not you, it's Three. Mobe network goes titsup across UK

Roland6
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Re: No problems here

APN: 3internet has been fine all day in my part of the East Midlands.

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What’s the KEYBOARD SHORTCUT for Delete?! Look in a contextual menu, fool!

Roland6
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Re: @Old Handle @John 110

>Type password (watching screen after every letter to make sure they go in - it's a row of dots!)

Don't knock it! There are some websites I use that time the keystrokes and hence will lock you out if you type too fast, inferring you are a machine and not a human.

I suspect that for many, because they've used a mouse-based GUI for so long, they are conditioned to use the mouse to move the cursor around the screen, only touching the keyboard when they need to enter text.

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Roland6
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Re: Touch typing

>As a rather Linux user I prefer the mouse to Ctrl C and V, but that is an other story.

It should be remembered that the key reasons why Unix/Linux commands are so terse and weird are because there were developed by techies who were unable to touch type and so preferred to stick two fingers up to those who could and who wanted to obfuscate things so that people had to read the manual.

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Roland6
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Re: Getting harder to transition from mouse to keyboard

That is because the general direction of travel with respect to UI's for a few decades now has been to make things more accessible to the lowest common denominator, and away from its initial market (typewriter replacement) to new markets where people have had no training in how to use keyboards and a computer (school children). Whilst these ideas have delivered interfaces such as iOS that require minimal user learning, they have also made it more difficult to do things; as we have witnessed in the uproar over Win8.

If memory is correct, MS (and others), deliberately stopped shipping user documentation and specifically relevant here shortcut cribcards/cheat sheets/keyboard key templates (remember those plastic cut out sheets that MS shipped with it's Office app's up to 4.n, that sat on the keyboard just above the function keys) with the releases of Win95 & Office 95, on the basis that software should be 'intuitive' and hence didn't need a manual...

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Roland6
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Re: Talking of 1-2-3 @Brent Longborough

Strange how lessons get forgotten, the experience with using a mainframe version of 1-2-3 reminds me of using various cloud based office applications, via a browser style client...

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Marriott fined $600k for deliberate JAMMING of guests' Wi-Fi hotspots

Roland6
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Re: Marriott's response is amazing. @thomas k.

>Gee, that's remarkably similar to the NSA's (et al) justification for indescriminate, blanket surveillance

As Marriott is a US company, that is to be expected; given their brief, the NSA would be very interested in the communications of Marriott's guests... So in this instance I would not be surprised to find Marriott has a hand up their back controlling the mouth...

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Roland6
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Re: A small step in the right direction @Phil W

"De-authing networks does have it's legitimate uses though."

Yes it does, however those uses are within your own private business premises and you use kit like the AirDefense Security & Compliance solution to enforce published company policy.

In a public space - which includes hotel bedrooms, it's use is highly questionable, particularly if it is done without being publicly declared (I bet the Marriott's signing in slip didn't include the guest accepting a clause forbidding the use of private WiFi...).

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Microsoft's nightmare DEEPENS: Windows 8 market share falling fast

Roland6
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Re: with no simple way to prevent users receiving the MS update nag... @I ain't Spartacus

Yes the update is via the Windows8 Store. When the full screen invitation to visit the store and update to 8.1 is displayed, the user has to respond - it prevents them from doing anything else, selecting the 'not now'/'don't bother me again' option (I think this the visit store and immediately exit action) will dismiss the invitation and the user can carry on working; however, a few months later it will reappear. I would not be surprised if it reappears because of an update received from Windows Update, like the end of XP reminder.

From what I saw the only way to determine whether the "8.1 Update 1" service & feature pack has been installed is to look at the update history for KB 2919355 along with the critical precursor KB 2919442).

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Roland6
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Re: Re @AC @Gene Cash

All are HP 650 series laptops, which were shipped with 8.0 installed. Currently HP don't officially support 8.1 on the 650 series, so provide no driver updates...

Whilst some have got 8.1 running (but not as stable as 8.0), the main problem is driver related, in that the versions auto downloaded from Win Update as part of the 8.1 update are at fault, but being more recent than the ones that work ...

The laptop I played around with, worked 'fine' if you didn't want to use the network. It could see and connect to the network (ethernet/Wifi - obtain IP address etc.) but not use it beyond 'ping'.

I suspect that sometime in the coming year HP will release a new suite of drivers and the update will work without problem...

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Roland6
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>Our new lenovo had 8.1 on it

Must be buying the cheap stuff! all the Lenovo stuff I purchase comes with a Win8 license but Win7 pre-installed, giving a much quicker and better out of the box experience...

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Roland6
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Re @AC

>Since 8 and 8.1 are basically the same OS

Yes I would of agreed until I had to undo the effects of a client's user who had accidentally okayed the MS update this past week. Basically we discovered that the client's HP laptop platform was incompatible with 8.1, so they have a bunch of laptops that are stuck on 8.0 ( supported until October 2015) for the foreseeable future; with no simple way to prevent users receiving the MS update nag...

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PEAK IPV4? Global IPv6 traffic is growing, DDoS dying, says Akamai

Roland6
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Re: @intrigid

>I thought that IPv6 networks were completely isolated from the IPv4 internet, and that switching to IPv6 would basically require building a brand new internet from scratch

Basically there are many 'hoary' problems to be overcome for an IPv4 end system to talk with an IPv6 end system. However, the use of IPv6 as a carrier service for IPv4 has been working for many years and has been slowly deployed by the carriers. Reading Akamai's report, it seems that they noticed a slight decrease (0.9%) in the number of requests received from IPv4 systems, but a more significant increase in the number of requests from IPv6 systems. What Akamai don't go into is whether the IPv6 requests are actually IPv4 requests or pure IPv6 requests. Given that Akamai's main customers are the providers, I suggest it is more likely that what Akamai are reporting is that more carriers and providers are switching to an IPv6 backbone infrastructure, even if they are publicly still presenting a pure IPv4 service.

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Windows 10: One for the suits, right Microsoft? Or so one THOUGHT

Roland6
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Re: Peak operating system?

>I can see a time when the only time you pay for an OS is when you eventually buy a new computer.

Where have you been all these years! for many users that has always been the case. Remember one of the common statements made by people running XP was that their n-year old system still worked and they saw no reason to mess around upgrading the OS, they would simply wait until the hardware died.

Outside of the MS tech crowd the only people who were into OS upgrades were businesses, where being able to reuse a few thousand systems purchased in the last year or so, rather than simply replace, was cost effective.

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Roland6
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Re: testing procedure.

And none of those options worked on a system MS 8.0->8.1 update crippled. The solution that worked was shutting down via the 'charms' menu. I've no idea why that should be any different to any of the other options, but it did the job...

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Roland6
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Re: The numbering makes sense now...

>Windows will be shite until they go to 11.

Don't you mean 11-SP1 ?

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Roland6
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Re: Tiles should replace icons fully - everywhere.

>Why not having a mail or messagin app tile showing you incoming messages? Why not tiles informing you about an application running tasks and status? Why not an "icon" whose info displayed can be customized?

That's what the notifications area is for.

Some contradiction here:

"Microsoft should replace icons with tiles fully. I would like to have tiles which ... can look like simple icons ... Icons are a relic of the past..."

So when I first log on what should all the various icons on my desk display, given that at this time the system is idle? I don't need the Word icon flashing up all my recent documents. Yes it might be nice to be able to right click on a desktop icon and immediately see a list of recent documents, but that is very different to having lots of icons simply shouting "look at me".

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DVLA website GOES TITSUP on day paper car tax discs retire

Roland6
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Re: Something not entirely clear

You only needed to display a tax disc (real or fascimile) until midnight September 30th.

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Roland6
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Re: A little common sense is called for... @Martin

> it should not be that different with the new system.

Well yes, the old system was sized and so was probably over capacity for most of the month. The new system probably used that very in concept called "elastic" or "CPU on demand". The trouble is that elastic works well for gradual growth in load not for sudden large surges in demand, particularly if there isn't sufficient pre-primed spare capacity idling in the wings.

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Roland6
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Re: Why wait?

> Me, when I notice it's the first day of the month and suddenly think "Shit! I haven't taxed the bloody car yet"

And I bet the only reason why you noticed was seeing the tax disc on the windscreen (by seeing, I mean you only needed to glance at the back of the tax disc holder to be reminded of the car tax...) I foresee a lot of people will be getting fined for late payment because there is no longer a visual reminder on the windscreen.

Not having to tax my car this month I don't know if DVLC are still issuing "tax discs". When I taxed my car from 1st-Sept, DVLC had run out of official tax discs and printed (inkjet) tax disc on a letter explaining that I could cut out this facsimile and display it in my tax disc holder until 1-Oct.

Hence I see no reason why DVLC can't as part of their online receipt, provide a "tax disc" that can be printed off and used as an aide mémoire.

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Roland6
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"not true, it's the same as it is now."

Not quite true!

The new system (should) automatically refund the "unused tax" when the seller sends in their V5C to DVLC, previously you had to send in two sets of forms: V5C and V14.

The unsatisfactory part of the change is the whole transfer of ownership piece; the V5C still has to be posted to DVLC and their service guarantee is for a new V5C to be issued 2~4 weeks after they received the V5C from the seller. It seems that the only way for a new 'keeper' to tax a newly acquired vehicle is in person at a post office. However, this ignores why the car is kept, obviously when I drive the car away from the seller it is still legally taxed (until the end of the day on which the transaction occurred) however I cannot legally keep it parked on the road for several days until I get round to visiting a post office (which will be a city centre one which will require me getting the car out to drive to it...)

Tellingly, the DVLC website gives very few details around this side of the change and hence I suspect it wasn't totally thought through; if the DVLC website is to be believed, I don't need to produce a valid insurance certificate if applying at the post office...

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Lenovo to finish $2.1bn IBM x86 server gobble in October

Roland6
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Re: ODMs.

>Just look at Linux merely 10 years ago - no one even thought of using it in their data centres

AIX 5L was released in 2001...

IBM's adoption of Linux effectively rubber stamped RedHat's new business model (enterprise Linux), it is also another example that seems to indicate that IBM do seem to have a good grasp of where the market is going.

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Roland6
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>You get to provide business to American corporations.

You think American corporations will suddenly stop doing business with IBM?

I suggest IBM/Lenovo are playing the long game...

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Renault Twingo: Small, sporty(ish), safe ... and it's a BACK-ENDER

Roland6
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Re: Nobody will buy the smaller engine

The Twingo wasn't intended for motorway usage but for city usage, just like the original Fiat 500.

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Roland6
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Re: Great!

Yes I noted the engine removal challenge, something the Hillman didn't suffer from - a supermarket trolley could be readily re-purposed into an engine trolley...

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CURSE YOU, 'streaming' music services! I want a bloody CD

Roland6
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Re: My 500 CD Memorex CD robot works on the local network.

>I remember blind testing 4 CD players ranging from £200 to £2000

Yes I remember doing similar, I finally selected the configuration of CD player, Amp and speakers that I could afford, where the triangle in one of Mahlers symphony's actually sounded like a triangle!

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