* Posts by Roland6

1672 posts • joined 23 Apr 2010

Sysadmins, patch now: HTTP 'pings of death' are spewing across web to kill Windows servers

Roland6
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Re: Problem identified - problem solved so what's the problem? @betacam

Whilst I would expect a hosting company to do just as you say and quietly deploy this update without fuss. The problem is that IIS is much more widely used, given it is bundled with Windows Server...

Extranets, intranets to name two obvious examples. additionally, if memory serves me correctly it can be used to deliver the help system for Windows Server. Which given most servers, I've encountered, have updates turned off, for good reason, means that many servers are vulnerable, albeit only to mischief makers on the local network...

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'Hackers racked up $$$$s via the Android Play Store, and Google won't pay me back'

Roland6
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Re: Complaint is suspiciously light on detail.

I would assume, given this is a filing and based on filings for patent litigation in US courts, the details will be produced as evidence in court. hence this lack of detail is normal and so nothing can be directly inferred.

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Roland6
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Re: The real story

Well according to the court document (points 9 to 13 on pages 3 and 4), it is an open question as to whether the account details actually left Google. It would seem that Google did all the billing, naming the recipient (I assume this is in a similar way as other intermediaries such as Digital River and PayPal name transactions). However, it seems that no one can point to an audit trail that links these payments to actual online transactions nor to monies paid to the recipients named by Google, which is what I take it that point 13 is alluding to.

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Roland6
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Re: App Name

Well according the court document, it would seem: Google Play Services!

The relevant sentences being: "After powering on her phone, Plaintiff was asked to provide a Google e-mail address or sign on using a Google e-mail address; she signed on using her prior Google e-mail address. Subsequently, the Android operating system prompted Plaintiff to provide payment information in order for her to receive updates regarding her phone. " [page 3]

I regularly get prompted to enter a payment method (card/paypal) when accessing Google services (gMail, Play Store). The pop-up does strongly imply that you must enter details before continuing, so I can see that normal people may be fooled/tempted into entering payment details when none are actually necessary.

So I suspect one of the key issues is whether having associated payment details with your Google account, should Google have also explicitly asked permission to use those details in the Play Store and secondly whether Google did/didn't should of notified via email all transactions being made, rather than simply bill them using the registered payment details.

What is clear, is once again the only safe payment method (other than none) to have associated with a Google/Apple/Sony etc. online account is a prepaid voucher.

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Google: Go ahead, XP stalwarts, keep on using Chrome safely all YEAR

Roland6
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Re: They'll support for as long as it makes sense...

Could be a long-time - there was no expiry date in the XP EULA...

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Roland6
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Re: unsupported?

I think the problem has arisen because MS have very publicly stated their standard support terms, which are what you get if you simply purchase the product. However, they have been less forth-coming about their paid for services.

Given the fun and games over XP, I would hope that MS will have got their act together better before 2020 when standard support for Win7 is due to finish. As given, the way things are changing, I would of thought that MS may prefer to support a large user base of paying Win7 customers rather than see them trickle away to competitors.

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Android lands on Microsoft's money-machine island fortress

Roland6
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Re: wha?

"Extended Support for Windows XP Embedded at the supported service pack level is available until January 12, 2016" [Source: http://blogs.msdn.com/b/windows-embedded/archive/2011/02/17/support-lifecycle-transitions-for-windows-xp-embedded.aspx ]

So actually given the size of the deployment (ie. number of ATMs and their geographic distribution), it is actually very late in the day to be announcing a new platform OS that is to replace XP. But if NCR are guaranteeing that it will run on all their existing NCR ATM's and so they can effectively updated overnight they might get some customers committing to it.

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Chrome version 42 will pour your Java coffee down the drain: Plugin blocked by default

Roland6
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Re: It isn't the 1990s any more..

One of the reasons I like IE over Chrome !!! is that my security suite gives me a nice little toolbar in IE that enables me to have set a global policy: no Java, and on a per website make it one click for me to enable it and several other content settings. Whilst chrome does give me exceptions, all the stuff is buried in the settings.

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Learn yourself hireable: Top tips for improving your tech appeal

Roland6
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Re: ITL exam only

ITIL Exam only try the BCS:

http://certifications.bcs.org/category/15421

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Roland6
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Re: Groupon etc

These deals can be really good, particularly if you are a bit rusty on out-of-hours learning (having a young family does curtail your 'free' time), as if you find you run out of time, you don't end up writing off relatively large amounts of money.

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National Grid's new designer pylon is 'too white and boring' – Pylon Appreciation Society

Roland6
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Re: The old tower looks like a very strong structure.

What got me about the National Grid erection picture was the kit being used to erect one of these new pylons and the size of the ground disturbance footprint - I suspect the new one leg pylon requires much more substantial foundations than the old four legged ones. So whilst they may visually have a lower profile, their erection could be much more damaging to the land...

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Eyes on the prize: Ten 23-24-inch monitors for under £150

Roland6
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@david bates

Obviously things have changed, for nearly eighteen years I had no problems, simply signing and returning the no TV declaration every year. Then we had children...

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Roland6
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Re: Why so big?

Well you really need a 24" (although a 23" 16:10 could just do it) to display an A3 (2 x A4) page at 1:1 and have a little space left for toolbars etc.

Yes with the 21.5" Dell Ultrasharp's you are being a little spoilt, but 1920 x 1080/1200 on a 24" display has a very similar pixel density to 1680 x 1050 on a 20" panel - which given most 20" panels these days seem to be 1600 x 900...

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Roland6
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Only if you don't have one (a TV licence) already for your 'premises' and you are going to watch 'TV' as it is defined these days on it.

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Roland6
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The point the article makes about the BenQ is misleading.

BenQ give the option to purchase with a "height adjustment stand (HAS)" (Model: GL2450HT).

With HAS, this monitor is currently retailing for 155 GBP's on Amazon, without 108 GPB.

Given this is a 24-inch monitor capable of taking a standard VESA mount then a quality stand such as the Ergotron Neo-Flex LCD Stand (part no. 33-310-060) (that can also pivot/pan) would suffice and that can be had for 41 GBP (obviously P&P extra on the above prices).

Beyond this all the monitors are identical and hence all could be mounted on the above Neo-Flex and deliver exactly the same landscape/portrait functionality as the BenQ, with the display being changed manually by the user via Windows... Personally, having had this capability for many years now, I'm disappointed that we've yet to see a mainstream monitor (in the 20~24 inch bracket) with the relevant sensor built in and a driver that can relay the orientation to Windows...

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Microsoft uses Windows Update to force Windows 10 ads onto older PCs

Roland6
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Re: Resource nasties....

Suspect MS are following a strategy similar to the one they adopted over the Win 8.0 to 8.1 desktop upgrade, namely: send out a bunch of 'updates' via WUP a year or so in advance that do a whole bunch of preparatory tasks ready for when they release Win 10 via WUP, your system will be 'hijacked' and automatically updated at a date and time convenient to MS.

I wonder whether part of this is that MS are moving towards an Apple iOS style of update - I note that my iPad has automatically downloaded iOS 8.3. However, at least Apple allow me to simply let it sit on my device until such time as I decide to install it...

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Win Server 2003 addict? Tick, tock: Your options are running out

Roland6
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@LDS - whilst your point is totally valid, I was responding to the query raised by 'x 7' namely "OK....how do you do that without running the risk of nuking the existing server? Most people don't have a spare one hanging around"

Which implies smaller installs typical of SME's (ie. non-VM and non-datacenter) where typically there is no spare physical server nor MS licenses to cover such a server if it did exist... Personally, I purchased a 'recent' dual Xeon workstation/server off eBay for a couple of hundred and use it as part of my migration service to get around this problem...

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Roland6
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At a basic level, if you are running 2003 then you are probably well advised to buy a new server. But there are proven tools that will enable you to take a physical 2003 serve and spin it into a VM, which can then be run on practically any system running a modern CPU; useful if business continuity is a consideration.

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Roland6
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Re: @ Hans 1

>I do think the author knows a thing or two about IT...

Probably, but I suspect they haven't been through an SME upgrade from 2003 to SBS 2008 or even 2012. I've found if you approach it as a full IT transformation/refresh, you tend to lift the covers and discover all the stuff that will trip you up and cause the business to be without IT for a few nail-biting days...

Also in the SME space there is no equivalent to SBS beyond SBS 2011, so an upgrade to 2012 can be more involved, particularly if you are deploying Exchange, SQL-Server etc.

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EE springs Wi-Fi phone calls on not-spot sufferers, Tube riders

Roland6
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Re: Pah

Need to filter those results, my AP supports 3 SSID's on each of the 2.4 and 5 GHz bands...

What I love is how many people simply plug in their AP and let it auto select channels. Me? I do a scan and then fix my AP on to specific channels. Now my neighbours are effectively sharing two of the four (EU) 2.4GHz non-overlapping channels, with constant channel swapping, whilst my AP generates a solid signal on my chosen channels...

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Tests show HTC, Sammy phablets BEND just like iPhone 6 Plus

Roland6
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Re: In other news…

The thing that I don't understand is that given glass (even gorilla glass because I've accidentially done the test!) will break if dropped on to a hard floor from circa 30 inches, is why we are using glass in mobile phones, particularly the developments in plastics....

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BT thinks EE customers will FLEE from enlarged four-play mobe biz

Roland6
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Re: O2

> If BT want to get rid of the EE branding they will need to convince those customers to stay and switch to a BT contract.

Doesn't necessarily follow, remember BT own PlusNet...

Personally, it would not surprise me if BT simply rebrands EE, given they have already made negative comments about the EE branding, and then use this brand for new converged offers.

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Roland6
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Re: Loyal Orange/EE customer

>My experiences of BT, from any angle you care to look at, is pitiful.

They've consistently paid out a reasonable dividend, not sure what is so pitiful about that.

As a shareholder and it depends on the purpose of your shareholding, the question is whether a drop in share price will impact the dividend long-term, if not it may present an opportunity to buy more shares...

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Is this what Windows XP's death throes look like?

Roland6
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Re: With Windows XP you are never 'out of date'.

The real problem with XP is certificates...

XP won't be in it's death throes until we start to see root certificates expiring.

Recently I had fun and games with an XP x64 system that had been locked down since 2008. Internet access proved problematic, in part because it only had IE6 installed. No problem, simply visit WUP and then installed Chrome... Chrome refused to load because of expired certificates and with MS no longer providing root certificate updates for XP x64...

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Ofcom's new broom Sharon White sweeps into office

Roland6
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Re: But...

I suspect 'Oxford' is being used as a wind up, all the evidence points to Cambridge (http://www.awards.civilserviceworld.com/diversity-and-equality-awards/judges/11-civil-service-world-awards/diversity-and-equality-awards/diversity-and-equality-awards-2013/judges-2013/29-sharon-white)

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Sony tells hacked gamer to pay for crooks' abuse of PlayStation account

Roland6
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Re: XBOX Live

"After reading all this I thought I'd better remove the payment option from my Xbox live account."

Also remember Apple? iStore/iTunes remembered your CC details without really asking permission and then used then without question for in-game purchasing etc.?

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Roland6
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Re: Other reasons to get your account banned

Be interesting to see to what extent these T&Cs stand up in a UK court, they do seem to try and impose unfair and and unreasonable conditions... Remember these are consumer contracts not B2B contracts.

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Roland6
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"That means Sony now have to take the 'hit' hence the alleged debt against his account."

Yes, but Sony should know with whom that transaction was made and hence recall the payment they made and so not be out of pocket. I suspect that Sony either didn't bother chasing the fraudulently transacted monies, or it acted too late and the money had moved on, leaving a dead account with the organisation (PayPal?) who hosted the account refusing to refund monies...

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Voda UK CEO says one thing about not-spots, Minister of Fun says another

Roland6
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Re: Its about time 2G was dropped from coverage maps / statistics.

All the UK networks (Vodafone, O2, Three, EE) give separate coverage maps for the differing technologies (ie. 2G, 3G and 4G) supported on their networks. As for O2 coverage outside of Cardiff, I assume you did click on the 3G and 4G tabs...

No the problem isn't so much the networks coverage checkers - although these are limited. It is how all this coverage and user data is fed into the official coverage calculations to come up with the single headline figure governments and politicians are so fond of quoting.

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John Lewis stakes £100,000 on building a working tech creche

Roland6
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Re: I like the sofa thing

Recommend a visit to your local Lego store for an example of what can be done with these types of customer interactive systems, kept the children happy for ages...

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Building a better society from the Czechs' version of Meccano

Roland6
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Re; To make a wi-fi enabled laser printer?

Depends upon the size of canvas - can't see a traditional printer being fit for purpose if you are doing a custom print job on a football pitch...

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Microsoft and Oracle are 'not your trusted friends', public sector bods

Roland6
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Re: So give them the boot - use open source

"Thales nShield HSMs ensure that your key is always under your control and never visible to Microsoft"

However, that doesn't mean that the French authorities don't have access...

But not really a problem, just as long as you don't do anything to antagonise them, as they won't release the information to the UK/US authorities because it seems the French get a lot of satisfaction from thumbing their noses at the British authorities...

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Roland6
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Re: Licensing audits

>I have 200 Machines, They all have windows and office on them...that means I need how many licenses?

Well it depends - from the discussions over the past year or so on licensing, I'm sure depending upon which MS/Oracle representative you are talking to, you may get a different answer, particularly as if you have 200 windows machines, you probably are also running a few servers...

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Roland6
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Agree MS license tracking could do with much improvement. Whilst it is a different league a small business customer uses a Microsoft Account, which whilst it does provide a single place for all the activated licenses, it doesn't do away with paper records, because it just lists licenses without providing any real information about which product the key is for and which user/systems have been using particular licenses.

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Roland6
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Re: So, give them the boot - use open source.

Whilst increased usage of open source might be the desired outcome of some, the key outcome of organisations being hit with a highly visible cost that hadn't been budgeted for, will be to encourage them to look more seriously at alternatives. Products that don't need you to track license usage in near real-time and allow for some vagueness in actual numbers will probably gain favour.

So it seems that MS has set it's heart on creating a mountain - similar to the one it created with XP et al., that it will need to climb in circa 2020 if it is to successfully move organisations off Win7 et al. on to whatever their replacement product set then is and not have those customers move to third-party product sets.

So yes MS are giving the open source movement yet another sales opportunity - who said that MS were anti open source?

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Vodafone: So what exactly is 'ludicrous' about the Frontier report?

Roland6
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Re: Hello, Mr Kettle... @Tom 38

The key point is as you note "market prices".

I suggest that any one looking at Vodafone in a similar way might discover what Vodafone's margins are...

I had a FT100 client once who complained about our prices, until we said okay we will go open book on the condition that our margin on the contract is the same as the margin your company publishes in their annual report each year - it did the trick they accepted our prices without any further question because they had just declared a 30% net margin...

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Roland6
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Re: Hello, Mr Kettle...

Isn't it about time someone conducted a similar analysis on Vodafone...

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700,000 beautiful women do the bidding of one Twitter-scamming man

Roland6
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Re: Ahhh Twitter...

Does that mean that once you clear out all the scam accounts Twitter is left with one real user, namely Stephen Fry?

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'Why don't you buy from foreign sites?' asks Commish, snapping on the gloves

Roland6
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Re: Interflora

International ordering with delivery by a business local to the intended recipient was something Interflora got right years back (okay the choice isn't great and you are to some extent buying blind and relying on the local florist to interpret your brief, but at least you can do it). It has always irritated me that many international businesses insist that if you are UK based say, then the only site you can order from is your national site and hence shipping is from the UK and not from their operation local to your stated delivery address.

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BT Home Hub SIP backdoor blunder blamed for VoIP fraud

Roland6
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Re: HH3

Warning!

If you've connected your HH3 directly into BT's wall socket, you will need to ensure whatever router you pick to replace it is certified to also operate in the same manner, many don't. If however your HH3 connects via an ethernet cable to a modem which in turn connects to the wall socket, you have much more choice.

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Roland6
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Re: Blame Game

>I wonder why so much focus is put on the part that the router was meant for home use and not SMB.

Yes, particularly given BT supplies the Hub 5 as standard on its business broadband...

EE similarly will supply the same hardware (BrightBox2) to residential and business customers.

From what I've been able to ascertain the boxes run identical firmware... differences arising from the preconfigured login details being used to offer a different line QoS and routing of traffic out of the exchange.

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Roland6
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Re: Really?

The point I was making was that there are advantages - as Terry Barnes indicates, but generally you have to dig to find them because the providers make a poor sales job.

Recently I switched providers and for many the difference in the headline offering at the same price point was for domestic unlimited data and the price included VAT, whereas the business version was capped and VAT was extra. But then the amount of information given out about business broadband is a wealth of information compared to the differences between business and consumer/personal mobile phone tariffs...

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Roland6
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Re: Really?

Yes, I come across lots of small/micro businesses (1~10 people) that use residential broadband, because it was much cheaper (and simpler to order etc.) than business grade, plus as you note the skills to install it are readily available.

In some respects the takeover of the O2/BE residential broadband by Sky a few years back was timely, as Sky had no real interest in the business users, these users had to go elsewhere. It enabled me to migrate several on to business broadband services because in addition to the need to move, their dependency on the broadband had significantly increased.

What I find odd is how many of the providers make very little of their business broadband, failing to understand that at the small end of the market where costs loom large, they need to sell the real benefits of the business broadband package over those of their home packages. Also there seems to have been a fall off of domestic packages that explicitly support home working (ie. packages that give all the domestic stuff, plus explicitly support business usage).

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Roland6
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Re: I would say this is completely BT's fault...

BT's fraud prevention team informed Keith's client that all charges would remain valid since it was not BT’s fault that fraud had occurred on customers' equipment.

Well can't see BT getting away with this one. If this is the BT domestic home hub that BT supplied when the firm of solicitor's contracted for the BT DSL service then the hub will most probably have been supplied under BT's Ts&Cs which I suspect carry words to the effect that the hub is and remains the property of BT...

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EU digital veep: If you like America's radical idea of net neutrality, you're in luck, Europe

Roland6
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Re: Zero rating of services

Mobile data will be virtually unlimited by then in the UK.

A good example of a zero rated service!

The example used in the article, namely: "a mobile network could say music streamed from Spotify doesn't count against a subscriber's monthly download limit" is interesting.

Firstly, for this to be a truly neutral provision of service, the provision needs to apply to all streaming music services, not just Spotify. However, if the network provides me with a range of tariffs and add-on's of which one is "unlimited Spotify" (which may or may not have a price attached, but critically the subscriber has to opt-in) then I suggest it does satisfy the criteria for net neutrality.

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Ten things you always wanted to know about IP Voice

Roland6
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Re: Needs better information on faxing

There is no reason this couldn't be done with a PDF and combi-printer/scanner without having to worry if the line is secure between you and the recipient.

Fax isn't about 'secure lines' but about real-time push delivery of a hard copy facsimile copy of whatever someone wants to send in (potentially) a readable form by the recipient and confirmation of completion of this task that can be waved around in front of managers and if necessary before a court.

For lesser tasks then the fax service is not really necessary. From your implementation examples, I think you've become a little institutionalised in your thinking about how businesses work and the level of IT out-there. Yes there is lots technology can do and will probably do better in the future. However, I've found that being able to accommodate the use of old fashioned fax machines (which these days is typically an all-in-one combi printer/scanner) by clients, has done my business no harm and potentially a lot of good...

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Roland6
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Re: Needs better information on faxing

>I've never understood why companies are clinging to fax.

Simple, I've sent a contractual document to a client that needs their signature before my team step on site. The easiest way for the client to read the document etc. is to print it out and use a pen to sign that copy and put it on to a fax machine, thereby transmitting a legally recognised copy back to me and knowing that I have received that copy...

There are other business use cases (albeit a small group), largely revolving around convenience and ease of use by non-tech people, where having a fax machine that can scan paper containing handwriting can be helpful.

But yes, as technology gets better we can expect traditional fax to disappear, something that the adoption of X.400 messaging (instead of SMTP) all those years back would probably have assisted...

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Brute force box lets researchers, Cops, pop iDevice locks

Roland6
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Just how secure do we want our devices to be?

I ask this question as in the last few days, I've had to deal with several Windows laptop/workstation systems where access has been locked down and the Admin passwords lost/forgotten - Hirens BootCD (in CD form) has seen a lot of use...

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Roland6
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17 hours is still a significant hurdle...

So with a little equipment and patience the pin can be cracked in under 17 hours...

What I find myself asking, who is going to invest this amount of time in cracking a 'hot' device? That could potentially be remotely disabled during this process and hence render the whole escapade worthless.

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FDA draws line between wearable health gizmos and proper medical gear

Roland6
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I'm a little surprised that the FDA aren't being encouraged to draw a line between consumer devices and medically approved devices. I'm sure the iWatch will be able to monitor my pulse, but will it's readings be accurate and reliable?

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