* Posts by Roland6

1796 posts • joined 23 Apr 2010

Wanna go all Gandalf – YOU SHALL NOT PASS - on Windows 10?

Roland6
Bronze badge

Re: It's a conspiracy

>Do you seriously think that MS is going to install W10 on legit W7 and 8 machines without telling anyone?

Obviously, you didn't have to deal first hand with the mess created when MS initially 'offered' the Win8.1 Update (via the Store) to Windows 8 users (using a "Get Windows 8.1" app that had been downloaded via WUP and then put the update natively on WUP for all those still running Win8 and thus catch out all those who had ignored the "Get Windows 8.1" app.

I suggest this effectively was a trial run of the "Get Windows 10" app.

I also note from this article and the articles it references, MS are not distributing anything that easily disables/removes the "Get Windows 10" app (eg. a "hot fix") that an administrator/IT expert could easily deploy across an estate.

2
0

Windows 7 and 8.1 market share surge, XP falls behind OS X

Roland6
Bronze badge

Re: Don't want 10

>I have resurrected a Win 8.1 install

Remember if that was originally a Win8 install, you will need to keep you Win8 install media. Because the Win8 key won't work with a Win8.1 install disk, only with Win8 and upgrade via WuP to 8.1.

Hence I expect that the 'Free' Win10 update will be similar, it will only install over a previously activated OS and won't accept a licence key for 7/8/8.1. Hence if you every need to reinstall... it may be simpler to buy a retail copy when MS discount it to a few pounds just as they did with Win8, which could be had for £14.99...

0
0

Chair legs it from UK govt smart meter installation programme

Roland6
Bronze badge

> I will use the same amount of electricity with or with a smart meter

But that isn't the real point of smart meters!

With a smart meter, the energy companies can introduce various fancy new tariffs that enable them to increase the amount you pay in real terms, whilst making you think you are getting discounted energy.

2
0

VPNs are so insecure you might as well wear a KICK ME sign

Roland6
Bronze badge

Re: AirVPN

Up vote - good reference, especially https://airvpn.org/topic/14231-ipv6-leakage-and-dns-hijacking/ as this clearly explains the exploits in a 'real world' context.

Be interesting to see if any of the other VPN providers also put up similar (technical) statements about their service and its vulnerability to these exploits.

Interesting, that commonsense advice for many years has been to disable IPv6 on Windows, unless you are actually using it, so as to avoid network issues...

0
0
Roland6
Bronze badge

Re: "It's just that few ISPs support IPv6 natively"

From the paper it isn't clear where the information is being leaked to...

If your client running a dual IPv4/IPv6 stack is behind a pure IPv4 router (ie. the typical 'free' home broadband router and typical public WiFi hotspot), the question has to be just who is able to pick up the IPv6 traffic and where are they taping into it?

0
0
Roland6
Bronze badge

Re: Nothing new here...

An up vote for the relevant RFC URL, but the news is actually that many implementations have yet to implement it... - I also suspect that many may not even be aware of this RFC...

1
0
Roland6
Bronze badge

Re: Why did the IPv6 rollout have to be such a mess as to encourage these problems?

Because interop with IPv4 was never part of the IPv6 design philosophy!

The idea was to "throw a switch" and hey presto the old IPv4 Internet simply disappeared to be replaced by a fully functional, highly secure IPv6 Internet. This is probably the main reason why there is so little IPv6 support and usage.

Additionally, whilst IPv6 was often described as being more secure than IPv4, it was largely designed during the early 90's when our understanding of and focus on network security was that much less sophisticated.

10
1
Roland6
Bronze badge

Re: Is there really a VPN solution called "Hide my Ass"

Yes and it made one UK young entrepreneur 'rich' (okay not Zuckerman rich) when he sold it to AVG for 40m GBP (just under 63m USD) earlier this year.

http://www.bbc.co.uk/news/business-32702501

5
0
Roland6
Bronze badge

Re: This is a test of VPN technology; in 2015 "network" means IPv4 *and* IPv6.

Well the paper isn't totally clear (and it should be) about the test environment. It does seem that the test was of VPN over an IPv4 network, but details of the configuration (IPv4 and IPv6) are not obviously given.

What is not clear (from an initial skim reading) is whether the leakage is happening because of client dual stacks and hence IPv6 traffic is not being routed over the VPN or what. What is clear, from the paper, turning off the client IPv6 stack resolves the leakage problem, however it is noted that not all client OS's permit this.

I suspect from the article and my experience that this 'leakage' problem may not be wholly attributable to the specific protocol stacks being used, but to the mechanisms that are used to select between protocol stacks and specifically address the fundamental cause of the leakage "No rules are added to redirect IPv6 traffic into the tunnel.".

A paper now on the "to read" list.

4
0

Server guys: Are you running fewer than 200 virtual machines?

Roland6
Bronze badge

Hyperconverged infrastructure systems (HCIS)

Arrh the new name for the mainframe...

3
0

Teaching people to speak English? You just need Chatroulette without the dick pics

Roland6
Bronze badge

Re: Prizes

From some investigation I did nearly a year back, one (or more) of the language learning providers effectively offered the facility for learners to test their newly learnt language skills against native speakers.Obviously not quite so unstructured as chat-roulette.

Also if you know your Neal Stephenson, you'll probably remember reading "The Diamond Age", published in 1995.

1
0

Cambridge boffins: STOP the rush to 5G. We just don't need it

Roland6
Bronze badge

Re: I think 5G is just a distraction...

Whilst I agree 5G is just a distraction, I think that the reason why we are hearing so much about 5G is that it is being used for chicken and egg marketing purposes by those with vested interests.

In one area, we see that the industry has discovered Oftel's soft spot and have got them jumping to their tune as it rushes to re-allocate spectrum firstly for 4G and now getting it to consider further spectrum allocations for 5G, in the full knowledge that having allocated and freed up spectrum for 2G/3G/4G/5G there is little chance of such spectrum being easily reverted to it's former use and users...

To aid in this the industry needs to create the impression that 5G is both imminent and will have sufficient capacity to support all those new and 'essential' applications, like driverless cars, and so stir up interest/demand and so justify why relatively large amounts of spectrum will be needed...

0
0
Roland6
Bronze badge

Re: And make the cost of 4G reasonable

>At home I get 1 bar of 4G at the front of the house. ...

And what is the actual internet connection speed? I 'love' one of my local network providers, whilst I may (at times) get a good 3G signal, according to the engineers the mast is at the end of a circa 3 mile length of copper...

0
0

Who wants a classic ThinkPad with whizzy new hardware? Lenovo would just love to know

Roland6
Bronze badge

Re: "What other brand has...

Yes Dell have done a reasonable job on their 'professional' range of laptops. But comparing a Latitude D620/630 with a Thinkpad T60 and you see some of the corners Dell cut. Additionally, Dell don't have the same approach to spares as IBM/Lenovo had with respect to the Thinkpads, so sourcing spares for the various D620/630 systems being used by friend's is a little more problematic.

I think that Lenovo actually have much to gain (or regain depending upon viewpoint) by re-establishing a 'traditional' Thinkpad machine in the market. Given they effectively took over IBM's manufacturing, you would expect the employees would not only have the skills but also the motivation to recreate a modern Thinkpad, worthy of the name.

0
0
Roland6
Bronze badge

Re: @Dan 55, re: impromptu Signiture Edition.

>You can get free Windows ISO's from Digital River

Not been possible for a while now,

ISO's for some editions of Win7 available from:

http://www.microsoft.com/en-us/software-recovery

and for some editions Office 2007:

https://www.microsoft.com/office/downloads/

2
0
Roland6
Bronze badge
Pint

Re: Dual ThinkLights - already had them for 4+ years

>After the Kaypro portable, everything was feather weight

Everything? It seems the Compaq portable was 'slightly' heavier :)

0
0
Roland6
Bronze badge

Re: @Gritzwally - what is the biggest appeal?

Build quality and repair-ability.

Yes Thinkpad's weren't the fastest, thinnest etc. machines in the business, but they were designed to be used by mobile workers ie. those who had laptop and would travel, for 3~6 years. Yes, they didn't do rugged, but then if you needed this, just get a Toughbook...

A big factor in their longevity, is their repairability and availability of spare parts, aided by IBM supplying full schematics and selling individual parts (okay some can be a little costly). It is this that enables someone who is proficient with a screwdriver to fully disassemble a Thinkpad, replace/repair a single component (eg. lubricate CPU fan, replace LCD or backlight) and reassemble back into a working system, with no broken bits of plastic left behind or clip-in panels that no longer clip-in.

I've been tempted to build my own 'FrankenPad' (technical term, Google for examples), because even now I can purchase parts from IBM et al. for a T60/T61 (manufactured circa 2007).

The only real problem with the Thinkpad, is it's default usage of Windows. Which in your case will be a problem, particularly if it shipped with Win8 or later (Win7 was probably the last version that had a fully functional Control Panel, Win8/8.1 still has a Control Panel, but it's not complete, with some stuff seemingly only accessible via the 'Charms' menu - where only the initiated can reliably find and access...).

8
0
Roland6
Bronze badge

Re: I'm gonna get flamed for this...

Not the comment I was expecting from a "field tech and user".

The big plus the Thinkpad had over many others, was that not only were they designed to be used by mobile workers they were designed to be field repaired, okay there are a few things that are problematic (eg. replacing the screen, lubricating the CPU fan), but given a screwdriver (and patience) you can readily dissassemble your Thinkpad, replace a component (which could easily be purchased "over-the-counter") and re-assembled into a working machine.

I suspect that with a few tweaks, that others here have also suggested, a retro Thinkpad could be very useful machine to you, particularly if it fully supported Mint out-of-the-box.

4
1

BT: Let us scrap ordinary phone lines. You've all got great internet, right?

Roland6
Bronze badge

OTT Players

"All the telcos find it especially unfair that Over the Top (OTT) internet messaging and calling operations such as WhatsApp, Skype, Apple Facetime, Facebook etc are not required to connect their users to rival networks."

Interesting that no one seems to have picked up on this.

I suggest here BT (and other Telco's) have a legitimate complaint, that is also aligned with consumer needs.

I suspect that what is needed is a standards group to begin working and defining relevant (open and royalty free) standards, just as they did with networking protocols (eg. TCP/IP, OSI, CCITT X-series) then we can start to get organisations to demand interop.

0
0
Roland6
Bronze badge

Re: One big problem

>Spend £3 and buy one that can.

Remember in the UK you can still use pulse dial phones for POTS services, although if you want to be able to use Internet at the sametime, you do need a pulse-to-tone convertor...

So no need to visit Currys/PC World/Carphonewarehouse..

0
0
Roland6
Bronze badge

Re: One big problem

"I would suspect these days most households have at least 3 mobile phones capable of making emergency calls."

Only problem is that in an emergency the typical user will forget they purchased a Fermocell to gain mobile at home usage and hence not understand why suddenly there is no reception...

0
0

THIS TIME we really are ALL DOOMED, famous doomsayer prof says

Roland6
Bronze badge

Re: he omitted the piece about our rate of consumption outstripping supply

@Tom 13 - "Commenting without reading again I see."

Commenting without thinking? :)

Tim's point was correct at the macro level, however, Tim didn't really address the here-and-now of the real world, particularly around essentials, during that period of adaptation ie. when demand outstrips supply.

Taking the UK water supply as an example. It doesn't really matter what the price does, at the point when supply diminishes ie. there is a water shortage, there is still a need and hence demand for water. Likewise with respect to the "bacon in the fridge", there are still mouths to be fed.

Now as such events become more frequent, adaptation will occur, however that takes time. In the case of water we have seen: investment in water infrastructure ie. a national water grid, in an attempt to mitigate local shortages. Industry taking steps to conserve water and in some instances securing their supply - because what is more costly isn't so much the price of water but the price of having plant (and people) standing idle. However, we still have a population that requires water and (humanely) reducing the population takes time...

Hence my response elsewhere the real question isn't so much whether or not the scientists are right or not, but whether we have sufficient time to (humanely) adapt when we encounter crunch points...

0
0
Roland6
Bronze badge

Re: @Roland6 @Tom 13

>even his population projections are wrong by an order of magnitude.

I don't remember his (Ehrlich's) projections, but my memory from reading various books in the early 70's was that the population would double in circa 40 years - something it has done...

It is worth mentioning that current population forecasters have concluded that the original idea that the population would plateau at around 9 billion, is not supported by evidence and hence based on current evidence the population could grow to 12+ billion. I would presume (but I could be wrong) this change by forecasters fully takes account of the birthrate change...

>His projections about food production were likewise completely backwards

I'm not so convinced they were so backward, only more cautious. Because whilst there were improvements in crop yields, in the late 1960's there was little indication that these would continue to the extent we have actually witnessed.

> the reason we haven't seen the massive extinction of species in the rainforests is ...

We started to protect the rainforests?

Also a cleared rainforest leaves little no trace of what it contained, hence whilst we may have confidence about the few rainforests we have studied, we just don't know what was lost in the rainforests that have been cleared, especially those cleared prior to scientific study...

1
0
Roland6
Bronze badge

Re: To Append A Necessary Phrase. @Ben Tasker

"I know we're talking about a doomsday scenario, and hard decisions would need to be made, but if you're going to effectively sentence an entire country to death (leaving aside the 'who has the right?') at least make it a bit more humane than starvation y'know?"

Actually it is worth taking time to think through the doomsday avoidance scenario.

In circa 1970 the worlds population was 3~4 billion. Now, 45 years later it is 7~8 billion, with forecasters now saying that their original forecasts for the population to plateau are incorrect...

So given what we are being told that over-population is a major cause of our problems and the crunch point (if we do nothing with respect to population, food, energy etc.) will occur before circa 2050, it is obvious that we should seek to massively reduce our population, lets say to 1970's levels ie. approximately half our current population, in a couple of decades (or less). It is a useful and enlightening exercise to go through how this objective might be achieved by 'humane' methods - I've yet to identify one...

0
0
Roland6
Bronze badge

Re: doom

"The central problem facing the green lobby, is that even if one day science comes in that actually backs their predictions, ..."

Is that having had the predictions confirmed, we can reasonably expect society to adapt (it may even be very painful) and so avert the 'doom' element of these projections. Then subsequent generations can laugh at the 'ancient' doom-sayers for failing to see x, y or z. ...

The only real question we have is whether we will have sufficient time to adapt when/if the predictions are confirmed...

1
3
Roland6
Bronze badge

Re: On the limits of growth

>Have you checked there's enough bacon in your fridge?

Yes! However, there is only enough for my family's needs, until we slaughter another pig...

Basically, whilst Tim's argument was good, he omitted the piece about our rate of consumption outstripping supply. So whilst there is a supply of bacon, there will be times when it is not available due to demand exceeding supply.

This is similar logic to that behind the UK's water system. Our system has been planned on holding a few (six?) weeks of water, because under 'normal' UK weather conditions, there will be sufficient rain to top the system up. With changing weather patterns we haven't been having the 'normal' patterns of rainfall and hence water shortages have become more frequent, even though total annual rainfall has not changed very much.

1
1
Roland6
Bronze badge

What is interesting, is that the (human) population projections from the late 60's seem to have been largely correct. However, what has been totally inaccurate is the (doomsday) forecasting of what that actually means.

I think there are two problems, firstly people, such as Ehrlich, under estimate the ability of humans to adapt and change. The second is that without the credible doom-sayers, drawing people's attention to things the opportunity to avoid the calamity could be lost.

So in part the reason why we haven't, yet, seen the massive extinction of species in tropical rainforests is because we are now aware of them and the importance of tropical rainforests. However, there are plenty of other species that are tottering on the edge of extinction, courtesy of human activity.

6
3

The insidious danger of the lone wolf control freak sysadmin

Roland6
Bronze badge

Re: Sounds like...

"He sounds very efficient"

Did you read the article?

Whilst Tim did engage with the business, something that may have been lacking, however, Tim was working all the hours to deliver what he promised, which would indicate that Tim didn't know how to say 'No' and also didn't know how to plan his time. I suspect also Tim had a very poor concept of his true worth and ability to negotiate renumeration accordingly, hence why he was prepared to work such long hours without bringing it to management's attention.

Now if Tim only worked 10am to 4pm, drove a high-end company car, had regular expensive holidays (with girlfriend/family) and spent the rest of his time playing golf then I would agree he would be efficient. The only efficient people I know who work all the hours are highly skilled IT consultants, who get paid to dig clients out of shit...

1
0
Roland6
Bronze badge

Re: We recently had this..

"but SME's rarely have the budget to do everything as "best practise". I mean, Change Management?"

The real issue is that "change management" is really all about: thinking about what you are going to do before you jump in!

Many SME's (and their suppliers) think they don't have time and budget for "change management", but fail to see the time lost due to both themselves and their suppliers simply jumping in and fighting fires set by their cavalier approach...

4
0

Why are there so many Windows Server 2003 stragglers?

Roland6
Bronze badge

Re: Linux?

>Why is this never considered for small business?

Because it is a non-starter! Believe it or not many people running SMB's haven't heard of Linux, but they have heard of Microsoft and Apple.

Also small business'es don't actually want Windows Server or Linux but the stuff that typically goes on the server, namely email, file sharing, time management, accounting etc. etc. that enables them to run their business.

So having a solid set of business applications the actual platform becomes significantly less important. Remember SMB's don't have the time or money to 'play' with IT, they want it to largely work straight out-of-the-box and to carry on working with minimal effort on their part.

Hence why astute offerings such as Microsoft's SBS Server (Windows platform) were appropriate. The challenge Zentyal server, an open sourced SBS server alternative/replacement, faces is increasing it's market presence, so that choosing it feels more like choosing between a Ford and a GM?Vauxhall, rather than between a Ford and a vehicle from some new name south east asian startup - remember Hyundai were among the first to offer 5 year warranties etc. because of this problem.

1
2
Roland6
Bronze badge

Re: No Windows Small Business Server 2012

>We where lucky to be migrate to smb 2011 but we don't know where to go from there in the future ...

Well, I would agree there are BIG issues in the sub 75 user business space with migrating from SBS to some fancy 2012R2 virtual server configuration. Fundamentally, all those small MS partners who delivered SBS, generally don't have either the background or employee's with relevant MS training to actually deploy a Server 2012R2 configuration, because even though it is a relatively simple configuration, it needs an understanding of enterprise computing principles...

Personally, I'm keeping an eye on the Zentyal Server project, which is firmly targeting the SBS market. However, the big challenge is finding local IT shops that are prepared to support it and are sufficiently skilled in Linux to actually do so. It seems many are wedded to MS without realising MS no longer cares for the SME sector and hence their business model...

2
0

How much info did hackers steal on US spies? Try all of it

Roland6
Bronze badge

Re: What the Chinese did with it?

Depends who "the Chinese" are. If they are government then I suggest they will do the same as we did in the WWII and for many decades afterwards over Bletchley Park, namely keep very quiet and use the information wisely.

Given what is on Form 86, I suggest it is information with a very long shelf life, which can also be used to cross match data from other 'public' sources. So they know who your children are and where they are...

1
0
Roland6
Bronze badge

Re: Dear US of A @Paul Crawford

"If they are taking security seriously the switch would be configured to only allow ..."

You are omitting the fun and games of multiple layers of traffic encryption which are usually done both physically separate to the switch and to each other, so that there is minimal risk of traffic of differing grades being "in the clear" in the same physical box...

1
0
Roland6
Bronze badge

Re: Dear US of A

"Who said it was on external-facing network? They could get there through multiple hops"

Well that would indicate that the database was incorrectly graded for security purposes. As given the risks associated with disclosure - the full database should of been Secret or higher (so no physical connection to lower grade networks), with only highly selective extracts being made available on networks with lower security ratings.

So once again it seems the US government is paying in spades for it's approach to security which doesn't seem to have changed over the years - namely extradite and put on trial those identified as having made unauthorised access to their "secure" IT systems.

2
0

Microsoft says its latest, dodgy Windows 10 build is good for (almost) everyone

Roland6
Bronze badge

Re: free upgrade

"I like to help people upgade to win 10."

I do as well, but my time isn't free...

2
0

It's 2015 and Microsoft has figured out anything can break Windows

Roland6
Bronze badge

Re: Why not just integrate EMET into Windows 10? @Charles 9

From the press reports over the years, you are right, I was just being provocative :)

However, given EMET was originally developed for XP, it is a little perplexing that MS having publicly made the commitment to making Windows more secure did not make any forward announcements concerning EMET functionality being rolled into Windows 'n' (where 'n' is a version greater than Vista/7).

Similar could be said about SteadyState which seems to have no MS successor.

0
0
Roland6
Bronze badge

Re: Why not just integrate EMET into Windows 10?

>It probably broke stuff.

But then MS deliberately broke stuff with Win8 eg. new printer driver system...

Suspect a consideration isn't that it probably broke stuff but that MS were uncertain as to whether it would break it's own stuff...

0
0
Roland6
Bronze badge

Re: Surely...

"What is it you would do differently in a new OS that current Windows doesn't do (or vice versa) which would make your new OS inherently more secure? "

Well, actually use the security features that have been present on all Intel chips since the 286...

However, I expect that would break backwards compatibility...

2
1
Roland6
Bronze badge

Re: Goody

" When it gets to this point, the application can now call the new Windows AMSI APIs to request a scan of this unprotected content"

Too late!!

There are already versions of malware that will probably get pass this! There are web based attacks where the downloaded script is 'innocent', only it includes calls to remote code that is only provided when invoked...

Hence we caan expect an application to merely see a 'handle'/agent which it passes to AMSI, and which in all likelihood AMSI will deem to be okay and hence instruct the application it is okay to run, the 'handle'/agent now executes and loads whatever payload it wants without calling AMSI...

0
1
Roland6
Bronze badge

Re: Why not just integrate EMET into Windows 10?

Also what happened to SteadyState?

A rather useful XP lockdown technology that was ditched before XP reached end-of-life.

1
0

Config file wipe blunder caused deadly Airbus A400M crash – claim

Roland6
Bronze badge

Re: Lack of imagination when thinking up things that can go wrong.

>But in an embedded system, the more checking you add the more things there are to go wrong.

However, you will have difficulty convincing me that this particular embedded system was constrained to 16K of ROM. Hence the question is why wasn't the absence of these key files picked up in the preflight tests/checks and flagged to the pilots.

1
0
Roland6
Bronze badge

Re: I'm glad the code I work on will never kill anyone.

I'm glad that the fail safe systems I had designed and coded back in the 80's were replaced at the end of their life in the late 90's having not caused any one's death.

As for the systems I worked on subsequently, they were (in comparison) straight-forward commercial stuff.

0
0

Fanbois designing Windows 10 – where's it going to end?

Roland6
Bronze badge

Re: That's hilarious

The issue with multiple desktops, is being reminded they are in use!

So as far as I'm concerned, I'm happy for the taskbar to only show the running applications for this desktop; but I also expect the taskbar to show me a reminder that I'm running multiple desktops and give me a simple and obvious mechanism for me to see what I have running in each.

[Aside: I agree the constantly changing UI/UX is distracting from all the other changes; but then that might be deliberate, as then MS would have to explain what they actually meant by 'faster', 'more secure', 'reliable' and 'flexible'.]

0
0
Roland6
Bronze badge

Re: Windows is UX Cubism

"You just need to configure it right"

Agree, however this takes time and understanding of the OS, user and application suite installed, a task that is ideally suited to having a Wizard to assist with, shame MS forgot to include one.

0
0
Roland6
Bronze badge

Re: A novel idea?

"Manga Wallpaper" - really says it all.

The people designing Win10 obviously spend too much time looking at a blank screen and not enough time actually working.

0
0

Industrial Wi-Fi kit has hard-coded credentials

Roland6
Bronze badge

Re: The only options...?

Reading between the lines, I would presume the vulnerability is in the AP's management interface, as I don't see where else the AP would need to be aware of SSH and HTTPS sessions. (The document does not go into any detail as to how the AP supports WPA2-Enterprise mode of operation and hence whether the vulnerability has any impact on WiFi security.)

From memory, Cisco AP's also contain hard-coded manufacturer's credentials, but I don't remember whether the certificate was unique to each AP or not, but you could load . Looking at the N-Tron user manual, the capabilities of these devices look very similar to the typical domestic xDSL/wifi/LAN router (rather than a Cisco enterprise AP) hence I wonder whether a similar issue is lurking in equipment from Netgear, D-Link, Draytek etc...

0
0
Roland6
Bronze badge

Re: It's a difficult crowd

" Who would let a serious industrial control system be run from the cloud."

Well we shouldn't forget that this is exactly how many of the driver-less car systems are being envisioned...

The issue with "the cloud" isn't so much the "seriousness" of the application, but the criticality of time and failure modes. So for example a river management system probably doesn't need millisecond interactive control responses and if communications did fail what would the consequences be if nothing happened until a person could be got on site. This naturally is different to say a pump storage/hydro-electric power station where you do want things to happen in seconds and hence you will have both control systems and people permanently on site - but then even these are effectively managed from "the cloud" given they only do stuff in response to a call from some operation's centre at the other end of a comm's cable...

0
0

Paper driving licence death day: DVLA website is still TITSUP

Roland6
Bronze badge

Re: Not fit for purpose

Not sure about HMG's usage of the NI number. To renew my driving licence online recently, I only needed my passport number - but perhaps that is simply a way of linking what they know together and getting me to confirm the links...

0
0

Windows 10 upgrade ADWARE forces its way on to Windows 7 and 8.1

Roland6
Bronze badge

Re: A Word to the Wary

Whilst it may be a little fiddly, it does seem that MS are not (currently) classifying these Adware 'updates' as "critical" and "security relevant" and hence a simple way to avoid/filter them out, is to update via WSUS Offline Update.

0
0

Forums