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* Posts by Roland6

1305 posts • joined 23 Apr 2010

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Oh God the RUBBER on my SHAFT has gone wrong and is STICKING to things

Roland6
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Re: Cheap rubber

Do't know a bout Psion 3, but I've noticed that mobile phones suffer from it also: My Nokia 6310i suffers from it to a greater extent than the older 6210.

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Blood-crazed Microsoft axes Trustworthy Computing Group

Roland6
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Re: What is the ratio?

But in the TwC group the flacks probably left the programming to the engineers...

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Monitors monitor's monitoring finds touch screens have 0.4% market share

Roland6
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Re: Replacement cycle....

I'll have a look on my next visit, but doubt any are touch screen due to when they were swapped out...

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Roland6
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Re: Replacement cycle....

> 17" 4:3 1280x1024 monitors with DVI and hard glass are particularly difficult (anyone know a supplier?).

I've got six Compaq/Dell/HP monitors sitting in a clients store room - located in the Northampton area, if it's of any help.

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Amazon rekindles e-readers and Fire OS without weeks of whack-a-leak fun

Roland6
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>Kids can destroy anything.

Particularly micro USB ports...

But then the OAP's also find these difficult...

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Roland6
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Re: Children's one available in yellow?

>An android tablet that gets replaced everytime you drop it would be nice

If this is for work, I'd suggest investing in a D30 case (see T-Mobile's video! http://www.youtube.com/watch?v=BPEciw3cBss ) because at least it increases the chances of the device surviving the 'drop'. There is nothing more frustrating than dropping a device and then having to carry on for the rest of the day with a damaged/dead device.

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'Windows 9' LEAK: Microsoft's playing catchup with Linux

Roland6
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Re: at least half a decade??@Roland @AC

Thanks for the comment, next time I get a chance to play with a Win8 laptop I'll investigate. What really provoked my comment was playing around with 8" Toshiba Win8 tablet in it's out-of-the-box configuration - which is set to use the native 1280 x 800 resolution screen as if it were on a 19" display with no obvious way of changing settings using the fingers...

With respect to your comment about laptop displays, the issue I perceive is more about the dot/pixel pitch - something that doesn't get talked about very much. I suspect for most people for a work display, provided the raw pixel pitch is at least as good as an old high spec CRT then the overriding concern is the physical size of the display. Hence why on a modern 20" LCD display I like to see 1680x1050 or better, because I'd like those users who want Windows to display at 1280x800 (on a 20" LCD) to at least have a legible display that doesn't look like a game of pacman.

A secondary issue with display resolution, is what assumptions have developers made, remember the netbook problem: many Win7 control boxes were longer than 600 pixels and hence couldn't be easily navigated. I would hope with Win8 and/or 9 that specific problem has been resolved.

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Roland6
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Whatever X-based window manager I was running

I seem to remember there was an X-Window manager for Dos/Windows - DESQview and DESQview/X

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Roland6
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Re: at least half a decade??

Bet also Win9 doesn't have any concept of physical desktop size: so in sizing desktop display items it assumes that a desktop of 1600x1200 is on a 20" monitor and not on an 8" tablet...

Plus it is unable to understand that whilst the physical desktop may be 1600x1200 I actually want it to size display items as if I'm using a 1024x768 resolution display, but use the additional pixel count to anti-alias. (This capability is very useful to make displays readable to people with poor eyesight)

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Roland6
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Re: Hopefully they'll introduce tabbed Windows Explorer windows too

Hope they'll let me put the tabs where I want them, like down the side of the window (and allow me to have the text orient down the page) rather than across the top - just like a paper file, organiser and Lotus did years back.

And yes as a leftie who can use both hands! - I want to be able to organise the window furniture how I want it, and not have to constantly make allowances for the limitations of developers who is unable to think outside of the right-handed mode of operation.

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Roland6
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Re: Windows has had multiple desktops for bloody years

>I would suggest that anyone who *hasn't* found that probably hasn't been looking very hard.

Until reading these comments I had totally forgotten about the sysinternals 'Desktops' toy. I gave up on running multiple desktops under Windows years back, after playing around with them on various versions of Windows. With Win 3 and probably all versions of Windows including XP, whilst CPU performance and memory were major constraints. Additionally, I found the biggest obstacle was the stability of Window's itself - with multiple desktops on a single system, when Windows crashes which it frequently did it created a big mess. It was simpler and more stable to run several Windows boxes through a KVM or Remote Desktop - but then work was paying...

Obviously, with significant strides having been made in Windows stability (since XP-SP3) and platform performance, Windows 9 might just be capable of running multiple desktops in primetime.

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Every billionaire needs a PANZER TANK, right? STOP THERE, Paul Allen

Roland6
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Re: Mamaaaaaa!

Whilst I do agree with you, it does seem that this purchase is of a tank already in a (US) collection, rather than quietly rotting in some forgotten barn/field in Europe.

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Apple iPhone 6: Missing sapphire glass screen FAIL explained

Roland6
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Re: Vaporpus Sapphire @Ledswinger

>Not much use if you can't use the thing in daylight?

Ignoring specialist phones (£££), I've yet to come across a mass market smartphone that is as usable in daylight as a device with an e-ink display such as the Kindle...

But point taken, I wonder whether Apple compared sapphire with gorilla glass in daylight and decided that perhaps it was better to wait until suitable coatings were available...

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Roland6
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Re: Sapphire

>Maybe someone will develop a way to attach a thin sapphire glass face onto a tougher base, resulting in excellent scratch resistance and good toughness too.

Seiko did that years back when producing sapphire was less reliable and more expensive than it is now (google sapphlex). With advances in production technology they now only use their proprietary hardlex (mineral crystal) or sapphire crystals depending upon price point and market being targeted.

However, it is worth remembering that the sapphire screen on your 1000m divers watch will be a totally different level of quality to the sapphire screen on your idevice; this will be reflected in the price and guarantee...

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Roland6
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Re: Vaporpus Sapphire @Ledswinger

Yes yield definitely is part it. Also I note from other reports there is a general issue of there being sufficient sapphire being produced, which Apple were addressing by building it's own glass plants, which I suspect aren't ready for prime time just yet.

As for your test, a simpler one would be to take the phone outside - sapphire is more reflective...

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Roland6
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Re: Vaporpus Sapphire

>Maybe it's simply not possible to reliably make millions of perfect sapphire phone screens

Over the years there has been much debate around the various mineral crystals available for watch displays. I suspect that part of the problem is not that you can't reliably make millions of perfect sapphire phone screens, but whether it can be done at the required cost and whether such a brittle screen really is appropriate given the application (yes sapphire may be very hard and resistant to scratching, however just like diamond is brittle and subject to cleaving or shattering on impact).

Personally, having the choice between a sapphire screen or a slightly softer and flexible mineral crystal screen, I would go with the non-sapphire screen.

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Retailers toast welcome return of Back2School notebook biz

Roland6
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Re: laptops for kids

Even at 'refurbished' prices of around £200 they are still good value, particularly when compared to a sub-£250 device being sold in the "Back2School" category. It is scary to think that those new devices typically have a lower performance benchmark than a device sold in 2007...

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Smart meters in UK homes will only save folks a lousy £26 a year

Roland6
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Re: LED's

Whilst lighting is very visible (no pun intended) and hence a switch from conventional bulbs to energy saving bulbs/LEDs makes a big difference. The problem is that lighting forms only a very small part of my total energy consumption, the vast majority is on hot water and central heating...

In fact I suspect that for many people simply upgrading their ageing computer would save them more. For the past few years I've been supplying All-in-One desktop systems with a 25w PSU as a replacement for their 300+ w desktops running XP...

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Roland6
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Re: Idiots

> If the kettle takes twice as long to boil, then it spends twice as long at each temperature from its starting point to boiling, so it will lose twice as much energy to the surrounding air. It follows that a low-powered kettle uses more energy than a high-powered one.

But only if you're using a normal kettle... If on the other hand you were using an insulated kettle (eg. Zojirushi Micom Water Boiler) and so minimising heat loss you can get away with a slightly lower powered kettle.

The best way to save energy is to use a smaller kettle (eg. one cup), but whilst these are readily available in many hotel rooms I've not seen them on the high street.

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Roland6
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Re: My Electricity supplier

Be prepared to see a bill of the form:

Usage from n years back to the most recent price increase: 1 kWh

Usage since last price increase to date: 9999 kWh

And because you didn't have a supply contract these will be at their standard non-contract rate.

Note your meter readings will count for nothing, only the meter readings made by their contracted meter reader will be taken into consideration...

I know this because I'm still in dispute with my utility over four different bills they sent me at various times that covered the same metering period last year...

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Roland6
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Re: not smart

>It's seriously scary stuff.

But look on the bright side(!) your smart meter will support your alibi that you were watching Strictly Come Dancing - provided you remembered to set the time switch to operate the kettle etc. to co-inside with programming breaks.

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Roland6
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Re: Well, the non-smart meters last 20, 30 years or more.

It would be nice to think that way, but it seems current in the field experience puts the lifespan in the 12~15 year bracket. Additionally, I suspect that if smart tariffs do take off (ie. tariffs that can only be reasonably applied if a smart meter with smart communications is fitted) we will find that the current generation of smart meters (that are being deployed) aren't up to the job...

Actually from my experience isn't so much whether they still work but what happens when they go wrong. Currently if your smart meter fails the utility will try and bill you for the period between their last reading and when they replaced the meter based on their estimate. You may think that sounds reasonable, until you discover that the majors currently only read the smart meter on the same periodicity as the normal meter ie. every six months, and the fact you were abroad (and can prove this was so) for a significant part of that time is irrelevant...

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Would Apple godhead Steve Jobs have HATED the Watch?

Roland6
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Re: Would Apple godhead Steve Jobs have HATED the iWatch?

> Depends. Was it his idea?

One of the omissions from this launch seems to be the substantive reference to Steve Jobs. I seem to remember just after Steve died Tim commented that there was a pipeline of products that Steve had road mapped out that covered the next few years. So I suggest the absence of reference to Steve Jobs in the launch of the watch would seem to indicate that this was a project that wasn't on the roadmap and hence didn't have his backing.

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Who us, SHARE infrastructure? Networks reject gov proposal

Roland6
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Re: Infrastructure as a public service

>Just think if the infrastructure was provided by a public company, that leased access to the telcos ...

Most parts of the country already largely have this situation in fixed line voice and DSL/fibre broadband...

So plenty of experience of how those arrangements work in practise...

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Limits to Growth is a pile of steaming doggy-doo based on total cobblers

Roland6
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Re: Enery is the secret

As is time.

The common theme to all the stuff that has been published since circa 1970 is that our existing population growth, resource consumption etc. are un-sustainable and therefore we need to do something.

There is disagreement about what that something is, but even Tim Worstall in his attempt to discredit the "Limits to Growth" accepts that we must change, just that his view of the change needed is different.

The key to all of this is time, either we do something eg. get innovating, or the resources will run out and our ability to and options for self motived/generated change become very restricted.

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You know what Cisco needs? A server SAN strategy

Roland6
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Re: Off topic - misuse of the acronym SAN

Perhaps we need some versioning of acronyms as per MRP/MRP II/MRP III and ERP/ERP II

Thus:

SAN - Storage Area Network

SAN II - Storage Array Network - ie. a network of storage array's

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DEATH TO TCP/IP cry Cisco, Intel, US gov and boffins galore

Roland6
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Re: Anyone remember the OSI protocols?

>The difference here is you have some massive heavyweights in the form of Cisco, Intel, Huawei, Acatel-Lucent and Qualcom in there. That is pretty much most of the networking market leaders right there.

Not nearly enough support: Remember OSI in it's various guises had the backing of computing and network equipment vendors, Telcos, Governments, major end user organisations etc. and yet it still failed. As I've noted elsewhere, all the major vendors demonstrated 7 layers of OSI in 1988; practically within a year it had been forgotten about and everyone was buying TCP/IP. Even government procurement was buying TCP/IP as long as the proposal made suitable commitments to using Open Standards and OSI at some undefined future date.

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Roland6
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Re: Anyone remember the OSI protocols?

>What essentially saved TCP/IP at the time was not the force of massive heavyweights, it was a chippy little upstart company, cisco,

No what made TCP/IP was that it was good enough, bundled for free with Unix on workstations and that code was available that enabled it to be ported to other kit eg. IBM mainframes and IBM PC's (the big challenge of the 80's wasn't Internet but simply getting all those PC's and workstations to share printers and terminal access to internal systems). And whilst all the major players had OSI stacks by the end of 1988, they had vested interests in their own networking suites, hence getting hold of them and deploying them wasn't made easy (a task also not made easy due to the number of OSI profiles that existed at the time). Cisco in the 80's was just one of several networking equipment vendors, hoping to make it to the big time.

The problem NDN has is effectively the same as OSI, breaking into a established market. Unless it can work over the established IPv4 infrastructure (or possibly IPv6) it will rapidly become just an interesting research project.

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Don't bother with Apple's 9 Sept hype-day: Someone's GONE AND BLABBED IT ALL

Roland6
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>To me it looks like apple stole the design for the new iphone from HTC if you ask me.

Stole? The Apple-HTC patent licensing agreement signed back in 2012 only prevented HTC from using Apple's designs...

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Scared of brute force password attacks? Just 'GIVE UP' says Microsoft

Roland6
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Re: Nice logic!

Not quite. The logic is basically saying that requiring people to wear seat beats is largely a waste of time when the people who design and build the roads can't agree on which side of the road people should drive, get traffic lights to operate in phase, correctly label lanes etc. etc.

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Roland6
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Re: um... no

@Mark 65 - I said "online bank account details" (ie. name of bank, username and "my super secure password") not my "bank account details" (ie. branch code and account number).

Although yes with my online account details a third party could effectively deny me access to the online account up due to their repeated authentication failures.

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Roland6
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Website Builders...

Has anyone done a security evaluation of the various off-the-shelf website builder packages and cloud services with respect to their out-of-the-box security credentials?

It just that it seems that the security problems that have been reported are for bespoke websites that have been 'professionally' developed.

I ask as it would seem that we've yet to create and promulgate good practise security patterns.

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Roland6
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Re: um... no

@theodore - depends upon the bank!

I could publish my online bank account details: bank, username and password and you still would't be able to access my account!

That is because you also need my debit card, PIN and the code generator gismo.

But yes the big weakness with respect to banking is all the mobile phone app's.

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Look, ma, FOUR HANDS! Microsoft bigs up pixeltastic TWO-USER mega-screen

Roland6
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Re: "Most mainstream touch-technology, like that on an Apple or Windows tablet, is single touch."

>What's new is bothering to apply that to a work UI.

Not so sure about that part being new. What I think is new is the combination of multi-touch with very large high-res immersive displays. You can get a feel of things from the video in this article: http://betanews.com/2014/04/10/why-microsofts-perceptive-pixel-is-the-coolest-touch-tv-you-cant-buy-yet/

However, what this video demonstrates is that there is some serious graphics and screen handling processing going on behind the scenes. It also indicates that MS will have to separate the UI from the underlying OS as I don't see how the UI paradigms that work on a single user smartphone really still hold true on a large multi-user UI.

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Roland6
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Re: I picture...

>with some techs from another and we were often drawing at the same time on an old fashioned flip chart..

You could do all that with the Surface (coffee table version). Unfortunately because MS kept the tech in-house there was no evolution. If common sense had prevailed then MS would of released the API's and dev kit - but that might have given people another reason to stay with XP...

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Roland6
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Re: "Most mainstream touch-technology, like that on an Apple or Windows tablet, is single touch."

>If you try that on a current 'multi-touch' setup it'll just assume you have one massive hand spanning the whole screen.

Obviously you didn't play around with the Surface (coffee table version) which supported multi-user multi-touch (and multiple user orientations). My understanding is one of the key reasons why current generation mass market devices (ie. desktop monitors, laptops, tablets and phones) have very limited multi-touch capabilities (and only support a single user orientation) is because of performance and cost considerations.

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4th Century GOBLET could REVIVE CORPSE of holographic storage

Roland6
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Re: How...

Looked over the shoulder of a neighbour Greek?

Remember the Greeks developed the Antikythera...

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Windows 7 settles as Windows XP use finally starts to slip … a bit

Roland6
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Re: Why is Win 8 and Win 8.1 seperated?

Veti, raises an interesting and important point.

According to netmarketshare their desktop OS market share data (cited in the article) covers all versions of Windows, with no exceptions being given, which seem to indicate that it includes Windows 8 phone, unless there is a simple way of differentiating Windows 8 desktop from Windows 8 phone. So perhaps the Windows 8.n desktop market share is being over egged...

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Roland6
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Re: Why is Win 8 and Win 8.1 seperated?

It actually makes sense to separate 8.0 from 8.1, as MS provided no service pack updated path via Windows Update; unlike XP. Remember to update from 8.0 the user has to visit the Store etc. etc. Once on 8.1 they will automatically be updated to 8.1u1 via Windows Update.

So what the 8.0 figure represents is the early adopters who have for various reasons decided not to update to 8.1 and hence will fall off support in January 2016, unlike the users of 8.1.

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Rubbish WPS config sees WiFi router keys popped in seconds

Roland6
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Re: Dumb question here

>A particular favourite is to change the DNS server to one of your own

The only problem I see with this is that many (low spec) domestic routers don't give user the option to change DNS servers etc. - they simply pick up the DNS severs from the ISP. So this would seem to be more of a threat to those with higher spec routers eg. draytek where the local admin can configure DNS and WPS etc..

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Google flushes out users of old browsers by serving up CLUNKY, AGED version of search

Roland6
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IE8 on XP exhibits this behaviour

Interestingly, on XP, both Chrome and Maxthon display the 'new' Google homepage, but with IE8 the black toolbar is displayed. All seems to be okay on Windows 7.

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This is how I set about making a fortune with my own startup

Roland6
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If you've got the option of building a new house...

Could also google Mike Hillard Tranquility Houses...

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Time to move away from Windows 7 ... whoa, whoa, who said anything about Windows 8?

Roland6
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Re: Gartner is, as usual, smoking crack.

>You could even force the subscription model onto businesses and make them pay just to keep their existing systems going even if they are old versions of Windows that you don't care a jot about...

Businesses adopted the subscription model years back - what do you think the volume licence agreement is?

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Who needs hackers? 'Password1' opens a third of all biz doors

Roland6
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Re: Resets?

Re: "12-character limit to the password and never told me that "fredandjimsmith" was not an acceptable password "

Yep, come across several of these sites over the years, they don't tell you at time of password setting that the password you've chosen is too long, leaving you to pull your hair out guessing what has gone wrong and then trying to rectify the problem...

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What's in your toolbox? Why the browser wars are so last decade

Roland6
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And the point of including better "Developer Tools"?

Sorry can't see the point of having 'Developer tools' shipped in what is effectively an end user application that will be deployed into production environments. However, I can see the need for better support and diagnostic tools to enable better event capture and hence aid understanding of what is causing a webpage or script to fail.

Remember Windows doesn't ship with developer tools, but it does have a dump reporting capability that seems to do what MS need it to do.

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Looking forward to the end of Tuesday? You've patched this month's 37 Microsoft bugs, right?

Roland6
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37 bugs but significantly more updates...

Last night patch Tuesday hit my main Win7 machine - 14 discrete patches/updates applied along with a mandatory reboot which was paused whilst 45486 update operations were actioned...

Would be interested to know why MS changed from simply reporting the installation of whole patch/updates (ie. 14) with the discrete update actions spawned from them.

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Operators get the FEAR as Ofcom proposes 275% hike in mobile spectrum fees

Roland6
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On what planet is the Ofcom spokes person based?

"Ofcom says that how operators choose to finance this – which is around £3 per subscriber per year – is, of course, down to the individual operators. Yet given the competitive nature of the market it's unlikely to affect consumers' mobile tariffs."

So Ofcom believe the operators will simply absorb a cost that is currently around 52p per customer pa and is anticipated to increase to around £3 per customer pa, when they (the operators) have recently passed on RPI based increases of 2.7% pcm (approximately 68p on a £25 pcm contract)...

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UK.gov's Open Source switch WON'T get rid of Microsoft, y'know

Roland6
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Re: It's not Open Source it's an open standard @alain williams

I have to agree it does begin to level the playing field and I'm glad the decision has been taken now (ie. in 2014) rather than delayed for a few years. Whilst it will probably make no real difference to current procurements centred on XP refresh, it does give incentive for people to enhance alternative offerings, such as Calligra etc.ready for the Win7 refresh in circa 2019.

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Roland6
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Re: Of course it won't get rid of MS

> I can access documents from 20 years ago today... Readers (even from Microsoft) are free.

Yes, that is possible, but MS don't make it easy to read pre-Office 97 documents; the latest Powerpoint viewer can't open presentations prepared in Office 95 ...

I've found it helpful to maintain a VM of Office 97 on Win98 as this version can read all MS document formats back to Word 2.0 (via the convertors pack) and save them in something that current versions of Office can read - although Office 2003 on XP is needed if you wish to save in ODF using either Sun or SourceForge convertors...

However, I suspect the real issue government has, or rather we will have, is that we need to be able to read electronic documents after 30 plus years when they get released to the public...

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