* Posts by Ropewash

57 posts • joined 17 Apr 2010

Page:

Visiting America? US border agents want your Twitter, Facebook URLs

Ropewash
Joke

Re: I guess it's good then that I'm a citizen and not a visitor....

"I grew up being taught torture was wrong, and these bastards legitimized it and watered it down for the masses."

Watered it down...

PFFFFT.

Good one, considering one of their favoured methods.

12
0

We have hit peak Silicon Valley: New crazy goal to disrupt entire cities

Ropewash
Flame

More hot air.

There are great things to be said for dreamers, but one of their worst failings is that they are, for the large part, all dream and no DO.

It's all well and good to go around saying matter = energy, but at some point you actually need to come up with a formula that works in the real world.

This sounds like a group that read some Buckminster Fuller and thought the "fund everyone and recieve inventions" idea was a great thing. (Operating Manual for Planet Earth iirc) Speaking as a total cynic I'll say 99.9999999% of those funded would fuck off to play XBox on your dime. By all means go ahead and try, but make sure MY dimes aren't involved. I work for a living thanks.

The best thing I think these people could do would be to buy a shovel and get to work learning the reality of making the city better, by actually getting their hands dirty building it. Money down that by the end of month one no-one would be at the jobsite.

1
1

Judge rules FBI can hack any time, any, place, anywhere

Ropewash

Re: Think about the Children!

Leaving the application of Hammurabi's law aside, you are exactly right.

Enjoy your upvote.

"Think of the Children" is always right at the very pointy end of the wedge, followed by muh turrurists and then by the MPAA and RIAA and then, inevitably, by everyone else with no regard for public privacy and some spurious claim to legal action.

Yes it should be struck down immediately and forcefully but I get this funny suspicion that it won't.

So now the government has driven another nail into their own damned coffin and soon they'll pine for the days when communications were as easy to hack as TOR and iphone encryption. I'm fair certain the rest of the world won't sit around waiting to be hacked by the US and will instead write better encryption and obfuscation tools and generally work right round the FBI who will be left crying for laws to be put in place to stop people from protecting themselves with foreign software.

0
0

US Senate strikes down open-access FBI hacking warrant by just one honest vote

Ropewash

Re: So ...

"It makes me wonder how they plan on misusing this proposed bit of legislation."

Spy on everyone, cherry-pick the easy victims so they can report great success to the media, justify their budget, convieniently misplace data on actual threats so they can blame their next failure on the lack of sureveillance capabilities, start casting about for the next freedom they can violate in the name of security.

Same 'ole, same 'ole.

If the American people are very very lucky the FBI hasn't cottoned on to the fact they could augment their funding by selling the data on to Google.

9
0

Windows 10 market share jumps two per cent

Ropewash
Paris Hilton

@Surur

I realize I'm feeding the trolls but...

Every modern OS needs;

App sandboxing - True. Preferably in a way that cuts it off from ratting you out to the mothership too.

An app store - Fuck off back to mobile you tosser.

Guaranteed updates - Yeah, but not forced updates. There's a big difference.

The more I see it the more the term App makes me think of VD. "That damned whore gave me the app."

Paris ...for some reason.

6
0

Samsung: Don't install Windows 10. REALLY

Ropewash
Facepalm

@jackr

So the generic drivers in a Windows version from last year support more hardware than the generic drivers from a 7 year old version?

I bloody hope so.

In other news: Linux kernel 4.1.8 supports more hardware out of the box than kernel 2.6.28

0
0
Ropewash
Coat

Re: What an absolute

Don't know if it still holds true but Solaris/opensolaris was the best I've seen for cross-version driver compatability. Next would be Linux and BSD communities which at least try to support the old stuff. Way down the list comes Windows, I'm not sure why they need the driver-churn but it must be keeping some QA people on their toes.

Mine's the one with the DOS boot disks with tuned config.sys autoexec.bat driver setups in the pocket.

4
0

Microsoft warns of worm ransomware, finds fix in Windows 10 upgrade

Ropewash
Linux

Re: Appears a lot of 11 year old girls are posting.

I think I'll copy/paste this to a .txt so the next time (and it's coming) MS push out a brick patch I can open that file up and have a laugh.

Here's how updates should go;

I have two Manjaro boxes with different UI's and software for differing tasks. Each day at midnight a little box pops up to let me know what updates are available and which issue(s) each update fixes. I can pick and choose what I'd like to upgrade from that list and the dependencies will be listed for each one so I can choose whether or not the ends justify the means.

See what they did there?

"I" choose what to update and when, they aren't just hammering 650+ program patches at me when I'm not looking and then tell me it's for my own good when my system no longer boots.

If you love forced updates and in fact forced whole OS 'upgrades' then feel free. I'll just wait here for the next infinite boot loop article.

P.S. Yes, one of those machines (that I'm typing this on) has 650+ updates waiting. Why a rolling release if I'm not going to let it roll? Again, My choice.

2
0

Microsoft's Universal Windows Platform? It's an uphill battle, warns key partner

Ropewash
Paris Hilton

Re: Infragistics

"Infragistics" I thought that was something to do with your kill count in a Doom deathmatch.

Of course I also thought WPF meant Windows Page Fault.

1
0

The Windows Phone story: From hope to dusty abandonware

Ropewash
Windows

Re: Senseless remininscing?

@ted frater

I've got to admit there's much I agree with in your view here.

I too fall into the catagory of Crusty, having learned partly from printed books and mostly from repeated physical trauma. I vastly prefer function over form and have a distinct preference for simplicity. That's why a Linux box handles 90% of my computing needs. A bit of time spent with pacman and the thing does what I want in the way I want it to (and stays that way too, fuck forced "upgrades").

However I'm certainly not going to expect any company to build a device or write software to do only what I want. It would hardly be a selling point. My Z3 has never seen a SIM chip and is used as a portable media player and camera. My Surfacepro is a low-rent Cintiq tablet and part-time newspaper. My Win7 machine is solely for games that won't run on Linux through Steam or Wine. I don't think anyone would expect their machine to only perfrom one or two important functions, most folks would like to own one or two machines that do almost everything. The software/hardware makers have their work cut out already trying to guess what tomorrow's "everything" will be. So I'll cut them some slack for consistantly making a pig's breakfast out of their work so long as their product will do approximately what I require it to do.

TLDR : I don't want them to release a system just for me. I'd prefer they release whatever they want and allow me to mod it.

0
0
Ropewash

Re: Too little too late

Sure it's not a statistically valid sample, but that 4.28571429e-8 is still important.

Each of those 4.28571429e-8 know another 4.28571429e-8 blahblahblah. Word of mouth spreads and eventually one of those 4.28571429e-8 writes a media article and here we sit in it's comments section reading about it and spreading our views to our own 4.28571429e-8 later on.

If everyone reads/hears that Windows has failed in mobile then Windows HAS failed in mobile. They've failed to influence the market positively and will suffer for it. Whether they really had this coming due to their own hubris is another discussion entirely.

Side note: If everyone who claims to 'love' this dying system had spent time/money getting apps ported to it rather than ditching it for another system then maybe it wouldn't be such a wasteland.

Linux wouldn't look so good either if everyone who liked it just sat around and waited for Linus/GNU to write everything for it. (apples and oranges sure, but community involvement matters to any OS)

3
2

US nuke arsenal runs on 1970s IBM 'puter waving 8-inch floppies

Ropewash

Re: Stuff that woks

Stuff that woks = Yan can cook.

I read your second sentence as 'To this day all calculations are done ON LSD.'

Thought it went some way in explaining banking in general.

1
0
Ropewash
Joke

Re: US nuke arsenal run by 1970s IBM 'puter using 8-inch floppies

It should be running on Windows 10 so MS can collect some real telemetry.

12
0

Surface Book nightmare: Microsoft won't fix 'Sleep of Death' bug

Ropewash

That service...

A hardware fault I could live with, everyone screws up. Recall if there's no way to repair.

A software fault should get patched ASAP especially if it's the software writer's bloody machine.

That run-around dimwit customer service on the other hand is just inexcusable. "Oh sorry, our PoS (named that for a reason) won't allow it." Bullshit. How many customers do they want to lose? How bad does the word of mouth have to be? What use is their expensive extended warranty if it doesn't cover the machine being a flaming bag of crap?

I've been a happy Surfacepro3 owner so far but am now not looking forward to having to deal with these bellends someday. (I'm glad I didn't pay for that warranty)

3
1
Ropewash
Pint

@agatum

So if the customers are now expected to test and patch perhaps MS should just opensource the thing and let the masses get on with fixing it properly (or patching functional code into wine and running that on top of a better platform.)

Win10 it's free-as-in-beer for now, how about some free-as-in-speech?

HAH.

I couldn't type that with a straight face.

Beer-as-in-Beer, it's Friday.

8
1

90 days of Android sales almost beat 9 months' worth for all flavours of Win 10

Ropewash
Facepalm

Re: Microsoft is finished

UGH.

Much as I do love me some Linux, I'm not exactly thrilled at the prospect of it becoming a mono-culture. That's what was wrong in Windowsland in the first place. (Well, one of the things)

I'd prefer that MS sticks to their own kernel/filesystem/API's/whatever. Competition is great and even if it IS Microsoft they still do some good work. (Looking forward to DX12 vs Vulkan for one.) Too bad they tend to bury it behind walls of ineptitude.

Still not gonna use Win10 though. I have 7 and 8.1 and there's nothing wrong with either when they are used in the right place. Nothing that needs Win10 to fix it anyhow.

1
2

The Windows 10 future: Imagine a boot stamping on an upgrade treadmill forever

Ropewash

Re: Re: Question.

That was lot of posts energystar.

Just to clarify a bit, these "machines" aren't workstations. I don't care if the workstations are networked or even if they're Win10 with full telemetry. The machines in question are production equipment and they'll never be getting an upgrade till the day they are dismantled for scrap.

I was just wondering how an embedded Win10 would cope with not being in contact with the mothership and therefore how fit it would be for the same task on machinery built today.

Judging by your many responses I'm guessing it will be fine as long as the company producing it knows to de-couple it from it's online content.

Hopefully so, because an update that invalidates a driver for a control board on a machine that's needed to actually make parts can bring misery to many people for many weeks as you sit and wait for the techs to fly in and try to sort it out.

Lucky me these ancient things only have RS232 for comms.

0
0
Ropewash
Paris Hilton

Question.

So I just wondered what the plan for embedded Windows will be.

Half the machines at our shop that run any OS at all are using WinXP. This is fine, it runs perfectly well and never sees the internet since it was never meant to and in most cases doesn't have a network card. Airgapped, because breaking these things costs a lot.

So how's that going to work with Win10?

Can it handle never being on a network?

Are they willing to accept that these machines will never be online and will never see a single update in their entire working lifetime?

Did Microsoft just abandon an entire market for the sake of telemetry and SaaS?

I'll just mention the other half of those machines run a custom Linux. It has also never seen a network and really doesn't seem to care at all.

6
0

FBI: Er, no, we won't reveal how we unmask and torpedo Tor pedos

Ropewash
Unhappy

This exploit

First they used it on the paedos and I did not stand up for I am not a paedo.

Then they used it on the drug runners and I did not stand up for I am not a drug runner.

Then they used it on the file sharers and I did not stand up because a bunch of goons were pinning me to the floor.

Okay... I don't use TOR to fileshare (yet) but the idea of feds uploading code to my computer at their own discretion makes me a bit twitchy.

0
0

The PC is dead. Gartner wishes you luck, vendors

Ropewash

Hmmmmm...

I'm not quite sold on convergence replacing the desktop just yet. Or ever actually.

Try loading Mastercam on your phone. Let's pretend it's possible. Now set up a part with some complex topography and close tolerances, set your rough and finish tools and tell it to render the toolpath with tolerance comparisons on. Watch your processor briefly turn into a ball of plasma.

Go buy a desktop and a Quadro.

The big PCs are not going anywhere.

Disclaimer : I'm not our resident Mcam guy. I just put together the desktop for him after he showed me what his job was like on the company supplied - new model, not crap - laptop. The render times went from 50minutes to 5 minutes.

1
0

Adpocalypse 'will wipe out display ad growth' by 2020

Ropewash
Flame

Digital herpes.

The malware that gets dragged in along with the ads these days is herpes and the ads themselves are the clap. I wear a rubber when I'm online in the form of script blockers and tracking blockers (oddly enough no actual ad blocker since those other two cut the ads out anyhow)

This shouldn't be hard to fathom. If you are sleeping with whores then wear the damned rubber. The whores don't get to complain that less people are fucking them due to worrying about disease, they made the lifestyle choices that brought the diseases upon them.

Not gonna push that analogy any further.

The system is broken and I'm not going to open my machines up to attack just so people can get paid with minimal effort. I like the internet and I realize it requires paid work to get what we have. I do pay for content I find valuable as donations, whitelisting sites with clean ads, one-off payments and even subscription for things I'm using a lot. I draw the line when everyone else with .02 to share wants me to pay for their often value-less work with my own security.

TLDR : Fix your busted funding model or die.

0
0

Work begins on Russian rival to Android

Ropewash

Re: Russian school informatics textbooks for all children.

I get your point here, but he really did just give them a big backhand compliment.

Any phone OS with the worldwide success of the AK-47 would make it's creators very happy indeed.

2
0

Kill Flash now? Chrome may be about to do just that

Ropewash
Pint

A line I once read...

From a poster on our outhouse wall when I was a kid.

"If builders built buildings the way programmers write programs then the first woodpecker to come along would destroy civilization."

I think they foresaw flash with that one.

I sit here on a wineless linux box so the "click here to install our codecs.exe" pop-ups don't work even if I was stupid enough to try. (I've yet to see a "click here to sudo our .sh") Without having ever installed a flash plugin and using Firefox with all the almost pre-requisite blockers installed just so I can browse the damned web without needing a re-install by the end of the week.

Beer, because it IS the end of the week.

3
0

Motion Picture Ass. of America to guard online henhouse

Ropewash

.movie .music .wtf?

It was hard enough to recall whether a site was .com .org or .net

So now you have to type the part of the name you can actually remember into google (good for google I suppose as they'll be tracking) and play Russian roulette clicking on the results until you find the .site you wanted or the compounding of malware infections causes your system to shit it's pants and pass out.

I'm actually happy in some ways to see this explosion of domains. It's certainly entertaining trying to guess what will get registered next.

Is .cocacola taken yet? Seems like a future sale opportunity.

3
0

Blocking ads? Smaller digital publishers are smacked the hardest

Ropewash

Re: Re: Before internet advertising...

I never did spend much time on geocities because yes it was a load of cack.

However I did use many decent pages that didn't look like that and didn't have ad funding run by people who actually had something useful they wanted you to read/view/mod/comment on.

Used to be when you fired up your pre-google spider of choice and typed in "blahblahblah.dll download" you'd get a result within the first 100 for a site with those individual libraries for download. Sure the site was just a huge list of links, but a bit of time parsing and you'd have your file.

Since the internet has been made so much better by advertising why not try that now.

My usual experience is you'll spend the first 100 results just sifting through ad sponsored "Download Drivers for Free (we don't actually have any on site)" and similar combined with about 60 asshat blog posts with the line "Got error in blahblahblah.dll" but nothing afterwards on how they fixed said error or in fact where they even found blahblahblah.dll in the first place.

So no. I'm not impressed with the innovation of ad funded networking in this particular sphere.

If all I wanted to do is sit and read other people's ramblings (like I'm doing here) then it would be fine, but I do actually need the damned web to be useful sometimes.

1
0
Ropewash
Thumb Up

re: number6

This.

Despite my previous attempts to articulate this point you've done it much better.

A serverside execution of ad code would still inform the ad-slinger of a view and/or clickthrough but without the end user taking the direct hit to bandwidth and malware exposure.

With the added bonus that if malware did exist in an ad stream the server operator would be the one to catch it and could block that advertiser until the mess was cleaned up, increasing the reputability of the site(s) they host and generally making life a bit more pleasant all round for their viewers.

1
0
Ropewash
Flame

Before internet advertising...

...as in , what did all these fathomless thousands of people do before advertising was allowed on the internet? It wasn't even all that long ago that this particular income stream did not exist. So what the hell did all these bastards whining about their $-27billion do for a living back then that was obviously NOT making them bitch about missing their ficticious pay from their equally ficticious product?

Perhaps they should be re-purposed for tasks in line with their particular skillset and actual value to society...

My toilet needs cleaning.

6
0

First successful Hyperloop test module hits 100mph in four seconds

Ropewash
FAIL

Holy shit.

Now WE can be those little message capsules the old-timers might remember feeding into the vacuum tubes at work.

16
0

Google open sources Thread in bid to win IoT standards war

Ropewash
Pirate

Ooooo...

I can see one really useful application for data sales here.

- No-one is home between 6:00am and 4:00pm

- The whole system uses xxx protocol to communicate and here's the link to aircrack-for-iot and a free copy of the control software.

- Lastly if these folks are rich enough to have networked lightbulbs, chances are they've a nice TV and stereo too.

Only $0.99 per address or $9.99 for 20. (address not guaranteed to be in your area and all listings subject to the terms of our Extranious-Unreadable-Larceny-Agreement.)

4
0

Prince of pop trash PerezHilton pwned, visitors hit with cryptxxx

Ropewash

I'm sure they have laws for this in place.

If you run an imageboard and it gets flooded with childporn that you don't bother to remove it's your server the authorities are going to nick when they begin the investigations.

Or witness the pirate bay getting their shit pinched just for having links to commercial content.

Same could easily be applied here. You open up your website to shady adscammers and end up hosting digital herpes it's your door the jackboots should be kicking down first.

For the rest of us there's adblock.

2
0

Official: Microsoft's 'Get Windows 10' nagware to vanish from PCs in July

Ropewash
Unhappy

re : Hans 1

"Am I the only one"

No. No you are not.

2 out of 6 win7 machines at work decided to run that update and also download win10 all by their lonesome overnight last week. Another 2 still have the nagware and the remaining 2 have no sign of it at all despite all being on the same update settings (as far as I know, I divorced myself from touching the work machines quite a while ago. I cut metal for a living, I'm not a helpdesk.)

My gaming rig and Surface-pro had the recurring un-hiding of the updates until I got mildly upset, purged the systems of all things win10'ish and turned off updates. Not an elegant solution, but they aren't on the internet much and I'll take my chances with possible malware over turning on updates and getting definite malware.

I've not encountered the UEFI thing yet but...

http://www.theregister.co.uk/2016/05/06/microsoft_update_asus_windows_7/

...I'm sure it's just a click away.

Okay, so maybe my Manjaro updates don't always go exactly smoothly, but they sure as hell don't do anything nearly as nasty to me and a fix is one rollback away as long as I can get to the CLI.

1
0

Malware scan stalled misconfigured med software, mid-procedure

Ropewash
Coffee/keyboard

Re: I always felt relieved that my horrible code isn't in safety-critical systems

You owe me a keyboard.

Clean up your filthy code. For fucks' sake have some pride.

4
0

US telly stations fling malware-tipped web ads at unsuspecting surfers

Ropewash

Re: Round robin blame

This.

100 times this.

I was just fondly remembering the days when consumer level commercial activity wasn't allowed onto the network and for whatever reason there was still a functional internet there. How could this be without having pop-up video ads for deoderant? Without flash banners spawning little UFO's and without even a blinking pulldown telling you that local girls want you right now?

Of course it might have been possible because page operators actually gave a shit about their content and wanted you to see it. They weren't trying, as the ads have told me, to earn $70,000/week from home just by doing whatever the ad wanted me to do that I obviously did not do since I've still got a day job.

I'm not against web commerce at all. I like Steam and Amazon and all the rest of their ilk. I just got sick of all the ads festooned overtop of, underneath, around and sometimes scrolling along to obscure the ONE bit of text that might have held some relevence on the site.

Maybe website operators could try giving a shit again. Only source ads from known companies that you would do business with and better yet, that have some relation to what you are displaying as content. Don't just reel in garbage from offsite agencies. Host the ads yourself like you used to and make sure they aren't something that would piss off your viewers.

Take note of how the children's network on TV doesn't run latenight dating service ads and Marlboro commercials during the Saturday cartoons. Even though those companies would probably pay very well to get into the early adopter market.

Failing that, perhaps a lot of these sites that make a living off all ads with little content need to fall off a cliff into blessed oblivion so the search results page looks cleaner.

5
0

Intel loses its ARM wrestling match, kicks out Atom mobe chips

Ropewash

Re: Who will now trust Intel ?

"We only supply X86 chips to PC and server makers. We will not be in any other business EVER."

I'll take this opportunity to say Good.

The cost in compromise for convergence is way too steep in both directions.

I don't want to run Crysis on my phone and I don't play Angry-Birds on my tower.

So if Intel want to pull their entire mobile workforce and chain them all to the performance x86 processor wheel then more power to 'em.

Not a RISC vs CISC argument here. Just saying that while the whole ARM community can focus on performance per watt, I'd personally prefer Intel to focus on performance per tick. I can always get a bigger heat-sink.

1
0

Microsoft headhunters seek Linux folk for secret open source unit

Ropewash
Linux

EEE

I doubt that the old Microsoft strategy would work on anything Linux without smacking right into the GPL. I can't see any licence with Stallman's name on it allowing a bog-standard MS takeover attempt to occur.

Maybe they could massage that shim you speak of to subvert the market but it would probably be very difficult. Microsoft would be better served to build on BSD in that regard.

But I can dream and I wouldn't actually mind an MS distro in the sea of other Linuxis out there.

Maybe they'd bring some fresh ideas to the mix especially around desktop environments and their interoperability. (I say while typing on a Frankenstein's hybrid of KDE and Cinnamon.)

Really... How many volume control applications do we actually need?

(Seriously I tried Kmix, XFCE volume, Gnome volume, basic Alsamixer and/or PAVC and finally settled on the Cinnamon control since it allows the easiest sink switching.)

0
0

Ad-blocker blocking websites face legal peril at hands of privacy bods

Ropewash

Re: Re: Serverside

That's exactly what I'm on about though isn't it. The server operator has no control over the ads.

They need to step up and take control or - as you said - I will simply turn it off.

Right now that means I turn off anything that isn't originating at the site's address.

This isn't the best option because I really DO wish to support sites that I like and am not paying directly for, but I'm not going to allow free access to my browser to do it.

8
0
Ropewash

Too late to edit...

Going to add (not ad) something to that.

My gaming rig has no blockers of any type installed. Why?

Because it only ever links to sites hosted by the game creators and you know what? Those sites offer ads I WANT to see. They are well vetted and always on target for anyone who is playing that game.

3
0
Ropewash
Flame

Serverside

I think the current ad model reaks of laziness and could use a change.

Why does the ad need to come cross-scripted from offsite? Laziness on the part of the content provider. They don't want to mess about vetting ads so they build in a bit of script that runs on MY machine and pulls crap from somewhere else that they have no control over.

Fuck that.

They can man up and actually pull the ads on THEIR machines and embed the result into their own site so my browser never sees anything from an address that I didn't specifically point it to.

My adblocker won't intervene if the ad is actually a built-in part of the page and my script blocker won't block a script that is not being loaded onto my machine.

That is how you get me to view your ad.

Otherwise go stick your head up your own ass and shout about what a freeloader I am.

15
0

Woz says wearables – even Apple Watch – aren't 'compelling'

Ropewash
Pint

Bah.

"BTW where the hell are the flying cars were were promised in the 70's?"

We've had those for ages. They're called helicopters and we're not allowed to fly them to go get groceries for the same reason we won't be getting any other form of flying car. Because people are too dumb to dodge powerlines in 3D traffic.

Beer because driving drunk is hard enough without the Z axis.

1
0

NYPD anti-crypto Twitter campaign goes about as well as you'd expect

Ropewash

Yep...

"evidence that used to reside in file cabinets, closets, and safes is today stored on smartphones"

Oddly I do not remember law enforcement asking for a backdoor combination to be built into every safe to make access easier for them. Maybe "1-1-1-1 and shake the handle" or something equally hard to crack.

14
0

Line by line, how the US anti-encryption bill will kill our privacy, security

Ropewash
Facepalm

These articles...

They angry up the blood every time I read them.

Not from the U.S. but in a country that tends to follow soon after on crap like this.

I'll repeat the only point I have on the issue,

The government can lead by example here and make sure they are running the same busted "security" on all their data so the people can have backdoor access to it for freedom of information requests.

They want to protect the people from the terrorists? They can start by protecting them from their own government.

34
0

Read America's insane draft crypto-borking law that no one's willing to admit they wrote

Ropewash

Not a chance.

It will be brought back over and over and over until people have given up protesting it and then it'll get slipped in with a bunch of other spurious laws that get passed to protect "the innocent" from whatever they are guilty of that year.

By that time everyone that really cares (and the criminals) will have moved on to better encryption and the whole cycle will need to be re-started because legislators/lawyers need paycheques.

Perhaps if the governments want these backdoors a little give&take is in order, since no-one is above the law after all...

...Freedom of Information Requests could now count as court orders and all government data must be backdoored/unlockable so the requestor can view it.

Any bets they'd go for that?

Anyone?

?

10
0

White House flushes away court-ordered decryption like it was a stinky dead goldfish

Ropewash
WTF?

How far ?

As in... How far underground do these clowns want to push their own people's communications?

Their spying is what caused this upswing in security in the first place and now they seem very eager to drive new innovations in the encryption field just so the citizens can keep their data safe from the government.

At this rate there won't be much clearnet activity left.

If they'd just kept out of the mass data collection fad then I'll wager no-one would even care and if they needed to spy on someone specific they'd have victi.. targets... who hadn't bothered to encrypt either drives or comms.

Hopefully the next encryption methods are from some country that loves laughing at the USA and everyone installs them by default.

Sent over clearnet from an un-encrypted computer not in the USA. If they want my crap data they're welcome to it, may it clog their bandwidth with useless sewage.

21
0

Ad-blockers are a Mafia-style 'protection racket' – UK's Minister of Fun

Ropewash

Re: It's all fun and games

I think perhaps a look at the old model would be in order.

Back when websites hosted ads on their own machines.

Sure a website can run all the ads at me that it wants...

...provided THEY download the things, execute the code on their servers and serve up the result as an in-page image.

I'm not against seeing ads when they are properly placed and somewhat relevant. I AM against having some dodgey bit of scripting hijack my browser to haul in junk from some jerkoff spam company(s), another few scripts to track me for google so they'll have a better idea what brand of running shoe I'm never going to buy, and 40 other scripts that do nothing but make me wonder why, when I click my no-script icon, that the list goes off the bottom of my screen.

So until the websites trying to do this to me do it to themselves instead and let me view the result in a safe in-page manner I'll be sticking with my adblock stack.

4
0

Is the world ready for a bare-metal OS/2 rebirth?

Ropewash
Happy

Wish I'd had the cash for that.

"This brings back the memories of a 40Mhz 386SX (with 387 maths coprocessor) and 4Mb RAM.... monochrome VGA... and a 80Gb HDD."

I'm certain it was a typo but...

Holy Shit, 80GB on a 386.

How many cylinders/heads did you have to assign to the drive?

2
0

Sprint sprints away from no-throttle policy – punishes 'unlimited' network hoggers

Ropewash
FAIL

Re: Howls of Outrage!

http://business.financialpost.com/fp-tech-desk/how-much-does-bandwidth-actually-cost

...“The cost associated with transmission and switching on a modern network is a non-issue — less than five cents per gigabyte and dropping fast,” David Buffett, chief executive of Radiant Communications Inc., an independent ISP, wrote in the Vancouver Sun this week.

Depending on who you believe, the cost for a large incumbent ISP to deliver one gigabyte of data — when you factor in fixed costs like fibre optic cables and networking gear, as well as operating costs such as technicians and electricity — can range anywhere from a few pennies to between 10¢ and 15¢ per GB...

0
0

Linux kernel dev who asked Linus Torvalds to stop verbal abuse quits over verbal abuse

Ropewash

This work is shit.

I once knew a boss who would yell exactly that as he threw all your freshly machined parts into the scrap bin. Was it pleasant? No. Did you make a lot of shitty parts afterwards? No.

An out-of-tolerance part IS useless shit and sometimes it's a lot easier to just say that than to try and explain why you can't accept out-of-spec parts to people who should already know better.

I'll assume this is likely the same in kernel dev.

2
0

Microsoft has developed its own Linux. Repeat. Microsoft has developed its own Linux

Ropewash

I for one welcome our new Redmond overlords...

I've been a rabid Linux desktop user since the 90's and it's always been just shy of something I could recommend to those friends who aren't fond of logging into a command line to fix some of the inevitable issues that crop up. So close on occassion, but still so far away.

Too many backends for sound? Arcane sorcery for printers? Programs that are developed exactly to the point where they almost, but not quite, fully useable and then put in a bin and left there forever? New projects that offer the same function but decide to re-invent the wheel rather than look in the bin and then base their work on the assumption that 4 is enough vertices for a wheel?

Perhaps looking at things 'the Redmond way' could help a few of these issues.

Perhaps not.

I'd be willing to give an MS Linux distro a look though.

0
4

Intel left a fascinating security flaw in its chips for 16 years – here's how to exploit it

Ropewash
FAIL

NSA

Wouldn't all the NSA machines with older Intel inside be equally at risk?

0
0

Google's Native Code browser tech goes cross-platform

Ropewash
Trollface

PNaCl...

...doesn't Sodium Chloro-phosphate sound both unstable and toxic?

2
0

Page:

Forums