* Posts by Uplink

111 posts • joined 7 Apr 2010

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EE looks at its call charges, hikes a bunch, walks off giggling

Uplink

Re: EE and PAYG vermin

"Solution; keep EE existing number on locked iPhone for incoming calls. Put 3 Network SIMM in second phone for outgoing"

Have you thought about unlocking the phone (call EE; they want £8.99 to do this) and porting your EE number to Three? It sounds like just the thing you need.

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Uplink

Re: EE and PAYG vermin

"With a second mobile sim that has free 0800 numbers"

All 0800 numbers are free from all UK mobiles since 1 July 2015. http://media.ofcom.org.uk/news/2015/call-charges-clearer-from-wednesday/

I can't believe this isn't common knowledge yet. I keep seeing stuff like "Call 0800 xyz free from your landline, or 0300 xyz free from your mobile." I had a small conversation with somebody who insisted that the 0800 number is not free from mobile, but the 0300 is (it isn't, if you're wondering, unless you have bundled landline minutes). After having this "debate" with the person in question, I found out that some of the leaflets she was handing out (but not all of them) actually said "0800 numbers are free to call from both landlines and mobiles."

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Kindle Paperwhites turn Windows 10 PCs into paperweights: Plugging one in 'triggers a BSOD'

Uplink

Drivers everywhere

Once I changed my AT power supply to a ATX one. I had to install a driver to make ACPI shutdown work. It told this to a Linux pro, and he quipped thus to a colleague of his: "What did I tell you? One day Windows will need drivers for the case screws too."

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Baffled Scots cops call in priest to deal with unruly spirits

Uplink

Vertical phone footage or it didn't happen

What? No mobile phone recording? It sounds like there was plenty of time to record an episode of <Whatever ghost-hunting TV show you like>, so where's the reel?

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Argos changes 150 easily guessed drop-off system passwords

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Revokable, frequently refreshed credentials

As I was reading the article I crossed it with something I've seen in Tesco: they can log into a till and print a barcode that they can then use to quickly log in and give help without entering any passwords.

While I don't think the Tesco system is much more secure than passwords on post-it notes, it gave me an idea:

What if, when the shift starts, or on demand later in the day, a public/private key pair is generated and the private key is printed as a QR that the employee can add to their badge? The key would have limited validity - say, until the employee checks out, and it would be easily revoked and reissued if lost or stolen.

The floor staff wouldn't need much training beyond "Don't lose it. But if you do, go scan your employee badge on this machine in the back and get a new code." Getting a new QR would invalidate the last QR issued to this employee. While not exactly RSA token secure, it's convenient for the employees and it's better than post-it notes and Password123 as the national password, with the benefit of very frequent password changes.

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Cats, dogs starve as web-connected chow chute PetNet plays dead

Uplink

I stay away from cloud-only devices

If a device requires a cloud to function, and I can't deploy my own server to replace that cloud, then I'm not buying it no matter how many fela^W cooked breakfasts I get from it.

I mean: I'm fine with requiring a central server to achieve magic, but I want the option to deploy my own with ease.

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Software bug costs Citigroup $7m after legit transactions mistaken for test data for 15 years

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Pocket change

It's like that time when I got fined 7 pence. Yeah... That never happened and never will.

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The Reg Coding competition – 10 times as hard as the last one!

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Re: Some of the specs a missing...

From your set of questions, it's only output EOL that I cannot deduce with total accuracy...

> Is the data file supplied on the command line or will it be present in the same folder as the script?

"[...] read its input from a file called Decathlon.dat and send its input to a file called Decathlon.out."

That looks like "files in the same directory" with the given hardcoded names.

Additionally: "Your program must produce no screen output."

> What is the file encoding of the input and output file? ASCII? ANSI? UTF-x? EBCDIC?

I'd go with ASCII encoding ("letters", "hyphenated"), but UTF-8 would probably work with my code too, as I wouldn't care about what non-space bytes they separate by spaces and tabs. And then the numbers are all in the 7-bit part of ASCII. Who uses ANSI and EBCDIC with Node, Java or Python anyway? That means they're not even options.

> What end of line marker can be expcted? \n \r\n ?

For input I'd just assume \n and treat \r as "whitespace", because the specs allow for trailing whitespace. For output... that's a tricky one, given that "extraneous output will cause an automatic failure".

I'd go with \n for output only because except VB all the others can run on non-Windows platforms (Linux, BSD, Mac) and produce \n EOLs in those environments. They're promoting cloudiness, and they mainly run Linux in there... I also just realised that Swift is Mac-only, so... \n it is then.

> Reagan & REAGAN are the same person? Can we expect a unique key of 1 name per event?

"Names and event abbreviations must be treated as case-insensitive"

"You may assume that there will be no more than one entry in each data set for a given event for a given competitor, and that there will not be more than one competitor with the same name."

That being said... the terms and conditions say "[...] the fastest and most accurate code"... so you if submit something in Python you're guaranteed to not win anything since Java and Swift will just smoke you. Node is fast, but still way behind Java and Swift.

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Behold the ROBOT RECTUM... medics' relief

Uplink

There's another use for that

Stick in a RealDoll(tm). For a little extra you can have one in each orifice.

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Prominent Brit law firm instructed to block Brexit Article 50 trigger

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Re: Bollocks

> So who decides if the notice is "in accordance with its own constitutional requirements"?

Well... I'm thinking that the ECJ would. But if I were a judge* of the ECJ I'd probably look at that article and ask: "What does the UK law / What do the UK courts say?" The ball is then thrown to the UK, where it will probably end up with the Supreme Court - civil track. Then the ECJ will take the ball back and say "The UK Supreme Court says this, so that's that." While that was happening, I would probably issue a stay order on the notification too - which would make Farage pull a Lazarus and come back among us to squeal.

*Disclaimer: I have no legal training beyond watching "The Good Wife" and other stuff like that :)

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Uplink

Re: Bollocks

> The question is whether the rest of the EU decides article 50 has been invoked and from their point of view, a simple statement is sufficient.

It's that phrase: "in accordance with its own constitutional requirements". If the notification is not given "in accordance with its own constitutional requirements", then it's null and void and they have to try again.

There's no indication what can happen while a legal challenge is under way after a notification (that is later declared void) is served. Will the notification run its course until voided, wasting everybody's time? Will it be suspended until the judicial review finishes? What does the UK law say about such things? Because it's the UK law that declares if the notification is valid, and Article 50 proxies that.

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Attention, small biz using Symantec AV: Smash up your PCs, it's the safest thing to do

Uplink

Easy

Just market it as a pro-virus solution.

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Microsoft releases open source bug-bomb in the rambling house of C

Uplink

Re: C is not an applications programming language

<quote> Point is: learn to FREAKING CODE. Don't code like a script kiddie. Don't allow script kiddies to commit code that don't check buffer lengths. that kind of thing.</quote>

And what is one supposed to do before becoming master of the code universe? Most people aren't born "senior coder", and to most of those people coding is just a job - a thing that gives them money; a thing they're looking to get away from everyday and not looking forward to returning the next day if it were not for the money.

Luckily for me, I found out about strcpy vs strncpy while still in school, but that's not mentioned in any classes. You learn srtcpy and then move to the next lesson. strncpy is not mentioned.

Applications also have this property: "we need it yesterday!". Even the most seasoned programmer can easily introduce a off-by-one error. I recently had a go on hackerrank at some C issues and while my algorithm was sane, I made a typo: I sized an array using the wrong variable, so it ended up shorter than intended. That meant that, with all the memory smashing, my code passed 10 out of 12 tests. The two that failed segfaulted. It took me forever before I saw the error and facepalmed.

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Samsung: Don't install Windows 10. REALLY

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Re: A$$ Backwards?

The way I understand it, your licence for the previous version isn't revoked when you upgrade. If you're past your easy downgrade month period, go to Microsoft's site and get an ISO for your previous version and go back. You may have to backup/format/restore, but that's what you get if you're past your 30 day post-install period.

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Uplink

Samsung? There's your problem

When a friend comes to me with a computer/phone problem, I ask them if it's a Samsung off the bat. If it's not, I'll have a look at it, because it's unusual. If it is, I tell them that's their problem, and I can't help them.

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'I thought my daughter clicked on ransomware – it was the damn Windows 10 installer'

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Windows Update 1-5 days

"Checking for Windows 7 updates now can take anywhere from one to five days before the list of updates appears."

Oh, is that it? I thought it got stuck in an infinite loop.

I _wanted_ to update from W7 and W8 to W10 on two machines and bleeping WU would just go around in circles. I went through all the troubleshooting steps MS had to throw at me to no effect, so I ended up installing W10 manually after searching Google to see how it's done. Once on W10 WU worked as expected. Both machines were fresh install of W7 and fresh activation of W8, things I did only as a step towards W10 anyway - which I then deleted to install Linux instead. I just wanted to make sure I get the licence for the machines in case I ever need to upgrade my phone software using an .exe from the manufacturer or other similar stuff I can't do on Linux or OS X.

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China's Great Firewall inventor forced to use VPN live on stage to dodge his own creation

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Re: please unplug your modem...

"you only felt safe posting anonymous"

It's quasi-anonymous. El Reg still knows who you are (Anonymous Coward had to log in) and can tell on you to any interested parties. This isn't Slashdot.

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Blighty starts pumping out 12-sided quids

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Re: Parking and Vending Machines

I think it can work. I used substitution: "It doesn't exist everywhere enough" and it seems to work. It's a measure of density per unit of everywhere.

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Data protection: Don't be an emotional knee jerk. When it comes to the law, RTFM

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Data Protection as an excuse to be lazy

One day I was unable to go through the Overground gates using my contactless card. After a few attempts which resulted in "seek assistance", I went online to see what the Internet has to say about this. The TfL website said that the staff at the station should be able to tell me what's going on, so I went and asked. The response? "Talk to your bank. I can't tell you what's wrong because of Data Protection." even after pointing out what the website said. They didn't even try to look up any error data that could have said "it's your bank's fault". Later on I called the bank and they said there's nothing wrong with my card - it wasn't blocked, wasn't subject to fraud, nothing. And it worked fine since then too. But I'll never know what happened.

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Austrian mayor spunks €40k on virgin-eating dragon

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Either stupidity or corruption

This is a great example that could have been run as a popular contest with a 100 Euro prize. Maybe make it 1000 and give out prizes to runner ups too (say 100 and 500 Euros). But then the brother's nephew's sister-in-law's artsy company wouldn't be getting the biz, would it?

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Californian tycoons stole my sharing economy, says Lily Cole

Uplink

For starters, I can't get what impossible.com does from their front pages. It has that neo-dotcom look where it screams "it's great! believe us!" but without actually saying how it works. I'm a software developer. Put an algorithm in front of me or Hulk Smash(tm). What I did get, is that it's something about sharing skills, time, objects (this is buried in the "About Us" page), but as soon as I land all I see is "shop". I can't reconcile being paid in Thanks with shopping in Pounds Sterling, and I've already spent enough time on their site, so I'll stop trying.

On a tangent:

Given a very recent past experience where a friend maxed her "underutilised" brand new credit card in two months and then came asking for help, I'm starting to move away from the idea of sharing. I'd gladly help her grow, but she failed so many times (I played the role of creditors to Greece in this play) that I have no idea what else to do. She's willing to cut on food and keep pay tv... and she even got upset when I suggested she does it the other way around...

If you want to do good in the world, help people grow. But as soon as you realise that they not only don't grow, but abuse the help to fuck their lives up, walk away - find somebody else. This should also be a prime directive when it comes to state benefits: Grow so you stop needing the benefits or fuck off.

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Google Project Zero reverse-engineers Windows path hacks for better security

Uplink

Re: : in a path name ?

If they start allowing colon in filenames, then Windows will get dotted with files called C:\npddf32Log\debuglog.txt like my Linux box is. It appears it's Firefox/XULRunner that does leaves these files all over the place - although, right now, 'locate' can't find any for some reason; maybe they fixed it.

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Putin's internet guru says 'nyet' to Windows, 'da' to desktop Linux

Uplink

Re: Next....

In my circle of friends it's been the year of Linux on the desktop (laptop rather) for years now. I don't really care about the rest of the world :)

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Next year's Windows 10 auto-upgrade is MSFT's worst idea since Vista

Uplink

Grandma is half savvy?

I've already had a call from an elderly relative asking about this and she's not keen, as she's only just learned how to use Windows 8 in the last few years and doesn't fancy redoing all that.

Fair point...

When I explained the situation to her the response was as you'd expect – she's turning automatic updates off to block the download. She says she'll do the job manually, [...]

Wait, she found the part of the OS where settings live? And she figured out how to turn updates off and run them manually all by herself? And she knows how to review updates when she pulls them in manually?

But she can't be arsed to "learn" Windows 10. What's there to learn anyway? Maybe the start menu and where the settings for updates have been moved. That "search for the thing I want to run" thing in the taskbar too complicated? And there's always "tablet mode" she can try.

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There's no Wayback in Russia: Putin blocks Archive.org

Uplink

Re: Putin is a putz.

The age old impression that the replacements just have to be better, kinder, smarter, less psychopathic than the current people. Who do you think will replace these guys? Hmm?

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URRGH! Evil app WATCHES YOU WATCHING PORN, snaps your grimace

Uplink

Draw over other apps

When I see this permission, I think twice. Anyway, adb remove crap.app, after you find out its ID, should rid you of the ransom request. Or just long-press the power button and choose to obliterate your phone :)

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Uplink

Re: Unchecking?

Cheap Chinese Spyware Phones come with that enabled by default for some reason.

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Attack of the IT monuments men: Museum wants your kit

Uplink

50 tickets

How many readers do your analytics tell you you really have?

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Spaniard sues eBay over right to sell the Sun

Uplink

I have a bridge to sell. Will eBay block me too? I can produce one of those notary documents about this bridge too.

Also, property rights are only as good as their enforcement. Thus, I hereby declare Adverse Possession of the Sun. I'd like to see her evict me and sue me for trespassing.

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Goog says patch⁵⁰ your Chrome

Uplink

Re: Are there any browser that just browse?

Lynx? NetSurf?

Lynx is text-only. NetSurf is graphical, but has no Javascript. What level of "just browsing" do you need?

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BT at last coughs to 'major outage' after broadband went titsup across UK on Sat

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Re: Funny

When the router can't be persuaded to give out Google DNS, I go the extra mile and tell my computer to not use DNS information from DHCP and just use Google. Actually, encountering BT DNS (or any other ISP DNS really) on a new computer promptly makes me take a detour to the settings and switch to Google. BT and other ISPs seem to think they're doing you a service when they break DNS hierarchies and ignore that DNSSEC exists.

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Microsoft gives away Windows Phone 8 licences in India – report

Uplink

Re: Almost free

Which country is that? How can anybody get away with "it's almost like Android" without being sent to misleading advertising hell?

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I KNOW how to SAVE Microsoft. Give Windows 8 away for FREE – analyst

Uplink

Not free... They're a business.

They're a business, so unless they can make up the shortfall from other sources, free giveaways isn't an option - even though that's what got MS Windows popular to begin with (albeit a bit without official permission).

But, say, a price of 20-29 pounds (above 29, even if it's 29.01 or 29.99, and you lose me), and I'll buy it when I need it. And I'm not using Windows except in a virtual machine, when I have to run some Windows software to configure some hardware, and I have no Linux option. I have a Mac as well, so I don't boot my XP VM very often at all, as most Windows software houses also publish for Mac. I paid 22 quid for my XP (retail French edition, regeditted to accept the English SP3, so now it's a mix of languages, mostly English, but still with some French in it). And then MS didn't get a single penny out of my 22 quid because they're not selling anything in that price range. I'm OCD enough to avoid pirate software unless there really isn't any other way to get the job done for that throwaway case I can't use Linux for (which means paying lots of cash for software does not make business sense). I haven't pirated anything in many years by the way - the one case that may have required a pirate copy came with a trial version of their software - and I ended up not using it anyway, because it didn't suite my needs (was beaten by vim if you can believe it).

I paid 13 quid for a OS X update after I got my used Mac without batting an eyelid, because friggin' Xcode wouldn't run on 10.6, and I needed Xcode. To me Mavericks really is free :) When I do need to be reminded of the stupid OS that is W8, I boot an image from modern.ie in a VM - none have survived more than 4 hours so far. And I'm an avid Ubuntu Unity user (in 2D, with XfWM instead of copiz or metacity - those are slow as hell), which as far as I can tell receives a lot of hate...

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We'll build Elon Musk's Hyperloop ... if you lob us ONE-MEELLION dollars

Uplink

My first thought was AMD's HyperTransport Technology. It sure almost sounds the same...

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US court: Dell can't hound debtor with robocalls to her mobile

Uplink

Re: PAY UP!!!

"As far as I'm aware, the only bank in the UK that lets you do international transfers online is HSBC."

Halifax does it too. Slower than HSBC (HSBC UK to ING RO - half an hour; Halifax takes 3-5 days), but also cheaper (HSBC £17, Halifax £9.99).

And I'm yet to see one bank in the UK that does not do International transfers online (but I didn't look too hard). So far, they _make_ you do it online by charging you more to do it in branch or by phone.

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Romania chucks €21m at IBM for Bucharest IT project

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Headmaster

Oh, so close

You got all the Romanian letters right, but then misspelled this one: Ziarul Financier :P There's no "e" in there :D

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Texas teen jailed for four months over sarcastic Facebook comment

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Facepalm

Re: Divided "threatening a bloodbath" @Lord Elpuss

"Without getting into the really nasty details, he’s had concussions, black eyes, moved four times from base for his own protection,” [...] “He’s been put in solitary confinement, nude, for days on end because he’s depressed"

Well... if what he wrote was a joke initially, I think he'll think twice now and plan it outright and do it. But not to a school. More like to a certain sheriff's office. You know... he already did the time, he may as well do the deed too. I really hope he goes the "I want to be a millionaire" law suit route and wins.

Excuse me for a second, some people are knocking at/down my door...

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Uplink

Re: be afraid

"Oh, IANAL etc but AFAIK, the US consitution need not apply to Aliens (what they call us johhny foreigners)"

IANAL either, but technically there are these international treaties that apply to people when they visit a foreign country, and they usually say that 1. you're supposed to obey the host country's law; 2. the host country should treat you like one of their own citizens in terms of law, observing whatever restrictions you may have extra imposed on you for being not from around there. It's this "international law" that we keep hearing about but have no direct.gov.world place to go to and read it, and it's because of these why you don't get your own special set of laws - EULA - to sign at the border when you enter another country.

Your home country will have a stern talking to the host country if they mistreat you. The organisations that supervise the treaties, and the other organisations your country is part of, may have a stern talk to the host country as well. And it turns out the USA isn't that special either when it comes to pulling trade agreements from under their feet - it's just that they're not used to being at the other end of the stick.

Tl;dr; If you go to the USA and they throw you in jail without charge, and you're from the UK, the UK.gov will probably take offence at that, and call the US ambasador in for a cup of tea, to tell them that only the UK gets to do that to you, so the US should just back off :)

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At last: EU slashes mobile roaming fees

Uplink

"Of course IP-based communications could be made as reliable as the PSTN, but then it would cost 10x as much."

I'm missing the terms that "10x as much" operates on. What will cost 10x as much compared to what? I assume the first operand is "IP-based communications" will cost 10x as much. But is it 10x as much as they currently cost? Or 10x as much as POTS currently costs?

I mean, I'm confused because mobile data charges are crazy enough as it is. Can't costs be 10x that, can they?

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Notebook sales to surge, says notebook seller

Uplink

Re: Competing in the wrong direction

If you're into external device integration (things that go on networks and serial ports to be controlled by computer), many times you get a stupid CD with the manual - a manual that isn't on the manufacturer's website. I barely use my optical drive, but it's there when I need it.

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Want to know if that hottie has HIV? Put their blood in the DVD player

Uplink

Re: Clever

For scratches, get a cat, or dog, that has claws. Cat claws appear to be a lot more effective than dog claws, because they don't need a lot of force to cause damage, and when they cause the damage, it's not flesh deep :) Then, under the ruse of helping your target clean the wounds, collect your sample.

For the more geeky inclined, a "babe, I got this modified DVD player that can check for HIV and other cool biological things" remark will most certainly elicit a "awesome! can I try it? we'll eat later" response.

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Samsung: Smart TV security hole is so minor we'll fix it immediately

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Joke

Samsung modus operandi

They seem to be in the business of cutting corners.

(My Galaxy S phone with Cyanogenmod 9 experiences exactly the same apparently kernel memory leaks as the stock Gingerbread firmware. The gaping hole in the S2, S3, Note where RAM is opened to everyone without restriction. The above article. Just to mention a few non-hardware corners they've cut).

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Just bought an Apple product? Need support NOW? Drop an F-BOMB

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Devil

Re: What's the magic word?

> I even go as far as actively researching which engines airlines buy and if I have a choice, I'll fly on a Rolls Royce engine instead of a GE one

You mean like this one: http://www.guardian.co.uk/world/2010/nov/05/qantas-a380-engine-failure ?

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UK.gov squatting on £1bn IPv4 motherlode

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Re: How do you flog addresses?

There's always something you can do. Like assign the IP addresses to a distinct business unit, then flog that. Then whoever buys that unit reassignes the IP addresses to its own relevant department and dissolves the unit. All done nicely through company restructuring and flogging processes, not involving RIPE or equivalent except maybe to update their records.

Can't move the item as is? You find a vehicle that can move the item, then move the vehicle. Man with a van for IP addresses. If you're clever, you might even be able to claim it as a loss towards your profits when you dissolve the purchased unit (some ad company MS dumped recently gave me this idea).

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iPhone 5 has 'laser keyboard, holographic images'

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Re: Eyeliner3D

Still requires a projection surface though. Anyone who manages to project into thin air, without any invisible projection screen, will be undoubtedly very very rich as a result.

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Everything Everywhere to be Nothing Nowhere in rebrand

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Re: I know, I know....

A nice lucky number too :)

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Beck's open-source challenge to freetards: play it yourself!

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Re: eeeh

"If no such agreement is anywhere on the product, are we then free to assume that once bought, you are free to do with the product as you see fit - I.E make tons of money off of it, without paying anything to Beck?"

The way I understand copyright law, rights are withheld by default. That is if they aren't explicitly granted to you, you don't have them. Long story short: if there isn't any agreement on or in the box, you don't have any rights to what you bought (except to the physical support, which isn't under copyright, and you can use that any way you like, like, say, as a paperweight or a doorstop). It's not public domain unless the author says so.

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Assange granted asylum by Ecuador after US refused to rule out charges

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Way out

So tell me this: What prevents the Ecuadorians from putting Assange on a helicopter and drop him on a boat in international waters? All they have to do is file a flight plan, not say who's on board, right? If gov.uk finds out while the helicopter is still in the air, would they send jets to down it? What? They'd have no mandate to shoot to kill. All they could do is actually escort said helicopter to international waters, where he'd be put on a Learjet to Ecuador. Who says they didn't do this already? :)

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Natwest freezes debit cards, online banking in fresh cock-up

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Time magazine front page suggestion

I declare this the year of the bug. Or rather of the fuck up, since the headlines aren't limited to software.

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Nokia set to axe China R&D jobs

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Happy

Somebody give them a clue

People are using Windows on the desktop because it became a de facto standard through various means (like: nobody bothered to target Joe Consumer before). These days, everyone with the cash gets a Mac, not a Windows PC. They didn't have any proper foothold on the mobile market, and people won't give them one. Unless hell freezes over, they'll have to satisfy themselves competing with the likes of Brew, Bada, and whatnot.

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