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* Posts by BongoJoe

385 posts • joined 3 Apr 2010

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Smartwatch sales off to a very slow start

BongoJoe
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Megaphone

Wrong Direction

Yes it's nice having a thing on one's wrist (well it is for some) that has a subset of the functions of the phone that's usually not more than an arm's strech away.

The phone can now do most things that I need to do on the move but there is one thing that the phone isn't good at and that's taking notes. I still have a small notebook and pen in my pocket to take down notes, to scribble a diagram and to generally jot things down on the spur of the moment.

Of all of the other tasks that the phone can do it can do it well. It has a good calendar function which works well but it can't yet take notes in the way that pen and paper can.

Going for the smartwatch option is, in my opinion, going utterly the wrong way. I can't come up with a reason why I would wish to be shackled into something like this for little or no benefit.

Just, please, give me something that replaces a notebook and pen.

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Weird interview questions

BongoJoe
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Two here

Two that I had in the same interview which, I admit stopped me for the moment:

1. How's the hangover?

2. Do you wish to buy my house?

The answers were,as it happens: raging, near fatal and no bloody way!

I still got the gig.

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Never mind the HORSE MEAT, trading standards cuts'll hurt IT crowd, too

BongoJoe
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Won't someone think of the children...

of the poor advertising types who whilst being unencumbered by talent produce those ropey adverts featuring manic one-eyed blacksmiths who are, quite clearly, sponsoring terrorism.

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It may be ILLEGAL to run Heartbleed health checks – IT lawyer

BongoJoe
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Big Brother

We're all guilty

So if hundreds of thousands of people run these sites at the same time and slow down the tested servers are we not guilty of a DDOS attack?

If so, my mother-in-law did it

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BongoJoe
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Re: Politicians....

You mean, for example, the person who was arrested at the Cenotaph for reading out the names of the war dead?

The Cenotaph was, one would have thought was the appropriate place for this, the names of the fallen were factually correct. No other information was given or implied and it still warranted an arrest.

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Not just websites hit by OpenSSL's Heartbleed – PCs, phones and more under threat

BongoJoe
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Re: Who Still Uses Malloc?

But is there a point in using calloc()?

The recipient still has to return the data to the sender and as far as the recipient is aware it's the stuff that's in the memory at the time. So whatever happens you are going to clear a buffer somewhere and then still return the wrong data because the recipient doesn't know, other than by the length byte, how long the data to be passed actually is.

The problem is the protocol which suggests that something can be defined by the sender. In the earlier days of the friendlier internet (remember the days when we could ping a domain to find all the eMail addresses before that was abused in the late eighties?)

The whole thing needs to be examined from top to bottom, re-specified and re-coded.

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Anatomy of OpenSSL's Heartbleed: Just four bytes trigger horror bug

BongoJoe
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Puzzled

I am curious as to why a response to a KeepAlive message, ie the hearbeat, needed to contain the original packet other than to say that the comms wasn't garbled.

The specs should have said that something like ten bytes expected and ten bytes returned.

Or, even better, have with that packet of data going in there would be a checksum. So if a shortened packet was sent the the checksum would be wrong because it wouldn't match the outgoing checksum of the data packet going out.

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Windows XP is finally DEAD, right? Er, not quite. Here's what to do if you're stuck with it

BongoJoe
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I am told...

...that one of the reasons why Microsoft tells us that XP is no longer funky and fit for the modern age is that it's not too mobile.

My bank manager assures me that he doesn't wish his ATMs to become mobile overnight any time soon.

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BongoJoe
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Here's what to do if you're stuck with it

What I am stuck with is is Microsoft. As far as I am concerned XP is the most productive operating system that they have produced to date.

Every operating system since then has borked something which makes an upgrade a decision making process. Because XP was so popular lots of stuff was written on it which won't work on other and later versions.

A number of these products are Microsoft's own products which were used to create other products. This means that for a good number of people there is LESS than no need to move. A lot of people would move off XP if the later versions of stuff which were developed on XP platforms would work on later versions of the operating system.

If Microsoft couldn't get their own Visual Studio to work seamlessly on their new operating system then what hope has the Real World where we're relying on code written by others?

For a good number of people who are left with XP it's not because they are too tight, too thick or too lazy to move it's a case that Microsoft has failed to create a 100% compatible upgrade path so a good number of this supposed 27% of all machines will be staying on XP because nothing else works.

A good example with all of this is the Internet Explorer 'update' process. For those using Visual Studio (and there are tens of lots of millions of lines of perfectly good code out there working in C++ and VB which needs to be supported still) they find that if they accidentally move to IE 10 or 11 then their projects are borked. Yes, changing the browser buggers up the development environment.

This is like like buying a new and latest television set for the living room and then finding out that because it's been installed on the wall the woodturning lathes in the workshop can no longer function.

Have a large project written in a Visual Studio language? Well, if it's much larger than a small app then it's not going to load, or if it does it may not compile properly on Windows 7 and above. This right here forces people NOT to upgrade their machines.

It is this sort of problem that Microsoft need to address because they can make inroads into that 27% of XP machines because I am sure that a good number of people would migrate tomorrow if they had total confidence that everything would run.

It's not as if Microsoft aren't aware of these issues: they've been ignoring my eMails on this subject for months.

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Office, IE, Flash fixes accompany Windows XP's final Patch Tuesday

BongoJoe
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Can't they take a hint?..

If I didn't want Bing Desktop v1 with my XP updates years ago and then when I declined versions two and three (and perhaps more) of the wretched thing why would I wish to have the lastest?

Hopefully when these XP updates stop they will stop trying to infest my machine with Content Free Search Engine Portals.

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Internet is a TOOL OF SATAN that destroys belief, study claims

BongoJoe
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And that leaves how many?

"the number of people citing no religious belief increased from 8 to 18 per cent between 1990 and 2010"

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Windows XP still has 27 per cent market share on its deathbed

BongoJoe
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Re: Lots of last-minuters out there.

You missed those "those who can't move" from that list.

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BT Tower to be replaced by 3D printed BT Tower

BongoJoe
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Re: Re too obvious

Well they have to go a long way to beat their own San Serif supplement.

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Life support turned off: NHS Direct dies silent, undignified death

BongoJoe
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England?

NHS Direct is dead and England's health service was hoping few people...

So, in order to save money have they already closed down the NHS in Scotland, Wales and Northern Ireland?

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Candy Crush King sees IPO go sour as stock price heads south

BongoJoe
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Well, their products are games with little (at best) depth. Is it any wonder that they're going to be last week's flavour of the day when (a) there's nothing to keep people using the game for months on end and (b) the vapid Yoof of Today gnerally only wants shiny, shiny and nothing more.

There are some game companies out there with one product and seem to be doing well. One example, if not the example, is CCP Games. But their offering won't fit on a phone or a fondleslab.

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ISPs CAN be ordered to police pirates by blocking sites, says ECJ

BongoJoe
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Re: In other news...

This is like saying taxi firms can be required to not pick up fares from areas where criminals might be operating.

"Cabbie, take me home [hic]"

"Naaah, mate. That's Saaf of the River. Not this time of night"

You're right, I could never see this happening.

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Microsoft issues less-than-helpful tips to XP holdouts

BongoJoe
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For this we have AdBlocker Plus and the ability to edit one's HOSTS file.

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Middle England's allotments become metric battlefield

BongoJoe
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Endorsed by the international community?

It's not often I say this, but let our cousins over the other side of the Pond have their say.

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BongoJoe
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Re: Fear not, ancient standards of measurement prevail in today's electronics ...

When I did my own PCB design years ago it was easy to do drawing on 1/10" graph paper going along the lines and then going onto acatate before making the PCB (all done in mum's kitchen which was a hazard at meal times) and it all worked well. My dad and I knocked out all sorts of PCB boards for various projects that way.

Then they came out with metric paper and the lines wouldn't match the integrated circuit legs any more.

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BongoJoe
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Re: Enter the metric pole?

So what measures in the UK are still truly Imperial and not just an alias to a given number measured in metric?

Horse racing: Furlongs are used extensively which are 220 yards as everyone knows. The weights, penalties and allowances are all done in stones and pounds.

Cricket. The length of a pitch is 22 yards. Or one chain.

Which brings us onto an acre - one furlong by one chain. The size of a footie pitch. Dead easy and I didn't have to faff around with hectometres which to me is a complely random measure.

What's wrong with a pole being five and a half yards? Take five yards and for the decimal purists add on ten percent and there you have it. It's actually about four strides, so it's easy to measure.

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AT&T and Netflix get into very public spat over net neutrality

BongoJoe
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Re: "Someone must pay a cost".

This is exactly what I do here in the UK.

I have just signed up to Nefflix and Amazon Prime. This means that my monthly download has increased and I have willing paid extra for the extra usage. Before my previous tariff worked out about 2GB a day on average now, for about twice the price I get unlimited. And it's not throttled or managed in anyway.

I now save on TV licence fee, which I no longer need, as the TV is an outdated concept (the news I can get from the internet, the weather from looking out the window, the few good British shows come onto the streams shortly and I now get the good US dramas which I could never get on BBC/ITV). So, I get what I pay for and it works out cheaper too.

And they throw in my phone connection too.

So, yes. It's like my car. The more I use it the more I have to pay in terms of fuel. I have no problems with this whatsoever.

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Google wearables: A solution looking for a rich nerd

BongoJoe
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Re: What's the big deal with charging every day?

My solar watch charges some days. I live in North Wales.

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Microsoft exec: I don't know HOW our market share sunk

BongoJoe
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Public Impression

You give people a version of Windows which fewer and fewer like, add in bits into Office (the Ribbon for a start) which annoys a good number of users. Bring out the initial MS phone which doesn't take off and then right in front of almost all of your intended market you have examples of how things have not improved but have become worse.

It doesn't help that MS bring out half baked products that don't work properly or they remove from public view and the trust goes. For example here in the UK we were going to have Media Center (sic) which was going to be brilliant. But it never went all of the way and couldn't do half of what it was supposed to. So it flopped.

I had Mcrosoft Money, a fairly decent financial application. And then they decided to pull it from the UK market. So I went to use Microsoft's Accounting which fitted into the Office suite. Remember that one? Well, if you did then you're good because that lasted for all of five minutes before getting pulled.

So why would I now want to look for a Microsoft product if I can't rely on it being here next year or even next week?

We now have a current batch of happy users with XP (the unhappy ones would have moved to Win7/8 or Linux long ago) and the less tech savvy are worried that their lives are going to get worse because of the doom mongering by, er, Microsoft.

Is it any wonder why when people want something and look at the options they tend to go for Android. Years ago I would have loved a Windows tablet but I wouldn't trust MS with making me one that I could tolerate for more than five seconds.

It's been downhill for almost a decade now and the board are only just asking why? Ten years ago I was happy to use anything Microsoft produced. XP worked as a good update from NT. The servers worked, Visual Studio worked and produced good code and then, somewhere, someone decided that we needed more glitz. more bloat, no backward compatability, no longevity, no support and to drop everything that Microsoft forced us into.

I am stunned that the board asked this question because if they aren't aware of what they have done and the perception of their company then they deserve all that they get.

Now, ten years on, I wish that I had never touched Microsoft for anything at all but am stuck with it because of, well,Microsoft.

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Oxfam, you're full of FAIL. Leave economics to sensible bods

BongoJoe
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Re: Sort of agree

I object to Oxfam because of their massive cost base and they meddle in politics.

There is one, and only one, 'Starving Charity' that I support: http://www.dafa.co.uk/

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Whitehall and Microsoft thrashing out 1-year NHS WinXP lifeline

BongoJoe
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I've a client who deals with a supplier which has the monopoly on its products. No-one else supplies this product and the only way that the client can get said product is via Active-X on IE6.

If the supplier refuses to update (they're an overseas state run industry) then my client is stuffed as they can't move elsewhere. So having clout is no good if the bloke at the other end holds the monopoly.

Now, my client would dearly love to move from IE6 but can't. And no amount of telling them that they have do bloatgrade to Win7 isn't going to help them unless they can bring IE6 with them.

This is Microsoft's fault for not making Internet Explorer backwards compatible before cutting off the old versions at the knees. And remember it was MS which pushed everyone into making Active-X apps in the first place. This is all their doing and they simply don't understand that IT doesn't revolve around each firm being responsible for the code it runs on its own desktops.

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Kent Police fined £100k for leaving interview vids of informants in old cop shop

BongoJoe
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Re: Guidance.

...with a truncheon up its arse.

Anyway, there will be a good number of people walking around Kent this week pleased that they still have their kneecaps so that they can walk around.

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BongoJoe
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Re: erm...

It's like an infinite loop of cash from then on.

And as any good economist* will tell you that is a good thing for the economy and, thus, we're all the richer for it!

* Oxymoron alert!

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NSA spies recorded an entire COUNTRY'S phone calls for a MONTH: Report

BongoJoe
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It'll be the UK. The US have been listening to all our non-local calls for decades so it wouldn't surprise me if they've ramped this up to include all calls.

All, of course, at the behest of the lads and lasses in Cheltenhaqm.

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Beastie Boys settle with toy maker over Girls copyright dispute

BongoJoe
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No, can't steal...

...but do nick those VW car badges though.

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Tony Benn, daddy of Brit IT biz ICL and pro-tech politician, dies at 88

BongoJoe
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Re: Sorry, but

Oh and disarming yourself of weapons while your enemy hangs onto theirs is the most effective way of suicide bar firing your own weapons at yourself.

...and how did the Soviet invasion fare?

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BongoJoe
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I would agree with Robin Cook for the same reason as you gave. The tin foil hat brigade may also wonder at his demise...

Others? Enoch Powell. Suffered, without doubt, by the misquoted and misunderstood Rivers of Blood speech which seems to be turning out all to be prophetic I would also add Paddy Ashdown to the short list.

There are others which are lurking on the back benches and will never see the light of the day because they're the honest brokers of Westminster but aren't in the power game which puts them into cabinets and shadow cabinets. There are others which are in minority parties whom I am impressed with, one of whom includes Elfyn Llwyd one of the senior members of Plaid.

There's only one in the Tory party that I will ever hold my glass to. And that's John Major who, in my mind, went a long way to get the Irish Peace Process started but seemed to have avoided all the plaudits. As Chancellor he wasn't any great shakes but as PM he was the least worst in my lifetime. I asked my mother once who was the best PM she'd ever known and after pausing for a minute came up with Asquith's name. That alone is a sorry state of political affairs where the modern day career politician is an entirely new breed of lizard little known to mankind.

Even though Wilson was rather useless, he had principles and was perhaps one of the least worst, even though I was no great fan of the man.

Anyway, it's all subjective. But Benn was one of the best of the bunch even though his policies were flawed in my book. That didn't stop me admiring the man.

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UK's CASH POINTS to MISS Windows XP withdrawal date

BongoJoe
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I wonder how many of these machines are infected with their recommended Rapport software?

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MtGox gets its sorry assets frozen amid US class-action lawsuit

BongoJoe
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Facepalm

Presumably this court order means that no-one is allowed to steal further BitCoins...

Horse and stable door comes to mind here.

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My work-from-home setup's better than the office. It's GLORIOUS

BongoJoe
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Everywhere where I worked in an air-conditioned cube with artificial lighting to supplement my experiences of hell I have found that middle managers always got the best kit and they didn't need it.

I hated worked for other people with their kit.

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Google's mystery barge flounces out of San Fran, heads to Stockton

BongoJoe
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Megaphone

Special Needs

One must have a special type of homesickness to want to name one's new town in one's new country after the original Stockton...

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Microsoft to push out penultimate XP patch on March Patch Tuesday

BongoJoe
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Re: Daddy, what is XP?

You are lucky. I am using a lot of development tools on my machines and they don't run properly on Windows 7 or 8.

The supplier of these tools? Why, it's Microsoft themselves.

So in effect they are the sole reason which is stopping my up/down/bloatgrade to Win 7/8 and they still want to nag me to move from a working platform to an environment which their tools won't work. What manner of madness is this?

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BongoJoe
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Is one able to stop these nagging pop-ups when they appear?

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Apple to grieving sons: NO, you cannot have access to your dead mum's iPad

BongoJoe
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Re: What do you want?

Quite. Most companies which live behind call centres have a small section of trained personnel who are skilled and are able to empathise with the bereaved.

A lot of the problem here is that they have in their hands something which is tangiable. This is not downloaded music which, to most people, "isn't there". This is an actual physical object like a DVD or a CD which people can pass onto each other.

We have the tale of one of the correspondents here whose mother is dying and she was given an iPad in her last days. The item, when it was purchased in a shop somewhere, would have seen to be something which can be passed on and not to be thrown away.

It takes a special type of heartless organisation which hides behind their T&Cs and tells the bereaved that they have to throw the item into landfill. Some form of compassion is certainly required here and Apple should think once again and have a section of people who are going to be sympathetic.

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BongoJoe
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Re: Isn't the iPad (and code) part of the deceased's property?

Ah, but <imaginary_relative> relative wouldn't have a certified copy of the death certificate.

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BongoJoe
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FAIL

Well done

Whilst one could appreciate the need for security by Apple but this is taking things far too far. If a death certificate is good enough for every other body on the planet then why isn't it good enough for Apple?

I've just gone through the mechanics of sorting out my mother's estate (what was left of it after the care home charges) and everyone I had dealt with were fantastic and every so supportive.

Apple need to have a damned good look at themselves here.

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Blimey! ANOTHER Bitcoin bleed brouhaha

BongoJoe
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Happy

Ha! I laugh at your inability to spell it!

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WHOA: Get a load of Asteroid DX110 JUST MISSING planet EARTH

BongoJoe
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Megaphone

Re: Work?

Tell you what, why don't you prise yourself away from websites and go to something called a "Job Centre". If you have any talent at anything, you'll get to find out.

Tell you what, if you have any talent at anything, then you needn't spend all of one's daylight hours 'working' for someone else and one could 'work' a couple of hours a day at home eating proper meals whenever one wishes.

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BongoJoe
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Cloud Cover

I find it amusing that the Near Earth Observtory which watches out for these things is sited here in Wales.

I wonder if they've spotted it through the rainclouds yet or will it come as a suprise to them when it lands in Powys with a bit of a wallop.

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Thanks a lot, Facebook: Microsoft turns Office 365 into social network

BongoJoe
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Where's the Ribbon?

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Hot, fit, SWEATY users stroke Backbeats model, beg: DON'T CALL US

BongoJoe
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Re: Yawn.

Spinning Class.

It's good to hear that the WEA courses are still present enabling us to maintain ancient crafts such as weaving and wool making.

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Wikimedia wants forced disclosures of paid edits

BongoJoe
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Re: Well, they need to do something.

I have to agree. When it comes to a number of subjects I simply don't bother going to Wikipedia.

Anything to do with military history is going to be mangled to present a strange form of history; I am surprised that the events of the War of the Roses haven't yet been modified in favour of the US . And forget facts on early pagan religions; the rubbish on Wikipedia is astounding. If there are any discussions on, for example, how Christianity borrowed ffom earlier religions then this gets deleted or modified.

Most of the problems I have come across as small often uninformed pressure groups who can't see anything any other way but what they have been programmed to believe.

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German freemail firms defend AdBlock-nobbling campaign

BongoJoe
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Re: "Merely...make money"

"So if I rip a newspaper page in two, I've breached copyright? Or if I clip an article out of a magazine, for my own use, I've breached copyright?"

Exactly.

Picture the scene; it's a Sunday afternoon and you're sitting in the lounge reading the Sunday papers with your spouse.

"Darling. Have you finished with the sports section?"

"Yes, shall I pass it over to you?"

"Oh, please darling. But only if you pass the main section, the news analysis section, the London theatre supplement even though we live hundreds of miles away. And don't forget the car adverts and the section which has the holidays and, oh is that the jobs sections too?"

"Yes, dear.. And there's also a broadsheet which appears to be an advertisement for frozen foods. Would you want that too?"

"Yes please, darling. I wouldn't want to get prosectured for breach of coyright by 'publishing' my own newspaper out of these parts here on the lounge coffee table."

"Oh, you are ever so clever and adorable. Aren't I fortunate to live with such a person who can guide me through the complexities of copyright law."

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BongoJoe
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Re: "Merely...make money"

Explain to me how you would provide a free email service without ads, and then we can have a sensible discussion. Ranting about advertising agencies is not an argument, it's just a rant.

I wouldn't. I pay for my eMail seperate from my web hosting which is seperate again from my internet connection.

Or if I had to then I would make sure that the adverts were appropriate, non malicious, non obtrusive and generally didn't get in the way of the site. I have done this before in the past for sites which were free and I wanted to serve specific adverts to the viewer.

I did this with an .asp add-in on to the page and because I did it properly I had no complaints.

But the point is it doesn't matter what the service is: the adverts quite simply get in the way. If there were a reasonable number of adverts then we wouldn't need Ad Blocker. The advertisers have spoiled it for everyone.

I guess that you're in the advertising trade then, AC?

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BongoJoe
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Re: "Merely...make money"

Boothy, absolutely.

I have a rather extensive HOSTS file which I share out to chums. As you say, it makes loading times a lot easier and it allows me to get the data for which I ask.

And as I say; if the advertisers wish me to see their adverts then all they have to do is to rein in their wares to a respectable volume, don't dish out Flash and no malware.

I've been over to the US a few times and have had the misfortune to try to watch their television shows as they are broadcast. Open show for a few minutes, advert, title credits, adverts and then a series of adverts interrupted by programme. I am not condoning the practise; but this is why people download programmes because an hour show there can be 21 minutes of 'stuff'.

Some adverts? Fine. Too many and you spoil it for yourselves and everyone else.

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BongoJoe
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Re: "Merely...make money"

> Nothing wrong with that, the advert is PAYING for the content because you don't!

You make little sense.. I have paid the going rate for the subscription sites because that is the rate charged by the vendor. Therefore, you are contradicting yourself - if I am paying the going rate for the data then why aren't I getting what I want first?

> Web pages also have drive-by download malware. Do you block the Internet?

Not every web page. Perhaps I don't go onto the sites which contain these items of malware but that doesn't mean that the advertising agencies on those sites have the right to dish out malware.

Do you really revel in all that crap these advertisers send to you? Perhaps it makes you feel important that these people are sending you pop-up adverts, pop-under adverts and obstructive adverts that generally get in the way; I don't. I find it clogs the bandwidth, slows down the browser because of another poorly written Flash advert shows the brower to a near terminal halt and, quite simply, the advertiers have gone too far.

Do you also read all the blow-in rubbish that you get in magazines? Do you read with enthusiasm the latest offer from Micheal Parkinson on a funeral fund, or perhaps you delight in hearing about the new Thora Hird 'Stairway to Heaven' stairlift before filling in the latest in somewhat uncertain lotteries which you have managed to win a cruise to the Bahamas or was that a banana?

I run a website which charges a subscription fee. And guess how many adverts I have on there? None. There's a good reason for this; I charge the going rate which I have determined and, as a consequnce, I don't feel it is right or appropriate to pester the members with unwanted adverts.

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