* Posts by Chemist

2462 posts • joined 24 Mar 2010

Windows for Warships? Not on our new aircraft carriers, says MoD

Chemist
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Re: Sadly only one upvote to give.

"The Git remembers drooling over a Silicon Graphics Indigo machine running Irix and some interesting mathematical/graphical software."

We used to use SGI with 3D graphics and a lot of backup horsepower (compute servers & Linux farms) for protein modeling etc - around ~~2003 we changed to Linux/Dual Xeons and saved a large amount of money on hardware - although the 3D graphics card and LC spectacles added a lot to the cost. Some experiments were done with porting some of our in-house software to Windows (W2000) but it almost always crashed. (We ran on SGI or Linux at ~100% CPU for 2-4 days or more so we gave it some stick. Once we had a 2048 core Linux farm it became a lot easier to do more speculative runs very rapidly )

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Chemist
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Re: Sadly only one upvote to give.

"And its no good bleating about how manufacturers "should" provide non-windows alternatives"

I didn't but there again I didn't mention anything about medical environment either.

On the other hand a quick Google suggest that most areas of specialized medicine that involved detailed analysis of MRI, CAT etc does use software that is often available for Windows, Mac & Linux. It seems to be in the areas of databases and messaging that Windows is used solely.

If you want specialist areas I know of dozens of scientific programs only available for Unix/Linux some of them are eye-wateringly expensive. I'd also point out that MPLab is highly specialized.

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Chemist
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Re: Sadly only one upvote to give.

"Who is going to pay that extra cost?"

Well Mozilla ( Firefox & Thunderbird), Google (Chrome, Google Earth) Gimp, LibreOffice , VLC, Skype, VirtualBox, Apache, MPLab (PIC dev/programmer) and a number of others.

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Newspaper kills 'what was fake' column as pointless in internet age

Chemist
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Re: If its on the internet...

"Sounds like the unofficial news sources are now just as bad as the official ones. The horror of it all!"

I think the 'official' news sources seem to be getting worse - maybe reflecting less rigorous research or lack of knowledge/skepticism. Certainly some of time that they report areas of which I have in-depth knowledge the ignorance displayed can be breathtaking. Of course then cut-and-paste journalism multiplies the errors rapidly.

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Microsoft steps up Windows 10 nagging

Chemist
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Re: I'm waiting until it goes to 11.

" any computer you don't assemble yourself is going to come with a valid Windows license"

That's certainly not true in the UK. I'm writing this on a very similar laptop to yours (minus the NVidia graphics) which was bought new without any OS and has had OpenSUSE 13.1 on it from new

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Physics uses warp theory to look beyond relativity

Chemist
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Re: thicko amused by ftl boffins

"@Chemist, there are plenty of mechanisms for getting to distant places, only a matter of time."

That is so obvious it wasn't worth mentioning. I assumed people wanted to travel to the stars within their own lifetime.

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Chemist
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Re: thicko amused by ftl boffins

I might add that personally I'd be delighted if there was some evidence for potential mechanisms for distant travel but realistically it may be that the physics of this universe don't allow for such things.

Wishing for something may drive technology but not science.

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Chemist
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Re: thicko amused by ftl boffins

"It's no wonder we're stuck where we are right now with people like you and your 'It's impossible because we know it to be so' attitude."

To be fair the skepticism is due to a lack of any theoretical framework to give any hint as to how this all might be achieved. Idle speculation can only achieve so much.

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Chemist
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Re: No theory

"Just because sodium fizzes under water here doesn't mean it won't sprout flowers in space."

That's NOT science that's mere idle speculation

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Part of the world's IT brought down by Azure Active Directory issue

Chemist
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"More like a migraine strategy"

I vote for 'micturition-about' strategy

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Can't get a break: Pwned Linux ransomware pwned again, infects 3000

Chemist
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Re: @chemist - only ONE attempt to attack SSHD?

"and need to look up something on my home computer. I can ssh via my phone"

Well I don't know what phne you are using but I generally access files from home using a file manager via fish protocol. My home file system is just another folder in my file manager.

https://en.wikipedia.org/wiki/Files_transferred_over_shell_protocol

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Chemist
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Re: @chemist - only ONE attempt to attack SSHD?

"I get them all the time, just ignore them"

Staggering isn't it. I have, as I say, just had the one on the non-standard port. I get attempts against the usual suspects all the time.but no other ports are open. I do other things when I'm being paranoid -like limiting the time the port is open to a small time window every day. But I do use it for real all the time when travelling.

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Chemist
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Re: Does it infect Linux destops?

"Downvoted 10 of millions..."

Say 1.5 billion desktops at @ 1.5% Linux - that's >20 million

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Chemist
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Re: Does it infect Linux destops?

Suggested reading :

"https://en.wikipedia.org/wiki/Linux_malware"

I know you are joking about "the six of us" as there are 10s of millions of desktop Linux users. The infection vector is content management systems that have been fixed already. So unless you are running such unpatched and exposing the same to the internet it seems very unlikely that you will have to face such problem.

I've been running SSHD for >10years and in all that time only one attempt has attacked the (non-standard) port without success, I add. But that is the only internet-exposed port I have. Indeed I have all lower ports blocked at several points my ISP, router and firewalls. If you expose ports to the internet you need to be responsible enough to maintain configs/software/logs as well as the usual care with installation sources, permissions , e-mails etc.I usually browse in a VM as well.

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Little bang for the Big C? Nitro in the anti-cancer arsenal

Chemist
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"To my personal knowledge Thalidomide was certainly trialled against multiple myeloma around 2001"

I've never worked directly on cancer but I know a number of cancer areas have been interested in Thalidomide over the years

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Microsoft rides to Dell's rescue, wrecks rogue root certificate

Chemist
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Re: Wont't stop me hating on MSFT!

" surreptitiously"

Sorry dogged, that's not how I'd define 'surreptitiously'

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What the world needs now is Pi, sweet $5 Raspberry Pi Zero

Chemist
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Re: Overpriced

"a compute with _NO_ network connectivity is rather useless in this day and age."

Certainly I have several PIC 18Fs connected by RS232/USB converters to my file server and laptops and they are very useful - and accessible over networks by running a daemon to control/interrogate them.

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Why Microsoft yanked its latest Windows 10 update download: It hijacked privacy settings

Chemist
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Re: people's unique advertising ID numbers

"and want to serve adverts in your application or game, you need some way to uniquely identify the user or player"

Luckily not in my world !

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Chemist
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people's unique advertising ID numbers

As someone with no interest otherwise in MS software my interest was still raised by the above ID business.

What is it ?

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Microsoft chief Satya drops an S bomb in Windows 10, cloud talk

Chemist
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Re: Newspeak from Nadella?

"I am consequently looking hard for replacements for those few programs I still have to run under Windows (8.1, 10 will not be installed)"

Care to share what they are ?. I understand they might be specialized programs for your line of work. My department had to run for years with two desktops each , one for the specialized Unix then Linux scientific software and one for the corporate guff (email and IE only websites on our intranet)

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Refined player: Fedora 23's workin' it like Monday morning

Chemist
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Re: Accident waiting to happen.

"However, when you do start interacting with files, they do act in a native way. That is, clicking a .ods file will load LibreOffice Calc - as you would expect"

I do something similar with Dolphin file manager on OpenSUSE only I connect to my own fileserver when traveling via fish protocol (file transfer over ssh) which gives an icon for my fileserver directories within the file manager and likewise an icon for my filespace on my ISP vis ftp. All seamless + NFS icon for use at home.

In response to another post I've used rpms under OpenSUSE/SUSE for years without any issues.

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Microsoft rolls out first 'major update' to Windows 10

Chemist
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Re: These Days...

"To clarify I had already tried out the iso in Virtual Box and it had worked fine, so the problem was in the burning process."

Can I enquire if you used the 'check installation media' option from the boot menu of the .iso. In my experience that shows up all flaky disks ( unless they are so bad that they don't boot ) Also - was the .iso checksum correct ?

My experiences over many years with OpenSUSE, installing on all sorts of machines is completely positive.

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Chemist
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Re: These Days...

"The Suse download produced an errored dvd that stalled mid way through the install"

In my experience if there's any kind of error on a DVD then installation is probably a waste of time

Was the .iso checksum OK ?. If it was and your hardware will support it why not use a USB install ?

Leap is 42.1 is very new - I'd use 13.2 - I've installed that on a number of machines with no problems at all. I'd also use a liveDVD or LiveUSB to check everything out and then use the install option from that.

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Chemist
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Re: These Days...

" then just stop using the terminal and see how you get on with your Linux installation"

Oh, not again !

See : http://forums.theregister.co.uk/forum/containing/2685979

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Royal Mail mulls drones for rural deliveries

Chemist
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"fierce mastiff dog"

So the golden eagle going for the drone .....

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Einstein's brain to be picked by satellites

Chemist
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Re: Improved GPS accuracy?

"will an improved understanding of GR lead to better GPS accuracy?"

Assuming the corrections applied now are those of GR theory only if something is sig. wrong with the theory will corrections need to be changed

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Here's the little-known legal loophole that permitted mass surveillance in the UK

Chemist
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Re: ...nearly 30 years ago

" past 50 and 1984 seems like only yesterday."

I'm rapidly approaching 65 but I think yesterday was Sunday !

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Coding with dad on the Dragon 32

Chemist
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Re: re : The CPU

" it wasn't the 6809 it was actually the MC6809E in both the TRS-80 CC & the Dragon 32"

Rather pedantic as the registers, instruction set and addressing modes of the 6809 & 6809E were identical AFAIR

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Chemist
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Re: Ah... fond memories...

"And tell t'kids that these days?"

AND I had to solder it together AND when it didn't work debug it with a xtal earpiece AND replace the 7400 that was faulty - we used to do that sort of thing in those days.

(and the bloody MS BASIC had a bug in the garbage collector !)

A broken router ! - we used to dream about a broken router ... etc. etc..

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Chemist
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Re: Ah... fond memories...

"and something about residing in a cardboard box in middle of t' street."

My first 'serious computer, (UK101) resided both in the cardboard box it came in and indeed in the north.

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Chemist
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Re: Made in Port Talbot

"The Dragon 32 was powered by a 6809,"

Got a disk drive for it and then a FORTH. Start of a very long relationship with both FORTH and 6809 assembler. Still have a home-made system around here somewhere.

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Lithium-air: A battery breakthrough explained

Chemist
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Re: @Itzman Oh look, another magic battery technology

"3 kw/kilo Li air battery would equal a gallon of fuel. Li air has the potential for 10 kw/kilo"

Can you clarify your units - you are using power when you should be using energy.

Petrol is ~32MJ/L or ~ 44MJ/kg - it's a rapidly moving target but a Li-ion is ~~ 1MJ/kg . Now I take your point about efficiency but given the very variable sources of electricity , transmission distance & losses, charging/discharging efficiency and motor losses I'd guess we are a long way from 90% overall at the moment. On the other hand it's good to see such a potential improvement.

Just seen a report of potentially 'cheap' magnesium/iron batteries for non-traction uses :-

http://www.sciencedaily.com/releases/2015/11/151104095223.htm

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Chemist
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Re: Source of Oxygen? How delicate is it? etc

"so can't the Oxygen left over be used? I do realise the quantity available may not be enough!"

In theory it could be used but the practical problem would be storing it during charging until it was needed.for use. I mole of oxygen is 32g but occupies ~23 L A vehicle battery would require a huge storage volume or a lot of energy to compress it and a weight penalty for the cylinder. .

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Chemist
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Re: Yeah, yeah that all sounds great until you learn...

"can you run electric cars off these batteries right now?"

No

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Chemist
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Re: Water?

"If you need water as a solvent and an atmospheric airflow you'll need a method to stop it drying out or having it topped up"

"The last important ingredient is a small amount of water." - the solvent is dimethoxyethane (b.pt. ~85C) (in this case).

But yes lots of hurdles to overcome.

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Chemist
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Re: Oxygen makes things burn brightly

"As pure oxygen is toxic above 0.5 atmospheres, it seems unlikely it was both "pure" and "high pressure"...."

I think it was both, an initial 100% oxygen at slightly higher than atmospheric reducing to 100% at ~1/3 atm. for almost all of the flight. I think after the fire they changed to using oxygen/nitrogen.

I didn't downvote BTW - you are quite correct about oxygen tox.

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Chemist
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Re: Did I miss the part...

"Where they talked about how much more energy these things can store? History, design, chemistry,"

It sounds like a fair step forward in absolute energy density but AFAIK* the output current is low for reasonable efficiency. Still these are very early days - this is a paper in Science after all.

* writing from memory, I've read about this a week or two ago but can't find where. In fact I thought it was published in Nature. In fact Nature has just published a supplement all about batteries. It will probably tell most people far more than they want to know.

http://www.nature.com/nature/journal/v526/n7575_supp/index.html

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Food, water, batteries, medical supplies, ammo … and Windows 7 PCs

Chemist
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Re: Linux, still not the way

"For instance, I have a laptop running Mint Debian edition."

So run one that does have a Device Manager !

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Chemist
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Re: Windows 7

"Could someone rationally explain what's this thing is with windowz users, "

Simple - in any other area if people didn't like the function, design or cost of something they'd vote with their feet and buy something else. Even with phones there is some choice but MIcrosoft have wormed their way into a position of power where, now, most people don't see another choice. Not just the OS but some of the major applications and file formats Most people are now stuck or think they are. They're frustrated, see a future of jumping through hoops, at greater cost and all the time burying themselves even deeper into this sorry morass.

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Chemist
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Re: Another highly satisfied Mint user here.

"Another highly satisfied Mint user here. "

Having said earlier that I'd not installed Mint I thought I should. So i downloaded a KDE .iso and just installed it ( into a VM admittedly) It was almost exactly the same as OpenSUSE, fill in forms, tick boxes and then smooth and fast install.

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Chemist
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Re: Linux, still not the way

A link to the installation screenshots

https://en.opensuse.org/Portal:Installation/Screenshots

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Chemist
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Re: Linux, still not the way

"Honest question: Really, really point and click?"

Absolutely yes. Never even open a terminal window.

Set to boot from USB, plug-in liveUSB, reboot, Several pages of options like locale, passwords, choices on partitions, etc, finally press the go button.

It's been like that for years.

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Chemist
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Re: Linux, still not the way

"It needs to be plug and play, and point and click "

I can confirm that OpenSUSE install is just point and click

BTW have you ever installed Windows onto fresh hardware i.e. not a re-install ?

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Chemist
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Re: Linux

"Mostly what's been slowing me down is trying to decide what to go with - currently considering Zorin OS"

It is difficult having so much choice. If you're happy running a VM like Virtualbox then try a few in that firstly, otherwise a LiveCD or USB will let you check your hardware without committing to installation although it will be a slow-ish system. I've installed OpenSUSE 13.1KDE on quite a range of desktops, laptops and netbooks without any hardware issues so I'd suggest that - it is fairly heavyweight so 2GB+ memory helps keep it snappy although I do have it on a 1GB celeron laptop and a 1GB netbook but both are sluggish with more than a few programs open. The consensus seems to be that Mint is also an easy distro to install but I've not used it.

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Microsoft's OneDrive price hike has wrecked its cloud strategy

Chemist
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Re: Trust, indeed

"Did you spot that command line "run sudo dpkg -i plexmediaserver_0.9.8.18.290-11b7fdd_amd64.deb (replacing the last filename with the name of the package you downloaded)"?"

I did - I also just installed Plex into a Mint VM by a one-click install from their web-site without any cli. I also note that no compiling either by your method or mine was necessary.

The permissions are a fact of life and one of the reasons for the security of Linux. Again in most distros no cli work is necessary

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Chemist
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Re: Trust, indeed

"nstalling software a nightmare of compiling and other arcane command line rubbish."

Right - you make a list of programs that need to be compiled by normal users and I'll make a list of the most common ones I use that don't. and the ones I use that do.

Firefox

Thunderbird

LibreOffice

Google Earth

VLC

LibreOffice

Virtualbox

Skype

Darktable - RAW photo developer

Kdenlive - video editor

Inkscape - vector graphics

MPLAB - PIC programming system

Hugin - panorama creator

Gwenview - image viewer

CUPS - print server

NFSD - fileserver

And ones that I use that need compiling are all my own programs, nothing else !

Don't have to take my word for it - I'm sure others here will confirm

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Chemist
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Re: Trust, indeed

"and installing software a nightmare of compiling and other arcane command line rubbish."

Ah, an 'expert' - an expert with no experience of the subject that is.

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Chemist
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Re: Linux to the rescue! Again!

"and open port 22 on your router"

I suggest a very diff. port. I've had just one attempt in 10 years on my non-standard port - every little helps.

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Chemist
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Re: Van-load of tapes

"It's ~5000 photos from a decent mobile camera. Not hard to exceed at all."

Certainly 5000 photos in RAW format from my 6D would be ~150GB, and clips from my HD video would add 3MB/sec.

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Windows 10 growth stalls during October

Chemist
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Re: Where did all the Windows users go?

Tetchy, tetchy, tetchy.

U R A/C so irrelevant !

(sorry to the adults - I stooped to his/her level)

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