* Posts by Chemist

2428 posts • joined 24 Mar 2010

Lithium-air: A battery breakthrough explained

Chemist
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Re: Water?

"If you need water as a solvent and an atmospheric airflow you'll need a method to stop it drying out or having it topped up"

"The last important ingredient is a small amount of water." - the solvent is dimethoxyethane (b.pt. ~85C) (in this case).

But yes lots of hurdles to overcome.

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Chemist
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Re: Oxygen makes things burn brightly

"As pure oxygen is toxic above 0.5 atmospheres, it seems unlikely it was both "pure" and "high pressure"...."

I think it was both, an initial 100% oxygen at slightly higher than atmospheric reducing to 100% at ~1/3 atm. for almost all of the flight. I think after the fire they changed to using oxygen/nitrogen.

I didn't downvote BTW - you are quite correct about oxygen tox.

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Chemist
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Re: Did I miss the part...

"Where they talked about how much more energy these things can store? History, design, chemistry,"

It sounds like a fair step forward in absolute energy density but AFAIK* the output current is low for reasonable efficiency. Still these are very early days - this is a paper in Science after all.

* writing from memory, I've read about this a week or two ago but can't find where. In fact I thought it was published in Nature. In fact Nature has just published a supplement all about batteries. It will probably tell most people far more than they want to know.

http://www.nature.com/nature/journal/v526/n7575_supp/index.html

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Food, water, batteries, medical supplies, ammo … and Windows 7 PCs

Chemist
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Re: Linux, still not the way

"For instance, I have a laptop running Mint Debian edition."

So run one that does have a Device Manager !

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Chemist
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Re: Windows 7

"Could someone rationally explain what's this thing is with windowz users, "

Simple - in any other area if people didn't like the function, design or cost of something they'd vote with their feet and buy something else. Even with phones there is some choice but MIcrosoft have wormed their way into a position of power where, now, most people don't see another choice. Not just the OS but some of the major applications and file formats Most people are now stuck or think they are. They're frustrated, see a future of jumping through hoops, at greater cost and all the time burying themselves even deeper into this sorry morass.

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Chemist
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Re: Another highly satisfied Mint user here.

"Another highly satisfied Mint user here. "

Having said earlier that I'd not installed Mint I thought I should. So i downloaded a KDE .iso and just installed it ( into a VM admittedly) It was almost exactly the same as OpenSUSE, fill in forms, tick boxes and then smooth and fast install.

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Chemist
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Re: Linux, still not the way

A link to the installation screenshots

https://en.opensuse.org/Portal:Installation/Screenshots

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Chemist
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Re: Linux, still not the way

"Honest question: Really, really point and click?"

Absolutely yes. Never even open a terminal window.

Set to boot from USB, plug-in liveUSB, reboot, Several pages of options like locale, passwords, choices on partitions, etc, finally press the go button.

It's been like that for years.

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Chemist
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Re: Linux, still not the way

"It needs to be plug and play, and point and click "

I can confirm that OpenSUSE install is just point and click

BTW have you ever installed Windows onto fresh hardware i.e. not a re-install ?

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Chemist
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Re: Linux

"Mostly what's been slowing me down is trying to decide what to go with - currently considering Zorin OS"

It is difficult having so much choice. If you're happy running a VM like Virtualbox then try a few in that firstly, otherwise a LiveCD or USB will let you check your hardware without committing to installation although it will be a slow-ish system. I've installed OpenSUSE 13.1KDE on quite a range of desktops, laptops and netbooks without any hardware issues so I'd suggest that - it is fairly heavyweight so 2GB+ memory helps keep it snappy although I do have it on a 1GB celeron laptop and a 1GB netbook but both are sluggish with more than a few programs open. The consensus seems to be that Mint is also an easy distro to install but I've not used it.

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Microsoft's OneDrive price hike has wrecked its cloud strategy

Chemist
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Re: Trust, indeed

"Did you spot that command line "run sudo dpkg -i plexmediaserver_0.9.8.18.290-11b7fdd_amd64.deb (replacing the last filename with the name of the package you downloaded)"?"

I did - I also just installed Plex into a Mint VM by a one-click install from their web-site without any cli. I also note that no compiling either by your method or mine was necessary.

The permissions are a fact of life and one of the reasons for the security of Linux. Again in most distros no cli work is necessary

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Chemist
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Re: Trust, indeed

"nstalling software a nightmare of compiling and other arcane command line rubbish."

Right - you make a list of programs that need to be compiled by normal users and I'll make a list of the most common ones I use that don't. and the ones I use that do.

Firefox

Thunderbird

LibreOffice

Google Earth

VLC

LibreOffice

Virtualbox

Skype

Darktable - RAW photo developer

Kdenlive - video editor

Inkscape - vector graphics

MPLAB - PIC programming system

Hugin - panorama creator

Gwenview - image viewer

CUPS - print server

NFSD - fileserver

And ones that I use that need compiling are all my own programs, nothing else !

Don't have to take my word for it - I'm sure others here will confirm

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Chemist
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Re: Trust, indeed

"and installing software a nightmare of compiling and other arcane command line rubbish."

Ah, an 'expert' - an expert with no experience of the subject that is.

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Chemist
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Re: Linux to the rescue! Again!

"and open port 22 on your router"

I suggest a very diff. port. I've had just one attempt in 10 years on my non-standard port - every little helps.

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Chemist
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Re: Van-load of tapes

"It's ~5000 photos from a decent mobile camera. Not hard to exceed at all."

Certainly 5000 photos in RAW format from my 6D would be ~150GB, and clips from my HD video would add 3MB/sec.

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Windows 10 growth stalls during October

Chemist
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Re: Where did all the Windows users go?

Tetchy, tetchy, tetchy.

U R A/C so irrelevant !

(sorry to the adults - I stooped to his/her level)

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Chemist
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Re: XP

"I /am/ having a lot of trouble. However, I don't like the path Microsoft has chosen,"

Well I'm sorry for that but I'd repeat the advice from Chika and use a more forgiving distro like Mint or my usual choice of OpenSUSE. But I reiterate flash isn't a problem usually and most installs don't need cli work.

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Chemist
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Re: XP

"For all things internet I moved away from Win7 and started using Linux (Debian 8.2) a while ago."

Why ? - you seem to be having a lot of trouble. Are you sure that this isn't an attempt by an AC to spread some FUD about Linux. It certainly doesn't explain why you continue to use Linux.

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Chemist
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Re: XP

"it can't handle Flash (I play one online game, hence I need the Flash); "

Don't know where you got that from . Any number of people here will confirm that if you want to it will run flash.

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Next year's Windows 10 auto-upgrade is MSFT's worst idea since Vista

Chemist
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Re: The recommended update will still require the user to accept or decline before installing

"Firefox has telemetry"

Only if you want it to

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Chemist
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Re: Linux

" the learning curve is vertical and no software supports it"

Firefox

Thunderbird

Google Earth

VLC

LibreOffice

Virtualbox

Skype

and those are just some of the cross-platform ones.

Darktable - RAW photo developer

Kdenlive - video editor

Inkscape - vector graphics

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Little bang for the Big C? Nitro in the anti-cancer arsenal

Chemist
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Re: Insulin Potentiation Therapy?

"Insulin Potentiation Therapy? "

All I'd say about this is that AFAIK glucose is transported into cells by active transport proteins (being very hydrophilic it wouldn't easily diffuse through the cell membrane) . It would seem very unlikely that any chemo. drugs would be transported by the same proteins. Not my area but if anyone else would care to comment....

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Chemist
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"Thalidomide is currently regarded the A Number 1 Wonder Drug for the treatment of leprosy."

Have you a good ref. for this. AFAIK antibiotics and dapsone are the usual & effective treatments. Thalidomide has been used for certain complications.

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Chemist
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"I thought vasodilation can be achieved simply by sustained low-level exercise ?"

But it still is mediated by nitric oxide release

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Chemist
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Not my area but....

AFAIK the vasodilation is due to the release in the body from nitroglycerine of nitric oxide ( yes the one from diesel exhausts and indeed many other combustion processes) The nitric oxide, which is also produced naturally by several enzymes from the amino acid arginine, modifies the activity/function of several enzymes/proteins in the endothelium and that's where the vasodilation comes from.

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Think Fortran, assembly language programming is boring and useless? Tell that to the NASA Voyager team

Chemist
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Re: Competent C programmers

"You need to know how to use basic concepts such as bitwise operations, BCD number representation, etc, which are basically universal in any assembly coding."

I'd add understanding of the various addressing modes and the elegant, fast data structures that they can be used to build.

(Mine's the one with programming the 6809 in the pocket

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How Microsoft will cram Windows 10 even harder down your PC's throat early next year

Chemist
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Re: Ah the MS hatred alive and well

"however we all know the advocates here are charging well for their services (as they are well entitled to) so it’s not FREE really."

WHAT !

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Chemist
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"How soon before all Linux users are leaking more personal data to the "cloud" than Microsoft users?"

So don't use Ubuntu !!. There are plenty of good distros - many would pack it all in if they thought that the scenario you conjecture would happen. Any Ubuntu users care to comment - I've not used it for years.

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Chemist
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Re: Just do the flipping update

"All the linuxians"

You clearly don't know much about Linux - I'm a long-term user (20+years) and I install/update/upgrade when I want

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Xiaomi preps Linux laptops for the post Christmas sales rush

Chemist
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Re: Yes please

My fault, sorry, I meant pcspecialist

They have several type of laptop & desktop which can be customized by drop down menus including OS (WIndows 10, 8.1 and no OS)

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Chemist
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Re: Yes please

"Whether this or any other brand, I'm really interested in the availability of new equipment that either isn't tainted with Windows 10 "

In UK google "pc components" - they have a Linux forum too.

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Mutant space germs threaten International Space Station

Chemist
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Re: Relativity

"So diphtheria and yoghurt are close relatives? I always suspected there was something dodgy about yoghurt..."

AFAIK the connection between Corynebacterium & yogurt is indirect. One Corynebacterium species is used in the manufacture of glutamate and then that glutamate is used in various foodstuffs including yogurt.

"One of the most studied species is C. glutamicum, whose name refers to its capacity to produce glutamic acid in aerobic conditions.[27] It is used in the food industry as monosodium glutamate in the production of soy sauce and yogurt."

"https://en.wikipedia.org/wiki/Corynebacterium#Industrial_uses"

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Chemist
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Re: Opportunistic pathogens

"I don't understand though, why does the immune system get suppressed in spaaaaace?"

Don't have a ready answer to that although I do know all sorts of biological systems seem to be affected by weightlessness + ?. In particular calcium metabolism/mobilization. Calcium levels have a direct and profound effect on lots of systems in the body.

Given the complexity of the immune system and the known effects of various interventions I'd think it might be quite a time before all of the possible effects might be know.

One, rather obvious one, given that sitting on top of a giant firework is in the job description is stress. This is known to have +ve & -ve effects on the immune system.

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Chemist
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Don't know what they expected.

Humans can't be clean roomed to the same degree, organisms multiply & filters concentrate. No-one on the ISS ever had a cold, flu or GI upset ?

As an example I worked in a building with forced air ventilation, After Chernobyl, although the local levels of radiation were only transiently raised, the ventilation filters were quite noticeably radioactive having purified many building volumes of outside air every 24hrs.

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Lawyers harrumph at TalkTalk's 'no obligation to encrypt' blurt

Chemist
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"my understanding is one of the main rules of PR is you shouldn't try to pass yourself off as a lawyer"

More generally : "my understanding is one of the main rules of PR is you shouldn't try to pass yourself off as an expert"

There's been an awful lot of that around recently.

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The iPhone 6 doused in bromine - an incendiary mix or not?

Chemist
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" suggested we might like to repeat the experiment and test it for ourselves. We're more inclined to test what happens when you pour bromine on, say, a banana wrapped in aluminium foil."

PLEASE DON'T THINK ABOUT TRYING THIS ! Bromine is very nasty, it will diffuse through normal rubber gloves and burns produced by it are dreadful and slow to heal. I knew a chap whose daughter merely put on contaminated gloves and she was scarred for life. I hate to think about the damage that could be caused to eyes.

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New Horizons: Pluto? Been there, done that – now for something 6.4 billion km away

Chemist
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Can I just have clarification...

about "maximum velocity of a sheep in a vacuum"

I'd assume that given enough energy the speed would be close to lightspeed. Now I do know (living surrounded by them ) that the average sheep is very unlikely to generate that amount of energy on it's own ( for a 40kg sheep at 99% lightspeed I estimate ~2.2E19 J)

Any farmers or relativists know different ?

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Oh dear, Microsoft: UK.gov signs deal with LibreOffice

Chemist
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Re: Hope they enjoy crashing and weird glitches

"Calc crashes less than Openoffice.org Calc, but is still pretty crappy."

I too use Calc for my finances ( for 8+ years OO & LO ) and far more so for scientific use. I can't recall it ever crashing !

What OS are you using ?

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UK drivers left idling as Tesla rolls out Autopilot in US

Chemist
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According to the BBC

"It should not hit pedestrians, hopefully," he told the media. "It should handle them well.""

Well he sounds so confident

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Weight, what? The perfect kilogram is nearly in Planck's grasp

Chemist
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Re: What does this mean for the "Olympic Swimming Pool/Double Decker bus" standards?

"What does this mean for the "Olympic Swimming Pool/"

As the pool is filled with essentially water it could be defined in moles

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How much do UK cops pay for Microsoft licences? £30 a head or £137? Both

Chemist
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Re: This has been going on for years

"for you as an individual, yes"

No, there are several retailers that will supply without OS, charging extra for Windows, in UK. I build my own desktops but I bought my most recent laptop (i7,8GB ) without.

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TRANSISTOR-GATE-GATE: Apple admits some iPhone 6Ses crappier than others

Chemist
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Headmaster

Re: Biased and a little bit clueless

"/pendant"

Unless you hang around a lot I think /pedant is what you meant

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Forget Ben Affleck – US, Euro boffins to SMASH spaceship into asteroid

Chemist
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Re: 5 years?!!

"5 years?!! "

Remember all the committee time to debate the styling, logos, colour schemes. Then building mock-ups, rendering obligatory animation sequences, and other press-release related activites. Then the panic about the funding shortfall due to most of the budget being spent on the aforementioned early stages requiring redesign, cutbacks on features, styling and functions..................

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THIS is MASSIVE! Less-Masslessness neutrino boffins bag Physics Nobel

Chemist
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Re: That detector . . .

". . . do you think it might be used to find the conscience of Tony Blair next?, because that's REALLY small."

Why the joke icon ?

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GCHQ's SMURF ARMY can hack smartphones, says Snowden. Again.

Chemist
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Re: @fLaMePrOoF: In the spirit of 'evidence or it didn't happen'

"It would be interesting to repeat the experiment,"

Wonder how they've managed to cope with all the trippers on the river with mere cameras ?

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Massive global cooling process discovered as Paris climate deal looms

Chemist
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Re: So-

"Chaotic system can operate within a bounded range"

Indeed a dripping tap is chaotic

http://www.nature.com/news/2000/001222/full/news001228-2.html

We should really use the phrase 'deterministic chaos' in these cases where, usually, the equations describing the phenomenon can be written but where the extreme sensitivity to initial conditions means that predictions are difficult/impossible.

Best not to use chaos when random is meant.

https://en.wikipedia.org/wiki/Chaos_theory

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Chemist
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Re: VOCs

"it's the high VOC stuff that turns yellow, the water based low VOC stuff is much whiter and stays that way. "

In my experience it's the low VOC but non-water based gloss that gives a good finish but yellows rapidly. I'd guess that to make it easy to apply the amount of VOC removed has been replaced with even more of the (necessary) binder which is what yellows.

UV probably works by getting the TiO2 pigment to oxidize the yellowing binder. Water-based, having no need for a large amount of binder stay whiter longer at the expense of poor finish

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Lies from VW: 'Our staff acted criminally but board didn't know'

Chemist
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Re: Doesn't pass the smell test

Hopefully for the last time :

Diesel MoT emission test .- only particulates are checked

http://www.ukmot.com/manual/7.4/Exhaust-Emissions-Compression-Ignition

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Herbie goes to a hackathon: Mueller promises cheatware fix

Chemist
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"but as we've learned the NOx regulations were too strict and not achievable."

Not to minimise this but Eur 6 does seem to be achievable BUT the standard is for a certain mix of simulated driving. As I've mentioned before this will never represent all the possible conditions of actual use.

In any case the actual risk to health is a function of the concentration.time product which can't be garnered from tailpipe emissions directly as it depends on so many factors. ( traffic density & speed , wind & rain, mix of HGVs vs vans vs cars, background levels of NOx from other sources [heating, industry] )

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Chemist
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"If a UK VW Passat (as an example) passed its MoT test emissions levels last year, "

What MoT emission test .? AFAIK only particulates are checked

http://www.ukmot.com/manual/7.4/Exhaust-Emissions-Compression-Ignition

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