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* Posts by Chemist

1913 posts • joined 24 Mar 2010

So long, Samsung! TSMC is fabbing Apple's A8 chip, insiders claim

Chemist
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Re: Why quad core?

"but hardly see the point for a phone or even laptop."

But I travel a lot ( 1/2 the year) with my laptop, DSLR and HD video camera. As 1080p/50 video requires masses of CPU for H264 rendering it took ~50 mins to render 1 min. of video with my old laptop ( admittedly an old Celeron) but now takes 1.7 mins for 1 min with this quad-core i7. That means I can render during the trip and don't have to spend time after. Well worth it if you spot a mistake in 10 mins of video and have to re-render.

And it's still perfectly usable during rendering for stills processing or editing more video.

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Chemist
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Re: Why quad core?

"I barely have any use for the 3rd and 4th cores in my desktop computer. Don't know why people might want them in a phone or tablet."

Well much of the time I'd agree but as I have a number of computer-intensive applications that can use multiple cores then I'd rather have them than not. I particular my video editor for 1080p/50 video and ffmpeg for transcoding video run all 8 cores (hyperthreading I know) at ~90% on this laptop and have a huge increase in speed over my best desktop ( which is overdue for replacement for this and other reasons)

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Roku flashes $50 HDMI TV web dongle at anyone sick of Google's stick

Chemist
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Re: Local content?

"A dongle that's a frontend to Myth TV or even simply VLC"

Our Samsung WiFi HD video recorder will do internet browsing & apps like iplayer, Netflix,etc,etc, but will also play/display H264/mp3/jpg from usb or a networked media server. (I'm using minidlna on Linux at the moment.)

Not a dongle, of course, but I don't see why all of these functions couldn't be easily integrated into one.

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Windows XP market share GROWS AGAIN, outstrips Win 8.1 surge

Chemist
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Re: I worry about the squirrels and otters

"ntil the Network Daemons refuse to start and nothing you do can get networking to work properly again,"

Have you got a ref. to that being a common issue ?. I don't use MInt but I have used Linux since ~1995 without an serious * network ( wireless or otherwise ) issues.

* occasionally with wireless I've had to use a different adapter until the drivers 'caught up' with the built-in chipset

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Chemist
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"Why would anyone prefer to use XP?"

One very common reason is that large businesses have standard desktop builds that support a vast array of programs, standards etc. They need a great deal of time and effort to certify a new build will support all their existing desktops. This certainly was the case at the pharma (70000+ desktops) I worked at before I retired where W2000 was the standard even in 2008/9. Not everyone can get by with Office, Exchange and a browser - we had a vast array of supported programs and that was just in the scientific areas.

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Chemist
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Re: Piss poor data?

"is that the methodology used and the resulting data is nowhere near as accurate as implied by the two decimal place precision "

Agree - and where there is this sort of time-related data (and possibly very noisy data ) where there might be a trend then the use of moving averages helps to clarify any such trend

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GNU security library GnuTLS fails on cert checks: Patch now

Chemist
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Re: The only reason this is news worthy...

"For instance when the FBI back doored the BSD IPSEC stack..."

As I've already replied (and I suspect to you)

"http://bsd.slashdot.org/story/10/12/15/004235/fbi-alleged-to-have-backdoored-openbsds-ipsec-stack"

This alleged backdoor report is 4 years old AND refers to something that might have happened in ~2000 - is this really the best you can do ?

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Chemist
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"Thanks to those who spotted, fixed it and pushed the changes to the various repositories."

Update just arrived (OpenSUSE 13.1) - echo thanks to all involved

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Hey doc, what's the PC's prognosis? A. Long-term growth below zero

Chemist
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Re: PCs are now workstations?

"if you want to sell this common professional tool"

You'll also need to adhere to common standards as well, I'd suggest

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Linux-friendly Munich: Ja, we'll take open source collab cloud

Chemist
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Re: Lucky

"Good news, everyone! KDE cookie-scoffing bug smashed after 10 years ..."

The 'bug' was so trivial nobody had even noticed it

From your ref :

"The flaw in the free-software environment is best described as a glitch or irritant rather than anything serious, but it did cause some systems to forget their web cookies after a reboot or shutdown"

Do you know how long I leave some of my desktops between reboot or shutdown ?

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Chemist
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Re: The bloke that keeps trolling these forums

"some nowhere council in a small city in a country well known.."

For economic and social innovation, the city was ranked 15th globally out of 289 cities in 2010 - guess which one ?

That's right - Munich is the third largest city in Germany, after Berlin and Hamburg. About 1.5 million people live within the city limits

Your usual standards I see.

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Chemist
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Re: @Chemist

"http://bsd.slashdot.org/story/10/12/15/004235/fbi-alleged-to-have-backdoored-openbsds-ipsec-stack"

This alleged backdoor report is 4 years old AND refers to something that might have happened in ~2000 - is this really the best you can do ?

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Chemist
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Re: @Chemist

"Open Source != bug/virus/backdoor free"

I agree, but at the same time the whole source is available. Do you suggest that intelligent programmers maybe using software tools are incapable of finding a backdoor. ? That forensic malware experts are incapable of detecting untoward traffic ?

Sure, it's possible, but between closed-source binary and open-source I know what I'd take and in fact I do take

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Chemist
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Re: Good test enviroment

"I cannot wait to see how well or poorly a big, all Linux enterprise will run after 10+"

I agree, but the 500000+ school computers in Brazil may be a more informative

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Chemist
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Re: Am I the only one who saw this??

"It looks like Germany is putting in their own backdoor and people are happy to do it "

OSS !

http://kolab.org/

http://git.kolab.org/

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Chemist
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Re: Lucky

@The Vogon - so you've actually managed NOT to tick the AC box or was it an accident ?

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Chemist
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Re: Lucky

"The user base are complaining and fighting for access to the "extra" 30% of computers that have access to a version of Office that actually works and has Outlook installed "

ref ?

Roughly 30% of users use some programs is what they say

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Chemist
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General The Register Comment

There really, really should be some way to distinguish one AC from another in any thread other than by using a posting time (apart from the obvious AC that is). Maybe AC1, AC2 just for the duration of the thread.

It would save a lot of confusion

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Chemist
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Re: Lucky

"The user base are complaining and fighting for access to the "extra" 30% of computers that have access to a version of Office that actually works"

ref ?

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Chemist
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Re: Hmm. You never......

"Here you go if the press commentary was not evidence enough:"

Here is some press commentary that provides a different picture. ( I didn't find any sig. press commentary that was supportive of the HP report )

http://techrights.org/2013/01/24/anti-munich-pr/

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Chemist
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Re: Ironic

"So they pulled it off. Maybe we should think about a similar move".

Indeed looks like a good opportunity for a consultancy business

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Chemist
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Re: Hmm. You never......

"This isnt even remotely causing MS to panic"

You are starting to sound like a set of "Monty Python" sketches - "The Spanish Inquisition" or "The Black Knight" maybe

'

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Chemist
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Re: Ironic

"24 million.."

My mistake it's 35 million !

"Success! 35 million students in over 50,000 schools throughout Brazil are now enjoying 523,400 new computer stations"

"The Brazilian Ministry of Education chose the free Linux operating system as the platform, calculating the projected long term benefits this choice will bring to the Brazilian economy."

http://userful.com/products/case-studies/brazil-case-study

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Chemist
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Re: Ironic

"14,000 users "**

Maybe not but 70000 French police, 24 million Brazilian schoolchildren and lots, lots of other projects - it's starting to stack up.

**1/4 of which are still using some MS products BTW

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Microsoft hardens EMET security tool: OK, it's not invulnerable, but it's free

Chemist
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Re: More security is a good thing

"Unfortunately, I can already hear the bearded, rabid masses of commentards flinging their spittle at this article"

Why ? I'd not criticize MS for getting their act together. In fact if you look at my posting history I rarely criticize their software at all. In fact I don't think about them at all unless I'm reminded on the Register.

(Also non-bearded and non-sandal wearing, non-basement dwelling, saliva-retaining, married scientist without Lyssavirus infection)

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UK citizens to Microsoft: Oi. We WANT ODF as our doc standard

Chemist
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"since almost any decent word processor will at least open & read pretty much any format."

And how about in 50 years time - all that will help then will be a well-documented format (so not an MS one). If you read the threads around this you'll get plenty of views on this **. Also documents are being edited on various tablets and not all of these will read every format.

**(I know you might not have had time having only joined today)

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Chemist
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Re: Thanks

": either way, if support for a format is dropped, I'm screwed."

All the more reason for well-defined non-proprietary format with a number of implementations

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Chemist
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Re: Thanks

"But if it collapsed, what then ?"

All the more reason for well-defined non-proprietary format with a number of implementations

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Chemist
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Re: Data Format, not Applications

"Yes, quite wrong, Munich for one, it's certainly the most famous one."

The French police have almost completed a move to Linux

http://www.zdnet.com/french-police-move-from-windows-to-ubuntu-linux-7000021479/

That's going to be ~70000

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Microsoft asks pals to help KILL UK gov's Open Document Format dream

Chemist
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Re: Re "Actually, I like CSV best."

"Which route did you try"

Opened the file with calc, data wizard opens , unchecked the non-relevant boxes (space, semicolon) and OK.

I generally ask collaborators for data as .csv as I've developed a lot of C over the years for handling all sorts of odd cases and often the files are millions of lines long and need some/lots of pre-processing before going anywhere near a spreadsheet (or more usually JMP)

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Chemist
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Re: Re "Actually, I like CSV best."

"Things CSVs don't work very well for:"

I just tried a few in LibreOffice Calc

test space, "test space","test,comma", test,comma, test;semi, "test";"semi"

read in as :-

test space | test space | test,comma | test | comma | test;semi | test";"semi |

where only the test,comma had been split into two columns ( as expected)

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Chemist
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Re: "why do you think posting this patently untrue and discredited nonsense ..."

"Because paid shill still has to shill."

But he/she is absolutely hopeless at it

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Chemist
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Re: UK gov, Beware the Microsoft Trojan Horse

"The current losses including all underlying costs are estimated at about €30 million and the project is unlikely to ever make a return on investment blah, blah"

My we are getting desperate, the tone of this thread as been overwhelmingly pro-open standards and to some extent anti-MS. So why do you think posting this patently untrue and discredited nonsense will sway anyone here ?

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Chemist
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Re: Format

"I doubt your competence to make such statements."

I doubt his impartiality to make such statements.

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Chemist
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"The letter further accuses the Cabinet Office of backing ODF primarily out of a desire to save money on software by switching to open-source applications"

This bad because ?

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Sanity now: Gnome 3.12 looking sensible - at least in beta

Chemist
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Re: Amazing what a bit of competition can do

"You will, of course, cite Munich"

You treat people here as though they were stupid with the memory span of a gnat. You post this drivel week after week.

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Better late than never: Monster 15-core Xeon chips let loose by Intel

Chemist
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"

"Server 2012 R2 would top the pile...."

of ?

Probably good for growing mushrooms then.

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Toshiba Encore: The Windows 8.1 tablet that might catch on

Chemist
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AFAIK the processor is 64 bit

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Help! Apple has snaffled the WHOLE WORLD'S supply of sapphire glass

Chemist
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Re: Sapphire Glass isn't...

"But what's an oxide between friends"

In the case of aluminium - abrasive !

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Whitehall and Microsoft negotiate NHS Windows XP hacker survival plan

Chemist
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Re: Such a shame we dont have

"Maybe they read the same third party report that assesses the true Munich project costs to date"

I'm sure they did but they seem to be the only ones to believe this 'unbiased' offering.

This is the third time you've raised the same nonsense in this one topic as well as countless times before.

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Chemist
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Re: Such a shame we dont have

"It would likely have cost more. Look at Munich - over 1/3 of users still have to use Windows after 10 years of migration blah, blah....."

Do you know someone has already spouted that cr*p earlier - do you know them ?

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Chemist
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Re: Why are we paying for this?

" Look at the Munich farce - It cost them ~ €30 million more to migrate to Open Source than to update Windows"

You have mentioned this before (again & again) , no evidence other than MS supplied 'evidence' whereas Munich ave been quite open about it. No-one believed you then and no-one does now.

BTW didn't you get your post bounced a week or so ago for repetitive trolling ?

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Friends don't do tech support for friends running Windows XP

Chemist
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"Its ram usage would just shoot up, for no good reason that I could see until the machine gave up and hung"

Can't imagine what this was. I've used Linux versions for file/print/media serving purposes since the mid-90s and never seen anything like that. In fact my file/print server has only failed once in all that time and that was hardware (MB capacitor). The current physical machine is a dual-core Atom (for low power as it runs all the time) with 2GB memory - apart from a little hardware upgrade and reboots for new kernels/OS versions it's been running non-stop for 3+ years. I've never even heard of nfsd behaving like this - anyone else ?

As for arcane installation requirements I've just upgraded 1 netbook, 2laptops, a desktop and the fileserver to OpenSUSE 13.1 without any issues apart from a systemd related issue with CUPS (now solved). The install to one laptop was to a new quad core i7 from a USBLive pendrive and took 7-8 mins.

Now I'm not an IT prof. and I can understand a business wanting a prof. supplied solution but I can't imagine what sort of cowboys supplied your system.

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Open MPI hits milestone with FORTRAN-ready 1.7.4 release

Chemist
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Re: Fortran, indeed

"Fortran has it's limitations"

Whilst I'd never write anything completely new in Fortran one of it's big advantages is that there are masses of very-well debugged programs/routines that are readily available to use & modify.

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CERN outlines plan for new 100km circumference supercollider

Chemist
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Re: Why not space?

"Why not space?"

WHAT ! You do realise that the whole structure is inside electromagnets - are you going to put those in a complete ring round the earth ?

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UK spooks STILL won't release Bletchley Park secrets 70 years on

Chemist
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"I wonder what kind of computing industry we would have now if they hadn't kept this secret for so long?"

Well, given that by 1948 Manchester Uni.had developed the 'Baby' which was stored-program and all-electronic I don't think it held anyone up long - indeed the speed of improvement was impressive with the full Mk1 being available by 1949 and a commercial version from Ferranti by 1951

Incidently Turing wrote the third program for the 'baby' which was for long division.

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Life support's ABOUT to be switched off, but XP's suddenly COOL again

Chemist
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Re: @Chemist

"unsafe non-Web Internet addresses."

Whilst I agree that you do still need a mechanism. Normal updating of a Linux distro would seem to me to be one of the less risky behaviours

I think it unlikely that just running an update mechanism as root and everything else as a user will result in harm. The real no-no would be running a desktop session as root and behaving like a user

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Chemist
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"Anyone using Linux who has to do system admin work that involves (as it all too often does nowadays) network access"

Network access != "browsing internet" For installations and upgrades I'm running the process (Yast in my case) as root but I'm browsing any necessary extra info as a normal user Yast is going to predefined repositories, IF these have been tampered with well that's a very different matter

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