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* Posts by Chemist

1964 posts • joined 24 Mar 2010

Cycle fires up 50,000-core HPC cluster on Amazon EC2

Chemist
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Good luck

Having spent the last few years doing just this sort of thing I must explain that it's REALLY hard. Not to get software to filter out the 'best binding' ligands but to find that reality rather foolishly doesn't agree with the output.

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Lesser-spotted Raspberry Pi FINALLY dished up

Chemist
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Re: You want hardcore?

"MK14."

Got one , 256 BYTES of RAM, raw machine code programming, hideous instruction set, hex keypad and calculator display output

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Death Star dinosaur aliens could rule galaxy

Chemist
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Re: Astrosaurs

"I prefer the idea that most of the dinosaurs left before the extinction event."

You may prefer it but it is now known that it was the DOLPHINS that left (playfully) before the extinction event

Cheers Douglas

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Windows XP support ends two years from now

Chemist
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Re: Migrate before ...

"can you shove in a disc and let it do the set-up work for you? No."

That's what I've done for years with Suse & OpenSuse. since ~2000 - must run to a good few dozen installs by now as I currently have 6 machines

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550,000-strong army of Mac zombies spreads across world

Chemist
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Re: lol

"Linux viruses in the wild"

I didn't actually say that - the known viruses are more curiosities, they never spread far as the architecture is rather unfriendly. Most of the antiviruses look for Windows viruses to stop them being passed on.

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Chemist
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Re: lol

"dodgy stuff" account, you're still infected."

"dodgy account " is still infected true but it's all just still extra layers of defence. Other accounts will not be so 'safe' account is still less vulnerable. Of course if a further vuln. allow escalation then that is a different matter.

"dodgy account" by the way is deleted/recreated at weekly intervals

Too complex a topic to describe in detail here but LONG complex passwords, multiple accounts, firewalls, NAT routers, Firefox/Noscript/ABP and a lot of other techniques alongside using Linux have kept me safe over the years.

Keeping an eye on the logs is useful. I esp. look for SSH attempts which is my only open port ( protected by unusual port number, one unusual account name and a long, difficult password)

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Chemist
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Re: lol

It's well known that Unix/Linux systems can get viruses - the difference has been that they've never become a widespread problem.

In any case if you want to be more sure in a Unix type OS use different accounts for different things.

I have an account I ONLY use for really important stuff like banking and another for for visiting sites that MIGHT be dubious. It's so easy to switch why not. Unless you can't be ars*d in which case you deserve all you get.

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Top Italian OPERA boffin steps down after faster-than-light mistake

Chemist
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Re: Quantum mechanics disproves Einstein's special theory of relativity.

@Destroy...

Agree heartily with your comment

http://scienceworld.wolfram.com/physics/QuantumElectrodynamics.html

"Quantum electrodynamics is a generalization of quantum mechanics to include special relativity. Its governing equations are ....."

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Chemist
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Re: The Failure

"it should still have been presented in a very cautious way,"

It was originally presented in a VERY cautious way but the media ( as usual) hyped it

OPERA is an experiment at Gran Sasso and really all CERN did was provide the neutrinos

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Chemist
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Sounds more like ...

there has been a lot of strain in the OPERA collaboration - it's a big experiment (1300 tonnes) and a large, varied team. Measuring neutrino velocity wasn't the major reason for OPERA in any case - it was intended to look at neutrino oscillations from one type to another.

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Hard-up Iceland plumps for cheaper open source

Chemist
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Re: Free stuff

"I have nothing against it" & "not great for anything other than hobbiests or home users"

I think you might have something against it if you ignore the vast numbers of commercial Linux webservers and the large number of scientist and technologists who use Linux etc.

I think it's seen as quite good for supercomputers as well

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Record-breaking laser pulse boosts fusion power hopes

Chemist
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Re: "or do I err?"

Are you actually asking a serious question ?

That's why AC said "it's equivalent to 1000* the US consumption" NOT the US consumption. As others have noted it's only a couple of MJ anyway and that is probably built up in the capacitors over a period.

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Hong Kong scientists claim 'self-charging' graphene battery

Chemist
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@MadChemist

I had a quick look at the full paper and it's rather hard to see what is being exposed to electrolyte.

The electrolyte mostly being used is Cu(II) Cl2 but the suggestion seems to be that it's the graphene being exposed whilst the gold and silver electrodes are sealed away from the electrolyte.

My guess would be a slight leak, maybe impurities in the silver or some slight copper plating and the Cu(II)/Cu(0) pair.

Scarcely worth speculating if it can't be repeated

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Windows 8 tablet freezes in Microsoft keynote demo

Chemist
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Re: So what /should/ have been done?

I've certainly never known it NOT to work - except when a keyboard connection failed/or pulled out.

Oddly enough that always used to need a reboot - recently though it just seems to accept the keyboard being replugged - I've not tested it rigorously though

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Chemist
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Re: So what /should/ have been done?

"And hope that when X starts post-boot it doesn't freeze again."

Don't let it start X when you reboot ! - an installation that you can't bring up as a terminal session if you want to is a royal pain when hardware gives problems.

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BBC Micro team to celebrate historic machine's 30th year

Chemist
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Re: 6809

Reason I'm so keen is I've still got a couple - I made a home-brew FORTH system years ago, own boards, disk drivers the lot - great experience -it still works even though I've now virtualized the terminal and disk. Cranked it up a year or two ago to experiment with replacing one of the serial ports with a PIC microcontroller programmed to emulate a 6850 which worked a treat.

Great processor esp. for FORTH as it had an architecture/instruction set that matched the FORTH machines requirements. Great to program in assembler with its position independent code ( subset of the instruction set)

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Chemist
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Re: Bloody Noobies...

Ah, 6809 - Yes !

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Now CHINA complains of surge in cyber-attacks

Chemist
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Only looked at my router logs this morning

Usual load of Chinese scans of usual ports ( all closed/stealthed)

One persistent sod scanning the same ports from the same IP for weeks now.

My only open port is for SSH and that's a very high number - so far no-one has ever scanned that.

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More evidence that neutrinos are NOT faster than light

Chemist
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Re: still quite impressive

a) The mass in not known but is expected to be real but very small and therefore it cannot actually reach c although it may get very close and the closer it gets the higher its energy.

b) The neutrino (which needs to have a certain minimum energy) needs to 'hit a proton head-on" which generates a neutron and a positron. The positron then combines with an electron and generates two photons. Some detectors have relied on detecting the pairs of photos but the argon, I think, acts as a bubble chamber detecting the energetic charged positron before it is destroyed.

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Chemist
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Re: still quite impressive

@James Loughner

"why do they not have a huge energy/mass???"

We don't know how fast they are going or their exact mass but their energy will fit the SR equations - they will not be traveling at the speed of light but they could be close enough to make measuring the difference pretty difficult

@Christoph

"Maybe only a very little bit slower, but shouldn't it be measurable"

Depends on the accuracy they can measure to - the time differences could be REALLY small

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Chemist
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Re: still quite impressive

On the other hand it's only dense rock because most matter interacts well with it as does light - neutrinos don't which is why the ICARUS experiment used 600 tonnes of liquid argon in an attempt to detect a tiny percentage of the beam and why the many billions per cm^2 that arrive from the sun every second don't pose a significant biological risk. ( although anyone that is worried about that needs to wear a VERY thick tinfoil hat)

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ARM's ultra-low-power fridge-puter chips: Just what the CIA ordered

Chemist
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Re: You seem to've dropped a zero

Charles Moore's original FORTH hardware design was only 4000 gates

"The NC4016 is implemented using fewer than 4000 gates on a 3.0 micron HCMOS gate array technology"

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Charge of the Metro brigade: Did Microsoft execs plan to take a hit?

Chemist
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Re: Not a chance @vic

If this had been a support forum I would have suggested using a LiveCD to check out the hardware/boot as a first step.

I am sick of unverifiable posters saying things about Gnu/Linux that I know to be not so. The list is almost endless - HD video doesn't work, 3G dongles don't work, hardware-assisted H264 video playback doesn't work. - They all do - not on just one machine but all the machines I try them on.

On another point the consumer as we know buys a Windows machine preconfigured - no option -hopefully all the snags are sorted. If they add any hardware the same problems crop up - many people will have no difficulty, some will. Linux is no different. All the people (mostly seniors) that I've installed Linux for have no difficulty using it

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Chemist
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Re: Not a chance @vic

"These days, it's frequently easier in Linux than it is in Windows"

Agree entirely Vic, if you can't get a good Linux distro to install then you are doing something wrong.

Everything I've installed on in the last 5 years (~ 10 installs of OpenSuse) has worked without any problems and that includes all graphics cards, printers, scanner, 3G dongle, USB/serial converters, cameras, firewire devices.

(I did buy a new Canon 55OD where raw mode wasn't supported on the resident version of OpenSuse but the upgraded packages were available and just had to be installed.)

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Apple iPad 3 packs LAPTOP battery

Chemist
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"that thing called physics"

and chemistry !

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Mobile banking security bypassed in fiendish malware blag

Chemist
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Re: Actually this is a big problem...

My mobile operator requires a password for ANYTHING. Certainly for changing phone/SIM

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Chemist
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Re: This sounds silly...

I've also got a UBS account. Even if somehow you get hold of a replacement card you'd still need the personal agreement number and 6 digit PIN as well as the card reader.

I'd guess they wouldn't send you a card without the agreement number.

I think it's the best method I've seen although I'm fairly happy with the hideous 20 digit passwords I use for my other accounts.

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Why Windows 8 server is a game-changer

Chemist
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Re: seems a bit arse about face to me

"A lot of us actually do real work on Linux "desktops""

Ditto in science

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NASA orders study for all astronauts over vision concerns

Chemist
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"few minutes at 3-4G "

I don't think that is what they are saying. The evidence points to possible fluid accumulation in the brain during zero-g is compressing the eyeball - doesn't sound healthy.

"William Tarver, the chief of flight medicine clinic at Nasa's Johnson Space Center, said the results were suspicious but not conclusive of intracranial hypertension."

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Chemist
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Re: *

If by "perigrination" you mean the act of travelling or moving you've spelt it wrong

I don't want to labour the point but on Earth the difference in gravity head to feet is very small but standing in a modest sized centrifuge it would be quite large. Lying down wouldn't stress the bones and muscles.

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Chemist
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Re: half gravity = f half the effect?

"were you to build a centrifuge for the 'nauts"

To be physiological and counter the other BAD effects like bone loss and muscle wasting I'd guess that they would need to be able to stand and move around in it. Problem then is unless the diameter is large compared to body length the differential effect* between head and feet will cause problems.

* Force at head less than force at feet

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Intel Xeon E5s pruned for single-socket workstations

Chemist
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"old-fashioned, heavy-duty, desktop machines that are still called workstations"

or genuinely useful as they are more generally described

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Warp drives are PLANET KILLERS, Sydney Uni students find

Chemist
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Re: "Einstein's theory of relativity will be 100 years old very soon....."

"hot and cold"

A unit of hot gas has higher pressure than the same amount of colder gas.

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Chemist
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"Einstein's theory of relativity will be 100 years old very soon....."

So ?

Thermodynamics have an even longer history. There's no indications that anyone will ever be able to produce a perpetual motion machine.

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Chemist
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Re: "every GPS enabled mobile phone contains a relativity corrector"

If it didn't correct for relativity the lat/long would be way out

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Metro breakdown! Windows 8 UI is little gain for lots of pain

Chemist
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Re: Hey people MS have an "ecology" to support

And people wonder about others 'banging on' about Macs and Linux.

Microsoft can do almost what they want and little can be done about it. Competition is the only thing that they fear and that will make them produce what people want.

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Microsoft drops 'risky' Windows 8 preview on World

Chemist
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Re: Windows 9? If I must use it, I'll switch to (Windows 8) Classic Mode.

@Chad H.

Are you stupid ?

I said I'd rather have improvement not just change (Hint : triangular wheels would NOT be an improvement because the ride would be bad )

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Chemist
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Re: @Chemist

My original post which didn't mention MS (other than in the auto-generated title) was :

{

"If you're change adverse, then perhaps IT isn't the right industry for you."

I want improvement not just change !

}

The comment was a general one - too often mere change is seen as a good thing when real improvement is what most people want.

I'd like all OSs to improve because I don't want any sort of monoculture - I make the choice to use Linux - I certainly wouldn't want to constrain other users.

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Chemist
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Re: Windows 9? If I must use it, I'll switch to (Windows 8) Classic Mode.

"If you're change adverse, then perhaps IT isn't the right industry for you."

I want improvement not just change !

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Tick-like banking Trojan drills into Firefox, sucks out info

Chemist
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Re: Correction - firefox on MS's rubbish OS's

@boltar

Don't know who's downvoting you but they are wrong

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Chemist
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Re: Re: Correction - firefox on MS's rubbish OS's

It goes like this :

On my system firefox-bin has permissions rwxr-xr-x and the owner is root.

So only root can change the file but all users can execute it. Hope that helps. No password needed to run Firefox

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'Kill yourself now' - Torvalds throws openSUSE security tantrum

Chemist
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Re: Re: Linus is right.

"The root password is the same as the first user's?"

No - root's password defaults to the first users UNLESS you change it as part of the setting-up process. I agree it would be better if it was explicitly required to be different.

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ZeuS Trojan embraces P2P – becomes even more sneaky and sticky

Chemist
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Re: @Bill Neal

"Does the laptop owner or you know how she got it?"

I got this recently as a .zip attachment supposedly from Fedex. The unzipped file was an .exe . Only unzipped it out of curiosity & in any case I'm using Linux. I don't know if it would autoexecute on unzipping in Windows.

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Death to Office or to Windows - choose wisely, Microsoft

Chemist
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Re: Re: Re: Re: "Windows is dead."

I think the problem is the assumption that Linux isn't used much or that users "must still have Windows to be able to survive". You may not know many scientist but of course I do and even in my last company ~200 computational chemists had Unix or Linux workstations without Windows. To get the corporate crap we also had Windows machines.

I also know Linux is heavily used by scientific academics. Good luck with the course !

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Chemist
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Re: What are PCs used for?

"Do you really do protein modeling on the train"

Well I used to drive to work - but let's suppose I did have a train journey.

With a laptop and internet connection I could do all the preliminary work, search databases, match protein sequences and set-up initial conditions. I could transfer the data to a compute server or a Linux farm and start the the simulation.

The main reason for a desktop workstation would then be be to analyse the output ( in 3D using liquid xtal shutter specs). This being a few years ago that would rule out a laptop - maybe even now.

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Chemist
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Re: @ChrisBedford

ps

I DON'T have any copies of WIndows - I will admit I threw away 5 DOS 5.0 disks last time I had a good clear-out

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Chemist
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@ChrisBedford

Welcome to The Register !

Although I've had an interest in computing that goes back a long way ( I was taught physics by a guy who had worked on the Manchester 'baby' as a post grad) I can only say that the credit in using Linux for everything goes to the countless people who have worked on the kernel, written the GNU tools and assembled the distros.

Installing a modern distro ( I use OpenSuse ) is simple - FAR easier than Windows - but of course not many users do that do they ?.

If 90% of Windows users are incapable of using Linux I'd say they were also incapable of using Windows - I don't see the difference in easy of use. OpenSuse installs with no fuss, a good selection of user programs and no user involvement other than ticking boxes, accepting defaults and choosing language.

I simply can't believe that people who otherwise wouldn't dream of having their choice restricted to one car, one supermarket, one smartphone or whatever will blindly accept 1 OS.

Back in the eighties all sorts and manner of people got involved with a wide, wide range of micros, wrote software, built hardware, became professionals and yet now 90% of Windows users can't cope with anything else - rubbish - and IF that's true then it's the monopoly of MS that has brought it about.

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