* Posts by Chemist

1991 posts • joined 24 Mar 2010

Is lightspeed really a limit?

Chemist
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Re: @Chemist

"but it may be possible to be beyond the speed of light, in which case the object in question would have to have negative mass/energy."

I point this out below somewhere although earlier in the day.

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Chemist
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Re: Limits.

@Androgynous Cupboard

I do appreciate a well-reasoned argument. How about you provide one

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Chemist
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Re: It's my understanding.....

That's because 'your' maths isn't valid. This isn't linear that's the whole point. I suggest you read a little SR

To get 1kg to 0.99c needs ~5E17 J

To get 1kg to 0.999c needs ~2E18J

To get 1kg to 0.99999c needs ~2E19J

as v->c , energy -> infinite

Even the LHC can't accelerate it's minute mass of protons to c and that uses a colossal amount of energy.

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Chemist
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Re: Limits.

"http://en.wikipedia.org/wiki/Negative_temperature"

Now that you've found it try reading it and understanding what it actually means - here's a snipette :-

"by contrast a system with a truly negative temperature in absolute terms on the kelvin scale is hotter than any system with a positive temperature. If a negative-temperature system and a positive-temperature system come in contact, heat will flow from the negative- to the positive-temperature system."

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Chemist
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Re: Limits.

I know it's by definition but it's amazing how many, otherwise intelligent well-educate people, think that it's just something that will be overcome as we learn more.

Incidently there may be a potentially max. temp. around 1E32K where physics breaks down so that all predictions fail.

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Chemist
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Re: Limits.

So several downvoters appear to believe that < absolute zero is a perfectly reasonable concept ?

Science education is appalling !

Absolute zero IS one of the limits - certainly in this universe

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Chemist
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Re: Limits.

"A shadow can travel (or be perceived to at any rate) faster than light. Not terribly functional mind."

As can the spot of light from a rotating laser at sufficient radius - but it's not the same as FTL

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Chemist
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Re: Limits.

Why not suggest going below absolute zero as well (Hint : below absolute zero doesn't mean anything )

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Chemist
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It's my understanding.....

that nothing in SR forbids FTL - just that approaching c from either direction requires infinite energy for anything with non-zero mass. It does, however, hint that anything that is traveling at c+ is a very strange beast indeed

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Big Blue bigwig: Tiny processor knobs can't shrink forever

Chemist
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"even long enough for someone to figure out how to shrink atoms down to a more convenient size"

Sorry this universe's parameters are so inconvenient - but it's the only one we've got at the moment

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Linux on ARM breakthrough to take away Torvalds' arse pain

Chemist
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Re: But wait

"Please refrain from feeding the troll"

Well I know what you mean but some people are SO ignorant about Linux that it's quite hard sometimes to tell them apart from trolls

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Chemist
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Re: But wait

"and least used OS "

What !!

(Hint : 1% of the DESKTOP market )

(Hint: think phones, routers, video recorders, televisions and supercomputers, servers.....)

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Astroboffins to search for mega-massive alien power plants

Chemist
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Re: Congratulations

12v does NOT = 0.012kw and the rest of your absurd ramblings make even less sense.

Troll or fool - it's hard to say

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Politico's locked room mystery Linux install crime solved

Chemist
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Re: On the other hand ..

""corrupted and erased the hard-drive of the campaign computer server"

I quote The Register - who they quoted is anyone's guess.

In my amateur experience using Linux as a file/printer/compute/web server is easy.

( of course I'm not a politician )

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Chemist
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On the other hand ..

a Linux installation can only improve his server

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They said it wasn't right for biz - but Samsung unveils TLC SSD

Chemist
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Re: How I learned to stop worrying and love TLC

"When SSD's come along, guaranteeing data destruction isn't going to be as easy.

"

BLOWLAMP !

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Chemist
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Re: How I learned to stop worrying and love TLC

"from time to time, be spectacular data loss incidents."

And this differs from HDD how ?

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Microsoft Research man: It all starts with touch

Chemist
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"be a good idea that companies are not allowed to patent an idea "

Ideas are NOT patentable - at least in sensible countries- only implementations are patentable. I can't patent an idea for treating a disease for example but I can patent a chemical entity that has some effect that might be useful in treating that disease, even if it turns out to be not so useful in practice due to side-effects or unrealistic doses or whatever.

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Pirate Party takes Mayor's chair in Swiss city

Chemist
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" Pirate Party takes Mayor's chair in Swiss city"

City ? Population about 1500 !

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NASA working on faster-than-light drive capable of WARP TEN

Chemist
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"Add to that the fact radio transmissions travel a little slower than the speed of light"

I think I'd alert a physicist about that !

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The Jupiter Ace is 30

Chemist
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Re: Some Forth:

Sorry, should qualify, that's for indirect threaded code as per most early 8-bit Forths

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Chemist
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Re: Some Forth:

No, most 8 bit forths need to JSR which , of course, can be a variable length routine depending on processsor. With the 6809 the actual code to implement NEXT is 4 bytes and can be put in-line saving the sub-routine call at the expense of slightly longer code

LDX 0,Y++

JMP [0,X]

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Chemist
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Re: Some Forth:

I'm more impressed by NEXT in 6809 assembler - 4 bytes !

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Microsoft preparing for diskless Windows 8 PCs

Chemist
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Re: USB 2.0

"I get a desktop up very quickly."

Ditto

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Windows Server 2012: Fickle pricing smacks Europe, Oz, Japan

Chemist
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Re: "Can you think of a reason they [Microsoft] can get away with this?" ....

I've only use Linux but that's not the point at all.

If you've backed yourself into being dependent on Windows ( or anything else) that is a de facto monopoly, even if it's largely self-inflicted.

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Chemist
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"Can you think of a reason they [Microsoft] can get away with this?" ....

Simple - if you MUST buy Windows Server then it's a de facto monopoly - they could charge what they want

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Old men who use computers less likely to get dementia

Chemist
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Re: NOOooooooo!

Excellent - many thanks.

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Chemist
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Re: NOOooooooo!

I know what you mean - I was taught Physics by a guy who had worked on the Manchester "baby" - he had a photo showing him stripped to the waist working in a cellar surrounded by racks of valves.

I thin Douglas Adams sums it up very well in a passage that kind of parodies the "Seven Ages of Man" speech from "As You Like It" but I can't just put my hand on just now. It's along the lines of - a technology that's invented when you reach a certain age is new and exciting and you could possibly get a job working with it ..........

I'm sure someone will have the passage off by heart

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Chemist
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Re: NOOooooooo!

I can only repeat :-

"What do old people know about computers apart from the fact they invented them"

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Windows 7 passes XP, Mac OS X passes Vista

Chemist
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Re: What amazes me...

"Linux is unusable - even if you are a computer bod you actually want to use your computer to achieve something, this just isn't possible with an OS so full of holes, problems.."

I don't recognise any of this !

It's certainly totally usable for me and mine, we don't use anything else. It was usable ( in fact essential) for the major pharmaceutical company I worked for and that was 8-9 years ago.

This is the usual ignorance or FUD

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Torvalds bellows: 'The GNOME PEOPLE are in TOTAL DENIAL'

Chemist
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Re: The actual reason Linux has never seen mainstream successful on the desktop...

"it's a disjointed pile of mish-mashed shit"

Strange then that I can read your wise words at all as OpenSuse is on all 6 of my computers and gives me a stable productive environment to support my many interests. There isn't one single thing I want to do that I can't do. Updates are automatic and easy, I don't have one piece of hardware that isn't supported - webcams, scanner, 2 printers, USB/serial converters, video acceleration, 3G dongle, wifi. A little bit of research before buying and sticking with a reliable distro has worked well for me.

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Elon Musk says he's planning a 'supersonic, electric hover jetplane'

Chemist
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Re: Electric jet

"but with a really big electric heater "

And the really LARGE amount of electricity ?

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Thanks ever so much Java, for that biz-wide rootkit infection

Chemist
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Re: Lets not just blame java here

"Richto; who is paying you and how much?"

Trevor - I really can't believe ANYONE would pay RICHTO to produce the sort of babbling that he does.

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Chemist
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Re: "And running any platform without some antivirus software is reckles at best, idiotic at worst."

@Richto - from your link - final paragraph

"We should close by saying that the number of Linux viruses that could possibly damage your system in any way is currently less than 10, so don't have any nightmares"

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Now Apple wants Samsung S III, Galaxy Notes off the shelves too

Chemist
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"Except that in the US patent can be renewed"

It can't !

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Wireless Power breakthrough: Iron Man can lose the chest reactor

Chemist
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"Nikola Tesla? I'm going to go out on a limb and guess that they have expired."

If they are relevant they are still prior art though

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Curiosity parks for a day, looks back in wonder

Chemist
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"He could have been writing Vogon poetry... "

No wonder he was depressed !

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Patent flame storm: Reg hack biteback in reader-pack sack attack

Chemist
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Patent examination

I certainly know from all the patents I filed that writing them was HARD work and the UK patent office in particular would be VERY picky about potentially related prior patents.

(Although all this Apple/Samsung stuff isn't really about what most people would call inventions anyway)

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Chemist
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Skilled in the art

"supposed not to be granted if the "invention" would be "obvious to a practitioner skilled in the art"; sadly virtually all patents that are granted would fail that test."

The first part is true - the second is rubbish.

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'FIRST ever' Linux, Mac OS X-only password sniffing Trojan spotted

Chemist
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Re: Linux trojan ? Utter rubbish!

Any fool can install a trojan - so you should have no trouble !

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Microsoft denies Windows 8 app spying via SmartScreen

Chemist
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"why is Linux marketshare so poor?"

Well let's try and work it out.

Essentially all computers come with Windows installed. To have Linux you either :

1) Build your own computer from parts

2) Delete Windows ( which has been paid for) and install Linux

3) Try and find a retailer who isn't cowed and buy from them

4) Get a second-hand machine/hard-drive broken machine and fix and install (really a variant of 1 but useful for laptops)

Given that most people don't even know about alternative operating system and most others have to put up with what their employers/school whatever provide I think 1% of desktops using Linux is actual a very creditable number.

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We're raising generations of MUTANT KIDS, says Icelandic study

Chemist
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AFAIK

They have a relatively stable population AND well-recorded health data.

So data-mining for health trends/associations is well worth while.

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D-Wave goes public with 81-qubit protein modeling

Chemist
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Re: Note their goal is to demonstrate the *tech*, not actually solve a problem.

LOTS of heuristics are used.

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Chemist
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Re: Well ...

The problem is really basic science. It's possible now to homology model a modest single domain protein in a few hours even on a desktop workstation. Understanding how the current algorithms and model assumptions fail is MUCH harder. In the end a protein is a dynamic entity and that makes it all much harder.

A few years ago I was interested in a kinase enzyme. A xtal structure was available but the reality turned out that the protein was in dynamic equilibrium between ( at least ) two forms. One was equivalent to the xtal structure, the other was a form that could be activated to give the (unstable) working form - what the structure of that was ???.

The whole reason to model proteins is to make use of the information gained - a fast method of getting the wrong, non-physiological answer is useless on it's own. I'm very optimistic really but there are many problems to solve that don't depend on calculation speed.

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Chemist
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Re: Well ...

"protein folding calculation"

It's not a 'calculation' really -just a series of relatively poor algorithms. Huge strides in the basic science have taken place in recent years - these have been assisted by the huge increase in processing power but it's all still far from routine - it's often (relatively) easy to fold a new protein if it has homology to a known structure but even in that 'easy' case it's often found that the optimized solution is still a poor fit to the eventual x-ray structure.

Even x-ray structures, produced as they are at very low temperatures in the solid state may not reflect the 'real' situation in vivo, where the protein is in aqueous solution and may well be associated metal ions (esp. calcium) AND other proteins AND be in dynamic equilibrium with various conformations of itself.

So great if the number crunching can be massively speeded-up but in all other respects there is still a long way to go.

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Disney sitcom says open source is insecure

Chemist
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Re: "“Did you use open source code to save time, and the virus was hidden in it?”"

" How many people using open source software actually know how to read the code to see what it does"

How many people using closed source software actually know what it does - fixed that for you

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Chemist
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"“Did you use open source code to save time, and the virus was hidden in it?”"

Open and hidden in the same sentence - interesting dichotomy - some new version of open source I've not come across before.

Beneath contempt !

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