* Posts by Chemist

1990 posts • joined 24 Mar 2010

US Copyright Office approves phone jailbreaking and video remixes

Chemist
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Re: Why does anyone outside the US care?

"USA law does apply globally."

This is nonsense - IF someone commits an offense in the US either in person or remotely then the law will apply. If someone commits the same act in another country then that is a different matter unless there is some treaty in place to cover this.

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Windows 8: An awful lot of change for a single release

Chemist
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"Seen plenty of kernel panics in my time too"

Not seen any since the days of having to compile the kernel - so late 90's ? - ghost processes, or rather zombies - sometimes but that's generally other software not the OS and indeed they get reaped anyway.

You really should keep up-to-date or better still silent !

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Chemist
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Re: Steady decline

"constant twatting about with sudo and command lines. "

FUD

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Chemist
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Re: Security @RICHTO

Certainly I remember that Windows 2000 crashed frequently using large Excel sheets or complex Word documents

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Chemist
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Re: Steady decline

"you need sudo to get things like popular wifi adapters to work"

Not on Opensuse. I've used if for years with all manner of hardware and hardly ever use sudo or indeed root other than to authorize updates or system changes. I'm currently running 4 wifi adaptors and a 3G dongle without any issues

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Chemist
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Re: Steady decline

"Linux - You still have to compile most things!"

@RICHTO - you usually claim that you have 'evidence' for the rubbish you spout.

I call on all fair-minded, informed users here to refute the nonsense that is you claiming that most things need to be compiled to install Linux. Almost all installs of Linux require NO compiling and that's for the complete system (OS and applications).

You really are pathetic !

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Gaping network port with easy-to-guess password? You ARE the 79%

Chemist
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Re: Get attacks at SSH all the time...

Just to mention the ONLY port that is forwarded from the router is the unusual SSH so it shouldn't respond. All others are closed

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Chemist
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Re: Get attacks at SSH all the time...

Well using Firefox it shows nothing at all but add the actual port number it responds : - SSH-2.0-OpenSSH_5.8

Ditto with Konqueror

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Chemist
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Re: Get attacks at SSH all the time...

"Don't open ports for any services. Use OpenVPN or some other VPN instead."

Not an area I've done anything with other than setting up remote access via a vpn to my wife's school's computer but surely I'd need to have an open port to access my server via OpenVPN.

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Chemist
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Re: Get attacks at SSH all the time...

Well I salute your solutions. I leave it open for a number of reasons but mostly recently proxying from our holiday home in Switzerland to watch iplayer. I did toy with setting a flag file on my web-site (on my ISPs server) and having (my) server scripts check that for a variety of reasons ( I have a PIC microcontroller that's controlled from my server that can do remote measurements like the house temp and remote switch on/off of kit) but so far non-standard port/username and really horrible password + up-to-date SSHD seems fine.

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Chemist
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Get attacks at SSH all the time...

but I've got a non-standard port, the router redirects to my server where the only allowed user for SSH login has a VERY non-standard username and 20 digit 'difficult' password and I still check the logs. Almost all attackers go for the standard ports.

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Microsoft has no plans for a second Windows 7 Service Pack

Chemist
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Re: Learning from XP

Me: "I want a set of brake pads for a 2004 Astra please"

I had a related experience many years ago

"can I have a steering wheel bearing for a 1972 Viva" - " Sorry we don't stock them there's no demand, you'll need to order it, I said the same thing this morning to a guy that wanted one "

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Is lightspeed really a limit?

Chemist
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Re: @Chemist

Suggest you read-up on this - the predictions are all very weird but many have been experimentally confirmed.

Wikipedia's Special Relativity is reasonable as is Time dilation

If you are on a craft at near c the light you measure ( from the TV or otherwise) will be measured as traveling at c - that's the cornerstone of SR - the observer will always measure light - ANY light - as traveling at c. To reconcile the problems that brings up other measurement s have to give way - in particular time varies.

This may all sound silly but experiments all agree. Sub-atomic particles with a known short lifetime last longer at high speed and do so by exactly the amount that SR predicts.

Further down this topic someone mentions that IF a craft could reach close to c the traveler inside could tour the galaxy in a short time by their measure although thousands of years might have passed on Earth

Incidently GR also predicts time changes due to gravity, the closer to a large mass the slower time runs - these effects are also measured as predicted.

It's a weird universe.

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Chemist
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Re: Am I On Youtube?

"everyone has an opinion that "speculates" one way or another."

So why waste your time posting here - your speculation is obviously as good as anyone's .

I can understand it if you have no interest in this but simply to spout uninformed guff and then claim it's all too boring and anyway 'nobody knows' is juvenile in the extreme. It's clear from your posts that you've never tried to educate yourself about this other than by asking naive questions here and then complaining when you didn't understand the answers

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Chemist
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Re: Limits.

" drawing a comparison with a value which BY DEFINITION "

Here's an experiment, you don' know anything about absolute zero, you have a good thermometer reading to low temperatures - doesn't matter what the scale reads in. You build various kinds of kit to produce lower and lower temps. At a certain point, to your amazement, the temperature doesn't go down anymore.

You have reached a limit - the same throughout the universe - we merely define that as 0 K.

In another universe with different parameters the limit will likely be different.

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Chemist
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Re: @Destroy All Monsters - "humans limited forever"

"you can get anywhere you like as fast as you want"

Assuming you have a means of generating the vast amount of energy required. - otherwise I agree

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Chemist
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Re: Slow

Why assume light moves at 1 million m/s - it's KNOWN to move at ~3E8 m/s in a vacuum=c

If you or anyone else set up to measure it, no matter how you or they are moving it will still be measured at c.

You can't just travel at c+ or even c as the energy necessary to accelerate you becomes infinite. I've written the equation for relativistic kinetic energy in a post on this topic

If you are really interested the net is full of information about special and general relativity.

.

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Chemist
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Re: @Chemist

I was actually replying to a comment by outinoregan who suggested that I didn't without giving any evidence.

As for the negative temperature as you say that's rather esoteric and not directly related to my point. I apologise if I assumed that you had no understanding of the area but on these forums many people know enough to search/quote from the web but have no real knowledge of the subject.

My comment about "science education being rubbish" was due to several comments recently in the media where several pronouncements were made along the lines of "of course everything is possible" when clearly the history of the world, let alone science shows that there are almost certainly limits in certain directions.

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Chemist
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Re: @Chemist

Well I am really a chemist (retired) but I've spent a lot of my time writing scientific software, protein modelling and utilising quantum mechanics. All these things have required rather a good knowledge of physics..

Your evidence ?? and indeed provenance as you only joined today so we've not had the benefit of your wisdom before.

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Chemist
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Re: But Why?

Apologies - I didn't read the original post accurately - let's say classical kinetic energy is proportional to the velocity squared.

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Chemist
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Re: But Why?

"You might as well ask why energy increases with the square of velocity in classical mechanics?"

It doesn't - the classical equation for kinetic energy is 0.5mv^2

The equation for relativistic kinetic energy is :-

E=(mc2/sqrt(1-((v/c)2)))-mc2

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Chemist
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Re: Light or Gravity?

"time slows down closer to a bigger mass"

Mass alters spacetime and seriously affects time near large masses, but c is c

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Chemist
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Re: It's my understanding.....@Chemist

I don't think anyone can give you a 'simple' explanation for this. Many topics are rather inaccessible to analogy - the theory and the mathematics give certain predictions and measurements agree.

It's not the only theory to be 'difficult' - the predictions of quantum physics are equally difficult to rationalize.

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Chemist
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Re: FTL - easy-peasy...

"is perfectly possible "

Well potentially possible as you need to go moderately close to c, say 0.95c, but where is the energy to get there coming from ? An (unrealistically ) modest 1000 tonnes ship would need 2E23 J to reach 0.95c - if the propulsion 'fuel' had to be carried on board that would add to the initial mass.

2E23 J is a LOT of energy. It's roughly 400 times the annual energy production of Earth.

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Chemist
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Re: Light or Gravity?

"does light move faster when closer to a bigger object"

No. Worst than that you are now edging dangerously close to General Relativity

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Chemist
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Re: Slow

AFAIK and this is where it gets weirder.

If you fire a gun, in your local frame of reference ( the ship ) the bullet will exit at it's normal muzzle velocity as far as you are concerned.

HOWEVER an stationary observer relative to you will still only see a slightly increased speed of bullet. This is the same kind of thing as 2 observers approaching each other at 0.55c only being seen to close at ~0.84c relative to a 'stationary' observer.

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Chemist
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Re: I don't get it ...

"lightbulb "radiates" light, thus using energy to "propel" something we can see?"

AFAWK the proton mass is zero - so it can travel at c, indeed in a vacuum it HAS to travel at c. VERY light mass particles like neutrinos can get very close to c which explains why there was so much confusion over the CERN/Grand Saaso experiment recently.

SR is a very well tested theory and physical measurements at close to light speeds on particles in accelerators match the theory.

I don't know why people EXPECT the universe to be set up to allow us to explore the stars - don't get me wrong I'd love it -but it doesn't mean it will happen

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Chemist
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Re: I don't get it ...

"can't I create a car that travels at 60mph if light travels at 50mph "

The normal, simple model for this is as the speed of light is approached the mass of the vehicle actual increases in a non-linear manner so that more and more energy is required to accelerate it. The mass becoming infinite at c unless the original rest mass was zero.

This might sound like madness but in particle accelerators that is precisely what is seen, furthermore time itself alters so that short-lived particles have a vastly increased lifetime. This all predicted by SR.

Reality is pretty weird

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Chemist
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Re: Limits.

"The drive works by using a wave to compress the spacetime"

Sorry this has nothing to do with it. The so-called warp drive even if it eventually proves feasible allows a ship moving less than c to travel large distances quickly by altering spacetime using exotic matter and a great deal of energy.

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Chemist
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Re: @Chemist

"but it may be possible to be beyond the speed of light, in which case the object in question would have to have negative mass/energy."

I point this out below somewhere although earlier in the day.

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Royal Society hosts edit-a-thon to get women onto Wikipedia

Chemist
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Re: Consider Her Ways

"The Kraken Wakes"

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Education Secretary Gove: Tim Berners-Lee 'created the INTERNET'

Chemist
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Re: Err...

"Hard drive is memory"

Yes, I agree BUT I've met many intelligent but computer naive people who thought the hard drive was the ONLY memory.

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Last month ties for WARMEST September on RECORD

Chemist
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So that means...

"Hall is a climate skeptic, he explains, because – at least in part – "I don't think we can control what God controls.""

Give up on disease and famine as well - no point apparently !

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Samsung, not Nokia, fans' most favoured WinPho brand

Chemist
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Re: Perhaps RICHTO you should learn to read AND comprehend

Selective amnesia as well eh ?

IN THE UK !!

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Chemist
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Perhaps RICHTO you should learn to read AND comprehend

What 'your' link actually says is :

"Ovum has forecast the Windows Phone OS will increase its market share from under five per cent IN THE UK today to around 13 per cent within five years "

It appears of similar quality to the other rubbish you post

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Apple pays up for stealing design from Swiss Railways

Chemist
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Re: Swiss Neutrality ?

" Of all the neutrals Switzerland has the greatest right to distinction. She has been the sole international force linking the hideously-sundered nations and ourselves. What does it matter whether she has been able to give us the commercial advantages we desire or has given too many to the Germans, to keep herself alive? She has been a democratic State, standing for freedom in self defence among her mountains, and in thought, in spite of race, largely on our side."

Winston Churchill (1874 - 1965), British wartime Prime Minister

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Chemist
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Re: Swiss Neutrality ?

That's just an opinion. Faced with large numbers of tanks and aircraft they would have lost the industrial lowlands- that's mine

They would have held out far longer in the mountains but probably would have been contained there only having the ability to use light weapons. I've spent a long time in the Swiss Alps and have a holiday home in Saas Fee so have some feel for the character and ability of the Swiss esp.in the mountains.

All sorts of things went on in Switzerland during WWII including meetings between Allies and Axis generals and politicians.

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Chemist
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Re: Swiss Neutrality ?

"but I suspect"

Evidence ?

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Chemist
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Re: Swiss Neutrality ?

It seems many people don't realise the geography of Switzerland.

After the start of WWII occupied France was on the western border, occupied Austria was on the eastern border, Axis power Italy was the southern border and Nazi Germany was the northern border. Now I don't see in the circumstances that given no direct access to the outside world that they could have resisted a serious invasion for long esp.as the German border is not as mountainous as the others.

They did have a desperate plan in the event of an invasion to abandon the north and retreat to the mountains but it certainly would have been a major disaster. All the major engineering and chemical factories in the north would have been converted to German war production and the country's wealth used for German war purposes.

They had to walk a VERY fine line. Can anyone think of an alternative they would have adopted ?

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Water, water everywhere on the Moon: But not a drop to drink

Chemist
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Joke

"doing with all the electrons"

Better hope they don't all come down the 'Earth' wire !

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Boffins baffled: HUGE EYEBALL washes up on Florida beach

Chemist
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Headmaster

Re: Possibly...

"That or wailing operations dropped something overboard."

I bet they howled about that !

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Japanese cubesat to flash Earth with Morse message

Chemist
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Re: Thin end of wedge..

THIS one might not be.

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Chemist
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Thin end of wedge..

Does this mean we are not going to able to look at the night sky soon without ads flashing everywhere ?

Maybe some suggestions ?

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Skype worm chats up victims - then holds PCs to ransom

Chemist
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Re: @Chemist

"it's hard to claim someone stole your credit."

Maybe they just used it - we'd need the original poster to comment and see if he checked his call history and how much went.

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Chemist
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Re: Skype takes the user experience very seriously

"Who uses credit rather than a subscription?"

I do - mainly use it for calling my mother from our holiday home in Switzerland - so £10 lasts for ages. Most other calls are skype-skype.

If I don't use $9/month why would I have a subscription ?

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Chemist
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Re: Not surprsing

4.0.0.7 here mate, works fine

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US boffins get Nobel for work on cell receptors

Chemist
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Re: Applause!

"So well deserved, this one"

Agreed - spent a lot of my working life on these devils.

Interestingly the full horrendous complexity of how they operate still hasn't been elucidated

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British Library tracks rise and fall of file formats

Chemist
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Re: Data size

I remember getting my first 470MB drive. It was like opening the fridge and finding Wembley stadium there.

Mind now I come back from one holiday with 5GB of video.....

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