* Posts by Chemist

1991 posts • joined 24 Mar 2010

Girl gang targets Microsoft's Seattle stores for $5,000 theft spree

Chemist
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"There's an amazing joke here somewhere, but I just can't find it..."

They're putting copies of W8 back !

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New transistor tech could beat silicon and save Moore's Law

Chemist
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"Sand is not silicon"

Indeed it is not. Further the silicon is highly purified which I think probably dwarfs the raw material cost.

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Boffin: Android's on-board malware scanner utterly FAILS

Chemist
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Re: Android is malware

"it is the third worst phone ever behind iPhones and Blackberries."

Your conclusion ?

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Australian Police say don't use Apple's iOS 6 Maps

Chemist
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Re: Who would leave a perfectly serviceable highway?

"3 different McDonald's."

There are DIFFERENT McDonalds ?????

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Chemist
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Re: Stupid people always want something to blame

I agree, we live about 1/2 mile up an unmade road just wide enough for a van in places with steep gradients, bends and a drop of ~20-100ft into a stream for the whole distance. Yet a HGV ! drove all the way up one day due to following his satnav and had to reverse the whole way down - horrendous - blocked the road for almost an hour, knocked down fences, pushed over small trees. `

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Rare critical Word vuln is the star of December Patch Tuesday

Chemist
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Re: Security FAIL

"Conversely, the reason NT is not a microkernel system is because most of the system components run in the same address space as the kernel,"

In any case "modern" != "better"

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Chemist
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Re: Security FAIL

@AC 10:54

Hello RICHTO

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'Facebook is completely undreamt of even by the worst spying nation'

Chemist
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" whole universe swapped left"

Same kind of thing happened to me when I was taking my first steps in protein modeling. Some joker swapped the wiring to the X,Y,Z knobs on the Evans and Sutherland vector graphics terminal I was using and in the dark, wearing stereo glasses, I damn nearly fell off my chair when my ' world' sheared away in quite a different direction

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Microsoft Windows Server 2012: Why Bother?

Chemist
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Re: Licencing hell

"As that's the LHC, I expect it is because it is full of beardy wierdies!"

They're smart though.

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Einstein almost tagged dark energy in the early 1920s

Chemist
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Re: But what about the cat?

"That, you have ask Herr Heisenberg."

I'm not certain where he is !

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Chemist
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Re: But what about the cat?

"But cats are pretty cool already, no?"

Er, yes and no.

"The experiment will be easiest to run if the probabilities are equal -- so the bags are equally warm, comfortable, easy to get into, hard to be pulled from, inconvenient for whichever human is nearby, on top of something someone is wanting to read, etc."

I also think that it's going to be impossible to get two exact bags and even if there is only an infinitesimal difference between them the cat will choose the best one

"if we cool the cat down as far as possible."

I think you are probably breaking the 5th Law of Thermodynamics

" Any small increase in the cat's de Broglie wavelength will be extremely helpful."

Cats can adjust their de Broglie wavelength, their zero point energy and almost every other parameter. They are also quite capable of emerging from a blackhole ( or any other sort of interesting subterranean space)

All this off-topic for sure but discussing GR at this time of the morning (UK) is a bit heavy.

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Chemist
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Re: But what about the cat?

"and not observing into which bag the cat climbed,"

That's easy, in order

1) the warmest

2) the most comfortable

3) the easiest to get into

4 the hardest to be removed from

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Chemist
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Re: Huh?

"that the cosmological constant was a fixed number, or variable."

"A variable constant? That's revolutionary maths right there!!"

or !

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US and UK spooks alerted over massive Swiss data leak

Chemist
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Re: Access control

"The Swiss taxpayer does not like to allocate huge resources to the government"

Indeed they don't -as far as I'm aware the bulk of taxes go to the local community & the local canton and then a small amount to the Federal government.

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Fred Flintstone may not have been real but his pet Dino WAS - boffins

Chemist
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No wonder they died out

If they behaved like real Labradors they would have eaten everything

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Brr, feeling cold? Galaxy is home to plenty of WARMER Earth twins

Chemist
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Lamuella

Seem to remember this planet had lots going for it. Interesting variations of day, month, year length that led to an extra hour in bed every day etc. Good food although slightly repetitive and a great white knuckle ride that went to a great bar that had the best singer in the known universe.

Thanks Douglas,

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A valid use for Windows 8?

Chemist
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Re: Media Centre

"and I've never seen Windows "just go unstable" for no reason."

WHAT !

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Chemist
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" Also, I use Canon's DPP, which doesn't run on Linux."

For Linux :-

PS Elements runs under WIne perfectly - at least the copy I had a few years ago. Otherwise dcraw, ShowPhoto, ufraw and a number of others import Canon RAW files. and allow levels, curves and size/unsharp etc. I've taken to using a script to convert entire collections at one go to have browse-able .jpgs. in the same directories as RAW files. (I've just converted 33GB) In particular dcraw will output 48-bit and showphoto will handle 48 bit

It just requires dcraw and ImageMagick. Just run the script in the directory. dcraw outputs .ppm files

raw1080.sh

#!/bin/bash

#

dcraw -w -H 2 *.CR*

#

mogrify -resize 1624x1080 -quality 100 *.ppm

#

mogrify -unsharp 0x1+0.5+0.02 *.ppm

#

mogrify -format jpg *.ppm

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Ready for ANOTHER patent war? Apple 'invents' wireless charging

Chemist
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Re: Hysteria from el Reg, who would have thunk it

Patents are about implementation but are also about novelty. Wireless charging is not novel unless the would-be inventor can show a significant improvement in some aspect of the process ( efficiency or safety ....). If they can they can patent THAT but it wouldn't cover wireless charging in toto

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Hearts, minds and balls: Microsoft's Windows 8 Surface gamble

Chemist
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Re: All very bizarre

"Just because you have been using "compute" incorrectly for several years doesn't make it right!!"

17million hits on Google for compute server

Compute Server - Encyclopedia - The Free Dictionary

encyclopedia2.thefreedictionary.com/compute+server

(computer, parallel), compute server - A kind of parallel processor where the parallel processors have no I/O except via a bus or other connection to a front-end ...

Linux Compute Servers | School of Natural Sciences

www.sns.ias.edu/computing/servers

Linux Compute Servers. The following linux servers are available for general and/or computational use. These servers are available for public use via ssh, and ...

Compute server | Define Compute server at Dictionary.com

dictionary.reference.com/browse/compute+server

compute server definition. computer, parallel. A kind of parallel processor where the parallel processors have no I/O except via a bus or other connection to a ...

If it's being used frequently by a range of people then it's right - even the OED accepts that

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Chemist
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Re: All very bizarre

""Compute" is a verb."

Certainly I've been using compute servers for years

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Chemist
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"The ARM machines need to use GPU features to decode video"

If a GPU is available it should be used to decode video. Running 1080p/50 video on a rather elderly Linux dual-core AMD takes all the processor - with a GPU and vdpau it takes ~10% and it becomes possible to watch edits whilst transcoding several other videos AND still have a responsive system.

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Scientists build largest ever computerized brain

Chemist
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Re: 6800

"I wrote a 6802* cross-assembler "

Actually I used it for a 6802 - it was the first cpu project I did and the end-result was a burglar alarm. Luckily I only needed to run the assembler twice as it was so slow. I had to shoehorn a PIA into the Dragon I was using to run a home-made EPROM programmer. I rapidly shifted to 6809s and Forth assembler after that !

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Chemist
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Re: So, not exactly Orac then

"preferably with a hex editor they'd written for themselves in their computer''s basic)"

Well I did write an 6800 assembler once in BASIC but that took hours to assemble 1K of code - raw hex is much better written on bare hardware and a hex keypad ( no- it's NOT )

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Chemist
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Re: As had been said... WTF Java?

I'll start you off :

: BRAIN HALFABRAIN HALFABRAIN ;

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Dell launches Sputnik Linux Ultrabook

Chemist
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Re: Seriously?

"Driver support for Linux is still hit or miss. In order to make a particular distro work on a particular piece of hardware, you have to do some tuning."

Mostly you are wrong. I've not had to do that for ~6-7 years and I install 3-5 a year on quite a range of hardware even 3G dongles and printer/scanners have worked out of the box.

I don't know where you get your 'information' from as you seem so dismissive of Linux but I can't believe that it from personal experience. If indeed Dell have some custom components, which I find hard to believe, then some configuration/coding might be necessary.

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Chemist
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Re: Why bother?

"You then go to Nvidia and get the proper drivers and away you go. What could be simpler? "

I agree entirely - some here would say not - they are wrong !

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What can save the Xmas PC market? Not Windows 8, say analysts

Chemist
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Re: Reverse Vista effect

I've no experience of recent Photoshops as I stopped using WIndows a few years back but I did have a legit copy of Photoshop Expressions which worked perfectly under Wine - I seem to recall it had just one massive .dll Certainly if you must have something it's a powerful argument.

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Chemist
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Re: Reverse Vista effect

@Charles Manning

If you don't mind telling what do you need to do that isn't available on Linux ? I know there must be some things but it'd still be good to know.

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America planned to NUKE THE MOON

Chemist
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Headmaster

Re: Nukes in SPAAAAAAACEEEEEE!!!!1!one!!

"Without an atmosphere there is no effective blast wave nor thermal radiation"

No thermal radiation ? - better tell the sun

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Chemist
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Joke

Re: ummmm...

"It'd make a nice little crater, and that'd be about it"

So it has been done before and many times !

Mad fools - they probably thought "Dr Strangelove" was a documentary.

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Real sci-fi space ships coming at last? NASA tests nuclear engine

Chemist
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Re: "i said it all a million times,."

"if you want to power a spaceship, you just need your everyday domestic wind turbine kit you will have in your loft, and a power drill motor to turn the direct drive dynamo instead of the wind,"

That'd be a troll then - there IS an icon you know

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Chemist
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Re: "i said it all a million times,."

You Sir are a troll or sadly lacking in even the basics of a scientific education.

Seriously try http://en.wikipedia.org/wiki/Perpetual_motion as a primer

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Chemist
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"i said it all a million times,."

So build one !

Bet you can't !

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How to launch people into space...

Chemist
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Re: "G-forces are simply acceleration induced by the Earth’s gravity"

What has Earth's gravity got to do with it other than giving a name to a unit of acceleration that's biologically relevant ?

A rocket far from any gravity source will still generate a force on it's occupants when the engine is running that can be measured in Gs indeed that's an Einstein thought experiment that's used in GR discussions

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Android users: More of them than fanbois, but they don't use the web

Chemist
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Re: £36 and $65 contracts are the norm for iThingsies.

"when renewing their £15-20/month contract buut often it has no data so basically they are just getting the handset to use as a full screen phone (plus texts)."

It's quite possible (my wife has just done it) to get a mid-range Android phone, 1GB data, 250 mins, 5000 texts for £15/month in the UK.

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Bash Street bytes: Do UK schools really need the Raspberry Pi?

Chemist
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Re: We need them for democracy

"requires every person to understand the world to some degree"

Not just democracy. In part lots of aspects of education are of themselves no direct path to a career. For example most people are not going to use calculus or chemistry or lots of other parts of the syllabus. It doesn't mean that exposure to some aspects isn't worthwhile. Many people don't know what they want to do - exposure to a bit of coding or hardware hacking may well be the start of someones career - I'm sure it was for some people here.

Although I'm not an IT professional an interest in electronics from 13 and coding all my adult life meant that when I NEEDED to write my own software for scientific purposes I could.

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Windows 8: A soaraway Kinect? Or is it Red Ink Friday for Microsoft?

Chemist
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Re: convicted monopolist"

"Do you think browsers would be free if not for MS?"

Well they bloo** well were before IE !

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The early days of PCs as seen through DEAD TREES

Chemist
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The one I remember

is from Byte or PCW I *think*

when the IBM PC first came out.

Dark clouds filling the sky with a giant hand & arm piercing them with an IBM PC like a little toy in it's palm

with the caption "The jolly grey giant delivers the goods" or some such.

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Microsoft's Surface bait-and-switch won't make people buy Windows 8

Chemist
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Re: The guy is on his way out

"Redmond and of those not finding a chair when the music stopped."

Er, I think there might be a shortage of unbroken chairs at Redmond !

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Chemist
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Re: No-one buys an OS?

"t is not Microsoft's fault they don't really cut it for most users..."

Indeed MS don't !

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Chemist
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Re: No-one buys an OS?

"Android and Linux will converge soon, someone somewhere will produce some kind of "Android Framework" that you could install on any distro so you can double click on .apk files."

Oddly enough I've just been trying a x86 Android build (for eeepc) in VirtualBox (on Linux) -seems stable and just like my wife's phone with the exception that there's no wireless, phone, GPS of course and there is a virtual Eth0. An SD card can be emulated but I've not got round to that yet so can't install apps. at the mo. There is a terminal emulator so I can tell you the kernel is 3.0.36-android-x86-eeepc.

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WWII HERO PIGEON crypto message STUMPS GCHQ boffins

Chemist
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"gives the name of the gchq resident historian?"

gives A name of the gchq resident historian

I'll just say "John Le Carre" and "workname"

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Chemist
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"'were designed only to be able to be read by the senders and the recipients''"

Yes, I heard that too, as well as the journo wailing something like "with all this technology and supercomputers you'd think ....."

If it's a one-time pad AND no context it's all but impossible

(Might be - remember wartime -rationing- "Put this bird in an oven gas mark 5")

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CERN rushes to install new anti-matter hunter

Chemist
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"I'm wondering how they make antihydrogen from antiprotons. Does the proton 'pick up' an ordinary electron, which stays in orbit due to normal processes, or do they give it an antielectron?!"

Well the antiproton would have a negative charge so they'd need a positron rather than an electron. I think antiprotons are relatively 'easy' to make but generating antihydrogen and bringing to reasonable temperatures seems a lot more difficult

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Skype 3.0 lands on Android tabs, says all your bass are belong to it

Chemist
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Re: Why bother?

"why MS should even bother to spend money developing free software"

One reason is that they charge for skype <=> conventional phone calls. Very reasonable price. I use it regularly to call my mother in UK from Switzerland - costs <2p /min. I see now it can be just £4/month for unlimited calls on a subscription basis (but a fair usage policy !)

Works fine on Linux - we've got a USB headset that improves the quality a lot

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Evildoers can now turn all sites on a Linux server into silent hell-pits

Chemist
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Re: Maybe its time...

Thanks for that.

In reality I'm not too worried - I run a webserver on the internal network but the only external open port is a non-standard one for SSHD which as I mentioned has a password from hell *and a very non-standard username as the only valid account. The server running SSHD is firewalled, the NAT router is firewalled and all ports below 1024 are filtered at my ISP. I'm assuming that the major risk is e-mail attachments and given that I'm VERY suspicious and have trained my wife to be the same I'm fairly sanguine.

I agree I could try tripwire or some such or apparmor.

I really wanted to open up any discussion around Linux security and see if there was anything I'd missed.

*The password from hell is NOT written down, is 20 digits long something not like "bcGbf54TTt32dfcm2n1f" and generated on the fly by a little c program from a passphrase that I can remember. I use the same method, with different passphrases for all my serious passwords

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Chemist
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Re: Maybe its time...

Genuine non-trolling query

I've used Linux for years without any anti-virus, as far as I know there are so few threats and the existing AV programs mostly seem to look for Windows malware that might be passing through. It's summed up in these quotes from the Wikipedia page : http://en.wikipedia.org/wiki/Linux_malware

"There are a number of anti-virus applications available which will run under the Linux operating system. Most of these applications are looking for exploits which could affect users of Microsoft Windows."

"The following is a partial list of known Linux malware. However, few if any are in the wild, and most have been rendered obsolete by Linux updates or were never a threat. Known malware is not the only or even the most important threat: new malware or attacks directed to specific sites can use vulnerabilities previously unknown to the community or unused by malware."

So far I've relied on regular updates, good firewalls, careful browsing on a limited account, separate account for banking, VERY hard passwords for secure stuff like banking and SSH, and rigid adherence to good practice. (yes I often get e-mailed Windows malware or phishing tricks)

The questions - is this enough - anyone know how effective the current AV products are ? - is this a non-issue ?

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German city dumping OpenOffice for Microsoft

Chemist
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Re: I've got LO 3.6.1.2 installed and some of it doesn't impress me

I've found it VERY slow when the computer has certain internet connections bizarrely enough

With my home wifi or ethernet it's very fast but at our holiday home (shared wifi) or other wifi or using a 3G dongle it hangs for quit a time before behaving normally - turn off the connection and it's fine.

I think it's a known issue but I can't find it at the mo'

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Ten Linux apps you must install

Chemist
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Re: Normal people don't use Linux

"I'm more concerned that someone might find themselves £300+ out of pocket after breaking their computer by experimenting with Linux."

More FUD

The only thing they'd break would be Windows NOT £300 of computer in any case.

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