Feeds

* Posts by Chemist

1913 posts • joined 24 Mar 2010

Anti-virus products are rubbish, says Imperva

Chemist
Silver badge

Re: ...spend “is not proportional to its effectiveness”

"I remind you that the first and worst internet worm ever was on UNIX based systems.."

I remind you that that was 1988 ( that's NINETEEN EIGHTY-EIGHT ) and probably the majority of connected computers were running UNIX

2
1
Chemist
Silver badge

Re: Oh go on, I'll feed em...

@RICHTO

"Since when does linux not let externally sourced code execute"

Let's see - browse to a page with link to a Linux executable - click on link - need to download then make executable and then run

Let's try a shell script link -oh, it still doesn't let it run automatically.

Mind your browser may be set-up in a less-secure manner.

2
0
Chemist
Silver badge

Re: The reality is all too real

@RICHTO

"Im not clear how that is FUD"

Gosh, I thought you'd know !

Just visiting the link doesn't root the phone - you have to get involved -there's even a link for donations for goodness sake.

This no more roots an OS than me deciding to put a different Linux distro on a computer as far as I'm concerned.

2
0
Chemist
Silver badge

Re: The reality is all too real

@RICHTO

"Web site to root a UNIX based system just by visiting a URL - here you go:"

I see the usual abysmal quality of your 'information' hasn't improved with the new year - what a load of FUD

8
0

I tried to buy a satellite and all I got was this lousy $67,000

Chemist
Silver badge
Joke

Re: I can do you a very good price...

"

I can do you a very good price...

... on a second hand space shuttle, only one owner..."

You do know there's no such thing as a free launch !

9
0

The year GNOMES, Ubuntu sufferers forked off to Mint Linux

Chemist
Silver badge

Re: @Fred (was: On the off-chance any of you missed it ...)

I've read all this article with a feeling of disbelief - my and mine have been using Linux happily for years without any of the problems and traumas depicted.

Only today I've edited a video, installed some bluetooth tools, converted the last of my vinyl disks to digital and done the usual e-mails etc. without any drama or bother - what is it with you people ?

Otherwise Happy New Year !

3
4

Boffins spot planet that could support life... just 12 light years away

Chemist
Silver badge

Re: Considering the distances from Earth for the *other* candidates this is pretty close.

I calculate the energy required to accelerate 1 tonne to 10%c as ~5E20 J. According to Wikipedia the sum of energy release from ALL the nuclear weapons test/uses is ~the same. Now I've not read the details of ORION but something seems amiss.

0
0

It's official: Mac users are morally superior to Windows users

Chemist
Silver badge

The joke icon...

....is, er, for a joke not a statement of fact.

0
0
Chemist
Silver badge

Re: Linux users.....

"It's almost like he's intelligent."

What an extraordinary assertion - where's the evidence ?

6
0

Goldman Sachs: Windows' true market share is just 20%

Chemist
Silver badge

Re: mmmm

I'm glad you posted this because it does help to illuminate the general ignorance around about Linux photo tools - even though I'm just a keen amateur I find it satisfying to convert a good raw photo from my 550D through 16bit programs like darktable or showFoto or do most of the tweeks in ufraw (again 16bit) and final (un)sharpening in GIMP. Even the command-line program dcraw and it's library which are at the back of many of these programs will output 16bit.

Apart from dcraw all these are GUI programs but for efficiency a little bit of scripting around dcraw will convert, resize, enhance an entire directory of raw images into a decent set of jpg proofs ( I use 1080 v) without the large sizes associated with the original .JPGs

e.g.

#!/bin/bash

#

dcraw -w *.CR2

#

mogrify -resize 1624x1080 -quality 100 *.ppm

#

mogrify -unsharp 0x1+.5+0.02 *.ppm

#

mogrify -format jpg *.ppm

3
0
Chemist
Silver badge

Re: Microsoft USP

I take your point but

"Why buy something else when you will still need a WinTel PC in some capacity?"

I don't and haven't needed to for 5 years

2
0
Chemist
Silver badge

Re: chemist

I'm sorry but you were the one who said "And yet you guys want to say that you can manage to get your work done on Tablets and Non MS systems. What kind of work do you do ?"

So I told you. This was about MS losing it's stranglehold -well it lost it a long time ago for some people.

"I am sitting at work with three screens (1280 * 3 Wide ) * 1024 High of applications, some of which, the following , of which have no viable Unix/Apple equivalants (Avaya ASA, Business Objects, Visio). I have several VMs open which are usually interfaces to the servers."

I don't suppose you are representative of the majority either.

4
1
Chemist
Silver badge

Re: chemist

A perfectly valid use for a computer - probably the original.

In any case It wasn't all exotic calculations, there was the real-time use of 3D graphics to study protein structures, analysis with spreadsheets ( no not Excel - that could only handle 16K rows at the time - we had to handle millions) and even writing reports & papers.

In any case dismissing thousands of people using non-MS solutions just because it doesn't fit your world view or experience only shows how little experience of the world you have. There are lots of other uses out there - CGI, stock trading, machine control ( all the NMR and MS spectroscopy machines where I worked DIDN'T use MS software.

The majority, by the way, probably only want a browser. If you mean people who work in offices that might be a different matter.

6
0
Chemist
Silver badge

Re: @Trevor

"And yet you guys want to say that you can manage to get your work done on Tablets and Non MS systems."

What's so suprising about that. Scientist, academics, engineers, designers - lots of them work on non-MS systems. You might not recognize the names of the programs but plenty of them are rather pricy. Before I retired I'd been using Linux plus a host of commercial scientific software for ~6 years, much of that had been ported from SGs and there were several hundred of us in the company so equipped.

A few comments recently have been along the lines "who needs more computing power - machines are fast enough" - well they may be to edit a document or fill-in a form but there are PLENTY of people who have requirements for as much as they can get. My twin Xeon workstation used to run all the time - many of the day-day requirements needed a run of several days and nights and I had a stack of jobs waiting to run whenever the machine was idle. For the really serious stuff there were several 1-2 K node Linux farms.

What wimpy kind of work do you do ?

7
0

Microsoft Santa gifts you with 5 critical fixes in Xmas Patch Tuesday

Chemist
Silver badge

Re: Arrgggh a mass rebooting session as well!

"seldom" it said !

0
0

Internet Explorer tracks cursor even when minimised

Chemist
Silver badge

"Doesn't track mouse movements on the extended screen!"

It's a bug- you need to report that

5
0

Revealed: The Brit-built GRAVITY-powered light that costs $5

Chemist
Silver badge

Re: Hydro Electric Power Stations

No, it isn't !

Weight on ground, energy used to lift weight to height above ground,physics well understood, energy released again as weight falls to ground - really it's not complicated - where on Earth do you think it comes from ?

Just potential energy - it's no hard. If you tensioned a spring the energy wouldn't come from the ground state of the spring -it would come from the muscle energy required to stretch it.

0
0
Chemist
Silver badge

Re: Hydro Electric Power Stations

No, they are sun-powered. Heat from sun, water evaporates, falls as rain, fills reservoirs = stored potential energy. You need gravity to make it work but that's not where the energy comes from.

0
1
Chemist
Silver badge

Shouldn't that be ...

muscle-powered light ?

Nonetheless neat - is it an improvement on a wind-up light/radio/etc though ?

2
0

Linux kernel dumps 386 chip support

Chemist
Silver badge

Re: Z-80

"The 6809 seemed to be one of the best of the 8bit breed"

I think the problem was it WAS rather slow and the complex, elegant addressing modes and position independent code which made it such a great cpu to program in assembler were dying the death as compilers generally only used simpler modes. It was caught at the wrong moment in time really with the 68000 being developed on one hand and the shift over to RISC on the other.

I've often thought that an updated 32 bit with high clock speeds would have been interesting but past is past and I'd much rather have a multi-core modern cpu running at 3GHz even if much of the power seems to disappear somewhere these days.

(I do have a 6809 still running in a home-made Forth system but I guess I've not switched it on in years)

1
0
Chemist
Silver badge
Joke

Re: And I remember...

"

And I remember...

combing my hair with a discarded 386 intel chip. The connectors worked like a fine comb!

"

Hope it got the bugs out !

4
0
Chemist
Silver badge

Re: Z-80

"6809 had multiply! Multiply! That made it practically a supercomputer!"

Integer multiply of course, but far, far better it has wonderful addressing modes.

8
0

Girl gang targets Microsoft's Seattle stores for $5,000 theft spree

Chemist
Silver badge

"There's an amazing joke here somewhere, but I just can't find it..."

They're putting copies of W8 back !

10
0

New transistor tech could beat silicon and save Moore's Law

Chemist
Silver badge

"Sand is not silicon"

Indeed it is not. Further the silicon is highly purified which I think probably dwarfs the raw material cost.

4
0

Boffin: Android's on-board malware scanner utterly FAILS

Chemist
Silver badge

Re: Android is malware

"it is the third worst phone ever behind iPhones and Blackberries."

Your conclusion ?

2
2

Australian Police say don't use Apple's iOS 6 Maps

Chemist
Silver badge

Re: Who would leave a perfectly serviceable highway?

"3 different McDonald's."

There are DIFFERENT McDonalds ?????

0
0
Chemist
Silver badge

Re: Stupid people always want something to blame

I agree, we live about 1/2 mile up an unmade road just wide enough for a van in places with steep gradients, bends and a drop of ~20-100ft into a stream for the whole distance. Yet a HGV ! drove all the way up one day due to following his satnav and had to reverse the whole way down - horrendous - blocked the road for almost an hour, knocked down fences, pushed over small trees. `

6
0

Rare critical Word vuln is the star of December Patch Tuesday

Chemist
Silver badge

Re: Security FAIL

"Conversely, the reason NT is not a microkernel system is because most of the system components run in the same address space as the kernel,"

In any case "modern" != "better"

0
0
Chemist
Silver badge

Re: Security FAIL

@AC 10:54

Hello RICHTO

0
0

'Facebook is completely undreamt of even by the worst spying nation'

Chemist
Silver badge

" whole universe swapped left"

Same kind of thing happened to me when I was taking my first steps in protein modeling. Some joker swapped the wiring to the X,Y,Z knobs on the Evans and Sutherland vector graphics terminal I was using and in the dark, wearing stereo glasses, I damn nearly fell off my chair when my ' world' sheared away in quite a different direction

2
0

Microsoft Windows Server 2012: Why Bother?

Chemist
Silver badge

Re: Licencing hell

"As that's the LHC, I expect it is because it is full of beardy wierdies!"

They're smart though.

2
0

Einstein almost tagged dark energy in the early 1920s

Chemist
Silver badge

Re: But what about the cat?

"That, you have ask Herr Heisenberg."

I'm not certain where he is !

0
0
Chemist
Silver badge

Re: But what about the cat?

"But cats are pretty cool already, no?"

Er, yes and no.

"The experiment will be easiest to run if the probabilities are equal -- so the bags are equally warm, comfortable, easy to get into, hard to be pulled from, inconvenient for whichever human is nearby, on top of something someone is wanting to read, etc."

I also think that it's going to be impossible to get two exact bags and even if there is only an infinitesimal difference between them the cat will choose the best one

"if we cool the cat down as far as possible."

I think you are probably breaking the 5th Law of Thermodynamics

" Any small increase in the cat's de Broglie wavelength will be extremely helpful."

Cats can adjust their de Broglie wavelength, their zero point energy and almost every other parameter. They are also quite capable of emerging from a blackhole ( or any other sort of interesting subterranean space)

All this off-topic for sure but discussing GR at this time of the morning (UK) is a bit heavy.

3
0
Chemist
Silver badge

Re: But what about the cat?

"and not observing into which bag the cat climbed,"

That's easy, in order

1) the warmest

2) the most comfortable

3) the easiest to get into

4 the hardest to be removed from

10
0
Chemist
Silver badge

Re: Huh?

"that the cosmological constant was a fixed number, or variable."

"A variable constant? That's revolutionary maths right there!!"

or !

2
0

US and UK spooks alerted over massive Swiss data leak

Chemist
Silver badge

Re: Access control

"The Swiss taxpayer does not like to allocate huge resources to the government"

Indeed they don't -as far as I'm aware the bulk of taxes go to the local community & the local canton and then a small amount to the Federal government.

0
0

Fred Flintstone may not have been real but his pet Dino WAS - boffins

Chemist
Silver badge

No wonder they died out

If they behaved like real Labradors they would have eaten everything

2
0

Brr, feeling cold? Galaxy is home to plenty of WARMER Earth twins

Chemist
Silver badge

Lamuella

Seem to remember this planet had lots going for it. Interesting variations of day, month, year length that led to an extra hour in bed every day etc. Good food although slightly repetitive and a great white knuckle ride that went to a great bar that had the best singer in the known universe.

Thanks Douglas,

0
0

A valid use for Windows 8?

Chemist
Silver badge

Re: Media Centre

"and I've never seen Windows "just go unstable" for no reason."

WHAT !

2
0
Chemist
Silver badge

" Also, I use Canon's DPP, which doesn't run on Linux."

For Linux :-

PS Elements runs under WIne perfectly - at least the copy I had a few years ago. Otherwise dcraw, ShowPhoto, ufraw and a number of others import Canon RAW files. and allow levels, curves and size/unsharp etc. I've taken to using a script to convert entire collections at one go to have browse-able .jpgs. in the same directories as RAW files. (I've just converted 33GB) In particular dcraw will output 48-bit and showphoto will handle 48 bit

It just requires dcraw and ImageMagick. Just run the script in the directory. dcraw outputs .ppm files

raw1080.sh

#!/bin/bash

#

dcraw -w -H 2 *.CR*

#

mogrify -resize 1624x1080 -quality 100 *.ppm

#

mogrify -unsharp 0x1+0.5+0.02 *.ppm

#

mogrify -format jpg *.ppm

2
2

Ready for ANOTHER patent war? Apple 'invents' wireless charging

Chemist
Silver badge

Re: Hysteria from el Reg, who would have thunk it

Patents are about implementation but are also about novelty. Wireless charging is not novel unless the would-be inventor can show a significant improvement in some aspect of the process ( efficiency or safety ....). If they can they can patent THAT but it wouldn't cover wireless charging in toto

3
0

Hearts, minds and balls: Microsoft's Windows 8 Surface gamble

Chemist
Silver badge

Re: All very bizarre

"Just because you have been using "compute" incorrectly for several years doesn't make it right!!"

17million hits on Google for compute server

Compute Server - Encyclopedia - The Free Dictionary

encyclopedia2.thefreedictionary.com/compute+server

(computer, parallel), compute server - A kind of parallel processor where the parallel processors have no I/O except via a bus or other connection to a front-end ...

Linux Compute Servers | School of Natural Sciences

www.sns.ias.edu/computing/servers

Linux Compute Servers. The following linux servers are available for general and/or computational use. These servers are available for public use via ssh, and ...

Compute server | Define Compute server at Dictionary.com

dictionary.reference.com/browse/compute+server

compute server definition. computer, parallel. A kind of parallel processor where the parallel processors have no I/O except via a bus or other connection to a ...

If it's being used frequently by a range of people then it's right - even the OED accepts that

0
1
Chemist
Silver badge

Re: All very bizarre

""Compute" is a verb."

Certainly I've been using compute servers for years

0
1
Chemist
Silver badge

"The ARM machines need to use GPU features to decode video"

If a GPU is available it should be used to decode video. Running 1080p/50 video on a rather elderly Linux dual-core AMD takes all the processor - with a GPU and vdpau it takes ~10% and it becomes possible to watch edits whilst transcoding several other videos AND still have a responsive system.

2
0

Scientists build largest ever computerized brain

Chemist
Silver badge

Re: 6800

"I wrote a 6802* cross-assembler "

Actually I used it for a 6802 - it was the first cpu project I did and the end-result was a burglar alarm. Luckily I only needed to run the assembler twice as it was so slow. I had to shoehorn a PIA into the Dragon I was using to run a home-made EPROM programmer. I rapidly shifted to 6809s and Forth assembler after that !

0
0
Chemist
Silver badge

Re: So, not exactly Orac then

"preferably with a hex editor they'd written for themselves in their computer''s basic)"

Well I did write an 6800 assembler once in BASIC but that took hours to assemble 1K of code - raw hex is much better written on bare hardware and a hex keypad ( no- it's NOT )

0
0
Chemist
Silver badge

Re: As had been said... WTF Java?

I'll start you off :

: BRAIN HALFABRAIN HALFABRAIN ;

0
0

Dell launches Sputnik Linux Ultrabook

Chemist
Silver badge

Re: Seriously?

"Driver support for Linux is still hit or miss. In order to make a particular distro work on a particular piece of hardware, you have to do some tuning."

Mostly you are wrong. I've not had to do that for ~6-7 years and I install 3-5 a year on quite a range of hardware even 3G dongles and printer/scanners have worked out of the box.

I don't know where you get your 'information' from as you seem so dismissive of Linux but I can't believe that it from personal experience. If indeed Dell have some custom components, which I find hard to believe, then some configuration/coding might be necessary.

3
0
Chemist
Silver badge

Re: Why bother?

"You then go to Nvidia and get the proper drivers and away you go. What could be simpler? "

I agree entirely - some here would say not - they are wrong !

1
1

What can save the Xmas PC market? Not Windows 8, say analysts

Chemist
Silver badge

Re: Reverse Vista effect

I've no experience of recent Photoshops as I stopped using WIndows a few years back but I did have a legit copy of Photoshop Expressions which worked perfectly under Wine - I seem to recall it had just one massive .dll Certainly if you must have something it's a powerful argument.

1
3