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* Posts by Chemist

1913 posts • joined 24 Mar 2010

Enormo-display Apple iPhone prototype surfaces

Chemist
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Re: RS232 is still relevant

"RS232 is still relevant "

Almost everything I do with PIC microcontrollers has a 232 interface along the lines of :

PIC-232----232/USB convertor ---- Linux daemon---client programs.

For quick look sees I find it a lot easier than PIC-USB

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New UK cyber-champ: Chemist's winning formula cracks 'F1 race hack'

Chemist
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Re: What does it say?

"when the winner of their most elaborate competition is an untrained chemist?"

Now security I will accept is rather a specialist area.

On the other hand some of the best programmers I've ever met in industry and academia have not been IT specialists. Many have been originally scientists, who writing for their own needs at first, as scientists often need to, have found a niche and moved full-time into scientific programming. Others whilst not getting their hands 'dirty' writing code have generated some wonderful novel algorithms to apply to complex scientific problems.

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Microsoft preps UPDATE EVERYTHING patch batch

Chemist
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Re: FUD

@AC 10.19

Your OWN link doesn't mention remote exploits at all !

It only mentions local exploits and remote password guessing/bruteforcing

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Chemist
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Re: Silverlight is widely used as an alternative to Flash @Irongut

"I'm going to go for arginine and proline."

Don't know who your post was directed to. If it was me and you're suggesting that arginine and proline are rare then think again. Arginine is very common, being one of those amino acids found on the surface of proteins and is also the source of the vasodilator nitric oxide that we all depend on, proline is also common especially in collagen where it is post-translationally modified to hydroxy-proline and seems necessary to generate the triple helix form of collagen.

On the other hand if you didn't mean me have a good weekend.

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Chemist
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Re: FUD

@CreosoteChris

I think you missed the point - the FUD was directed at opensource update mechanisms.

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Chemist
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Re: Silverlight is widely used as an alternative to Flash @Irongut

"A lot of people could say they couldn't name 2 amino acids."

That's a very strange way of stating the bl**ding obvious. Most people can't know most things, given the size & complexity of the universe .

Now I can name all the amino acids and indeed some rather rare variants - but I don't know many sites that use Silverlight

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Chemist
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Re: XP through to Win 8....

"Don't MS keep telling us that all the code is new at each release?"

Yes, so they keep telling us

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World's 'smallest' mobe unveiled in Japan

Chemist
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Re: The terrible word 'phablet'

"Tablerone"

Never used a triangular screen but at least it gets around Apple's so-called patents. Mind the Swiss'll be after you.

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Gnome cofounder: Desktop Linux is a CHERNOBYL of FAIL

Chemist
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Re: funny

"All my laptops are hand-me-downs"

Well my Lenovo is, donated by a relative when a Windows update trashed it. Mind I have a new battery and, indeed somewhere to recharge it on most holidays.

I was going to post about choosing a distro after trying a few and then sticking with it - that's the way to happiness in my view, but I see you've already done something similar.

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Chemist
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Re: Usine arborial defecation

"The only time I have ever had this issue is"

The only time I have ever had this issue is when I got one of the first Canon 550Ds - Dave Craws RAW converter wouldn't handle the 18MP files. A couple of days later it updated to the latest version that did.

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Chemist
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Re: KDE

"hat doesn't look anything like the KDE that I'm writing this on"

Me neither !

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Chemist
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Re: Linux Desktop ? Yes

"Why bother going that far? Once would be enough to indicate once too often."

Don't you write any software ? I do so I compile on Linux. What I don't NEED to do is compile the kernel !

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Chemist
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Re: funny

"Machine would suspend and resume without problem, WiFi just worked, audio did not stop working, I spend three weeks without having to recompile the kernel to adjust this or that, nor fighting the video drivers, or deal with the bizarre and random speed degradation that my ThinkPad suffered."

I take my Lenovo laptop everywhere and for much longer holidays. Using OpenSUSE I can also say I never have any problems - what is this guy going on about - anyone who is constantly recompiling the kernel ( and isn't a kernel dev) has a problem it's true, but inside his head not his laptop

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Europe tickles Microsoft with €561m fine for browser choice gaffe

Chemist
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Re: No choice popup on Apple, Google or Linux devices devices

"The original poster said Apple and Google, no-one suggested Linux didn't have a plethora of browsers."

Are you sure ?

because the OP's title was "No choice popup on Apple, Google or Linux devices devices "

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Chemist
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Re: No choice popup on Apple, Google or Linux devices devices

"No choice popup on Apple, Google or Linux devices devices "

Well every Linux install ( I use OpenSUSE) gives me a two browsers immediately available (FF & Konqueror) and another 5or 6 others available in the distro. IF Microsoft deigned to write IE for Linux then I assume that would be available too.

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Indian atomic boffins draw up plans for 50,000 TONNE magnet

Chemist
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Re: Just think...

"your girlfriend has a collection of vibrators you say? I wonder why."

Presumably she works a lot with concrete.

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New class of industrial-scale super-phishing emails threatens biz

Chemist
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Re: Hmm

"Possibly because anyone booting their own OS in a library"

I wasn't suggesting anyone should boot another OS on a library computer - I'd assume they'd have disallowed that in any case. The OP seemed to suggest that he used a library computer to specifically deal with this sort of e-mail, not for all their computing.

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Chemist
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Re: Hmm

"they were all responded to from a library computer,"

If you really wanted to have 'fun' with this why not use a LiveCD distro ?

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Moscow's speed cameras 'knackered' by MYSTERY malware

Chemist
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Joke

Suspect it's spread by ..

A drive-by download !

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Best Buy takes axe to touchy Windows 8 PCs - lops $100 off price

Chemist
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Joke

Re: or finally ...

"You can't say that for Windows 8 either...."

True - after all people keep saying it's not worth writing malware for an OS with ~1% of the market

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Hands-on with Ubuntu's rudimentary phone and tablet OS

Chemist
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Re: High Hopes

"Hi Chemist"

I don't know what you are going on about - I didn't criticize or dismiss Ubuntu, I merely pointed out via the illustration of another distro that the problems were being sorted out across Linux. Ubuntu may well have been trivial to install but so was Suse

I have Ubuntu in VMs and have installed Kubuntu on EEEPCs but I find the process no easier or harder than OpenSUSE.

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Chemist
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Re: High Hopes

"Remember back to the Linux world before Ubuntu."

Certainly do - Installed my first Linux ~1995. I DON'T remember any particular need for editing config files after I moved to Suse and then OpenSUSE.

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New blow for Microsoft Surface: Touch Chromebooks 'on sale in 2013'

Chemist
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Re: Desktop Wars!!!!!

"Microsoft are currently on an exponential trajectory"

Would that be exponential growth or decay ?

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Microsoft legal beagle calls for patent reform cooperation

Chemist
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Re: Quite Sensible: Don't Throw the Baby Out with the Bathwater

"Big pharma get extensions of term on their patents in most countries."

Big pharma may be able to get extensions of term on their patents in most countries. It's not routine.

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Chemist
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Re: Quite Sensible: Don't Throw the Baby Out with the Bathwater

"similar way to pharmaceuticals - you get ~5 years to use your patents, then it gets opened up.""

In most countries pharma patents are exactly the same as any other 20 years

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Bill Gates: 'Microsoft didn't MISS cell phone' bandwagon

Chemist
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Re: "Bing, people have seen is a better search product ."

"Maybe you're just using the wrong frame of reference "

But it's been mentioned before that a card index is better

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Ubuntu? Fedora? Mint? Debian? We'll find you the right Linux to swallow

Chemist
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Re: @Peter Gathercole

"I can't use the software provided with my Canon DSLR without Windows"

I only use Linux and have 2 Canon DSLRs - I don't find it necessary to use the Canon software.

I can process the raw files to 48bit tifs, adjust exposures etc and drive the camera remotely all from Linux.

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Chemist
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Re: OpenSuSE

"KDE4 is (mostly) fine, but KMail is an inflamed pustule on its nether regions."

So use Thunderbird, that's also installed by default

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Chemist
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Re: "Comfortable with the terminal"

@Michael Habel

NVIDIA drivers install perfectly in my experience (OpenSUSE) and that's on about 10-15 occasions in recent years.

I've never seen "You appear to be running an X server please exit X before installing"

I just install from the NVIDIA repository and logout and back in. NO CLI

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Chemist
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Re: Mint is great but ...

"Security seems to be such an afterthought in Linux with add-ons like SEL and having to run specific file systems to get proper ACLs, instead of having security built in from the ground up like in Windows."

Well you stick with Windows if you are so confident - I know what OS is feel most confident with.

(Are you related to RICHTO because there is an AC whose been posting a lot of funny stuff recently who seem to write just like him ?)

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Chemist
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Re: "Comfortable with the terminal"

"Yes, but you might, just as you might in Windows or OSX"

I did qualify it by saying it enhanced the experience, I also used the words "most modern "

You might well have had a problem with one install of one distro where you needed the command line but most people don't have with most modern distros

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Chemist
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Re: "Comfortable with the terminal"

"Until you want to use something that isn't in the official package manager,"

I do often without using the command-line - the point is that an install and use of the (GUI) installed packages doesn't need the command-line. I'm not against the CLI - indeed I use it all the time as I write a lot of programs as well as building/running scripts but there are far too many people out there who spread the FUD " Linux installations need CLI or programs compiling or whatever else. "

They don't !

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Chemist
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Re: Test 'em first in VMs if you can.

"Nothing worse than downloading an ISO, burning it to disc or USB and then watching it crap out half-way through a real hardware install"

Don't do it then. Use a LiveCD that will not affect your existing setup. Check if the hardware works that way then install.

There are several liveCDs at : http://software.opensuse.org/122/en

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Chemist
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Re: "Comfortable with the terminal"

""Comfortable with the terminal" "

For the last griefing time - You do NOT need to use a command line to install or use most modern Linux distros.

BUT if you do it can greatly enhance the experience.

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Chemist
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Whilst it might be useful to try a few distros I find that long-term sticking with one distro/desktop means a much easier life. Of course I occasionally still try new or 'improved' distros but generally in a VM.

For me OpenSUSE/KDE has proved super stable, easy to install on all sorts of hardware including by USB pendrive and has a wide range of programs including many not actually in the distribution.

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Earth escapes asteroid flyby, boffins want lasers aimed at next one

Chemist
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Re: @JassMan

"Although I think a lot of their experiments are far fetched this is actually an area which the Mythbusters covered quite excellently (in my humble opinion that is)."

I think JassMan has already pointed out above that a number of solar furnaces/power stations using mirror arrays are already established. So Mythbusters or legend means nothing.

See also http://en.wikipedia.org/wiki/Solar_power_tower

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Soak up CO2 with sponges, says CSIRO

Chemist
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Re: Uh, how much energy is required to produce the stuff?

"The MOF is produced using the massive energy of a beam line at the Australian Synchrotron?"

Er, no. The beam-line was used to analyse the structure during the development.

"the development of the materials used the powder diffraction beamline"

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Chemist
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Re: Somebody takes it...

" Somebody takes it...

and hopefully makes some kind of liquid fuel from it"

As mentioned previously.

Carbon burning to CO2 gives off ~400 kJ/mol or ~ 34MJ/kg - there's no other oxidation state to go to - any other chemical change NEEDS energy so it's hardly likely to be a useful power source. Maybe you'd take a hit, use energy to make a new liquid fuel, but it's now just an energy carrier like batteries or hydrogen.

And then it still ends up back in the atmosphere !

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Chemist
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Re: Where are we going to store it?

"There are some uses for CO2 that could soak up some of it"

AFAIK there's no use for CO2 on any significant scale that doesn't return it to the atmosphere eventually

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Chemist
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Re: Where are we going to store it?

"just find a way of using CO2 as a reliable power source"

Is that a joke - in which case I'll let you off otherwise please explain the magic.

Carbon burning to CO2 gives off ~400 kJ/mol or ~ 34MJ/kg - there's no other oxidation state to go to - any other chemical change NEEDS energy so it's hardly likely to be a useful power source

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Chemist
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Re: density of liquid CO2

"and converting the C into something solid like"

and converting the C into something solid like CARBON

In any case the problem is, even in theory, it needs energy, lots and lots of it, indeed somewhat more energy than was obtained by burning the carbon in the first place.

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Chemist
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Re: Ironically...

I think you are confusing a specific chemical with the azobenzene class. As far as I can see a particular azobenzene is bonded to this large-surface area material.

The analogy would be sodium cyanide is very toxic but the cyanide group (a nitrile actually) can be part of an organic molecule without any sig. toxic effects. In fact the breast-cancer treatment Arimidex contains 2 nitriles.

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Scottish uni slams on the Accelerator to boost UK boffinry

Chemist
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Re: Hi!

"but buying processing power on educational/governmental supers"

Agree entirely, we had ( I'm now retired) several in-house Linux clusters of 1024 & 2048 nodes for computationally intensive jobs but would also buy time on more powerful systems. It's the norm in many areas of science.

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Forget wireless power for phones - Korea's doing it for BUSES

Chemist
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Re: How well insulated are steel toecaps?

"he post said copper insoles. No mention of steel toecaps."

Then why was the title " How well insulated are steel toecaps? " ?

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Chemist
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Re: How well insulated are steel toecaps?

"The material needs to be ferrous AFAIK."

And what metal do you suppose steel toecaps are made from ?

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Microsoft! Bing! must! make! Yahoo! more! money! moans! Mayer!

Chemist
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Re: Yahoo!

"They manage to beat Bing in the search engine rankings."

Wouldn't a card index do that ?

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Chemist
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Yahoo!

Remind me what do they actually do ?

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Tesla vs Media AGAIN as Model S craps out on journo - on the highway

Chemist
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Re: how come no one ever mentions the $ to charge these cars

As 85kWh has been used as an example just calculate using whatever your local electricity cost is - here it would be ~£10 excluding any losses. I could travel ~ 90 miles in my diesel for that - mind that weighs 1.7 tonnes and carries 5+2

On the other hand if electric vehicles did take a good portion of the market they'd be taxed in some way

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