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* Posts by Chemist

1953 posts • joined 24 Mar 2010

Microsoft partners seriously underwhelmed by Windows 8.1

Chemist
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Re: Windows 7?

"Time for the Henry Ford quote again: "If I made what my customers wanted, I'd be making faster horses.""

Difference is that HIS customers bought the product

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UK sitting on top of at least 50 years of shale gas – report

Chemist
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Re: HS2

"What benefit? HS2 goes nowhere near Manchester."

What !

HS2 - love it or loath it is intended to run from London - Birmingham and then branch to Manchester and Leeds. The (eye-watering) costs are in the news currently.

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Boffins create tabletop ANTIMATTER GUN

Chemist
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Re: Cool

"rather unpleasant if we have a few hundred kilograms of antimatter depart containment inside of the Earth's magnetosphere"

It's an antimatter catalyzed process. It's supposed to only require <micrograms of antiprotons

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Chemist
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Re: "doesn't actually risk the earth-shattering kaboom of a matter-antimatter annihilation."

"all we have to do is build an interstellar starship"

Oh, is that all. Driven by ?

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Chemist
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Re: "doesn't actually risk the earth-shattering kaboom of a matter-antimatter annihilation."

"The laser itself would do a pretty good job of that..."

It's only 20J per pulse so the 'owners' say that it would give you a nasty burn which would likely make you jump out of the way of the next pulse.

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Chemist
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"doesn't actually risk the earth-shattering kaboom of a matter-antimatter annihilation."

Oh, good grief!

The size of the bang depends entirely on how much anti-matter you have. Given it takes an inordinate amount of energy to generate a miniscule amount of antimatter then getting even a decent size 'pop' will probably bankrupt us.

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Sir Maurice Wilkes centenary - 'Flash-Gordon' tech

Chemist
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This all very well but..

I thought that the Manchester 'baby' was the first electronic stored-program computer in June 1948 and led to the Mk1 and the Ferranti Mk1 ( first commercially available computer). There's a plaque on the wall recording the event near Manchester Dental Hospital

My physics teacher had worked on the Manchester computers and had a photo of himself, stripped to the waist, working in a sweltering nightmare of racks holding chassis. The 'baby' was apparently 17 feet (5.2 m) in length, 7 feet 4 inches (2.24 m) tall, and weighed almost 1 long ton (1.0 t).

As a by-note I started in electronics at ~13 years old with valves, first a regenerative radio and then a record player with a valve amplifier

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Mint 15 freshens Ubuntu's bad bits

Chemist
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Re: Alternative to Windows?

"Hi AC, you obviously have bad vibes with Linux"

He's RICHTO/TheVogon just trolling - does it all the time, often as AC.

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Nissan to enter 300 kmh electric car in Le Mans endurance race

Chemist
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Re: Electric racing vehicles

"All that's needed is a cheap method of extracting the universe's most abundant element from a source - sea water probably."

Depends what you mean by cheap. You still need a source of energy at least equivalent to the energy that you are going to get back by 'burning' the hydrogen. And that assumes a method of generating hydrogen at high efficiency and that hopefully doesn't involve carbon. Electrolysis doesn't look too good at the moment even with a lot of development.

Storage and distribution of hydrogen is still a big issue.

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Tor users locked out of Facebook after wave of dodgy traffic

Chemist
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Users of the Tor traffic anonymizing service are currently locked out of Facebook

This is a problem ?

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Chrome and Firefox are planet-wreckers, IE cuddles dolphins

Chemist
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Re: Any power consumption results by OS?

"26 000 litre of oil....."

So even at a conservative estimate of 20p per litre for the oil that would be £5200 per computer just for the energy - better upgrade your memory

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Sneaky new Android Trojan is WORST yet discovered

Chemist
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Re: Couple of questions

"Who says it was an app?"

As the link in the article states :-

"Recently, an Android application came to us for analysis"

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Boffins develop 'practically free' sulphur-powered batteries

Chemist
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Re: Lucas Electric Vehicles,1980s called, your sodium-sulphur battery experience is needed

"Are you confusing hydrogen sulphide?"

NO, I'm a chemist - hydrogen sulfide IS VERY toxic but sulfur dioxide is also toxic at the 10 ppm kind of level. One of the major hazards of carbon disulfide, a extremely flammable solvent is the rapid production of sulfur dioxide during a fire. Although many materials are more toxic than sulfur dioxide the fact that 32 g of sulfur can produce 22.4L of sulfur dioxide which is still toxic when diluted with ~ 2 million litres of air would concern me.

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Chemist
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Re: Lucas Electric Vehicles,1980s called, your sodium-sulphur battery experience is needed

"downwind proximity to a large pile of burning Sulfur."

Sulfur dioxide is a VERY toxic material by inhalation.

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Microsoft and FBI storm ramparts of Citadel botnets

Chemist
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Re: I'd never trust non-techies with Windows online.

"How are things at Burston Marsteller today, Mr AC?"

He's not MR AC- he's The Vogon/RICHTO and many other AC posts that are all so obviously from the same person it's pathetic.

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Petascale powerhouse cracks important HIV code

Chemist
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"Ebola is a retrovirus,"

As indeed is AIDS

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Chemist
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" but the mutation that made so also weakened it to give flue like symptoms. In which case the human race dodged a bullet that day."

If that's is true/confirmed (the link doesn't work) then it actually sounds like a candidate for a vaccine

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Chemist
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"we all be up shit creek?"

Unfortunately the only answer is perhaps. If it was as infective, that is to say that there were very few people that had a natural resistance then the population would be decimated without any drug or more likely vaccine breakthroughs - luckily most infections tend to adapt to their hosts and become less aggressive. Let's hope it doesn't happen.

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How Microsoft shattered Gnome's unity with Windows 95

Chemist
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Re: To be fair to MS... @Eadon

@Don Jefe

Many distros will install a goodly selection of applications by default and have a GUI package manager that lets the user browse and install/uninstall more. This is what OpenSuse does. The default KDE install includes LibreOffice, an editor, GIMP and other photo programs including a panorama creator, Firefox, audio & video players, CD burner, e-mail, file-manager, rdc and a console ( and lots of other stuff )

All, by the way, on a hierarchical start menu

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Chemist
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Re: Perhaps a little research ?

I think it's perfectly reasonable to research an area, any area, before diving in. To just suggest that the command-line is needed to install a package on Linux without actually knowing that it isn't just shows a kind of arrogance.

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Chemist
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Re: Perhaps a little research ?

"yeah, maybe start by trawling through the internet to find the specific command line needed to extract the package and install it?"

NO !. I install all packages from a GUI and have for years ( certainly since SUSE 4.0)

By research I meant a little research would show plenty of Linux distros where all packages could be installed by GUI ( if that''s what you want ).

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Chemist
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Re: So in summary..

"Even installing basic apps I needed to go trawling through the internet to find the specific command line needed to extract the package and installl it"

Well I've been using SUSE and then OpenSUSE since you had to pay for it and it's never needed any of this. Perhaps a little research ?

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Former Microsoft Windows chief: I was right to kill the Start button

Chemist
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Re: jumping ship

"When average Consumer Joe goes looking for a printer... and doesn't see anything about Linux Support on the printer box... then as far as they are rightfully concerned.... that printer does NOT support Linux."

The average consumer isn't likely to care because they will have purchased a computer with Windows already installed as do the vast majority - partly because they don't know anything else and partly because it's nigh impossible to buy one with Linux already installed.

Anyone, like me, who assemble their own boxes are far more likely to know about Linux and also check the the suitability of peripherals.

As to Photoshop - if what you want to do is a little level or curve adjustment, resize, crop and sharpening of photos and/or RAW conversion then there are plenty of programs available for Linux including several using 16 bits/plane and I don't mean GIMP.

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Chemist
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Re: jumping ship

"its stupid when people say "Just use Linux""

Depends entirely on what you are doing ! I don't need or have access to Windows now I'm retired.

I process RAW digital photos, edit 1080p/50 HD video, design and layout PCBs, program PIC microcontrollers, write software in c, tcl and assembler, and do all the other usual stuff. I have a 3G dongle for my laptop and netbook that just works, several printers/scanners, Skype, Google Earth etc.

Linux is there if it fits your needs. We have 6 machines running it.

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Chemist
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Re: jumping ship

"*NEED* to make standard printer/scanner drivers that work out of the box"

I've used Epson lasers, Samsung Lasers, Brother lasers, Epson photo and Epson printer/scanners - only the latter gave any problems but that was sorted several releases of OpenSuse ago. I've never needed to go to a manufacture's site - all the necessary was in the distro.

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Chemist
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Re: jumping ship

" I'm working out a plan to migrate everything I can to Linux of some breed."

Good luck with this. After years of PDPs & VAX I moved to a mix of Linux and Windows systems professionally where Windows was used for the corporate guff like e-mail and PP, Word and Linux was used for the big complex scientific software that ran over nights & weekends. At home I was using Linux more or less from the start + Windows. Around ~2004 I switched entirely to Linux for home use and have found no real problem in doing everything I want ( RAW photo processing, HD video editing, programming and the usual stuff + all the scientific software I need)

If you can do everything you want then go for it - I've used OpenSuse for years and would recommend finding a distro you like AND STICKING with it. Even after all these years I still use a Live CD or equivalent first to check for any snags. In fact I carry a USB stick around with a 32-bit version on my keyring.

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Elon Musk pledges transcontinental car juicers by end of year

Chemist
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"Depreciation of the battery is factored into the headline rate of the electricity."

That's what I'm saying - but many people will think that they'll be paying cost of electricity + garage profit. However the depreciation charge will be the majority of the bill.

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Chemist
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"so you just pull into a garage when your battery is low and they swap it out for a fully charged unit."

Must also remember that the cost of a 'swap will need to include quite a large charge for depreciation of the battery.

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COLD FUSION is BACK with 'anomalous heat' claim

Chemist
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Devil

Scientiic Method

1) Get rich fools to buy systems off this guy

2) Allow to run

3) Measure success/failure by number of law suites (even rich fools have lawyers)

I hate the smell of snake-oil esp. in the morning

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Windows 8 'sales' barely half as good as Microsoft claims

Chemist
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Re: @Flocke Kroes - If I wanted high Linux usage figures ...

"Android has nothing to do with Linux"

What !

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Penguins in spa-a-a-ce! ISS dumps Windows for Linux on laptops

Chemist
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Re: Fuming

"somehow you think an astronauts "real work......."

I'm amazed that a Vogon doesn't know about working in space, mind they are a right bunch of bureaucrats.

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Microsoft: All RIGHT, you can have your Start button back

Chemist
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Re: Microsoft's strategy is FAILING

"great idea if you don't mind spending weeks rewriting drivers and other crap to get it to work at all "

You do a lot of that do you ? I don't seem to need to !

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Why next iPhone screen could be made of SAPPHIRE - and a steal...

Chemist
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"Must try harder"

Standard plain glass is silica (silicon dioxide)

NO it isn't - it's a mix of sodium and calcium silicates + various other bibs and bobs

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Brit horologist hammers out ‘first’ ATOMIC-POWERED watch

Chemist
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"Must try harder"

"and a microwave resonator to detect the emissions from the atoms’ electrons as they change energy levels as part of the radioactive decay."

"and a microwave resonator to detect the emissions from the atoms’ electrons as they change energy levels" -Fixed

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Microsoft carves out 'niche' in tablets, says numbers chap

Chemist
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Re: Growing market...

I read it as "carved out zilch in tablets"

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Linux in 2013: 'Freakishly awesome' – and who needs a fork?

Chemist
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Re: And yet, and yet ...

"Have you seen how big RTFs can get when you start including pictures?"

Have you seen how big anything can get when you start including pictures? - fixed.

What's different about rtf+pics and Word documents+pics ?

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Survey: FOSS biz fans aching for 'enterprise-class' support

Chemist
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Re: LO instead of MS Office...

"https://bugs.freedesktop.org"

If the document in question is the 38 page one ( in Dutch ?) I find that in LO 3.6 running under OpenSUSE 12.3 -32 bit. the document occupies 24MB more than an empty document on initial loading. Scrolling this increases memory use to ~50MB but then this stabilizes and on further scrolling the memory use varies in the range 30 -50 MB. Scrolling a lot uses ~75% cpu but that's on an old 1.6 GHz Celeron laptop with 1GB memory.

I don't know if this is a 64-bit version issue - I'll try when I'm back home - but I can't reproduce on this laptop.

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Chemist
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Re: The FOSS bubble @Chemist

Hello AC - what do you think ?

The Vogon & RICHTO often post as AC judging by their syntax, bad grammar and general ranting - who, indeed, are you ?

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Chemist
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Re: The FOSS bubble

AC gives advice - why would anyone listen ?

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Netbooks projected to become EXTINCT by 2015

Chemist
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Re: @cstumpi @Peter Gathercole

" I can't see Chemist ever admitting any problems with his installs."

Of course I had problems - in the early days compiling kernels, graphics adapters always had some sort of issue or other. I'm sure if I needed some exotic hardware now I might well have problems.

But I do a little research, don't install new distros immediately they come out and sometimes need to be patient. (for example when I got a then new Canon 550D, Dave Craw's RAW converter dcraw wouldn't handle it, a week or two later it did). On the other hand some hardware has been easier to install like my 3G dongle, where plenty of people have complained about Windows installation.

BTW "Well, it works fine for me" are usually avoiding the issue"

Which 'issue' - if people are having problems that can be one or more of LOTS of issues - we are not going to be able to sort that out here. All individuals can do in most circumstances is report their experiences - you have mine.

Thanks for being AC by the way it really boosts your credibility !

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Chemist
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Re: Simple Explanation - MS MURDERED THE NETBOOK

" Linux on laptop sucks"

OpenSUSE works on all laptops I've tried - admittedly only 4 of which the current Lenovo 3000 N100 runs 12.3, Asus 901 runs, at present 11.3. WiFi works fine, sleep, 3G dongle, bluetooth all fine. I didn't select the hardware specifically for Linux other than the 901.

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BlackBerry slams Z10 returns report as 'false and misleading'

Chemist
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Re: Ahh BB10 Finally

"nb - did you know Windows Phone is now outselling Blackberry by almost 6:1 in the US? (07% market share versus 4.1%)"

Ah, that would explain this graph then, no wait

http://regmedia.co.uk/2013/04/05/us_smartphone_market_share_os.jpg

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The gloves are on: Nokia emits super-sensitive £99 Windows Phone

Chemist
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Re: "The Lumia 620 has been well-received, and deservedly so"

"Yep - by miles: http://blog.laptopmag.com/windows-phone-sales-see-global-gains-while-blackberry-falters"

The main thing that table seems to show is how badly both Blackberry AND MS are doing

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Windows 7 'security' patch knocks out PCs, knackers antivirus tools

Chemist
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Re: Windows Security Patches + Anti-Virus considered Harmful

"I simply don't believe this"

Believe what you like - I'm a physical scientist and not used to being economical with the truth. I regularly use the command-line for all sorts of jobs but, with the exception of the Android in a VM I haven't used the command-line to INSTALL a distro for years. I have stuck with SUSE however.

You don't have to believe me plenty of other people here have stated exactly the same.

Commercial software is different - it's down to the developers and in any case isn't the same as installing a distro. I've used some extremely expensive protein modeling software that was rather a handful to install and use.

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Chemist
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Re: Windows Security Patches + Anti-Virus considered Harmful @Eadon

"http://www.theregister.co.uk/2013/03/19/carna_botnet_ipv4_internet_map/"

You are joking ? How many Linux desktops have telnet activated by default - none I've used since ~~1998

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Chemist
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Re: Windows Security Patches + Anti-Virus considered Harmful

"It was about 10 years ago."

Right !

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Chemist
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Re: Windows Security Patches + Anti-Virus considered Harmful

"I must just be really unlucky with my choice of machines"

Well I've installed on a dual-core atom ITX, Asus netbook, 5 misc desktops and Lenovo & HP laptops. I've got 3G dongles, USB/serial convertors, Epson scanner/printer, 3 WiFi , laser printer and heaps more all without problems. Maybe the distribution ?

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Chemist
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Re: Windows Security Patches + Anti-Virus considered Harmful

"due in part to all the command line pissing about to get it working properly"

Just to clarify - I've installed Linux ~6 times a year since ~2000 without needing to use the command-line. That's almost always SUSE or OpenSUSE. The only exception to this was installing x86 Android to a VM when a bit of tinkering was needed to get the networking going.

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Chemist
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Re: Windows Security Patches + Anti-Virus considered Harmful

"due in part to all the command line pissing about to get it working properly"

FUD !

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