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* Posts by Chemist

1855 posts • joined 24 Mar 2010

Windows 7 'security' patch knocks out PCs, knackers antivirus tools

Chemist
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Re: Windows Security Patches + Anti-Virus considered Harmful

"due in part to all the command line pissing about to get it working properly"

Just to clarify - I've installed Linux ~6 times a year since ~2000 without needing to use the command-line. That's almost always SUSE or OpenSUSE. The only exception to this was installing x86 Android to a VM when a bit of tinkering was needed to get the networking going.

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Chemist
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Re: Windows Security Patches + Anti-Virus considered Harmful

"due in part to all the command line pissing about to get it working properly"

FUD !

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Space elevators, vacuum chutes: What next for big rocket tech?

Chemist
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Re: Fuels

Definitely ethanol/water/LOX. As stated above peroxide (+ permanganate) to generate steam for the pumps

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Shaky liftoff for Sputnik: Dell's Linux lappie runs its own cloud, ish

Chemist
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Re: What a surprise! Linux is STILL not ready for the desktop!

"sorry, I mean a driver for each linux fragment of 1%"

AFAIK the drivers are the same for all distros and are distributed with the kernel

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Chemist
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What a surprise! Linux is STILL not ready for the desktop!

"- and which brand of laptop is that?"

Well mine are a Lenovo 3000 N100 and an Asus 901 and yes everything works every time

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German boffins aim to burn natural gas - WITHOUT CO2 emissions

Chemist
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Re: I've forgotten how to do the calculations...

@JeffyPooh

AFAIK ( I'm traveling and don't have access to my usual references)

C +2H2 > CH4 is exothermic by ~~75kJ/mol so at NTP it need energy to split. At 1000C it looks as though the equilibrium allows at least some hydrogen and carbon to exist and be separable. There will be some entropic gain going to hydrogen and carbon so that may compensate somewhat.

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Microsoft to slap 9 patches on Windows junkies on Tuesday

Chemist
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Re: More Windows Rot

"roughly an order of magnitude more patches to contend with"

Well of course they have, ALL the software is capable of being patched, mostly I might add for improvements not security problems. But this goes on in the background as the distributions are updated. I installed OpenSUSE 12.3 a week ago ( that's about 6GB of software I have installed ) and each day has produced 1-10 updates but they don't cause me any probs. and of course hardly ever require reboots.

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Bank card-slurp nasty 'infects tills, ATMs', corrupt staff fingered

Chemist
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Re: I wouldn't mind so much

"I wouldn't mind so much if they were stealing from big faceless corporations rather than innocent members of the public."

I think you actually meant "I wouldn't mind so much if they were stealing from innocent members of the public by causing big faceless corporations to pass on the costs of fraud".

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Model S 'leccycar selling better than expected, says Tesla

Chemist
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Re: Leccy? No!!

"Is Reuters lying?"

Someone is ! Just because Germany may have produced 50% of it's requirement on one light load day on a sunny day in May does not mean that 50% of German electricity is produced by solar.

Reuters was reporting not understanding. Germany produces most of it's electricity from coal & gas. The most generous estimates of all renewables is ~20%

Compiled by Prof. Bruno Burger, Fraunhofer ISE

August 30, 2012

PV plants produced 19.5 TWh electricity in 2011. This is an increase of 65% compared to 2010. The share of solar energy of the gross power generation was 3.2%. In 2011 PV produced more energy than hydro power for the first time. Wind turbines produced 46.5 TWh in 2011 and increased their production by 23% compared to 2010. The share of wind energy of the gross power generation was 7.6%. Wind energy is the strongest renewable energy source in Germany.

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Chemist
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Re: Leccy? No!!

"Germany now produces more than half of it electricity from solar alone "

Nonsense !

"Solar already rivals existing hydro in Germany and solar PV's contribution is increasing dramatically. In 2011 it supplied 3% of total generation in Germany and is expected to reach 4% or more of total generation in 2012."

http://www.renewableenergyworld.com/rea/news/article/2012/10/german-coal-fired-generation-of-electricity-falls-while-renewable-generation-rises

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Reg man goes time travelling at iconic observatory

Chemist
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Re: Is there a physicist in the house?

"pretend you have a dish a couple of hundred kilometres across"

That's for angular resolution, but it has a small collecting area so weak signal. The SKA has that and much more AND an actual collecting area of 1 square kilometre.

That's a very rough summary of my knowledge but then I'm a chemist ( Einstein said that the trouble with chemistry was that it was too difficult for chemists"

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No, really: Austrians develop hi-tech jewellery made out of concrete

Chemist
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Re: @Chemist (was: Build one out of)

Well I see what you mean !

By the way has anyone read the book " Pyke : The Unknown Genius" or some similar title

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Chemist
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Re: Build one out of

" Build one out of pykrete. " - that's COOL !

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Microsoft, Adobe, wilt during Australian price gouge grilling

Chemist
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Re: Gouging

"Do you honestly think if you told them to feck off .."

They might think you have some backbone, are prepared to be different and adaptable

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Victoria and Albert museum in narrow escape from Napalm Death

Chemist
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Re: Sublime

"Disaster Area, a plutonium rock band from the Gagrakacka Mind Zones, are generally held to be not only the loudest rock band in the Galaxy, but in fact the loudest noise of any kind at all. Regular concert goers judge that the best sound balance is usually to be heard from within large concrete bunkers some thirty-seven miles from the stage, whilst the musicians themselves play their instruments by remote control from within a heavily insulated spaceship which stays in orbit around the planet - or more frequently around a completely different planet.

Their songs are on the whole very simple and mostly follow the familiar theme of boy-being meets girl-being beneath a silvery moon, which then explodes for no adequately explored reason.

Many worlds have now banned their act altogether, sometimes for artistic reasons, but most commonly because the band's public address system contravenes local strategic arms limitations treaties.

This has not, however, stopped their earnings from pushing back the boundaries of pure hypermathematics, and their chief research accountant has recently been appointed Professor of Neomathematics at the University of Maximegalon, in recognition of both his General and his Special Theories of Disaster Area Tax Returns, in which he proves that the whole fabric of the space- time continuum is not merely curved, it is in fact totally bent. "

Thanks Douglas

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Cyberspies send ZOMBIES to steal DRUGS from medical research firms

Chemist
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Re: Why sell a cure for baldness when I can sell you a pill that stops your hair falling out as long

"A product that actually cures your condition (so you don't need to keep buying it) is actually a failure "

It must be nice to be so far removed from detailed knowledge of medical conditions to be able comfortably believe that.

There are really only two classes of condition. Acute - usually infections by viruses, bacteria and fungi. Viruses are hard but some short course treatments are available for some. Bacteria and fungi can be tackled by short courses although the nature of the organism or location of the infection can often require longer treatments esp. some fungal infections due to the difficulty of achieving therapeutic levels in, for example nails.

Some cancers can also be treated as acute problems depending on the mechanism being attacked.

Chronic conditions are very common, a product of life-style, genetics and environment. Reversing the disease in these conditions is MUCH less likely. A good example would be osteoarthritis where the damage to the joint may never be reparable. Here the aim of treatment may be to slow down the degeneration and ease pain. Ultimately large joints are best treated by replacements. Other chronic conditions like maturity onset diabetes again can't be simply reversed by drug treatment and in any case may require large scale changes to diet & exercise .

Ultimately many of the diseases may be tackled by vaccinations, gene therapy, stem-cell therapy, antibodies and life-style changes - these are still in many cases unknowns and potentially expensive unknowns.

By the way the current worries about antibiotic resistance are partly the result of the cost research combined with the limited returns due to the short treatment courses. The manufacturing costs of new, effective antibiotics can be enormous. I heard of one where the manufactured cost of the drug - which was enormous due to the length of the synthesis - was itself dwarfed by the cost of getting the lyophilised drug into a sterile sealed glass phial.

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Reg live natter with GNOME superstar Miguel de Icaza

Chemist
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Re: Respect for the man, but didn't use his products

"I stayed with SUSE & openSUSE over the years and their default KDE desktops"

Ditto. Only time I used Gnome extensively was at work with RedHat.

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SCADA honeypots attract swarm of international hackers

Chemist
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Re: This just in

"Interesting as I don' see that at all. I specifically moved the port to get rid of all the stupid login scans in the log..."

Same here. Although I see attempts all the time on standard port I've never seen ANY on my (very non-standard port). Mind of course it's just one of the mitigation measures and I certainly wouldn't rely on it alone.

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Researcher sets up illegal 420,000 node botnet for IPv4 internet map

Chemist
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Re: Give the researcher a medal!

"Most routers I've come across only provide a ssh login on the internal interface."

Eh ?

How would you get in from outside then. I have mine set-up to port forward ssh to an internal server for the purposes of remote access and reverse proxy use. Nothing wrong with ssh as long as it's up-to-date and has sufficient security - the real problem is exposing telnet or web interfaces to the outside by default with weak usernames/passwords

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Chemist
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Re: Linux

" 99% of Windows exploits require user interaction, whereas 99% of Linux exploits don't."

HaHaHa!

By the way you've SO missed the point. These are devices configured badly with open telnet ports and bad defaults. The chances ANY of them run Windows seems vanishingly small.

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Sysadmins: Let's perch on Microsoft Santa's lap, show him our wish list

Chemist
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Re: @anons

" they have essentially no commercial competition"

Yes I know the reasons for that. I was trying to point out the consequences not the reason. The fact that most of the world has managed to lock itself into a very unhealthy situation bodes very badly for costs and innovation. Even Trevor is suggesting giving MS even more money ( & power of course) in exchange for a few crumbs, admittedly crumbs he wants.

I don't know what can be done about it in the short term other than the change to mobile devices and a much healthier mix of OSs - I'm just glad that me and mine are completely out of it.

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Chemist
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Re: @anons

Your answer, wonderful as it might seem to you, still doesn't address the problem that Microsoft essentially holds the world in a grip of their own deriving. They are out to make as much money as possible of course but they have essentially no commercial competition and up to date they have been able to do much as they like - that's now changing.

By the way you seem awfully familiar , with the same stilted views, right down to the icon. Are you of the prostetnic class really ?

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Chemist
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"Imagine if there was no Microsoft"

I'd just settle for several competing vendors so that 'lock-in' didn't happen. Funny how 'everyone' ( by which I actually mean WP supporters) insist that the mobile phone market needs several competing companies

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Drilling into 3D printing: Gimmick, revolution or spooks' nightmare?

Chemist
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Re: Part of the process

"But can't a 3D printer make a copy of the object to be cast in iron"

Don't see why not - the only complication is scaling the pattern to allow for the shrinkage of different metals in casting. These patterns used to be made in wood and various non-standard rulers were used to get the correct size for the finished product AFAIK

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OpenSUSE 12.3: Proof not all Linux PCs are Um Bongo-grade bonkers

Chemist
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Re: Linux as a desktop is a failure, its time to move on

@the J to the C; The Vogon

I think you'd be better rushing over to some of the other forums where MS is under direct attack !

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Chemist
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Re: KDE submenus still don't work

"Never noticed this problem on any of them."

Thanks for reminding me about VNC - I've just opened a session to my dual-core Atom fileserver and even though this can be a little laggy depending on what else is going on the KDE menus are fine.

(For anyone complaining that I have a desktop on a fileserver the machine actually has many functions some of which are better with a GUI)

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Chemist
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Re: Linux as a desktop is a failure, its time to move on

"However there is no compelling reason for the average Joe Public to switch "

There is no likelihood 'Joe Public' as you call them will switch anymore than if all PCs came with Linux installed and people had to choose to switch to Windows.

1% market share, whatever that means, is a great percentage when people have to CHOOSE to change.

Given how disparaging you are about Linux I'm amazed you feel the need to bang on about it as though it threatens you in some way.

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Chemist
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Re: KDE submenus still don't work

"Ah I see. "Works for me, thus the other poster must be a liar (despite their supplying evidence)""

Not calling anyone a liar, I can only report what I find, no menu problems on 6 different machines with various OpenSUSEs/KDEs. After many years of using KDE I've never seen this problem

How about other KDE users ?

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Chemist
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Re: KDE submenus still don't work

""Works for me, thus the other poster must be a liar "

It does work for me, further on reading the bug-reports I can't see what they are talking about.

Click on a menu, menu drops down, slide down to a sub-menu item, sub-menu opens, slide across, ditto if there are any further sub-sub menus. No lag, no problems.

Of course replying to a group of individual ACs isn't the easiest - or are they all one person, and why the need for AC - it's not a confidential topic.Or have you reason to think that you might not get a warm welcome.

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Chemist
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Re: Upgraded. Hoping my NVidia card would still work..

"you look at any tutorial (assuming you network card actually works) you'll see the CLI"

Are you sure ? That's a rhetorical question actually as I know that you are not.

Try http://linux.about.com/od/linux101/a/desktop14.htm

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Chemist
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Re: Upgraded. Hoping my NVidia card would still work..

"want to share a folder?"

As it happens although I don't normally need Samba being all Linux so use NFS , my wife needed access to the fileserver for her Nexus 7 and Android phone. As the filemanager we'd installed on the Androids needed Samba I set it up on the fileserver. It took a handful of clicks. on the YAST GUI to get it working.

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Chemist
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Re: KDE submenus still don't work

"Then you clearly do not use KDE"

I use KDE all day, every day. I'm writing this on it now. Menus are all fine

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Chemist
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Re: Upgraded. Hoping my NVidia card would still work..

"It was good to see the troll being totally ignored"

It was but as you see I answered almost certainly the same one below. The reason is simple, experienced users of Linux know he's a troll, interested onlookers might actually believe some of the garbage spouted.

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Chemist
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Re: Eh? Wifi?

You might have run foul of this problem :

http://lizards.opensuse.org/2013/03/13/one-that-got-away-12-3-networking/

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Chemist
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Re: Upgraded. Hoping my NVidia card would still work..

"The truth is that every OEM and service (e.g. Netflix, AMD, Broadcom...) supports Windows, almost none support Linux.

Broadcom : http://www.broadcom.com/support/802.11/linux_sta.php

Intel : http://www.intel.com/support/wireless/sb/cs-006408.htm

AMD : http://support.amd.com/us/gpudownload/linux/Pages/radeon_linux.aspx

NVIDIA : http://www.nvidia.com/object/unix.html

Even your beloved Microsoft is contributing to the kernel.

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Chemist
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Re: KDE submenus still don't work

"KDE submenus still don't work "

Nonsense, absolute nonsense. Never seen anything like that and IF I had it would be fixed rapidly.

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Chemist
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Re: Linux as a desktop is a failure, its time to move on

"Stuff Just Works."

Agree entirely. I've used SUSE & OpenSUSE for years at home, certainly since SUSE 5.0, and I've used RH at work again for years.

Installation on a wide variety of hardware has generally been trouble free even years ago and these days I'd no more expect to have a problem than I would expect to compile the kernel or use the CLI for installation. (I notice one of the usual troublemakers is spreading that FUD at the moment and in doing so is displaying the depths of his ignorance)

OpenSUSE is my only desktop these days and I also use it on my file/odds&sods/proxy server. 3 machines of 6 have wireless networking which never gives a problem ( and I travel a lot with a laptop or netbook and connect to all manner of access points ). I have a NVidia accelerated graphics card on one machine that I do 1080p/50 video editing on, scanner/printer and laser printer, webcam, RAW photo processing.

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Chemist
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"called a folder view."

Yes, I tend to have several on my desktop, regularly used program links in one and regularly used documents and network directories in another

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New nuke could POWER WORLD UNTIL 2083

Chemist
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Re: connected to a drain plug of salt that has been frozen solid

"Although the idea of disolving stuff in molten salt is quite enthralling."

It's common in many industrial processes already e.g. aluminium production. Note that the article should say a salt not salt which many might take to be sodium chloride.

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Ten pi-fect projects for your new Raspberry Pi

Chemist
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Re: How is that "netbook" running Windows?

That's, in fact, why I asked my question above as I couldn't see anything running Windows.

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Chemist
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Re: How is that "netbook" running Windows?

What netbook ?

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Boffins build robo-CHIMP for DARPA challenge

Chemist
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Re: So is it a tele operated remote handler or a true robot?

"So is it a tele operated remote handler or a true robot? "

Both

""Humans provide high-level control, while the robot provides low-level reflexes and self-protective behaviors. This enables CHIMP to be highly capable without the complexity associated with a fully autonomous robot.""

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Enormo-display Apple iPhone prototype surfaces

Chemist
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Re: RS232 is still relevant

"RS232 is still relevant "

Almost everything I do with PIC microcontrollers has a 232 interface along the lines of :

PIC-232----232/USB convertor ---- Linux daemon---client programs.

For quick look sees I find it a lot easier than PIC-USB

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New UK cyber-champ: Chemist's winning formula cracks 'F1 race hack'

Chemist
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Re: What does it say?

"when the winner of their most elaborate competition is an untrained chemist?"

Now security I will accept is rather a specialist area.

On the other hand some of the best programmers I've ever met in industry and academia have not been IT specialists. Many have been originally scientists, who writing for their own needs at first, as scientists often need to, have found a niche and moved full-time into scientific programming. Others whilst not getting their hands 'dirty' writing code have generated some wonderful novel algorithms to apply to complex scientific problems.

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Microsoft preps UPDATE EVERYTHING patch batch

Chemist
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Re: FUD

@AC 10.19

Your OWN link doesn't mention remote exploits at all !

It only mentions local exploits and remote password guessing/bruteforcing

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Chemist
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Re: Silverlight is widely used as an alternative to Flash @Irongut

"I'm going to go for arginine and proline."

Don't know who your post was directed to. If it was me and you're suggesting that arginine and proline are rare then think again. Arginine is very common, being one of those amino acids found on the surface of proteins and is also the source of the vasodilator nitric oxide that we all depend on, proline is also common especially in collagen where it is post-translationally modified to hydroxy-proline and seems necessary to generate the triple helix form of collagen.

On the other hand if you didn't mean me have a good weekend.

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Chemist
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Re: FUD

@CreosoteChris

I think you missed the point - the FUD was directed at opensource update mechanisms.

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Chemist
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Re: Silverlight is widely used as an alternative to Flash @Irongut

"A lot of people could say they couldn't name 2 amino acids."

That's a very strange way of stating the bl**ding obvious. Most people can't know most things, given the size & complexity of the universe .

Now I can name all the amino acids and indeed some rather rare variants - but I don't know many sites that use Silverlight

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World's 'smallest' mobe unveiled in Japan

Chemist
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Re: The terrible word 'phablet'

"Tablerone"

Never used a triangular screen but at least it gets around Apple's so-called patents. Mind the Swiss'll be after you.

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