* Posts by Chemist

2395 posts • joined 24 Mar 2010

SpaceX adds Mars haulage to its price list

Chemist
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Re: I assume...

"That's to Mars orbit or even less, "the general direction of Mars". A lander/rover is going to be less weight than the entire package."

A Landrover is going to weigh less than the entire package !

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'Impossible' EmDrive flying saucer thruster may herald new theory of inertia

Chemist
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Re: The first hint you are reading an Orlowski article

"Let me state the Method Position as follows:

There is something called the scientific method, and someone who understands this method will be able to understand all of science, regardless of the specific subject matter that person has been taught. Thus the goal of science education should be to teach that method.

It's hard for me to understand how anyone could hold a position that is so clearly untenable."

This all nonsense. I note that you've already admitted being rather rusty about Physics. I suggest your sense of logic and indeed commonsense is also lacking.

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Chemist
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Re: The first hint you are reading an Orlowski article

"Needless to say I was told not to ask such questions by my teachers. Happy now?"

No ! You seem to be suggesting that scientific is something uttered by a scientist . The scientific method is not that. It's the scientific method that needs to be applied to problems. The practitioner might be right or wrong in their application, deduction or even mathematics and being human may well be influenced by fear, greed and prejudice but others will eventually test re-test, argue and adjust.

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Chemist
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Re: The first hint you are reading an Orlowski article

"Try reading some and you might be surprised."

Oddly enough for a physical scientist I have read a few.

You didn't answer any of my points BTW

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Chemist
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Re: "But it can't work if we can't explain how it works, can it?"

"We can't explain gravity,"

What ! We can explain it as well as many other forces. GR makes many startling predictions from its rather ( for non-physicists) exotic mathematics. and when tested is shown to provide correct predictions. Sure it probably isn't complete or maybe will be refined or displaced one day.

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Chemist
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Re: The first hint you are reading an Orlowski article

"Other scientific horseshit includes:

Columbus being the first person to realise the Earth is a sphere."

What particular usage of scientific are you using here ? Someone or other may have said it, it may have been the common belief among even 'educated' people but scientific ?

Ditto : "Gravity in outer space is zero", "Medieval scholars etc"

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Chemist
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Re: @Chemist

"The reason we talk about rest mass is precisely because a particle has an "effective mass" or "relativistic mass" "

I know why we talk about rest mass - the point is that a photon has no mass otherwise it couldn't travel at c.

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Chemist
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Re: I think _I_ can explain it (and it's not that hard)

"If you're equating the energy of a photon to an 'effective mass' via an e=mc^2 equivalence"

Which you shouldn't really AFAIK. A particle of zero rest mass has no increase in mass with velocity - indeed it is constrained to travel at c at all times in a vacuum.

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Chemist
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Re: I think _I_ can explain it (and it's not that hard)

"the photon mass is involved in how gravity affects it, and was part of the proof of Einstein's theory of relativity back in the day, when stars were observed to have "moved" due to their relative position near the sun during an eclipse."

No it wasn't ! Einstein's theory of gravity involves mass/energy curving spacetime and light then following the shortest path in that spacetime.

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CERN publishes massive data set

Chemist
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Re: Barn ?

"Yep, already a unit. I use it when I'm dealing with fission, and yes, there already are femtobarns."

I think the author already knows it's a unit - they were just trying to put it into a 'Reg' unit. Unfortunately as mention above it's an area Not a volume - so they should really look at the area of the door of the great barn unless they can find a bigger door on some other barn.

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Chemist
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Barn ?

"ver alive to the possibilities of new standard unit, decided that a Barn has to be suitably imposing, such as the 4,890 cubic metre Harmondsworth Great Barn."

Sorry to rain on your parade but AFAIK a barn is unit of area not volume. ( I think it's derived from 'hitting a barn door') Can't e-mail at present so can't send via corrections.

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Intel takes aim at Arduino with US$15 breadboard

Chemist
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Re: A clever name?

"You can't get anything smaller than a Quark but you need three of them to make anything that matters."

Well I take your point but the universe would be a very strange place without electrons - positively shocking in fact !

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Graphene solar panels harvest energy from rain

Chemist
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Re: Lifetime?

"With nano-particles a surface becomes self-cleaning - apparently"

Certainly I've seen examples of titanium dioxide nano-particles being used for self-cleaning ( in sunlight) - not sure of anything else unless they have some with non-stick properties.

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Commentard April Fool decries Blighty's dodecaquid

Chemist
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Joke

"Sanwin had no real excuse to be so uniformed in their opinion and thereby made themselves fair game for a ribbing."

Indeed if his opinion needs to wear a uniform then let the ribbing start

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Tesla books over $8bn in overnight sales claims Elon Musk

Chemist
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Re: @ bazza

"What is the fuel-energy conversion efficiency of a modern all electric car compared to a modern petrol driven car?"

Well I look at it like this - just comparing the basic energy per mile for both.

Tesla S 85kWh for ~250 miles = 1.2MJ/mile (85e3 W *3600 s /250)

My slightly lower weight but less aerodynamic diesel ( 55mpg measured over the last 1400 miles) = 3MJ/mile. ( 36MJ/L * 4.5 / 55 )

So it all comes down to electric generation/distribution/charging/discharging losses vs refining/transport losses. The electrical losses are the big variable country-country and indeed station-station with older coal-fired stations being particularly bad and gas, nuclear/wind/solar/hydro increasingly better.

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X-ray scanners, CCTV cams, hefty machinery ... let's play: VNC Roulette!

Chemist
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Re: Or a simpler (than SSH) solution

"65536 to be precise.

So as a password it is comparable to a 3 to 4 digit numerical PIN"

Not quite sure the point you are making. I've already said that moving ports doesn't stop a determined attacker. After all in ~12 years of having sshd open on a unusual port I have had 1 attempt that found that port. Any number of attacks go for port 22. I take that as reasonable evidence that shifting ports has a noticeable effect.

I was merely pointing out that much of what we call security is in fact by obscurity. and passwords are no exception - that's why they need to be long and non-obvious.

Almost everything helps confuse or slow an attacker - hence I use a very unusual username and very hard password* , just one account is available and then for a couple of hours a day

*Example would be QspSbitjfphxtfjt1eUu which is never written down or remembered but generated from a memorized passphrase by a little c program and pasted. Of course I only use that sort of thing for important passwords like banking or ssh.

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Chemist
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Re: Thanks Chris.

"However just don't see the need in this day and age to remote control your desktop, whatever the OS."

Well apart from a collection of raspberry pies, I also access my fileserver, mostly by ssh or fish but often by ssh/VNC

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Chemist
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Re: Or a simpler (than SSH) solution

"You are basically arguing the merits of security through obscurity there..."

No (if you mean me ) I'm arguing for using every means possible to increase security. Using a non-standard port doesn't stop anyone specifically targetting you but it does reduce the noise. I still use password on ssh but they're 20 chars hard passwords and only one user with a very unusual name is allowed access and that to a very limited account and that to limited times of the day if I'm feeling paranoid !

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Chemist
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Re: NX is getting there but only recently

"As for RDP mentioned above: and when did that take off? Granted, I don't check every month how some tech advances, I sometimes have work to do ;)"

Version I'm using seems to be ~Nov 2013, but there are several later versions

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Chemist
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Re: Thanks Chris.

"VNC is way more popular on linux because it is the only thing available to share your desktop (and is easy to setup)."

Interesting. So the rdp session I've got running at the moment from my OpenSUSE laptop to a raspberry pi is just a figment of my imagination. Admittedly I've just installed the pi end and not exercised it much yet but it is working.

Thank you for the incentive to try.

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Chemist
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Re: Or a simpler (than SSH) solution

"This solution isn't recommended for really sensitive stuff, but should be good enough to protect your torrents."

It certainly cuts down the amount of attempted accesses : I've had a ssh port open to the internet for years but on a non-standard port ( and with tight authentication etc ) and I've only ever had 1 attempt on the non-standard port.

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Mud sticks: Microsoft, Windows 10 and reputational damage

Chemist
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"I've installed W10 on a few boxes now. I've tried it on an elderly laptop (early dual-core) with 2GB of RAM and performance was acceptable. It won't run 64-bit, but it won't run 64-bit W7 either, and W7-32 was *SLOW*."

Certainly until this i7, 8GB laptop I've never, ever had more than 2GB memory with a 64-bit LInux since ~2004 and not had any issues with speed. And that's with KDE as a desktop.

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Chemist
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Re: It's the data harvesting

"I will take a pass on fucking you."

A man of taste and refinement

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Chemist
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Re: Diabetes...

"and at times needs to eat sugar quickly or pass out if they fail to keep it under control"

Usually if they've had too much insulin.

http://www.niddk.nih.gov/health-information/health-topics/Diabetes/hypoglycemia/Pages/index.aspx

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Chemist
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Re: USB to serial converters

"I was pleasantly surprised a couple of weeks ago when I tried attaching a USB to RS232 converter to my laptop and all I had to do to make my serial code work we tell it to open /dev/ttyUSB0 instead of /dev/ttyS0"

I've used them for years with OpenSUSE to connect mainly to PIC microcontrollers. Mostly from my own daemon ( so I compiles in /dev/ttyUSB0) but also from some comms software when testing. Never had an issue.

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iOS flaw exploited to decrypt iMessages, access iThing photos

Chemist
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"Mines an 8 digit."

And I've got a debit card with 6 digit PIN although it isn't a UK one

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Microsoft will rest its jackboot on Windows 7, 8.1's throat on new Intel CPUs in 2018 – not 2017

Chemist
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Re: "One solution is to boot a Linux USB stick ..."

"As a home user what else would they want to use a PC for,"

Well quite a few will want RAW photo development and video editing. No point in having that DSLR or HD video camera otherwise.

There's a number of good solutions for Linux - I use Darktable and Kdenlive

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Chemist
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Re: Microsoft has lost it's way.

"Joe Public is going to do this?"

Not apparently in your sad philosophy. No they're just WIndow's fodder with no ambition, desire for change or self-improvement. Your way is just more of the same Microsoft pushing everyone into their way of thinking, their proprietary protocols, their new ways of siphoning off your cash and driving you mad.

What a defeatist view. Joe Public has somehow managed to cope with phones and tablets with different OS/UI Masses of information is out there and readily available these days for anyone with enough drive to seek it. Wonder who bought all those Raspberry Pi ?

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Ben Nevis embiggened by a metre

Chemist
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"Does anyone know if the heights of such mountains change much due to expansion between winter and summer?"

In general the temp. a few metres into the ground doesn't vary.

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Chemist
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Re: ffs

"However, is it possible that they just had a slightly taller tripod in 1949?"

They truly were giants in those days !

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Chemist
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Re: I'm glad

"but not now, that extra meter will kill me."

Just start off from a small ladder

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Chemist
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Re: I'm glad

"I'm glad I climbed it last year. Harder work now!"

Glad I climbed it in 1968 - definitely harder work now !

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Linux fans may be in for disappointment with SQL Server 2016 port

Chemist
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Re: Perfectly understandable

More interestingly try

sudo printenv

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Chemist
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Re: Perfectly understandable

"the next time you run SUDO, type echo $UID"

As per Vic sudo echo $UID is 1000 here also ( as it should be )

echo $UID = 1000

sudo echo $UID =1000

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Chemist
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Re: Perfectly understandable

"As Linux lacks so many enterprise-scale features compared to Windows Server"

Strange then that Oracle (spit) seem able to cope - hint : maybe it's not Linux that is lacking

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Get lost, Windows 10 and Phone fans: No maps HERE on Microsoft's OS

Chemist
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Re: Burning platform

"- Complex Excel spreadsheets (the stuff business decisions are made with if they are to defy any attempt at auditing)"

Whilst I share your skepticism about badly-written spreadsheets I have to say that LO calc be used for extreme spreadsheets - the major difference is the macro languages are different. Recalc. speed used to be slow - it's now very fast

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Linus Torvalds wavers, pauses … then gives the world Linux 4.5

Chemist
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Re: PS/2 Mice

"do you still need to reboot after inserting a PS/2 mouse or keyboard for it to be recognised"

Well I've got an old, old IBM keyboard ( the one with the weight in ) which regularly detaches from its cable due to the unforgiving nature of the cable ( think mooring ships) and on plugging that back in it all works fine without any further actions running OpenSUSE.

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Tech biz bosses tell El Reg a Brexit will lead to a UK Techxit

Chemist
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Re: "...North Korea of Europe..."

"what-if-britain-left-the-eu-and-could-be-more-like-norway/"

Thank you for this ref. It is quite detailed and needs close scrutiny. However ...

Have you actually read it?

Far from supporting exit it gives a considerable number of reasons for staying in as well as for leaving. One quote from it :-

"Part of Rognan wants to join the EU to open up the market, which he says is the ultimate driver of the economy.

Two of the EU’s biggest members, France and Germany, have already warned Britain that it would be denied access to the single market if it did not accept free movement of labour.

The EEA agreement does allow members to restrict movement on the grounds of “public policy, public security or public health”, but only on a temporary basis."

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Chemist
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Re: 2 years to negotiate all this stuff.

"Since Switzerland is not part of EFTA, they have to negotiate by themselves"

Switzerland is not only a member they were a founding member of EFTA !

http://www.efta.int/about-efta/the-efta-states

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Chemist
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Re: "...North Korea of Europe..."

"Like Switzerland that well known third world country?"

Switzerland gets rather a mixed deal from the EU, that have to accept migration, payments into the EU funds without representation and ~ 200 other rules/regulations etc.

A rather limited BBC analysis : http://www.bbc.co.uk/news/live/uk-politics-eu-referendum-35603388 or better : http://www.bbc.co.uk/news/uk-politics-eu-referendum-35615604

And if Scotland splits and joins the EU are we really going to have border controls ? (We don't with Ireland AFAIK)

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Microsoft has crafted a switch OS on Debian Linux. Repeat, a switch OS on Debian Linux

Chemist
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Re: 100 times more?

@ toughluck

I'm not sure what the problem is - I've never seen it unless I wildly over commit with multiple user desktops, VMs video and RAW processors. Firefox stays within ~0.3GB-1GB.

But your VM (2GB) usage suggests that you're not using anything like 4+GB for Firefox and very little swap usage too. Free suggests that In fact you still have ~~700MB available . In one of my machines (real) with 2GB memory I'd see something similar with some applications open including FF

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Chemist
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Re: 100 times more?

"I use Opera (12.16) or Firefox. I have about 20 tabs open. Opera takes 3.7 GB. Firefox takes 4.2 GB with the same tabs."

Suggest you look at the output of free and see how much total memory is actually being used. On this 8GB i7 with lots going on it shows 7.6GB (3.4GB used ignoring buffers and caches) and only 80MB swap used.

The value you are quoting for Firefox sounds like the virtual memory size. If I look at the amount used size for the just top 18 memory 'hogs' using the virtual size it runs to 40GB - showing how useless a measure it is.

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Chemist
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Re: 100 times more?

"Running just a single browser in Linux tends to eat up 4+ GB of memory, plus whatever services, X and the window manager all use.""

What !!

Well I'm running 3 (KDE) desktop users , Firefox, Thunderbird a Virtualbox inst, VLC to a webcam server, VNC to a pi, 5 filemanagers, and several terminals on this i7 laptop that only has 8GB and only 3.4 GB is in actual use - the remainder is cache/buffers - swap is ~80MB

Firefox with 11 tabs open is using ~0.45GB and ~380 processes are showing in the task manager

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Google-backed British startup ‘stole our code’, says US marketing firm

Chemist
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"behavioural marketing automation software"

Aaaaaaaaaaaaaaaaaaaagh !!

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Microsoft has made SQL Server for Linux. Repeat, Microsoft has made SQL Server 2016 for Linux

Chemist
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Re: Nice to see.

"That's not our experience and we do a LOT of scientific computing."

Same here

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E-borders will be eight years late and cost more than £1bn

Chemist
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Re: Soon!

" We're not part of Schengen and everyone without an EU passport gets checked."

I've waited in the queue at Calais often enough in the past few years to know that everyone with an EU passport gets checked ( and its taking longer )

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Crowd-funded OpenShot 2.0 delivers graphic Linux package

Chemist
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Re: Thanks for the review

"I am finally starting to figure out how to do video properly on Linux, so the timing of this review is perfect."

Use kdenlive - not crashed on me since ~~2007

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Raspberry Pi celebrates fourth birthday with fruity version 3

Chemist
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Re: Whichever way you slice it

"In fact, 1GB RAM isn't even sufficient to run a 32bit desktop OS these days - unless you're a masochist."

Well I've had a pi 2 for a few days now and I've never seen more than 400MB used - more if you count caches etc certainly.

I've got a browser with BBC main news page, LibreOffice calc with a 23000 row * 20 col. spreadsheet with all cells occupied with calculations, filemanager, taskmanager, terminal window and synaptic package manager all open on the desktop and and a lightweight webserver running too - memory usage is ~370MB

pi@raspberrypi ~ $ free

total used free shared buffers cached

Mem: 948120 933348 14772 82056 24104 539240

-/+ buffers/cache: 370004 578116

Swap: 102396 4 102392

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Building a fanless PC is now realistic. But it still ain't cheap

Chemist
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Re: How about

"but I will be compiling a lot of my own C programs"

Just compiled a little C client program (~75 lines) that opens a socket & queries a set of sensors on a PIC microcontroller controlled by a server on my network . Apart from altering the server name to an ip address as the pi doesn't yet have that in hosts the program compiled and ran perfectly

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