* Posts by John Sanders

1485 posts • joined 29 Sep 2006

Tech firms reel from Leave's Brexit win

John Sanders
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Re: London Falling

We need the common market, but not only we but all of Europe, and that's it, no more mega-european-government elite serving shenanigans.

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John Sanders
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Holmes

Re: " with a third of its staff in the UK from overseas"

"Priti Patel" does not get it, does he?

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John Sanders
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Re: " with a third of its staff in the UK from overseas"

That's what this is about.

Big business love a servile and desperate underclass who will work for slavery wages, no matter the long term social cost to the host country.

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John Sanders
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Re: Really?

Spot on! we live in 2016 not 1980, does Spain want to lose the UK as a customer for their produce? does Italy? This is just an example though it is the same with the rest of the EU.

I'm sure that the EU will implode sooner or later (it happens to any entity that tries to plan the economy) and when that happens there will be a new agreement to go back to some form of the old common market, which the EU should have always been and nothing else.

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John Sanders
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Holmes

Re: Really?

I remember reading in 1992 that the UK was "doomed! doomed I say!" for not getting the Euro. The UK was to go down in flames within 2-3 years. It was all over the press at the time.

So no, the earth will still spin and the UK will do fine without Europe, the UK is not great because of the EU, it is great because the people in it is great, it is their hard work that make the UK possible, not some self serving bureaucratic monster in Brussels.

Freedom has a cost and it is always scary at first, but surely pays lots of big dividends, a life of servitude is a life where you can not decide what's best for you.

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Docker taps unikernel brains to emit OS X, Windows public betas

John Sanders
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Meh

Wondering how long...

Will it take for MS to start messing up things.

This "container thing" is technically "let's bypass Windows".

If you write a Linux application and it can run anywhere regardless of the OS, why do you want to pay MS?

Just thinking.

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UK's education system blamed for IT jobs going to non-Brits

John Sanders
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Pirate

Re: "..had to teach a person.. " "..remain available for consultation... "

>> Should this happen to you it's time for the scorched earth protocol.

I disagree with this, time to become stupid, socially inept, get ill, forget things, recommend books... etc.

If I had to teach something I would just teach specifics but won't teach how to think or approach problems.

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John Sanders
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Holmes

Re: Outsourced onshoring - racism ?

It is not called racism, it is called Slavery Wages.

hard to compete with that.

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John Sanders
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Headmaster

Correction!

"we're only here to save you from climate FARCE and nonexistingRIGHT-WING-terrorists."

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John Sanders
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Facepalm

Please....

>> The kids are clever about using those gadgets, no doubt at all, but coding? I don't think so.

No, they goddamn aren't.

The use them as toys and complain to dad when something does not work as expected, any attempts to try to show them how anything works is met with a "meh".

A tablet uses so many abstractions as to not need to know how a file system works or what a file is any more.

Do not confuse kids learning how to have fun quickly with a device with understanding the devices themselves.

Next time you see a 12-15 year old using a computer, pretend you know nothing and then ask them to do anything simple.

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Microsoft releases open source bug-bomb in the rambling house of C

John Sanders
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Holmes

You can have both

Security and speed, C more than anything else makes it possible, If you're good that is.

I'm not claiming I'm good, but I know people who are and they produce incredible code, robust and fast, believe it or not there are several projects out there with incredible good tracks of security and they all use C.

The issue is that while you can learn C in 21 days, you need 10 years to be a mediocre developer.

And this doesn't help an industry that loves to sell the next best fad again and again, as quickly as possible.

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PC market sinking even faster than first thought, thanks to Windows 10

John Sanders
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Holmes

Re: An Untimely Conjunction

No,

MS is trying to get as much people on board windows 10 as they can because they want to turn the PC into a closed platform.

(Whispering voice) Windows application store, stoooore, stoooore.... secure boot, boooot, booot.... Telemetry....Teleeeeeeemetry... Teleeeeeemetry....

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John Sanders
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Mushroom

Re: And no. Microsoft not guilty.

OEMs have for years accepted that MS owned the PC space and bended over to whatever MS demanded, that if they weren't outright in bed with the "MS industry shenanigans" while feeling special about it.

Now they reap what they sow.

I'm waiting for the day when the whole world wakes up and realises that MS has only MS's interest in sight, partnering with them is a death sentence sooner or later because if they can use your corpse to further their objectives they'll murder you for it.

You being a paying customer or a partner that brings lots of money makes no difference.

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John Sanders
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Flame

Relevance of the PC platform

>>>I'll be the first to ridicule MSFT for their ham fisted attempts to innovate, but I >>>don't really think anyone was going to keep the PC platform relevant.

The relevance of the PC platform remains the same as it has been the last 30 years.

It is the most relevant computing form in the planet, do this mental exercise, picture companies without PCs, see, not only the world's economy runs on PCs (servers included) but PCs make possible the rest of the computing platforms, can you imagine game development without a PC? Architecture without AutoCAD? Photography without PS, the internet without PCs? have you tried to write a mobile application without a PC?

Now what people want to say is that market sales of PCs is are not that relevant any more as they have reached plateau while other platforms enjoy sales growth.

News about the death of PCs were typed on the very same PC where they will be written within the next god knows how many years to come.

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John Sanders
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Linux

Re: You could say

That has a very easy explanation.

Windows has no value on itself it is a very limited bloated OS, its only value comes from the large ecosystem of proprietary applications one can run on it.

If you port Windows to ARM devices (or anything non x86) you have no applications other than MS, and sorry but running IIS or MSSQL on a Pi is not only complicated, it is also stupid.

Enter Linux and free software, once you port Linux and the GNU userland to a given platform you can re-compile mostly every application in the Linux ecosystem in a relative short period of time, and have not only an OS but an entire catalogue of applications for free, both in human freedom and monetary freedom.

Applications that are happy for the most part to run on little power and limited memory.

Running Apache and MySQL on a Pi gives surprisingly good results, which is why many people is intrigued about the idea of ARM servers.

If you want further proof MS's own ARM devices tanked almost immediately.

I did not run windows because I loved it, I needed to run windows because my applications ran on Windows.

These days Wine runs some of the Windows apps I need (fewer and fewer) and whatever doesn't run in Wine I run on a VM.

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John Sanders
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Holmes

Re: I wouldn't blame Windows 10

Makes one wonder how stupid some people in the PC industry is, as you say the real issue is that except for very few operations that normal people hardly do (Heavy video editing, video compression, 3D rendering, big data, etc) computers have been fast enough for everybody in the last 5-6 years.

I can imagine them looking out of the "window" hoping someone comes to rescue them.

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UCLA shooter: I killed my prof over code theft

John Sanders
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Childcatcher

Of course!

Its so simple, if there are no guns no one can kill anybody... why no one ever thought of that.

http://www.usatoday.com/story/news/nation/2014/09/30/oklahoma-beheading/16482769/

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Cisco warns IPv6 ping-of-death vuln is everyone's problem

John Sanders
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Facepalm

Why I'm not surprised...?

Stupidly complicated protocol... stupid bugs.

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Microsoft's Windows Phone folly costs it another billion dollars

John Sanders
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Holmes

Re: Probably cheaper

Sendo is the reason they failed this time, and the reason they will keep failing in the mobile market.

TL/DR, Those in the know understand.

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Lost containers tell no tales. Time to worry

John Sanders
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Meh

Re: dev0ps

No one is saying containers are a bad thing.

Just not the cure for cancer many people insist they are.

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John Sanders
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Mushroom

Re: Ah, DevOps

I for once advocate the F****ing developers admitting they know shit about the platform they are developing for and speaking to the sysadmins who 150% of the time all they want is to help.

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John Sanders
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Pint

Re: Ah, DevOps

You won the interwebs beer today mate.

People who "Love" to deploy containers are these who do not know how to administer a server and who do not take time to learn how to integrate stuff.

It takes me the same time to deploy a container from scratch (without using a 3rd party image hosted by someone else as a base) as to build a complete server, with one big difference, the server is easier to troubleshoot and administer.

All this DevOPS business leads to what I call "Impossible jobs" where you're required to know so many different fashion of the week techniques as to make it impossible to go through an interview.

The only development shops who are using this shit in an effective manner are these who had a decently designed application and good procedures from the beginning. Or they have a server fleet with some decently-thought out orchestration system.

Anyone trying to build a large code-base of anything mission-critical with no proper planning, and churning out code to customers every 5 mins... well, good luck.

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Pointless features add to browser bloat and insecurity

John Sanders
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Re: What we need

Can we have decent printing and modern bookmarks too please?

No one seems interested in those these days.

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90 days of Android sales almost beat 9 months' worth for all flavours of Win 10

John Sanders
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FAIL

What do people say in situations like this...

Ah yes;

Good riddance!

I said this a long time ago, and I will say it again, MS threatened the carriers with Exchange and Skype, the carriers have killed MS Phone.

MS is a 800 pounds gorilla, the carriers; Godzilla, they fulminated them with their radioactive beam ray ray, then eat their charred remains as a snack.

Ballmer: "Skype is happening whether you like it or not"

Carriers: "Is that so..."

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Coders crack Oculus DRM in 24 hours, open door to mass piracy

John Sanders
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Well this only means one thing

No Oculus for me.

No sir.

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Hate Windows 10? Microsoft's given you 'Insider' powers anyway

John Sanders
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We at Microsoft

Just realised that we were probing and analysing everybody anyway, so why not making everybody our bitc... We mean 'special'.

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Sick of storage vendors? Me too. Let's build the darn stuff ourselves

John Sanders
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Pint

Re: No one said it was easy but...

I do the same you do at home, but small scale.

With a single £50 ITX motherboard, single ATX motherboard, 16GB RAM and Debian.

4 x 4TB Drives, 2 RAID10 using MDADM, LVM ext4 and xfs volumes.

I have done horrible things to the set-up in the quest for science, while the server run every single conceivable service under the sun, including VMs.

It is not very fast, but it is not slow either, I know companies with older kit that have much more problems and way less functionality.

It is really good for the price.

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John Sanders
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Linux

Re: what he said

Best NFS head ever is a Linux server (either physical or virtual) where the storage is presented from a LUN on a SAN.

Not because a Linux box is not going to give you a headache every now and then (Linux diehard here) it is because the Linux box gives you flexibility and troubleshooting ability beyond any proprietary solution.

For the file-system you can mix and match.

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John Sanders
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Holmes

Re: Anyone can build something small

Although at the SMB level it is perfectly possible.

I have seen a couple of large GPFS deployments in action, and it can replace a lot of things. If only IBM wasn't that greedy.

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Chrome OS to get Android apps via the magic of containers

John Sanders
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Linux

Re: Sounds a bit like Crouton?

I have been saying for a long time that APKs will become the path for commercial software into Linux.

Sooner or later.

Windows will get them too, and so do Macs, (even before Linux)

Why do you think MS is trying to fence the PC market?

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Blocking ads? Smaller digital publishers are smacked the hardest

John Sanders
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Headmaster

It used to be called

Lost revenue.

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Windows 10 build 14342: No more friendly Wi-Fi sharing

John Sanders
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Paris Hilton

Intriguing...

"perhaps even open source the Linux subsystem (that would be nice)."

To do what with it exactly?

Where can you run this code... on Linux??? On Reactos?

To submit patches to MS? how? where? github?

What does this accomplish?

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Microsoft bods tell El Reg: We've re-pivoted open-source .NET Core

John Sanders
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Windows

Re: Don't trust them

You will spend a year learning this, some stuff will be implemented somewhere, MS will not maintain the product and will keep it around like a Zombie to kill it 2-3 years later.

In the mean time just to ease the pain they will recommend that you deploy your code in Windows where it will magically work just fine.

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John Sanders
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Megaphone

Re: Is it just me?

Marketing dept:

- Quick, get us a smiley tech guy!

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Spaniard live streams 195km/h burn-up

John Sanders
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WTF?

WTF is periscope?

Another pile of nonsense like Twatter, Farcebook, Linkedpin, mysplace, yarhoo I guess.

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Can ad biz’s LEAN avert ADPOCALYPSE?

John Sanders
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Go

They can advertise all the Futurama they want to me

More Futurama please!

(There is an ad for Futurama in the middle of the image)

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The 'new' Microsoft? I still wouldn't touch them with a barge pole

John Sanders
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Holmes

Re: Just a question:

* drag and drop - NO

* the taskbar, the toolbar - NO

* ClearType - NO

* scroll-wheel mice - NO

* SideWinder Dual Strike, SideWinder Freestyle Pro (not successful, but definitely original) - NO

* Surface (the original one, not the laptop) - NO

* DirectX - NO

NO, stop confusing MS version of a product with the product's idea.

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John Sanders
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Linux

Re: This is why I've still not bought a personal/home O365 sub.

Have a look at LibreOffice, much better fork of OpenOffice.

Almost inmediatelly after Oracle acquired SUN, OpenOffice was forked into LibreOffice and currently is more advanced than OpenOffice, better maintained and receives updates and fixes continuously.

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John Sanders
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Linux

Re: What!!!

I once worked on an ISP where 2 really ancient postfix boxes dealt with 10+ million emails a week.

They hardly gave us any problems ever.

The exchange servers... these were a whole different story.

Exchange is widely used because of the AD+exchange+outlook combination.

At the time the companies producing alternatives were greedy and did try for decades to charge 110% of what MS charges for Exchange. Had they set-up for more realistic prices, MS would had have a lot of competition and the groupware and messaging market would be lots more healthier.

Nowadays MS using Office365 can undercut anyone with their cloud shenanigans, so no serious alternatives to Exchange are being developed any more.

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John Sanders
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Facepalm

Re: The lock in Question

Enough about the systemd crap please, learn how it works and then compare to systemv.

And if you do not understand why grub has a large configuration file that you should not be touching (/etc/default/grub is where you change stuff) you strike me as someone who doesn't read any documents, not just the instruction manuals but also the release notes.

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Microsoft half-bricks Asus Windows 7 PCs with UEFI boot glitch

John Sanders
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Terminator

What a nice os...

What a nice OS you got there... it would be a shame if something happened to it...

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'I thought my daughter clicked on ransomware – it was the damn Windows 10 installer'

John Sanders
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Holmes

Re: May I humbly offer the following advice

Why people keep bending unconditionally to MS is one of the greatest mysteries of our time.

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BT Sport takes Elemental step of software encoding

John Sanders
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Trollface

Translation to plain english:

""The chief problem with dedicated hardware is that it is cast in stone, so that even if it out performs generic processors at the time of implementation, it tends to get left behind after a few years and then needs renewal at cost.

The software approach allows successive generations of commodity hardware to be slipped in and deliver incremental improvements in performance and functionality, getting away from the big-bang approach which has characterized TV through all its history.

The software approach allows the broadcasting industry to join enterprise IT in being able to enjoy the benefits of Moore’s Law.""

TRANSLATION: We have decided to use FFMPEG for encoding using servers like everybody else has been doing now for a couple of years.

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The 4 stages of All-Flash storage: Denial, anger, bargaining... and integration

John Sanders
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Holmes

Re: Of course most of us will wind up all-flash

Whatever solution wins will be the most open/standard and the one that requires re-writing the least software.

Anything else is just proprietary crap.

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Server-jacking exploits for ImageMagick are so trivial, you'll scream

John Sanders
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Linux

Re: That's the unix way of doing things..

I was about to write a lengthy response, but as I'm not as idle as I wanted I'll just say; NO, you do not understand why the insistence on using separate commands and processing text streams via pipes.

I will give you a simple example of imagemagick in action, using pipes and text:

qrencode -t PNG -o - "${1:-Empty data!}" | display &

There you go my on-the-fly QR code generator and viewer, courtesy of the 70s

Imagemagick was created circa 1991, qrencode 2006

That my friend is not a religion, it is just practical, I made something to fit my needs with a single line of code, I can quickly generate a QR code and display it on screen to pass data to my phone.

Joining two applications without having to do anything special is part of how Unix stuff works.

One does not need to even think hard to come with little bits like these, they just come naturally.

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John Sanders
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Re: Who's using ImageMagick on the server?

In my experience it is not that popular, php.gd on the other hand is.

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Thunderbird is GO: Mozilla prepares to jettison mail client

John Sanders
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Linux

Re: Good thinking that tool

Amen brother!

I think this is for the best of Thunderbird, at some point Firefox will completely sink and finally rest at the bottom of the Mariana trench, so for Thunderbird is better to get of the Firetanic now that's still okay-sh.

I hope the Document Foundation is who ends maintain it, I'm willing to make a considerable money donation towards fixing the font issues that have plagued the HTML editor for the last 10 years, or the lack of official tray icon in Linux, or the enormous memory consumption, or the archive function breaking if you try to archive more than 200 messages, or the filters breaking when a message is both moved and mark as read... etc.

And have no doubt besides its defects I love Thunderbird.

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A perfect marriage: YOU and Ubuntu 16.04

John Sanders
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Linux

Clearly...

""Running a datacentre on Linux means that the admins are forever having to check each and every kernel, library and application update to see if there's any important security patches they must adopt, and do a ton of regression testing every single time. That's not productive.""

You haven't run many datacentres on Linux.

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John Sanders
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Linux

Re: I would have expected...

These days RadeonSI works more than well, AMD is abandoning fglrx for the new AMDGPU PRO driver, RadeonSI is more than ready, and AMDGPU PRO is expected soon (1-2 months)

So not a biggie.

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John Sanders
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Linux

Re: One experience - some good some bad

Advice is to leave the servers alone up until a couple of weeks/month after release, they tend to iron out all these issues in ~2 weeks after release.

In my case I always upgrade servers once the x.1 is released, I do it for everything Centos, RH, Debian and of course Ubuntu.

Upgrading on the first couple of weeks is always risky no matter the Distro, upon release they are more concerned from getting it out of the door on time than anything else, so they focus on the installation issues for launch and the upgrade issues they work it on later once people begin reporting issues.

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