* Posts by NumptyScrub

716 posts • joined 18 Mar 2010

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Humongous headsets and virtual insanity

NumptyScrub
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Re: Neck Fatigue?

I'm wondering if there are physical problems due to having the weight of it hanging in front of your eyes for a long time. Has anybody worn one for a long time and noticed any problems and how much do they weigh?

I've got the Oculus Rift DK2, comfort is fine and the total headset weight is allegedy "0.97 pounds" which is ~450g (less than a 500ml bottle of drink). It's perfectly usable for prolonged periods, as long as the content being displayed doesn't trip too many nausea triggers* ;)

By "prolonged periods", I mean a few hours at a time; I mostly use it to dick about in Elite: Dangerous and a 2-3hr session is not uncommon, and friends who also have the DK2 say much the same.

*E:D is great as you are a spaceship pilot; being seated and seeing stuff move around you feels perfectly natural. Try one of the rollercoaster demos, or try playing Half-Life 2 in VR mode, and it can be much more jarring.

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Microsoft releases free Office apps for half of all Android phones

NumptyScrub
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Re: Windows in the cloud? IoT (no, seriously)?

I have no experience of it, therefore I don't dismiss it as a pile of poo. The [hypothetical but plausible] CEO and her family did (probably also with no experience of it... <snip>

Correct me if I'm wrong, but did you not create that fictional CEO (and the attitude of the fictional CEO) with the intent to put across the point that Windows Phone was "bad"? I know 2 people who currently use it in a corporate context and they both actually like it. I've personally only used 6.1 on a terminally underpowered HTC, which was a less than stellar experience and has certainly coloured my perceptions of it, but it did the basics without issue.

Blackberry is of course another example of companies whose market dominance was once thought by the faithful to be unassailable.

Blackberry's real problem was in not being Apple when everyone jumped on the Apple bandwagon. They had the period where iOS still didn't have decent remote configuration and management features to try and catch up aesthetically, but dropped the ball and now here we are. It's a shame as I actually liked BES, but since both iOS and Android decided to allow the ActiveSync "remote wipe" calls to actually factory reset devices (rather than the minimum of just deleting all ActiveSync related data) us engineers still get to power-trip when hovering over the button :D

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NumptyScrub
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Re: Windows in the cloud? IoT (no, seriously)?

At some point, companies like yours, and many others (including the likes of National Instruments) are going to come to realise that MS currently seem to want Windows to be a cloud-dependent OS, paid for on a subscription basis. Or a server OS, with no GUIs. Or maybe an IoT OS. They'll all be different from (incompatible with?) what you're used to today.

If/when that happens, it seems to leave a bit of an inconvenient gap for a lot of stuff of the kind you reference (and a lot of people use), not just in pharma but in loads of places where a little computer is needed for data gathering and display (and whatever).

Win16 apps are incompatible with current x64 builds of Windows, Windows 95 and 98 drivers are incompatible with current NT kernel builds of Windows. The stuff from 20 years ago doesn't work, but that's fine because we're not using 20 year old drivers for contemporary equipment, manufacturers have realised that they should write stuff that is compatible with the newer builds.

Since input and display are always going to have to be local, peripheral connectivity is also going to remain local, regardless of any OSaaS cloud-based remote computing going on. Funnily enough, I suspect that manufacturers will end up providing compatible drivers for Windows as a Service so that you can still plug expensive pharma kit into your renamed VT100 terminal and get it to work.

If/when that happens, your CEO might be the one asking why you didn't see it coming, that she and her kids knew that Windows Phone was a pile of poo, that they've all given up on Windows at home, so why there wasn't a fallback strategy for the critical uncloudable corporate applications?

Blackberry, anyone? We used to use those, then we switched to iPhones, although it was upper management that made that decision based upon aesthetics (aka brand recognition), rather than any technical appraisal. My personal preference would have been Android, however at the time we moved, only Windows Phone provided the full suite of Blackberry-style corporate lockdown options and remote management out of the box.

So yeah, the "best" option from a corporate perspective was one that neither management nor the techies actually wanted, and the one that you dismiss as "a pile of poo".

If none of this makes sense, try this: Raspberry Pi recently got a Windows 10 IoT variant, not that anybody actually cares. Bear that in mind and read the above again. Where are today's instrumentation drivers, apps, whatever going to run in five years time? MS don't think it'll be the same kind of Wintel desktops as we see today. See a problem with that?

To be fair, I recently bought a tablet with a 2.0GHz quad core CPU and 2GB RAM, that's more than enough grunt for local processing of normal desktop tasks, and approaching equivalency with cheap, low-end business desktops (it was £250 all in, which is also near-equivalency with low-end business desktops). It's not that far fetched at all to consider these devices taking the place of a desktop/laptop for a majority of use cases, and not that surprising that device (or OS) companies are adjusting their infrastructure to be able to work with these devices used in that way.

And that is without even considering that all of them want your data sitting on their servers for sifting and classification so they can profile ads at you (and comply with local security service requests on that data).

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NumptyScrub
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Re: "Hate fest"...?

Most companies that I have worked for have switched from Windows to Linux to run their software for reliability, scalability, performance and cost effectiveness reasons.

They must be pretty small companies then; the multinational I work for is still on Windows for the desktop and the majority of servers, because it would cost too much to change. I have yet to find a company that offers (multilingual) Linux training for free, and we have a few thousand people that would need it (including the support staff, many of whom are currently only Windows skilled) :'(

I'd be interested in moving over, but it's the situation where you get fucked by the original design choices (aka Windows) and you have to choose between starting over (for several thousand people) or just living with building on your past mistakes and doing what you can. Budgetary restrictions mean that moving to Linux is but a pipe dream at the moment, and looks to remain that way for a while...

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NumptyScrub
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Why do you care if Microsoft survive or not? The world does not need the company, or its poorly written software.

You can replace "Microsoft" in that quote with any tech company (Google, Apple, Oracle, Canonical... the list is endless) and it will still parse. We don't need any single tech company, regardless of how you view their products, but more companies means more choice.

You couldn't get on with Linux?

Yes, they apparently couldn't. I have the same incredulous look when people tell me how they "couldn't get on with Windows 8". Personal preference is fine; I prefer how 7 did it, and I prefer how Cinnamon does it, but that does not stop me from being able to use Win8 or Unity.

(Bloodbeastterror didn't mention which distro they tried, but it could well have been Ubuntu running Unity, which seems to generate as much unreasoning hate for the GUI as Win8 does)

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Indiana Jones whips Bond in greatest movie character poll

NumptyScrub
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Re: What no...

Harrison Fords gets first and third, he must be well chuffed :)

Personally I would have liked to see Hobo or Machete somewhere on the list, but thems the breaks...

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Tim Worstall dances to victory over resources scaremongerers

NumptyScrub
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Re: But...@Zoolander

Even middle-aged though there is the ability to look good without trying to look "cool", whatever that is.

The wikifiddlers entry for "Smart casual" dress code actually shows someone wearing jeans, a shirt and blazer in the sidebar, apparently Topman magazine thinks that that sort of ensemble is viable for whatever bizarre fashion reasons.

YMMV, of course ^^;

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It begins: Time Warner Cable first ISP accused of breaking America's net neutrality rules

NumptyScrub
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Re: "Peer"?

First rule of downvote club: don't talk about downvote club. If people haven't already posted why you're unlikely to get any explanation anyway :/

Maybe they just took exception you you using the æ grapheme? Who knows..

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NumptyScrub
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Trollface

Re: "Peer"?

"Peer" implies a relationship between equals; ideally, upstream and downstream traffic is expected to be, to within an order of magnitude or so, roughly equal. The chances of "a streaming company" providing that sort of profile seem to me - slender.

I would be interested to see the commercial arrangements between Content Delivery Networks (such as YouTube, Akamai et al) and service providers like Time Warner, because they are also going to be massively biased in one traffic direction. I am assuming Time Warner charge the same "competitive rate" for bytes moved on behalf of Google's video delivery website, as they are proposing for CNS?

I can't imagine YouTube's upstream bandwidth requirement being within an order of magnitude of the downstream...

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Vicious vandals violate voluminous Versailles vagina

NumptyScrub
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Re: Offensive "art" deserves an offensive response.

Simple rule of thumb I use. If you have to argue the case for something being "art", it almost certainly isn't.

I know someone who sees literally no value in "art", and thus classes all non-engineering, primarily aesthetic works as "a waste of time". If you were talking to them, your rule of thumb would define nothing as art. Which is certainly true from their point of view, but not necessarily from others.

Full disclosure: I think this particular piece is indeed a waste of time, but I'll defend the creator's right to call it art, and defend their right to claim any defacement is vandalism.

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NumptyScrub
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Re: Offensive "art" deserves an offensive response.

It's high time the Yarty-Farties learned confrontational pieces making a political statement are not art.

If you wouldn't live with it in your backyard it's not suitable in a public place, either.

I'd live with it in my back yard fine, so I guess that makes it suitable for a public place :)

Unless you are suggesting that only your opinion of what is suitable should be considered?

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Post-pub nosh neckfillers: Reader suggestions invited

NumptyScrub
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Coffee/keyboard

Re: Noodles and peas.

The most common error is using cold water or beer, and neither results in anything that will hurt you.

COTW material :D

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NumptyScrub
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Re: Cheese and tomato sandwich

But the best toasty is the egg toasty. You need a maker with pronounced edges, that crimp the bread effectively to avoid leakages. This is bad enough with cheese, but far worse with egg.

Oh. My. $DEITY. That sounds delicious, I am going to have to try this :D

I'd imagine that pickle, like jam, is deadly.

Anyone who has ever used a toastie maker (of any brand) will be well aware that there is a ridiculous difference in the specific heat capacities of some ingredients. The main problem is that finding this out only ever seems to occur after the fact :'(

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NumptyScrub
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Re: Cheese and tomato sandwich

Having dealt with cheese and pickle Brevilles (other brands are available) I can second the dangers of allowing a drunken fool to bite straight into a cheese and tomato toastie without checking the temperature carefully. The SHC of some vegetables is apparently orders of magnitude less than cheese or bread...

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California über alles? Is MEP Reda flushing Euro copyright tradition down the pan?

NumptyScrub
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Re: Limit the term

I am not so keen on the 70-year extension after death (based on an old model that he's want to keep supporting his widow and kids).

I've heard allegations that it's actually based on the model that the Disney Corporation don't want anyone to be able to copy a stylised mouse that was first drawn in 1928, because it is still an enormous cash cow for them.

So if I write a song when I am 20, at 40, my rights in it expire? What if it was a steady seller, with many cover versions down the years? Why am I suddenly not allowed to reap the continued fruit of my creativity after I am 40? If it right that film makers, looking for a sound-track, can scour old songs and use them for free to their huge profit, while I, who wrote the song that helped cement the popularity of their movie, sit and watch them rake in the dosh?

I never quite figure out why a creator suddenly isn't allowed to get the profit of his or her actions throughout his/her lifetime.

Counterpoint; I invent the cure for cancer when I am 20, and patent it. Under existing law it is already time-limited to 20 years after filing and after that anyone can use it; I have 20 years to make my money out of it, then it becomes a free for all where I receive no recompense from anyone using and benefiting from my work. At 40 years old, I, who invented the cure, have to sit and watch them rake in the dosh, and this is the expected result of the patent process.

I completely agree that creators have intrinsic rights to (and over) their creations, however there is an enormous discrepancy between the terms of patents and copyright. 20 years vs life+50 (or life+75 if it is a corporate copyright) seems to indicate that the value of one is grossly disproportionate to the other; especially given that both are essentially a state-protected monopoly over the creation in question.

Personally I would see either patents becoming life+50 (which is an idiotic idea in a free market which relies on innovation), or copyright becoming 20 years (which will outrage anyone who owns copyright in anything), because IMO if you are going to protect a creators rights over their creation, it should be done equally and without prejudice to the actual creation in question.

I completely understand that I'm probably alone in that view, though :'(

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The world .sucks at a minute past midnight on Sunday

NumptyScrub
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Re: Does anyone even use these additional add ons?

You could register yourself on the specialist dating site, hunglikea.horse, order in some liquid refreshment from fetchmea.beer, and then go on to browse some classic Mr. T quotes on pityda.foo, the possibilities are, if not endless, certainly quite large ;)

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Apple! and! Yahoo! fight! the! man!, claims! EFFing! daftness!

NumptyScrub
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Re: Errrmmm

That time period is for the financial backing data (which companies paid the EFF money so they could continue to operate) rather than the actual "Who's Got Your Back" report.

From the article:

Cardozo told The Register that the group does disclose its financials — although because of the way a non-profit body works, the most recent report covers July 2012 to July 2013, a period before most of the global surveillance revelations came to light. ®

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Zionists stole my SHOE, claims Muslim campaigner

NumptyScrub
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Re: A few pointers

Before making accusations of ignorance, may I suggest that you first research the Koran, the Hadiths, and the culture. There are exhortations of the 'kill everyone who doesn't agree with them' type in there, thankfully most submitters to the religion don't do that these days. Along with the positives, there is also a rich history of jihad, subjugation of women and minorities, and other things that Western culture consider to be negative.

You realise that every one of those negatives is equally as true of Christianity (and Judaism), right? All of those negatives are the prevalent attitudes from when the books were written, not specific to the ideology.

The UK didn't abolish slavery until 1833, we only stopped subjugating people less than 200 years ago, even though we have allegedly been "Christian" for over a thousand.

I've not found a single religion I was 100% comfortable with, afaict they all have dark sides and ropey adherents :'(

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British banks consider emoji as password replacement

NumptyScrub
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Re: New most common password

Since we're talking about banking, I'd have said

:) :| :( >:(

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Spanish TV journo leaves subordinates cowering after verbal shoeings

NumptyScrub
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As far as I am aware, "because of what they said" is not a valid defense for violence charges anywhere in the EU, although I'm happy to be corrected. It is generally illegal to punch people for being mouthy fucks, regardless of how much you want to punch the mouthy fuck.

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Why did Snowden swipe 900k+ US DoD files? (Or so Uncle Sam claims)

NumptyScrub
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Re: Time

If a politician who may want to run for the white house sits in congress and swears under oath that he DIDNT have anything to do with xxx then it becomes mighty uncomfortable when Snowdon releases a document proving he actually did.

Perhaps knowingly lying while under oath might be the issue here, rather than blaming Snowden for exposing this after the fact? It could easily be avoided by actually stating the truth, after promising that you will only state the truth.

I realise that the concept is anathema to politics in general, but to the rest of us it's common sense...

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Bethesda all out for 'Fallout 4', fallout for global productivity foretold in countdown

NumptyScrub
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Or how about "Why fix what isn't broken?"

I can only assume you never played Fallout 3, BethSoft sometimes refuse to fix what is broken :P

Not content with announcing and hyping games that have barely even started being developed and won't be available for years, are they now so desperate that they're taking to announcing and hyping announcements that haven't been written yet? Madness.

Official Fallout 4 trailer on YouTube

If they can put that together using the in-game engine, then it's basically in a state that Bethedsa are happy to release (see above) ^^;

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NASA picks tools for voyage to possibly LIFE-SUPPORTING moon Europa

NumptyScrub
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Re: This you learn each day

It's brine for curing the Cheese Mantle(TM), so that Wallace and his trusty pal Grommet won't sink into some tasteless curd(led) goop...

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NumptyScrub
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Re: too cold, no life

I think you missed the part that it was (apparently) an ocean of liquid H2O, meaning that it will be at or above 270K (give or take, dependant on salt content and pressure, unless I'm missing something fundamental about the temperatures required for phase change in water). Not really any colder than our oceans here.

If life independently formed here, there may or may not be anything on Europa. If the chemical basics were seeded in this region of the galaxy, via any potential natural or artificial method (like heavy elements get seeded by novae), it is highly likely that there is similar life on Europa, since the whole system congealed out of the same cloud of gunk.

I'm actually quite excited to find out, either way :)

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German watchdog rips off Facebook's thumbs after online fracas

NumptyScrub
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Unhappy

Re: Twitter et al should be covered by this too

To be fair, anyone linking code off ajax.googleapis.com is also likely facilitating tracking without consent, because I never see that domain without scripts also wanting to run from google-analytics.com (which often does not appear as a blocked domain until I enable the ajax one, so it's likely the ajax domain specifically calling the analytics domain itself...)

Thanks to the prevalence of using 3rd party hosted scripting, basically the entire commercial internet is tracking you without informed consent anyway, singling Facebook out for it just because their button is visible is akin to cutting the leaves off and leaving the roots behind. They just revert to invisible means of doing the same thing, and back to BAU.

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SAVE THE PLANKTON: So much more than whale food

NumptyScrub
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Re: mouthful of seawater? No thanks.

20 million bacteria (or 200 million viruses) in a mouthful of seawater is apparently a tiny fraction of the potentially >20 billion microbes already present in the mouth. You could advance the argument that the mouth is contaminating the seawater, rather than the other way round... ^^;

You probably don't want to think about the number of bacteria in a "lungful of air" either. Have a pint, you're looking a bit peaky there...

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Hacker uses Starbucks INFINITE MONEY for free CHICKEN SANDWICH

NumptyScrub
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Starbucks simply exploit a validation issue in the transfer pricing codebase. It's not illegal to do so...

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ZX Spectrum 'Hobbit' revival sparks developer dispute

NumptyScrub
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Indeed

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Clinton defence of personal email server fails to placate critics

NumptyScrub
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Re: In this case it certainly wasn't illegal:

Yes, currently , what you say in your MAIN paragraph is the LAW NOW, TODAY. But prior to Clinton stepping down, for EMAIL, was NOT the case.

Really? The USDOJ guidance on Records has a link to archive.gov's definition of "a record":

Records include all books, papers, maps, photographs, machine-readable materials, or other documentary materials, regardless of physical form or characteristics, made or received by an agency of the United States Government under Federal law or in connection with the transaction of public business and preserved or appropriate for preservation by that agency or its legitimate successor as evidence of the organization, functions, policies, decisions, procedures, operations, or other activities of the Government or because of the informational value of the data in them

Email is an "other documentary material" in that list, and I would be happy to argue as such in court (IANAL though). Looks to me like the Federal Records Act 1950 may indeed be relevant enough, even without any amendments that specifically mention email, to claim that Hilary's decision to only use personal email and then fail to properly record all of it in case it is required, may already have been an offense.

Speed limit regulations do not specifically mention my make and model of motor vehicle, but I am still liable for exceeding them with my make and model of vehicle. Federal documentation legislation doesn't have to specifically mention email, for emails sent as official Federal correspondence to count as Federal documents...

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Backpage child sex trafficking lawsuit nixed thanks to 'internet freedoms'

NumptyScrub
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Re: Love that last paragraph

Free speech does not cover all speech. There are legitimate restrictions, though few. Good judgment and responsible behavior should be mandated.

"Free speech" does cover all speech, including the speech that most people agree shouldn't be spoken. That's why we don't have "free speech" (in either the UK, or the US) and instead have various levels of restricted speech; the concepts of slander and libel as a crime, and the concept of free speech, are mutually exclusive ones.

It's outrageous to think ANY entity would NOT be held responsible for publishing the information in this lawsuit. It's no surprise at all the EFF would support the abuse of people under the guise of free speech. Apparently some folks do not understand that ALL speech is not free and that this is a perfect example of where an entity is liable for their negligence in allowing these ads by crims for illegal behavior to be posted. There are responsibilities associated with mass publication and these folks clearly are negligent in allowing these ads to be published.

I appreciate that the subject matter here is immensely emotive, but while the EFF are doing themselves no favours getting involved in this one, the actual decision was not theirs; it was the judge. An actual legal Judge, made a legally binding decision in a court of law, that people (including yourself) disagree with. You are free to disagree (unless you make slanderous or libellous comments about the judge, obviously), but don't blame the EFF for any perceived travesty of justice; blame the judge who disagrees with your interpretation of the law.

It would also be nice if you didn't blame me for pointing this out, as well, although I understand that for immensely emotive subjects like this, it is easy to get into the "anyone who disagrees must be destroyed!" mindset.

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This post has been deleted by a moderator

+5 ROOTKIT OF VENGEANCE defeats forces of gaming good

NumptyScrub
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Trollface

Re: Streaming does have its advantages

Fuck everyone else in the game. If I can afford a better PC that can display better graphics and higher framerates, why should I be punished just because other people can't?

I just buy the developers, and they write the game to always put me in top spot regardless, because it is not cheating if it is all part of the legitimate game code. That's how you pay to win :P

You are saying that you should be able to pay to win, right? That's how I'm interpreting your statement anyway... ^^;

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Tech troll's podcasting patent blown out of the water by EFF torpedo

NumptyScrub
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Re: Basically no, as he settled out of court.

One thing that would change that is making all of their settlements related to the patent chargeable back to them if the patent(s) or even parts of it are invalidated.

Easily circumventable by ensuring all profits leave via dividend as soon as they get the payout(s), and then filing for bankruptcy if they ever get told to pay money back. Your "new", "completely unrelated" company then gets to buy the remaining patent portfolio for a song off the old one, and back to BAU.

I can't see it making any perceivable to the existing patent troll companies, even if it were implemented that way :(

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BOFFINS: Oxygen-free, methane-based ALIENS may EXIST on icy SATURN moon Titan

NumptyScrub
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Re: Saturn's moon Titan...never had a dinosaur....or a fern.

Hydrogen is the most abundant element in the universe, and carbon is a natural by-product of the stellar fusion process. Methane is found in interstellar clouds (apparently) so having a planetary body with a high proportion of it is easy to explain just by aggregation from the protoplanetary disc...

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NumptyScrub
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Re: Thx to you, too

If we scooped it all up, it would probably all fit inside 1km2, out of a total 38 million km2 surface area. Also, lifting off with a toilet full of poop requires more reaction mass, I can't say I am surprised that they flushed before setting off ^^;

We apparently have a giant floating mass of plastics larger than Texas in the Pacific, in that context a few broken landers, lunar rovers and some bags of effluent seem pretty tame.

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Theresa May: Right, THIS time we're getting the Snoopers' Charter in

NumptyScrub
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Re: Good - Forces me to get off my arse and encrypt everything

Of course, as far as GCHQ is concerned, if they can't trivially get all your data with little to no effort, you suddenly become a person of extreme interest. You are aware that all security services operate on the premise that everyone is guilty until proven innocent, right?

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Love-rat fanboi left bobbing for Apples in tiny Japanese bath

NumptyScrub
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Re: his beloved collection of overpriced blahware

I'd like to see you try running Windows on a PowerBook, you need an Intel CPU for Windows.

Well, except the ARM builds of Windows (various Windows Phone / Windows CE versions, Windows 8 RT, Windows 10 for Pi) which don't require an Intel CPU. ;)

Windows 10 for Pi is by far the most bizarre press release I've seen from MS yet...

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Turkey PM bans Twitter, YouTube as 'tools of terrorist propaganda'

NumptyScrub
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Re: So....

So you don't think circumstances make a difference? Is the guy holding shotgun at a bank teller no different to the clay pigeon shooter? Don't be a twat.

Compare one 5-year old in a Batman costume standing at my door demanding sweets with menaces, with one of those Anonymous chucklefucks spending 3 hours holding a placard (while wearing a mask) and then going home. Do circumstances make a difference? Nope, they both completely legally wore a mask in public and committed no crime.

No, but wearing a mask in public at a demonstration is probably a good indication you might have intent to do something wrong or you don't want to police to know its you there. Why would someone who has nothing to hide bother?

Utter bullshit and literally a specific logical fallacy (fyi in this case P is "is a criminal" and Q is "wearing a mask"); as well as being trivial enough to refute using actual events. "Criminal" and "wearing a mask" are not commutative, and they are not causal, and I challenge you to provide logical proof of your statement.

Wearing a mask in public simply means you are wearing a mask in public. If you seriously believe that anyone who chooses to wear a mask (or balaclava, or hoodie) in public is "probably" a criminal then petition your MP to make balaclavas illegal, because until that point (where the mere act of wearing one is itself a crime) your argument is as leaky as a colander.

ISIS are terrorists, and ISIS are Muslim. If you can see why equating "Terrorist" and "Muslim" is a bad thing, I'm hoping you can see why equating balaclavas and rioters is just as bad. Lots of people wear balaclavas, but only a tiny percentage are rioters, and tarring us all with the same brush is really fucking annoying (not to mention bigoted as fuck).

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NumptyScrub
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Re: So....

No it isn't actually. It means if you have no intention of causing trouble then you have no reason to cover up. Why would they be fearful unless they knew they were going to do something wrong?

Please re-read what I've just quoted there, and tell me if it sounds an awful lot like the stereotypical "nothing to hide, nothing to fear" argument. Protip: it does, because you are basically using the "nothing to hide, nothing to fear" argument.

Is your issue with me calling it that simply one of syntatical pedantry? Would you prefer I called it the "nothing to fear, no reason to hide" argument instead so it exactly matches the syntax of your assertions? I can do that if you like.

Not automatically but the potential is there to cause trouble if they can't be identified. Give me a good reason why in a western democracy someone would cover their face at a protest.

You are basically arguing that the act of wearing a mask in public shows direct criminal intent; tell that to the gaggle of kids outside my door at Halloween wearing various spooky costumes, or the clueless Anonymous nubbins at one of their rallies. Citation: your second sentence I quoted at the start of this reply; "It means if you have no intention of causing trouble then you have no reason to cover up." 4 masked individuals (plus parent or guardian) stood outside my door demanding sweets with menaces; is that really direct, criminal intent?

If kids can do it for fun, then adults can do it for fun. Those numbnuts in Anonymous rallies are doing it for fun. So to answer your request for "a good reason" to cover your face in public: for fun.

Silly little kids wearing masks from a film doesn't count as a serious protest.

a) any organised protest gathering that gets several thousand people together is by definition pretty serious, even if you think all the people that turn up are dicks

b) several thousand masked protesters that do not go on to commit criminal acts is evidence which directly rebukes your premise that anyone in the West who covers their face is intending to cause trouble.

Wearing a mask in public is not a criminal act, nor is it a guaranteed precursor to a criminal act, and there is more than one "good reason" to do so (Halloween, fancy dress, the Great Gorilla Run, just for the giggles). Correlation is not causation; wearing a mask in public does not make you a criminal, being a criminal makes you a criminal and wearing a mask is irrelevant.

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NumptyScrub
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Re: So....

Can you cut and paste where I asserted that? No, didn't think so. If you're going to lie try not to make it quite so easy to disprove.

Here you go:

"If you're demonstrating peacefully and not breaking the law you have no reason to cover your face."

Your actual copy/pasted quote there is essentially paraphrasing "If you have nothing to fear, then you have no reason to hide"; it's the classic logical complement of the actual "nothing to hide, nothing to fear" statement. I though it was an obvious parallel, but I'll accept that I might be the only person who would make that jump.

If you think its fine to cover your face in a public place without issue in every situation then try and walk into a bank with your lid on and see how far you get.

To quote you back at yourself, could you confirm where I asserted that? I simply pointed out a set of situations (I am not the only motorcyclist in the UK, so it will be a set, not a single one) where wearing a balaclava is completely socially acceptable, considered a valid reason to wear one, and happens regularly.

On a lighter note, I actually have walked into a high street bank wearing my motorcycle helmet; this particular one is a full-face opener, and the face part was flipped up, revealing the rather large face hole in the balaclava (the motorcycle ones, or at least the ones I own, aren't your classic film ninja-eye-slit headgear, the face holes are about the size of a face). It was completely possible for me to both keep my helmet and balaclava on, and reveal almost my entire face while talking to the bank staff. I've done exactly the same thing when paying for petrol and the cashiers had no problem with it either. Point that I never actually said validated anyway, I guess?

"On a scale of Right to Wrong, wearing clothing at a protest doesn't even come close."

Your naivety is breathteaking. But frankly unsurprising on this site.

Naïve? Naïveté would be in thinking that everyone who turns up to a protest wearing a mask is automatically a violent criminal.

In your own words, "If you're demonstrating peacefully and not breaking the law you have no reason to cover your face. Ok, in turkey perhaps that rule doesn't apply, but in the west people who cover their faces at demos usually have trouble in mind."

People at Anonymous rallies wear masks to cover their faces, and the vast majority intend nothing more than peaceful protest. It's a basic, low-effort refutation, but would still appear to be a valid refutation nonetheless. Have I missed something?

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NumptyScrub
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Re: I totally agree with this

If youtube and twitter can't abide by their own policies they should be shut down. Allowing themselves to be used to broadcast ransom demands and beheadings, and to be the media outlet of choice by terrorist organisations, they should be ashamed of themselves.

If "terrorists" were disseminating "terrorist" information by putting bill posters up on empty walls, would you blame the walls (or the owners of the walls) for carrying that information, or the people who posted it in the first place? If I receive a phone call from someone constantly shouting racial epithets down the phone, and telling me how they will kill me slowly for having the "wrong" genetics, should my telephony provider be shut down for allowing it, or is it only the person who called me who should face prosecution for their actions?

Also, terrorist according to which side? I see BBC News showed an awful lot of coverage of the insurgent US and UK forces when they toppled the sovereign government of Iraq (as in, the cocksucker that we put in charge in the first place), but we were blatantly the terrorist forces in that instance... violent acts that intended "(iii) to affect the conduct of a government by mass destruction, assassination, or kidnapping" and which were against Iraqi stat and/or federal law.

Freedom of speech does not mean freedom to blackmail, kidnap and murder.

It does, however, mean the freedom to talk about blackmail, kidnap and murder. Anyway, the point is moot because no country on the planet has actual "freedom of speech". All of them have laws governing various forms of hate speech and incitement (or exhortation) to violence, and even the "enlightened" countries have libel and slander laws. It would probably cause less confusion if people stopped using the terms "free speech" or "freedom of speech", because it hasn't been a thing for several hundred years, at least.

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NumptyScrub
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Re: So....

If you're demonstrating peacefully and not breaking the law you have no reason to cover your face.

I haven't seen anyone wear a balaclava due to the weather for decades and unless you live way north of the artic circle or are at Amundson base in antartica I can't see any reason to wear one.

I wear a balaclava, underneath my motorcycle helmet, every time I get on the bike, because here in the UK 70mph can get pretty fucking cold, even in summer (I have a silk one for summer, and a "windproof" thermal one for winter). Does that refute your premise sufficiently? Do a google search for "motorcycle balaclava", this is a big enough thing to be a product range in its own right ;)

Regarding the blatant "nothing to hide, nothing to fear" assertion of yours, then I can't summon up the energy to write a proper rebuttal. Suffice to say that this inevitably gets trotted out by people who think they have nothing to fear, until you point out that they e.g. habitually exceed speed limits, drive the morning after (while still potentially over the limit), watch / listen to copyrighted material that they do not have the rights to, and various other offenses (civil and/or criminal). Everyone who I have had this conversation with IRL has at least 3 habitual offenses they commit either without thinking, or (in most cases) actively commit "because it's not a real crime" (aka the "everyone does that so it doesn't count" defense).

On a scale of Right to Wrong, wearing clothing at a protest doesn't even come close.

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Microsoft update mayhem delays German basketball game, costs team dear

NumptyScrub
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Re: Clearly it's a case of...

All possible because the new files were already in-place earlier as *NIX style file systems allow an atomic in-place replacement of files, but still allows an open file handle to continue using the previous on-disk data until the last handle is closed (i.e. on shut-down for the kernel or similar).

Which, of course, also allows users to have updated Firefox to version 36, but still be running an instance of Firefox 25 that has remained open for the past 12 months, running a 12 month old version of the Flash player plugin, even though they updated Flash Player only yesterday.

Atomic in-place replacement of files is awesome, but there are some updates that I would personally want flagged as "the system will close all instances of this to ensure the patched code is being used" because otherwise end-users (and not just the less experienced ones) can end up running old, potentially vulnerable code without realising. MS forcing reboots, for things that shouldn't actually require reboots, is one (ill-advised, irritating) method of mitigating that.

Best practise would be to take the best parts of both approaches, of course, even if you would be borrowing far more heavily from one than the other ;)

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Atomic keyrings: Just how bright are they?

NumptyScrub
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Re: How bright are they?

I have a Traser branded green one of these I got as a present from a friend over a decade ago (more like 15+ years I think). When appraised as a torch, the output is pitiful bordering on useless. When appraised just as a luminous marker that needs no batteries, the output is perfectly adequate and they appear to last for ever.

I can't read books with it (at least I wouldn't want to try), but I can always find my keys in the dark. ;)

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EU court: Mobe makers not liable for users' copyright badness

NumptyScrub
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Commissioned reports

UK Music commissioned an authoritative economic report that the damage and potential damage of an uncompensated private copying exception is quite significant.

Whereas I commissioned a report that the damage and potential damage of an uncompensated private copying exception is practically insignificant. Where do I get it stamped as "authoritative"? Does it need to be laser printed, or will the original crayon suffice? This is important.

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Shove off, ugly folk, says site for people who love themselves

NumptyScrub
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Re: Tawnie Lynn (pictured)

Don't like the site, don't join. Don't like that they turn away people who don't meet their standards? Same is true when I interview someone for a job (or am interviewed). Different people want different things from a partner. What is wrong with specialist dating sites in principle?

The horribly grey area involving bigotry / discrimination legislation, IMO. If they specialise in interests or activities then fair enough, but when they specialise purely in physical characteristics, it does start to skirt dangerously close to existing discrimination legislation.

Or if it is not possible to disparage their looks, to make unsupported claims about how they must be shallow or dumb.

Regarding Ms. Lynn, then I am perfectly happy judging her purely on her words:

“If the management failed to maintain the quality of the site by polluting the gene pool, most members would leave. ... It would make BeautifulPeople just like every other dating site – full of the kind of people you wouldn’t want to share an elevator with, let alone date.”

It is only 2 sentences, but I think there are enough hints in there to gauge the depth of her character, at least superficially.

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Upchuck nation: Half a million CHUMPS now own Google Cardboard VR gear

NumptyScrub
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A sucker and his money are soon parted. Or half a million suckers as it turns out.

$20 for a bit of cardboard and a $5 pair of lenses? What are these people thinking?

"Fuck me, that's a shitload cheaper than $300 plus shipping and taxes for an Oculus Rift? (which is still a development kit and comes with no support)"

BTW I paid $300 plus shipping and taxes for the Rift, and have also tried the Cardboard at a friends, and while the far more expensive Oculus is certainly "better" in a subjective sense, I can't fault Cardboard at the price. If you want to piss about with some VR (and you have an Android device that supports Cardboard) it's definitely worth either $25 to the lazy person, or your time measuring and cutting and gluing cardboard together.

Just be aware, Google Cardboard will probably function as a gateway drug to the much more expensive Oculus Rift. You have been warned ^^;

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Frontier promises it won't 'dumb down' Elite: Dangerous for Xbox

NumptyScrub
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This... is a good damn thing. Assuming it's connected to the same server/peer system as the PC version, it will draw in a lot of people - friends of mine among them - who would LIKE to play Elite, but only own a console, or who don't want the hassle of buying stuff they can only play on the PC quietly gathering dust in a corner of the house they don't want to sit in.

It will be a different multiplayer environment, MS require XBox games to use the Live servers for multiplayer, meaning that the existing FDEV infrastructure will be wholly incompatible. There would need to be a "Games for Windows Live" version to allow for cross platform gaming (Shadowrun is the only one that springs to mind, although there might have been others). I don't think anyone even codes for GfWL any more, and I can't say I blame them... ^^;

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Forget 1,000 lashes for Facebook posts, Saudis now want to behead blogger Raif Badawi

NumptyScrub
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Re: Reproachless

Right and wrong and justice are absolutes that exist for all times and places, and are not subject to change by human whim, or alterable to benefit vested interests.

"Right" and "wrong" and "justice" are entirely relative, and are constantly redefined as societal norms evolve. The Crusades were considered "right" and "just" at the time, as were the practises of slavery and indentured servitude, for quite some time. The concept of judicial combat (and personal duels) even managed to last well beyond the 16th century when it was outlawed in the UK. The Saudi authorities happen to consider beheading for apostasy to be "right" and "just", and while I completely disagree, I suspect that like me you already know a few people who would consider beheading "right" and "just" for the crime of committing acts of paedophilia.

I have a personal definition of what is right and what is wrong, which I adhere to, but I'm not naive enough to think that anyone but me has the exact same definition; life constantly puts people in front of me who have (sometimes vastly) different opinions on those concepts. They are certainly not immutable, if my experience is anything to go by.

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NumptyScrub
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Trollface

Re: Reproachless

2 : Saudi Arabian laws are not dictated by the USA, therefore the Saudi Arabian government are not commiting an act of agression against an innocent according to SA law. US laws apply only to the US...

This was also equally true of Saddam Hussein in Iraq; even though he was acting like a proper totalitarian despot, he was also the sovereign ruler of Iraq and acted entirely under Iraqi law (that he wrote himself, possibly in crayon), yet the US saw fit to go steaming in and replace him anyway. So they need to man the fuck up and go steaming into Saudi to "install democracy" as well, or they'll end up looking like giant hypocritical turds for replacing one human rights violating government, but completely ignoring another.

I'd put my money on the US deciding that the giant hypocritical turd look is in for this season, but maybe the lure of all those Saudi oil wells will prove me wrong.

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