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* Posts by NumptyScrub

523 posts • joined 18 Mar 2010

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UNIX greybeards threaten Debian fork over systemd plan

NumptyScrub
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Re: the "fun" part about systemd

quote: "I'm not sure why anyone would choose to shut down their laptop when they could just close the lid and suspend, open lid and continue working where they left off."

I have a low-power Mint box that stays on 24/7 and only gets rebooted for updates and upgrades, but everything else spends more time unused than used, so it gets shut down. The standby power draw for 18 hours out of 24 equates to more inconvenience for me (in the form of electricity bills) than the inconvenience of an extra 10 second wait while the machine boots.

YMMV, of course, as everyone weights inconvenience differently. As long as you are aware that a laptop on standby is still discharging the battery (at a reduced rate) and act accordingly, then it is entirely your choice to use standby instead of shutting it down.

Tangential aside: almost every laptop I pull off the shelf at work for a rebuild is discharged, so I suspect most people at work also use standby in preference to a shutdown, and return laptops in a suspended state. If they were shut down they shouldn't be flat inside of a week of storage ^^;

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AMD pays new CEO $150K LESS than her male predecessor

NumptyScrub
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Re: " $1m that former Lenovo exec Read received each month."

quote: "And tell me why it's relevant. They are in different industry sectors."

Because it is exactly the same job: Read was employed as CEO of AMD, and Su is now employed as CEO of AMD, and there is a difference in remuneration package between the 2.

But I had assumed that Su was on $850k compared to Read's $1m during the same time period, not $850k per annum vs $1m per calendar month. That is a bit more of a discrepancy than a few % for not having the same experience...

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Torvalds CONFESSES: 'I'm pretty good at alienating devs'

NumptyScrub
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Re: Social skills and techies

quote: "In my thirty years of dealing with techies, I have found over and over again that technical ability is inversely correlated with social skills."

In my 20 years of working as, and around, support staff, if you don't understand people and understand technology enough to properly troubleshoot and fix it, you are not a good support engineer.

It is entirely possible to be pleasant, personable, approachable, and technically skilled. What you found was a corollary of the "nice guys finish last" effect; only people ruthless enough to climb the corporate ladder have climbed the corporate ladder, and if they do not think you are important enough to be nice to, they are unlikely to be nice to you*.

If you have regularly had to deal with support engineers who are also socially unskilled, then I apologise, as in my experience these should be the exception rather than the rule.

*Some of the senior and board level people I've had to deal with can be total dicks when they are under even a little pressure. This includes those in PR, who are supposed to have excellent social skills, so it's not just technical staff that have this particular failing.

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Scientists skeptical of Lockheed Martin's truck-sized FUSION reactor breakthrough boast

NumptyScrub
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Re: just like water

quote: "You know, you are welcome to collect your own water. And treat it for cryptospiridum, e coli, heavy metals, VOCs..."

They make straws for that now ;)

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Red Bull does NOT give you wings, $13.5m lawsuit says so

NumptyScrub
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Re: Really?

quote: "It goes to the whole "Truth in Advertising" business."

Unless and until this is also applied to campaign promises, Red Bull can claim their caffeinated pisswater will let you shoot lasers from your eyes and be able to call forth the power of 10 tigers for all I care.

"Truth in Political Campaign Advertising" is a far more pressing matter IMO.

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Internet Explorer stars in monster October Patch Tuesday

NumptyScrub
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Happy

Re: "including Windows RT"

Nope, that would be Little Bobby Tables, who is both OS and db engine agnostic.

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Trolls have DARK TETRAD of personality defects, say trickcyclists

NumptyScrub
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Re: Trolling for suckers

quote: "The initial comments do not have to be dark or offensive, just the sort of thing that gets people posting a reply. Mentioning that evolution is just a theory or purposely misquoting Dumbledore out of Lord of the Rings is classic trolling because although not offensive the deliberate errors will often elicit a response."

Lol u stoopid evrybody knows the wizzard in LoTR is called Gadaffi

did I do that right?

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Crims zapped mobes, slabs we collared for evidence, wail cops

NumptyScrub
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Re: Have they not heard of Faraday bags?

They also seem to be unaware of the existence of professional data recovery services who claim to be able to recover data deleted from mobile devices and flash memory.

1) get (encrypted) data recovered via forensic methods

2) demand suspect provide the decryption key under RIPA Section 49

.....

Profit!

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'Bill Gates swallowing bike on a beach' is ideal password say boffins

NumptyScrub
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quote: "german keyboard layout (and derived c-e european) has 'y' and 'z' swapped. imagine the joy "i'm positive i typed the %@!$ thing right! oh, blimey, wrong keyboard layout again!"

of course, who in their right mind would set anything different than plain US as default keyboard layout?

well... apparently it's our new domain default. which cannot be changed. enforced by domain policies. updated on every reboot. they can even reboot your computer for you. arghhh!"

Standardised keyboard layout for servers in EU subsidiaries, I completely agree with. My place does this as we only have the one 3rd line support department for the whole of the EU, and it's based in the UK so we're familiar with (and use) UK layouts. It's not difficult to fit a physical UK keyboard in to the racks for any local support techs to use either.

Standardised keyboard layout for users though? Utter insanity. If there is one thing guaranteed to cause a fistfight between users and support, it's not having the fucking keys in the correct place. Yes, it means I have to be mindful when typing passwords on a remote system and the layout is QWERTZ or AZERTY, but that is minimal fuss compared to asking several hundred people to use a different layout than the rest of their country uses.

Maybe I'm being far too sympathetic though ^^;

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HOT BABES! Worried you won't get that JOB in IT? MENTION how hot you are

NumptyScrub
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Re: My solemn promise

quote: "Does that include the men?"

Obviously; the original post failed to mention gender in any form, so by definition it would include stunningly attractive people of any gender.

That would be the default interpretation of such a claim, anyway ;)

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Revenge smut bullies who send 'grossly offensive' messages WILL be prosecuted

NumptyScrub
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Re: re: revenge porn can affect anyone

quote: "The issue with explicit photos of adults is that adults are deemed too immature to be able to provide consent."

There is a difference between consenting that your partner has an explicit image of you for personal use, and consenting that your partner can freely distribute an explicit image of you to the public.

You know, like movie studios letting you buy a DVD, but throwing a wobbly if you then post it on the internet. As long as you ensure you are the copyright holder for any explicit image, you are then entitled to the full protection of the law regarding the control of its distribution.

Of course what we apparently need is more badly worded legislation to cover specific circumstances, rather than ensuring that existing legislation can cover the requirements, because politicians need to be seen to be "doing something" in the run up to an election.

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Coming to a theater near you: the TETRIS MOVIE

NumptyScrub
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quote: "Surely with such a tenuous link between whatever storyline is in the movie, and the original game there's really no reason to call it Tetris? Do they think that the association between a decades-old puzzle game will drive people into movie theatres to see it?"

Usually works for Uwe Boll, and he's equally incapable of making a good game-related film ^^;

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IRONY ALERT: Former MI6 chief warns of 'mass snooping' - by PAEDOS

NumptyScrub
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Re: But

Paedos can already use statutory powers from RIPA to covertly surveil potential targets without their knowledge. Or are you under the impression that public service never employs paedos?

I could be right, even if my message is a little alarmist... ;)

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Want to see the back of fossil fuels? Calm down, hippies. CAPITALISM has an answer

NumptyScrub
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Re: Clean energy NOW

Hydrogen is also the most abundant material in the known universe, so no chance of running out any time soon. Fissionable materials are far less abundant, and while I agree they are the obvious short term solution, some people have this irrational fear of an irradiated zombie apocalypse or something if there's a power station within 100 miles. You'll need to fix that before we can start building new reactors.

I'd use H2 at home as a fuel. I already have a gas cooker and central heating, and methane has explosive limits of 4.4-15% and is being piped though the whole ground floor of the domicile. Gasoline surprisingly has an LEL of a mere 1.2%. I'm not saying H2 is not dangerous, just that all combustible fuels are dangerous yet we use them anyway. Sensible design of the storage and generation equipment (including protective enclosures) can minimise explosive risk.

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NumptyScrub
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quote: "It's not difficult to get, but it is difficult to store and distribute when compared with hydrocarbon fuels; so being able to make hydrogen using solar power and then make electricity from hydrogen is not a complete solution."

I'd argue that the completeness of that as a solution is merely one of scale. If you can get enough H2 and electricity from solar to be able to completely replace your current energy providers, it becomes a complete solution. Home gas appliances can all be replaced by electric appliances (electric cookers and heating), and transport can be run on H2, it's just less energy dense than petrol. Make it cheaper per unit energy than petrol, and people are naturally going to switch when the choice becomes pertinent to them.

Then there's just the safety issues to address; personally I don't think H2 as a fuel is any more dangerous than LPG or petrol overall, but irrational public fears are still fears. Make sure that H2 powered vehicles are crash tested to the same standards as petrol vehicles (including passenger safety) and we should be good to go :)

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Mine Bitcoins with PENCIL and PAPER

NumptyScrub
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Coffee/keyboard

quote: "...finding a way to break the epileptic curve encryption used"

Ok, where do I send the bill for the keyboard? :D

(I think you meant "elliptical")

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NumptyScrub
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Re: Other fun tasks!

quote: "- Why not write a manifesto detailing how an anarcho-capitalist society will work in practice!"

Answer: they already are. Most capitalist societies are de-facto anarcho-capitalist, it's just that one group ("government") has the largest collection of paid enforcers and can thus exert influence over the general population under threat of violence. Note how another group ("criminals") refuses to subject themselves to the rules laid out by the first group and wilfully ignores them, even knowing the consequences will be violent.

Or had you never thought of it that way? The continued existence of criminals shows that all societies have not (and apparently cannot) force people to conform if they do not wish to conform, and thus all societies are at least part anarchy. IMO, anyway.

quote: "- Work out why scams proliferate in the world of Bitcoin, but make sure the existence of the scams >really< show Bitcoin gets stronger!"

Scams also proliferate in the world of money. Actually, scams proliferate in any field where something of "value" exists, whether it has an intrinsic value or has value as a barter token. Any argument regarding the existence of scams affecting the usefulness of Bitcoin as a whole is equally as applicable to USD or GBP (or gold, or camels).

Since we have been using barter systems for hundreds of years, and people have been scamming for hundreds of years, I would conclude that the existence of scams is generally not considered enough to preclude their use. I would assume that this would also hold true for Bitcoin as it has for all of the other barter systems we have in place.

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Renault Twingo: Small, sporty(ish), safe ... and it's a BACK-ENDER

NumptyScrub
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Re: Nobody will buy the smaller engine

quote: "Normally rear wheel drive is better in snow

Say what??"

Tyres, tyres, tyres. I understand your incredulousness regarding RWD in snow, however the drivetrain is less important than the snow:car interface (aka tyre) as far as available traction is concerned. FWD just means you understeer when you lose grip at the drive wheels, RWD will oversteer when you lose grip at the drive wheels, and AWD might do either depending on how the center differential is set up to deal with loss of traction at one axle (some vehicles have a front bias and thus tend to understeer etc.).

The most important part of driving in the snow is driving appropriately for the conditions, but a close second is using snow tyres. Thinner tyres are "better" (unintuitively) as they concentrate the vehicle mass on a smaller area, allowing the sipes on the tyres to bite better.

I ran my Shogun in RWD mode last winter, as the comedy 30" M&S (mud and snow) tyres were gripping fine for the speeds I was comfortable doing, and thus I never felt the need to switch to 4WD mode. A work colleague even ran his XKR with proper winter tyres (Bridgestone Blizzaks IIRC) and also had few issues, although I'm pretty sure he also uses different wheels to ensure he can get tyres that actually fit ^^;

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NumptyScrub
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Re: Reanult has a problem, called 'marketing'

quote: "A 1 litre lugging round a giant lump like the Mondeo? Can you say over-strained???

Doubt any of these new Fords will reach double figure birthdays before their owners are faced with costly engine repair/replacement bills."

The Mk III Cortina (circa 1970) came with 1.1l to 2.0l engine options, and according to that page it had "98bhp". I suspect that is the output for the 2.0, so it was significantly outclassed by the current 120bhp Ecoboost lump with only half the displacement (but with a turbo).

If the Ecoboost is designed for reliability at that boost level it'll be fine. I drove the old 90bhp diesel Mondeo, and it was slow but usable, with 120bhp you'll get a bit more poke along with the commensurate drop in economy if you have a heavy right foot.

I have a 160bhp 1.2l engine that is >10 years old and still running fine, and I know people with 400bhp 2.0l engines that have hit 100,000 miles without breaking. As long as you use and maintain them properly engines don't normally go bang, and passenger car engines are designed on the assumption that drivers won't reliably do either.

YMMV of course :)

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Kenyan court case could sound death knell for mobile money

NumptyScrub
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Of course not. However, note that M-Pesa was already competing with banks and apparently winning, so now banks are trying to claw back the lost custom. Custom which the banks refused to serve in the first place, because they couldn't see an easy profit in it.

Interesting turn of events, really :)

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Infosec geniuses hack a Canon PRINTER and install DOOM

NumptyScrub
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Re: My reaction...

psDooM but for the print queue? Hells yeah :D

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BMC Software flings patent sueball at ServiceNow

NumptyScrub
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Re: Remedy v ServiceNow

Crappacino vs a cafe shatté, as it were?

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Ordnance Survey intern plonks houses, trees, rivers and roads on GB Minecraft map

NumptyScrub
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Re: No Profit

Yep, Mojang has a decent revenue stream so I don't know where the idea of it not making a profit comes from. My concern is rather what on earth MS are intending to do with it, especially if they value it at $2.5b. I have a horrible suspicion we'll be looking at paid DLC replacing user mods, and in-app purchasing surfacing within the year, alongside a new-found platform exclusivity on Windows and XBox :'(

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Will Europe's ISPs unmask anonymous IP infringers?

NumptyScrub
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Re: I'm confused (again)

quote: "There is a non-trivial difference. First, you can be compelled to hand over your encryption keys, but it requires a court order (not a huge hurdle, admittedly). And second, at least you know that you're being so required."

I linked Section 49 of the Act, have a quick read of it.

Here is the mentioned Schedule 2 authorisations which does mention a court order, but have a read of the specifics for data obtained under statutory powers but without a warrant where it clarifies that juducial oversight is not required:

(2)Subject to paragraph 6, where—

(a)the statutory power was exercised, or is likely to be exercised, by the police, SOCA, SCDEA, Her Majesty's Revenue and Customs or a member of Her Majesty’s forces, or

(b)the information was provided or disclosed, or is likely to be provided or disclosed, to the police, SOCA, SCDEA, Her Majesty's Revenue and Customs or a member of Her Majesty’s forces, or

(c)the information is in the possession of, or is likely to come into the possession of, the police, SOCA, SCDEA, Her Majesty's Revenue and Customs or a member of Her Majesty’s forces,

the police, SOCA, SCDEA, Her Majesty's Revenue and Customs or, as the case may be, members of Her Majesty’s forces have the appropriate permission in relation to the protected information, without any grant of permission under paragraph 1. (emphasis mine)

So the police, SOCA, SCDEA, HMRC agents and all armed forces employees do not need a court order to demand disclosure, if they have reason to believe the information is important in detecting crime (section 49 3 (b)) and they obtained the information through the use of a statutory power, such as the seizure of a mobile phone after you were involved in a road traffic incident.

So you get rear-ended on the road, police look around on your phone and find an area that requires a password to unlock, you are required by law to make available all information on your phone or face a 24 month custodial sentence (5 years if the case is "national security" or "child indecency" related). They simply need to justify in court that they had reason to believe that the information they could not access could help them "detect crime". It is an edge case, absolutely, but it is also demonstrably completely legal for the police to do that should they wish to.

I categorically do not like the idea that I can be forced (under pain of custodial sentence and lasting criminal record) to make demonstrably unrelated (and innocuous) private information available when I have committed no crime, and there is no warrant for the procurement of said information. On a scale of Utopian to Oppressive, this is already crossing the line in the wrong direction, in my opinion.

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NumptyScrub
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Re: I'm confused (again)

quote: "* Don't laugh - French law did make it illegal to encrypt data for many years."

Whereas current UK law just makes it illegal to not decrypt any of your data whenever they tell you to.

Same shit, different day ^^;

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It's official: LOHAN's arboreal avoidance algorithm is PANTS

NumptyScrub
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Pint

Re: Blimey!

Standing upon the shoulders of giants, and all that :D

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NumptyScrub
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Re: I'm glad that LOHAN has PANTS

Now we just need to make sure they stay up for the whole flight ^^;

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iPhone 6: Advanced features? Pah! Nexus 4 had most of them in 2012

NumptyScrub
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NFC gives me the same feeling as Wifi Protected Setup; my phone had it disabled within 5 minutes of turning it on the first time, like my router got WPS disabled just after I changed the admin password. There is without doubt a use case for the technology, and there is without doubt the potential for exploitation to gain access to the device; indeed my phone model was one specifically mentioned for an NFC exploit 2 years ago. In the fight between convenience and security, personally I normally choose security. If Apple succeed in making NFC far more ubiquitous, then expect far more people attempting to exploit NFC for personal gain :(

What surprised me far more was Apple deciding that the smallest model was going to expand to 4.7", IMO it would have been far more sensible to keep it at iPhone 5 size. Many Apple using friends liked the fact that their 3 / 4 was the size it was and did not like the idea of my jumbo 5" phone, and I now have to wonder what their next phone is actually going to be if their only Apple choices are now that size or larger.

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What the BLOCK? Microsoft to gobble Minecraft-maker 'for $2bn'

NumptyScrub
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Re: Absolute stark raving, swivel-eyed, dog fingering insanity

quote: "TWO BILLION? Two billion US dollars? Are you sure it's not two billion Zimbabwean dollars or something?

Nadella must be off his chump."

Ask Zuckerberg how much he paid for WhatsApp, on the back of less profit per year.

Either big companies are staffed with utter fuckwits (possible) or some purchases have other reasons than simple profit seeking (also possible).

Personally, I reckon MS have looked at it, and decided what Minecraft really needs is in-app purchases, and that they are just the people to wring every last cent out of it. I will now go observe a 2-minutes silence for platform-independent, independent games development :(

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NumptyScrub
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Headmaster

Re: It was fun while it lasted.

quote: "I'm pretty sure you could use a nail as a lethal weapon, would that not be a death nail?"

Nope, that would probably be better referred to as a killing nail (like a "killing blow"). Although I've not heard the term before, I'd suggest a "death nail" might be a nail (toe or finger) removed from a dead person, potentially for commemorative purposes. Similar to a death mask being a cast of the dead persons face, used as an aid to commemoration.

Searching "Death nail quote" leads to an extensive list of pages using it (incorrectly) as a substitute for death knell. The one link I saw which correctly surmised it should be death knell then used "for all intensive purposes", (should be "all intents and purposes") so I am now officially a sad panda, dis langwij iz fuked innit :(

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'4chan may be just a sysadmin who knows his way around', claims so-called expert

NumptyScrub
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Re: Miley

I'm not saying her misdirection wasn't obvious, I was mainly taking the opportunity to point out that your statement context was implying "drug use" and "controlled substance use" were interchangeable. From a medical and scientific perspective, they should not be, or I'd have to put every person in this company into rehab for their caffeine habit, myself included ;)

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NumptyScrub
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Re: Miley

"Drug use" is such a perjorative term when it shouldn't be. I know so many people who regularly take drugs it's not even funny.

I used to use nicotine daily, although I gave that up a decade ago. I only take ethanol a few times a week (I can give up any time I like), although I will admit I am a heavy user of caffeine several times a day. It is practically impossible to live on this planet without taking something which classifies as a drug, especially given the availability of aspirin, ibuprofen and paracetamol over the counter.

If someone says they don't take drugs I usually just laugh at them, and when they look at me funny I point out that I'm a language pedant, and what they meant to say was "I don't take controlled substances". The vast majority of drugs are not controlled substances, and many are taken daily by people who vehemently "wouldn't do drugs".

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Heavy VPN users are probably pirates, says BBC

NumptyScrub
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Re: BBC Worldwide

quote: "Drink-driving isn't a "criminal act of theft" either, does that mean it's OK?

The pointless argument about whether making an illegal copy is theft, or some other offence, is irrelevant. It's against the law, until and unless you get the law changed. Live with it and stop making specious anonymous excuses."

Actually the point being made, is that anyone who owns a car and is seen to be making frequent trips to the pub, should be considered a potential drink driver, and that there should be "mechanisms in place" to automatically determine if they were actually sober when making the journey. If those mechanisms cannot determine if the driver was definitely sober, then they should be assumed to be a drink-driver and the appropriate measures taken.

Guilty until proven innocent is just one part of this erosion of public rights, the other being the automatic, warrantless inspection and data gathering of all the driving public as a whole.

Presumption of guilt automatically makes it "to be avoided" in my opinion. Any system based upon a presumption of guilt inevitably ends up as Judge Death or some facsimile thereof.

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Applelutely fappulous: Fashionistas bow down before the JESUS PHONE

NumptyScrub
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quote: "I would say if you have people queuing outside your shops for weeks to buy the stuff you make, before you have even shown the world what that stuff is, it's a pretty good sign you're the cool kid already."

Food Aid vans. People will walk for days just to queue up for the chance of getting whatever random item is handed to them from the van.

Apple products are apparently less cool than bags of rice, using that metric. You heard it here first :)

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California blue whale numbers soar to historical levels, say boffins

NumptyScrub
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quote: "I appreciate that you can't just go around telling other sovereign nations what to do but some practices have global impact."

Of course you can, what do you think we start embargoing nations for if it's not failing to do what they are bloody well told?

If we can walk into a sovereign nation and uninstall their current government because we don't like it (invisible WMDs notwithstanding), then a show of force regarding whaling is small fry.

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Alien Ninja Fembot Pirates vs the Jedi SAS Chuck Norris startroopers: RUMBLE

NumptyScrub
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Re: Special Circumstances?

GSV Sleeper Service in the configuration from Excession.

That stunned quite a few ROUs into silence ^^;

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Huawei 'beats' Apple to bag sapphire smartie bragging rights

NumptyScrub
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Obligatory link to the Macdailynews story covering LG's issue with the original iPhone design. As long as Huawei have got the ok from LG for making a phone that is mostly screen, with rounded corners, they'll be fine :)

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NumptyScrub
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Re: How tough is it in real life?

Some people report sapphire "glass" on watches remaining blemish free for decades under robust use, although others have also had them scratch within years. The Mohs scale has corundum (sapphire and ruby) second only to diamond for hardness, so I'd be comfortable stating it should outperform any type of silicon oxide glass for "toughness" when used as a device screen covering, although some people do appear to have a knack for scratching pretty much anything.

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Vote NOW for LOHAN's arboreal avoidance algorithm acronym

NumptyScrub
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Re: Hang on

My original reply was simply an attempt to align his excellent suggestion closer to the known LOHAN parameters regarding undergarments. I'm giving him full credit on that one :)

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NumptyScrub
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Hang on

I blatantly plagiarised Sir Sham Cad for mine, if it gets any votes then add them to his total to work out if he should get the stickers :)

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Jimbo tells Wikipedians: You CAN'T vote to disable 'key software features'

NumptyScrub
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Re: salaried employees

quote: "Back when I was on Windows, this is years back, I reinstalled my workstation - no domain bs for me thank you ... same username & password on the local workstation than on the domain, never had a problem."

So you replaced a centrally managed domain, with a locally managed domain. I can see several drawbacks and practically no advantages to that approach. The fact you never had issues with domain password expiry (aka "security best practise") regularly causing you to have to change your domain password on a colleagues machine, and then update your local domain account to the same password, suggests that a lack of understanding of Windows domains may have extended to that company's support staff as well.

If I came across a similar situation professionally the result would not have been the same. Potentially it could have ended up with you getting the config and tools you need to do your job, assuming you raised your concerns early (before wiping your machine) and corporate policy was flexible enough to allow me to address your concerns (e.g. providing you with a *nix install instead). As presented, it would probably have ended in a disciplinary, because thinking that you are more important than corporate security policy rarely ends well, in my experience.

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Not even CRIMINALS want your tablets, Blighty - but if that's an iPhone you're waving...

NumptyScrub
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Meh

Re: Stating the obvious

quote: "c) iphones are very popular amongst the kind of demographic in the UK that would do daft things like leave their mobile unattended in a bar

I don't think that last one is even theft, it is wealth redistribution by lack of intelligence."

Taking something that belongs to another person (whether by force, deception, or opportunity), that you do not have their permission to take, is still theft.

Just because most of us would expect it to happen, doesn't make it any less a crime.

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GCHQ protesters stick it to British spooks ... by drinking urine

NumptyScrub
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Unhappy

Re: Why it could or couldn't

quote: "Next up is the law around the intended use of the photographs. If it is reasonable to believe that the photographs might be of use to someone committing acts of terrorism, the photograph is illegal. It doesn't matter whether the photographer is a terrorist or whether the photographer knows any terrorists, it is enough that the photographer intends to publish the useful photos on a website where terrorists might be able to find them, for example posted on a website visible to the general public."

That sounds like it potentially covers every photograph on Facebook, Instagram, and Flickr that shows a location inside the UK. Is there a government department that I can send every single photograph I take inside UK borders to, so they can pre-check and vet each one and let me know which ones won't be useful to terrorists and thus won't open me up to prosecution for terrorism?

Obviously photos inside/of Tube stations are going to be illegal (Tube bombers can use those to plan more Tube bombings), as are photos taken inside/of airports, and I'd probably include schools, shopping centres, High Streets, and any places where enough members of the public gather and are thus potential bomb targets. Also, some people I know may or may not be important enough that they could be considered targets for kidnapping, so I'd need guidance on those even if they are taken inside my own house.

Man, it sounds like I need to just stop taking photos, because if any found their way onto the internet I could be in some pretty hot water :'(

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BBC: We're going to slip CODING into kids' TV

NumptyScrub
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Re: Oh crap.

Small children have been happily destroying important and/or expensive things since the invention of small children. I was an utter nightmare once I worked out what screwdrivers did ^^;

The only winning move is to put everything important out of reach (high shelves, or preferably locked up in a verboten area like the "study") until some semblance of "adherence to rules" (aka trustworthiness) emerges as they get older. This varies by child, so you'll have to make your own judgement call there.

17mo is definitely too young to be trusted with kit that isn't at least IP57 certified, drool gets everywhere ;)

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LOHAN wrapped in vinyl as Kickstarter campaign hits £18,000!

NumptyScrub
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Happy

Re: But...but...aww s'not fair!!!

quote: "All the tankards have gone before we even got to see a picture to see if we even wanted one!!! {sulks!} You could have left the books closed on that one until the sample pictures were published!"

as of this typing:

£70 = tankard plus tshirt (36 of 50 left)

£120 = tankard plus the chance to hurl abuse at Lester in person and/or buy him a pint (20 of 25 left)

Much more expensiver than £40 for just the tankard, but still available if you have the funds :)

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Top beak: UK privacy law may be reconsidered because of social media

NumptyScrub
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Re: He wha?

quote: "You deliberately mischaracterise the remarks, and it has nothing to do with celebrity or politicians.The point is , is that recording devices are so ubiquitous and social media makes it very easy for ANYBODY to be a "journalist"."

So, the remark I am mischaracterising:

"If I want to do or say something which I am only prepared to do or say privately, then it is an interference with my freedom of expression if I cannot do it or say it because it will be reported in a newspaper"

Implying that a voluntary refusal to act, because of a perceived chance of it being reported, is the form of the alleged interference with freedom of expression. You are actually still free to do or say it, but it is fear of the consequences of people finding out that restrains you.

This statement is not referencing things that have already been said or done coming to light, it is referencing things that do not get said or done because they could come to light, and equating that to a violation of freedom of expression. "I cannot express myself, because I do not wish for other people to learn how I expressed myself."

The vast majority of laws are prohibitive in nature, and the fear of the consequences of acts which contravene those laws is supposed to be how we keep society in check. It seems strange that Lord Neuberger is comfortable with "fear of the law" as a valid deterrent to action, but believes "fear of publication" is a violation of his basic rights.

Or am I the only one that put a crime in as his "do or say something" to see how the statement read, and immediately saw it as untenable? "If I want to fiddle kids, which I am only prepared to do privately, then it is an interference with my freedom of expression if I cannot fiddle kids because it will be reported in a newspaper" just doesn't work, does it?

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NumptyScrub
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Re: He wha?

Came here to make that same point. If you are "only prepared to do or say (it) privately" then don't do or say it in front of journalists. If you are prepared to do or say it in front of people who may be (or may forward that information to) journalists, then it is not being done or said "in private".

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TROLL SLAYER Google grabs $1.3 MEEELLION in patent counter-suit

NumptyScrub
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Re: Legal term?

Muphrys Law proves itself to be a universal constant again, I see :)

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'Stop dissing Google or quit': OK, I quit, says Code Club co-founder

NumptyScrub
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Re: So basically...

"I do not want to get into the specifics of any particular policy. Nonetheless, it’s worth restating that I believe Robert Mugabe is a tremendous partner. As a member of the board I am completely aligned with that view."

Sometimes you just feel compelled to bite :)

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Raspberry Pi B+: PHWOAR, get a load of those pins

NumptyScrub
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Re: ElReg on the pulse as normal

Let me guess, was it on the 22nd July? :D

(doesn't work with American date formats thought)

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