* Posts by NumptyScrub

728 posts • joined 18 Mar 2010

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Ashley Madison invites red-faced cheats to bolt stable door for free

NumptyScrub
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Trollface

Re: Odd modus operandi

This isn't a Hollywood movie and most people aren't cosy with Mafia types, so that's all rather a bit far fetched don't you think?

This isn't Hollywood, this is the same Real Life that had the US physically invade Iraq and deliberately depose the existing government, because they didn't like the existing government. Is that how a sane and developed First World nation is supposed to act in Real Life when dealing with other sovereign nations?

Sometimes you really couldn't make this shit up, and depending on how much power some of these butthurt adulterous leches actually have (Congressmen maybe?), I would venture to suggest that some of the wacko suggestions about people getting offed because of this aren't actually as unlikely as some might think. Art imitates life, and absolute power corrupts absolutely...

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Google robo-car in rear-end smash – but cack-handed human blamed

NumptyScrub
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I'd suggest that these events are probably representative of driver experience in that locality. For us meatsack drivers, this is (literally) just another vehicle on the road, and will be treated as such by other drivers. Possibly a minority might recognise it as an autonomous vehicle, but anyone paying that much attention to be able to do so is (in my experience) the exception rather than the rule :'(

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FBI probe physical intrusions into Californian internet cables

NumptyScrub
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Re: Founding fathers terrorists? Hardly

Comparing (or alluding to) the Founding Fathers of the US as terrorists (e.g. ISIS) is absurd.

The Founding Fathers work was built upon that of insurgents. People who fought and killed soldiers working for the (then) legitimate government. They were Patriots, absolutely, because they were working to free the Colony from a corrupt and hated regime. That's how they were viewed by one side in the conflict, but the other side absolutely saw them as insurgents who turned to armed revolt; aka terrorism.

From the current US FBI definition of Terrorism:

"Domestic terrorism" means activities with the following three characteristics:

*Involve acts dangerous to human life that violate federal or state law;

*Appear intended (i) to intimidate or coerce a civilian population; (ii) to influence the policy of a government by intimidation or coercion; or (iii) to affect the conduct of a government by mass destruction, assassination. or kidnapping; and

*Occur primarily within the territorial jurisdiction of the U.S.

Some of the actions of the Patriots during the American Revolution are going to fall foul of that definition, if you look at it from the point of view of the (corrupt, hated) UK Parliament.

I am not saying they are ISIS, but I am saying they are both terrorists (as per the FBI definition of terrorist) as well as freedom fighters, and the difference is purely which side you look at them from. I've not heard of any renowned freedom fighters who, when viewed from the point of view of the other side, wouldn't be classed as terrorists, however if you are aware of any I'd be happy to hear about them :)

The only thing the headchoppers want is a totalitarian nation (aka Caliphate) where there is your hated "my world view is the only world view" in full display, as it were.

Actually I am lamenting the prevalence of such a polarised viewpoint here in the West. Where people are being told that "terrorists" are always and inherently evil, that government surveillance is always and inherently benign, and various other "truisms" that are trivially disputable with just a basic knowledge of history.

For instance, I do hope that the "headchoppers" you mention are, in your own view, the tiny minority of violent fuckwits actually in ISIS or Al Qaeda (or the various IRAs, or any of the Christian terrorist groups), and that you are not using that term in a potentially bigoted manner. The Christian groups who perpetrate attacks on abortion clinics feel that they are doing God's work (they think they are Freedom Fighters) even though their acts are blatantly Domestic Terrorism as defined by the FBI, and they are just as guilty of trying to force their own world view on us as any other terrorist organisation.

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NumptyScrub
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Timothy McVey, American, white Christian terrorist responsible for the Oklahoma bombing on US soil! Some people should really learn abut their own country's history.

In a former colony that only celebrates it's "Independance", because of armed insurrection against the legitimate government at the time*, no less. I daren't turn my irony meter on, I'd never reach minimum safe distance in time ^^;

* one side's "terrorist" (or insurgent) is the other side's "freedom fighter" and it has always, and will always, be that way. You cannot condone (or vilify) one, without implicitly condoning / vilifying the other at the same time. Like when you overthrow the (at the time) legitimate government of Iraq, you are foreign terrorists running a campaign of violence against the State, whilst simultaneously being Freedom Fighters for the people, overthrowing a corrupt and hated regime. If you condone the freedom fighting aspect, you are implicitly condoning the violent anti-State terrorism as well, because it's just a different spin on exactly the same behaviour.

The frequency with which I see signs of cognitive dissonance on people's faces when trying to explain that duality, worries me. They've bought into the whole "my world view is the only world view" bullshit which allows Terrorists to be considered a different thing to Freedom Fighters, rather than being 2 sides of the same coin. You can't eradicate Terrorism without removing the need for Freedom Fighters, and you'll only avoid the existence of Freedom Fighters if you never piss off anyone.

As a government, you pretty much can't eradicate Terrorism. :'(

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NumptyScrub
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ISIS / ISIL etc. have stolen my lime light.

Your role has apparently been outsourced to a more cost effective supplier ^^;

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Cell division: The engine of life – and of CANCER. Now some of its secrets are revealed

NumptyScrub
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Re: At the risk of sounding frivolous ...

By analogy to cryptography: "cell division causes cancer, so we ought to prohibit it".

Not quite, I'd assert that the correct analogy is "cancer cells use cell division to propagate, so any cell that uses cell division should be suspected of cancerous activities!"

It would also seem to suggest that the "cure" could be enacted by allowing the proper authorities unfettered surveillance of all cell division activities, so they can act upon any cancerous divisions and keep us all safe :)

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'The server broke and so did my back on the flight to fix it'

NumptyScrub
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Re: graeme@the-leggetts.org.uk

Plus also it takes a fairly massive dose of it to do any sort of damage, more than a mentally stable person would actually take.

People suffering from severe pain are not renowned for their acute mental faculties and diligent decision making processes. In fact in my experience, otherwise intelligent people suffering from severe pain will often gobble anything that remotely looks like it will help, and keep doing so until it feels like it is helping.

Or in other words, people in serious pain are not necessarily classifiable as "mentally stable" as per your definition :(

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Humongous headsets and virtual insanity

NumptyScrub
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I think you underestimate how many non-devs have bought the devkit. Devs won't be ditching theirs to CeX, that's a consumer establishment (real devs will just chuck it in a cupboard "in case it comes in useful later", or fob it off on the new guy) ;)

The one you saw in CeX will be a consumer (like me) who bought one and then realised there was still a dearth of stuff that actually used it, what with it being a devkit and all.

The killer app for me was Elite: Dangerous, but EVE: Valkyrie, Star Citizen, Assetto Corsa, Project CARS, and a whole host of others are now turning up, so I don't feel like I wasted money on the thing.

I just need to decide if I'll get the Vive when it releases, or wait for the Rift CV1... ^^;

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NumptyScrub
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Re: AR vs. VR

I would imagine Occulus is the death of Mouse and Keyboard gaming. If you can't see your hands, it's pretty much simple game controller only.

Consoles were the death knell for mouse+keyboard gaming; as an old Doom/Quake nerd I can confidently state I am maybe 80% efficient in current FPS titles using an Xbox controller, versus those same titles using mouse and keyboard. There are some titles (e.g. Payday 2, Warframe) that I play using a pad on the PC in preference to mouse and keyboard; I'd be more accurate using kb/m but I'm more comfortable actually using the pad.

You can also have complex controllers that don't require vision to operate competently; for internet spaceships (E:D et al) I use an X-55 plus the mouse, and I can manage without needing to remove the Rift at all, there are enough buttons / switches / axes on the hotas that I don't need to use a complementary input method. (If I absolutely have to type when wearing the Rift, I cheat and look down the tiny gap next to my nose).

Let's face it, top tier players don't actually look at the keyboard while they are playing anyway, regardless of what game they are playing, it's only scrub tier like me that have do that ^^;

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NumptyScrub
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I see iPhones on the shelves at my local CeX, are you suggesting the Rift will be as successful as the iPhone?

I don't think it will be as successful as the iPhone.

I also paid £300 for a brand new DK2 direct from Oculus (this was last year), CeX as usual are pricing themselves out of a sale for a piece of kit with only 6 months to live.

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NumptyScrub
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Re: Neck Fatigue?

I'm wondering if there are physical problems due to having the weight of it hanging in front of your eyes for a long time. Has anybody worn one for a long time and noticed any problems and how much do they weigh?

I've got the Oculus Rift DK2, comfort is fine and the total headset weight is allegedy "0.97 pounds" which is ~450g (less than a 500ml bottle of drink). It's perfectly usable for prolonged periods, as long as the content being displayed doesn't trip too many nausea triggers* ;)

By "prolonged periods", I mean a few hours at a time; I mostly use it to dick about in Elite: Dangerous and a 2-3hr session is not uncommon, and friends who also have the DK2 say much the same.

*E:D is great as you are a spaceship pilot; being seated and seeing stuff move around you feels perfectly natural. Try one of the rollercoaster demos, or try playing Half-Life 2 in VR mode, and it can be much more jarring.

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Linux Mint 17.2: If only all penguinista desktops were done this way

NumptyScrub
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Re: Goodness.

You might like to compare the following workflows for updating my wife's laptop (say) compared to a Win updateathon:

$ssh me@wifeslaptop

$pacman -Syu

You appear to be confusing your usage of the term "update" here; your Linux example seems to be analogous to using Windows Update to install Win7 SP1 on base Win7 (click button, wait until finished, reboot), not installing a brand new version of the operating system (Win8 on a Win7 box). In my experience with Mint, (from Mint 5 or thereabouts through to today), upgrading to a new major revision (Mint 7 to Mint 8, for instance) requires a reinstall from scratch, just like upgrading Windows to a new version.

I actually switched to Mint Debian a year ago or so specifically because reinstalling from scratch that frequently was getting tedious, and I wanted an install that I could just keep pressing update on instead (I am lazy, and that box is mostly for automation rather than daily use).

I think your prejudices may be showing, where Linux Mint (Ubuntu) is concerned the level of effort is quite similar to Windows for both updating and upgrading ^^;

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Climate change alarmism is a religious belief – it's official

NumptyScrub
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Re: In other words, "When to act"

Since some form of worldwide climate change is now apparent, even to the deniers, it is completely and utterly irrelevant to take a position of asking 'how much' is necessary to create a dangerous situation once the understanding of climate inertia is added into the equation. The point of those supporting change is that, thanks to climate inertia, any change from this point forward will take years to manifest.

Funnily enough, some form of worldwide climate change has been apparent for as far as we try to look back (linked from this article). Apparently the last 200 million years has been, on average, warmer than it is now, with only the last 3 million or so going colder (than now) and then warming back up again.

We're definitely getting warmer, both short term an on a longer scale, however we are apparently still at the "bastard cold" end of the scale as far as the planet is concerned, taking the last 500 million years in context. No doubt there is an anthropogenic contribution to change in climate, but I would suggest that the main point to be taken on board is not that we might be adversely affecting any "natural" temperature cycle (with all the blamestorming that that engenders), but that we should be focusing on dealing with the effects of the observed changes.

Maybe it's time people got reminded that you become the dominant species by adapting to the prevalent conditions, not by demanding that the conditions be changed to suit you. 50 million years ago the planet was apparently 14C hotter as a global average, if it can get that hot without humans being involved at all, then anthropogenic emissions are obviously not the sole driver for climate change. If current temperatures are toward the bottom of the observed range for the planet, then we need to plan for it to get hotter regardless of what we do or do not do as a species.

Telling people to stop driving cars and it will all get better is not the correct response to the situation. The correct response is to design and create solutions to allow humans to continue to live on a ball of rock that fluctuates between 6C colder and 14C hotter than the current global mean temperature. Anything else is blamestorming and displacement activity ;)

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Microsoft releases free Office apps for half of all Android phones

NumptyScrub
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Re: Windows in the cloud? IoT (no, seriously)?

I have no experience of it, therefore I don't dismiss it as a pile of poo. The [hypothetical but plausible] CEO and her family did (probably also with no experience of it... <snip>

Correct me if I'm wrong, but did you not create that fictional CEO (and the attitude of the fictional CEO) with the intent to put across the point that Windows Phone was "bad"? I know 2 people who currently use it in a corporate context and they both actually like it. I've personally only used 6.1 on a terminally underpowered HTC, which was a less than stellar experience and has certainly coloured my perceptions of it, but it did the basics without issue.

Blackberry is of course another example of companies whose market dominance was once thought by the faithful to be unassailable.

Blackberry's real problem was in not being Apple when everyone jumped on the Apple bandwagon. They had the period where iOS still didn't have decent remote configuration and management features to try and catch up aesthetically, but dropped the ball and now here we are. It's a shame as I actually liked BES, but since both iOS and Android decided to allow the ActiveSync "remote wipe" calls to actually factory reset devices (rather than the minimum of just deleting all ActiveSync related data) us engineers still get to power-trip when hovering over the button :D

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NumptyScrub
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Re: Windows in the cloud? IoT (no, seriously)?

At some point, companies like yours, and many others (including the likes of National Instruments) are going to come to realise that MS currently seem to want Windows to be a cloud-dependent OS, paid for on a subscription basis. Or a server OS, with no GUIs. Or maybe an IoT OS. They'll all be different from (incompatible with?) what you're used to today.

If/when that happens, it seems to leave a bit of an inconvenient gap for a lot of stuff of the kind you reference (and a lot of people use), not just in pharma but in loads of places where a little computer is needed for data gathering and display (and whatever).

Win16 apps are incompatible with current x64 builds of Windows, Windows 95 and 98 drivers are incompatible with current NT kernel builds of Windows. The stuff from 20 years ago doesn't work, but that's fine because we're not using 20 year old drivers for contemporary equipment, manufacturers have realised that they should write stuff that is compatible with the newer builds.

Since input and display are always going to have to be local, peripheral connectivity is also going to remain local, regardless of any OSaaS cloud-based remote computing going on. Funnily enough, I suspect that manufacturers will end up providing compatible drivers for Windows as a Service so that you can still plug expensive pharma kit into your renamed VT100 terminal and get it to work.

If/when that happens, your CEO might be the one asking why you didn't see it coming, that she and her kids knew that Windows Phone was a pile of poo, that they've all given up on Windows at home, so why there wasn't a fallback strategy for the critical uncloudable corporate applications?

Blackberry, anyone? We used to use those, then we switched to iPhones, although it was upper management that made that decision based upon aesthetics (aka brand recognition), rather than any technical appraisal. My personal preference would have been Android, however at the time we moved, only Windows Phone provided the full suite of Blackberry-style corporate lockdown options and remote management out of the box.

So yeah, the "best" option from a corporate perspective was one that neither management nor the techies actually wanted, and the one that you dismiss as "a pile of poo".

If none of this makes sense, try this: Raspberry Pi recently got a Windows 10 IoT variant, not that anybody actually cares. Bear that in mind and read the above again. Where are today's instrumentation drivers, apps, whatever going to run in five years time? MS don't think it'll be the same kind of Wintel desktops as we see today. See a problem with that?

To be fair, I recently bought a tablet with a 2.0GHz quad core CPU and 2GB RAM, that's more than enough grunt for local processing of normal desktop tasks, and approaching equivalency with cheap, low-end business desktops (it was £250 all in, which is also near-equivalency with low-end business desktops). It's not that far fetched at all to consider these devices taking the place of a desktop/laptop for a majority of use cases, and not that surprising that device (or OS) companies are adjusting their infrastructure to be able to work with these devices used in that way.

And that is without even considering that all of them want your data sitting on their servers for sifting and classification so they can profile ads at you (and comply with local security service requests on that data).

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NumptyScrub
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Re: "Hate fest"...?

Most companies that I have worked for have switched from Windows to Linux to run their software for reliability, scalability, performance and cost effectiveness reasons.

They must be pretty small companies then; the multinational I work for is still on Windows for the desktop and the majority of servers, because it would cost too much to change. I have yet to find a company that offers (multilingual) Linux training for free, and we have a few thousand people that would need it (including the support staff, many of whom are currently only Windows skilled) :'(

I'd be interested in moving over, but it's the situation where you get fucked by the original design choices (aka Windows) and you have to choose between starting over (for several thousand people) or just living with building on your past mistakes and doing what you can. Budgetary restrictions mean that moving to Linux is but a pipe dream at the moment, and looks to remain that way for a while...

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NumptyScrub
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Why do you care if Microsoft survive or not? The world does not need the company, or its poorly written software.

You can replace "Microsoft" in that quote with any tech company (Google, Apple, Oracle, Canonical... the list is endless) and it will still parse. We don't need any single tech company, regardless of how you view their products, but more companies means more choice.

You couldn't get on with Linux?

Yes, they apparently couldn't. I have the same incredulous look when people tell me how they "couldn't get on with Windows 8". Personal preference is fine; I prefer how 7 did it, and I prefer how Cinnamon does it, but that does not stop me from being able to use Win8 or Unity.

(Bloodbeastterror didn't mention which distro they tried, but it could well have been Ubuntu running Unity, which seems to generate as much unreasoning hate for the GUI as Win8 does)

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Indiana Jones whips Bond in greatest movie character poll

NumptyScrub
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Re: What no...

Harrison Fords gets first and third, he must be well chuffed :)

Personally I would have liked to see Hobo or Machete somewhere on the list, but thems the breaks...

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Tim Worstall dances to victory over resources scaremongerers

NumptyScrub
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Re: But...@Zoolander

Even middle-aged though there is the ability to look good without trying to look "cool", whatever that is.

The wikifiddlers entry for "Smart casual" dress code actually shows someone wearing jeans, a shirt and blazer in the sidebar, apparently Topman magazine thinks that that sort of ensemble is viable for whatever bizarre fashion reasons.

YMMV, of course ^^;

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It begins: Time Warner Cable first ISP accused of breaking America's net neutrality rules

NumptyScrub
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Re: "Peer"?

First rule of downvote club: don't talk about downvote club. If people haven't already posted why you're unlikely to get any explanation anyway :/

Maybe they just took exception you you using the æ grapheme? Who knows..

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NumptyScrub
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Trollface

Re: "Peer"?

"Peer" implies a relationship between equals; ideally, upstream and downstream traffic is expected to be, to within an order of magnitude or so, roughly equal. The chances of "a streaming company" providing that sort of profile seem to me - slender.

I would be interested to see the commercial arrangements between Content Delivery Networks (such as YouTube, Akamai et al) and service providers like Time Warner, because they are also going to be massively biased in one traffic direction. I am assuming Time Warner charge the same "competitive rate" for bytes moved on behalf of Google's video delivery website, as they are proposing for CNS?

I can't imagine YouTube's upstream bandwidth requirement being within an order of magnitude of the downstream...

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Vicious vandals violate voluminous Versailles vagina

NumptyScrub
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Re: Offensive "art" deserves an offensive response.

Simple rule of thumb I use. If you have to argue the case for something being "art", it almost certainly isn't.

I know someone who sees literally no value in "art", and thus classes all non-engineering, primarily aesthetic works as "a waste of time". If you were talking to them, your rule of thumb would define nothing as art. Which is certainly true from their point of view, but not necessarily from others.

Full disclosure: I think this particular piece is indeed a waste of time, but I'll defend the creator's right to call it art, and defend their right to claim any defacement is vandalism.

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NumptyScrub
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Re: Offensive "art" deserves an offensive response.

It's high time the Yarty-Farties learned confrontational pieces making a political statement are not art.

If you wouldn't live with it in your backyard it's not suitable in a public place, either.

I'd live with it in my back yard fine, so I guess that makes it suitable for a public place :)

Unless you are suggesting that only your opinion of what is suitable should be considered?

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Post-pub nosh neckfillers: Reader suggestions invited

NumptyScrub
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Coffee/keyboard

Re: Noodles and peas.

The most common error is using cold water or beer, and neither results in anything that will hurt you.

COTW material :D

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NumptyScrub
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Re: Cheese and tomato sandwich

But the best toasty is the egg toasty. You need a maker with pronounced edges, that crimp the bread effectively to avoid leakages. This is bad enough with cheese, but far worse with egg.

Oh. My. $DEITY. That sounds delicious, I am going to have to try this :D

I'd imagine that pickle, like jam, is deadly.

Anyone who has ever used a toastie maker (of any brand) will be well aware that there is a ridiculous difference in the specific heat capacities of some ingredients. The main problem is that finding this out only ever seems to occur after the fact :'(

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NumptyScrub
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Re: Cheese and tomato sandwich

Having dealt with cheese and pickle Brevilles (other brands are available) I can second the dangers of allowing a drunken fool to bite straight into a cheese and tomato toastie without checking the temperature carefully. The SHC of some vegetables is apparently orders of magnitude less than cheese or bread...

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California über alles? Is MEP Reda flushing Euro copyright tradition down the pan?

NumptyScrub
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Re: Limit the term

I am not so keen on the 70-year extension after death (based on an old model that he's want to keep supporting his widow and kids).

I've heard allegations that it's actually based on the model that the Disney Corporation don't want anyone to be able to copy a stylised mouse that was first drawn in 1928, because it is still an enormous cash cow for them.

So if I write a song when I am 20, at 40, my rights in it expire? What if it was a steady seller, with many cover versions down the years? Why am I suddenly not allowed to reap the continued fruit of my creativity after I am 40? If it right that film makers, looking for a sound-track, can scour old songs and use them for free to their huge profit, while I, who wrote the song that helped cement the popularity of their movie, sit and watch them rake in the dosh?

I never quite figure out why a creator suddenly isn't allowed to get the profit of his or her actions throughout his/her lifetime.

Counterpoint; I invent the cure for cancer when I am 20, and patent it. Under existing law it is already time-limited to 20 years after filing and after that anyone can use it; I have 20 years to make my money out of it, then it becomes a free for all where I receive no recompense from anyone using and benefiting from my work. At 40 years old, I, who invented the cure, have to sit and watch them rake in the dosh, and this is the expected result of the patent process.

I completely agree that creators have intrinsic rights to (and over) their creations, however there is an enormous discrepancy between the terms of patents and copyright. 20 years vs life+50 (or life+75 if it is a corporate copyright) seems to indicate that the value of one is grossly disproportionate to the other; especially given that both are essentially a state-protected monopoly over the creation in question.

Personally I would see either patents becoming life+50 (which is an idiotic idea in a free market which relies on innovation), or copyright becoming 20 years (which will outrage anyone who owns copyright in anything), because IMO if you are going to protect a creators rights over their creation, it should be done equally and without prejudice to the actual creation in question.

I completely understand that I'm probably alone in that view, though :'(

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The world .sucks at a minute past midnight on Sunday

NumptyScrub
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Re: Does anyone even use these additional add ons?

You could register yourself on the specialist dating site, hunglikea.horse, order in some liquid refreshment from fetchmea.beer, and then go on to browse some classic Mr. T quotes on pityda.foo, the possibilities are, if not endless, certainly quite large ;)

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Apple! and! Yahoo! fight! the! man!, claims! EFFing! daftness!

NumptyScrub
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Re: Errrmmm

That time period is for the financial backing data (which companies paid the EFF money so they could continue to operate) rather than the actual "Who's Got Your Back" report.

From the article:

Cardozo told The Register that the group does disclose its financials — although because of the way a non-profit body works, the most recent report covers July 2012 to July 2013, a period before most of the global surveillance revelations came to light. ®

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Zionists stole my SHOE, claims Muslim campaigner

NumptyScrub
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Re: A few pointers

Before making accusations of ignorance, may I suggest that you first research the Koran, the Hadiths, and the culture. There are exhortations of the 'kill everyone who doesn't agree with them' type in there, thankfully most submitters to the religion don't do that these days. Along with the positives, there is also a rich history of jihad, subjugation of women and minorities, and other things that Western culture consider to be negative.

You realise that every one of those negatives is equally as true of Christianity (and Judaism), right? All of those negatives are the prevalent attitudes from when the books were written, not specific to the ideology.

The UK didn't abolish slavery until 1833, we only stopped subjugating people less than 200 years ago, even though we have allegedly been "Christian" for over a thousand.

I've not found a single religion I was 100% comfortable with, afaict they all have dark sides and ropey adherents :'(

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British banks consider emoji as password replacement

NumptyScrub
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Re: New most common password

Since we're talking about banking, I'd have said

:) :| :( >:(

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Spanish TV journo leaves subordinates cowering after verbal shoeings

NumptyScrub
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As far as I am aware, "because of what they said" is not a valid defense for violence charges anywhere in the EU, although I'm happy to be corrected. It is generally illegal to punch people for being mouthy fucks, regardless of how much you want to punch the mouthy fuck.

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Why did Snowden swipe 900k+ US DoD files? (Or so Uncle Sam claims)

NumptyScrub
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Re: Time

If a politician who may want to run for the white house sits in congress and swears under oath that he DIDNT have anything to do with xxx then it becomes mighty uncomfortable when Snowdon releases a document proving he actually did.

Perhaps knowingly lying while under oath might be the issue here, rather than blaming Snowden for exposing this after the fact? It could easily be avoided by actually stating the truth, after promising that you will only state the truth.

I realise that the concept is anathema to politics in general, but to the rest of us it's common sense...

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Bethesda all out for 'Fallout 4', fallout for global productivity foretold in countdown

NumptyScrub
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Or how about "Why fix what isn't broken?"

I can only assume you never played Fallout 3, BethSoft sometimes refuse to fix what is broken :P

Not content with announcing and hyping games that have barely even started being developed and won't be available for years, are they now so desperate that they're taking to announcing and hyping announcements that haven't been written yet? Madness.

Official Fallout 4 trailer on YouTube

If they can put that together using the in-game engine, then it's basically in a state that Bethedsa are happy to release (see above) ^^;

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NASA picks tools for voyage to possibly LIFE-SUPPORTING moon Europa

NumptyScrub
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Coat

Re: This you learn each day

It's brine for curing the Cheese Mantle(TM), so that Wallace and his trusty pal Grommet won't sink into some tasteless curd(led) goop...

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NumptyScrub
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Re: too cold, no life

I think you missed the part that it was (apparently) an ocean of liquid H2O, meaning that it will be at or above 270K (give or take, dependant on salt content and pressure, unless I'm missing something fundamental about the temperatures required for phase change in water). Not really any colder than our oceans here.

If life independently formed here, there may or may not be anything on Europa. If the chemical basics were seeded in this region of the galaxy, via any potential natural or artificial method (like heavy elements get seeded by novae), it is highly likely that there is similar life on Europa, since the whole system congealed out of the same cloud of gunk.

I'm actually quite excited to find out, either way :)

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German watchdog rips off Facebook's thumbs after online fracas

NumptyScrub
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Unhappy

Re: Twitter et al should be covered by this too

To be fair, anyone linking code off ajax.googleapis.com is also likely facilitating tracking without consent, because I never see that domain without scripts also wanting to run from google-analytics.com (which often does not appear as a blocked domain until I enable the ajax one, so it's likely the ajax domain specifically calling the analytics domain itself...)

Thanks to the prevalence of using 3rd party hosted scripting, basically the entire commercial internet is tracking you without informed consent anyway, singling Facebook out for it just because their button is visible is akin to cutting the leaves off and leaving the roots behind. They just revert to invisible means of doing the same thing, and back to BAU.

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SAVE THE PLANKTON: So much more than whale food

NumptyScrub
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Pint

Re: mouthful of seawater? No thanks.

20 million bacteria (or 200 million viruses) in a mouthful of seawater is apparently a tiny fraction of the potentially >20 billion microbes already present in the mouth. You could advance the argument that the mouth is contaminating the seawater, rather than the other way round... ^^;

You probably don't want to think about the number of bacteria in a "lungful of air" either. Have a pint, you're looking a bit peaky there...

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Hacker uses Starbucks INFINITE MONEY for free CHICKEN SANDWICH

NumptyScrub
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Coat

Starbucks simply exploit a validation issue in the transfer pricing codebase. It's not illegal to do so...

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ZX Spectrum 'Hobbit' revival sparks developer dispute

NumptyScrub
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Coat

Indeed

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Clinton defence of personal email server fails to placate critics

NumptyScrub
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Re: In this case it certainly wasn't illegal:

Yes, currently , what you say in your MAIN paragraph is the LAW NOW, TODAY. But prior to Clinton stepping down, for EMAIL, was NOT the case.

Really? The USDOJ guidance on Records has a link to archive.gov's definition of "a record":

Records include all books, papers, maps, photographs, machine-readable materials, or other documentary materials, regardless of physical form or characteristics, made or received by an agency of the United States Government under Federal law or in connection with the transaction of public business and preserved or appropriate for preservation by that agency or its legitimate successor as evidence of the organization, functions, policies, decisions, procedures, operations, or other activities of the Government or because of the informational value of the data in them

Email is an "other documentary material" in that list, and I would be happy to argue as such in court (IANAL though). Looks to me like the Federal Records Act 1950 may indeed be relevant enough, even without any amendments that specifically mention email, to claim that Hilary's decision to only use personal email and then fail to properly record all of it in case it is required, may already have been an offense.

Speed limit regulations do not specifically mention my make and model of motor vehicle, but I am still liable for exceeding them with my make and model of vehicle. Federal documentation legislation doesn't have to specifically mention email, for emails sent as official Federal correspondence to count as Federal documents...

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Backpage child sex trafficking lawsuit nixed thanks to 'internet freedoms'

NumptyScrub
Silver badge

Re: Love that last paragraph

Free speech does not cover all speech. There are legitimate restrictions, though few. Good judgment and responsible behavior should be mandated.

"Free speech" does cover all speech, including the speech that most people agree shouldn't be spoken. That's why we don't have "free speech" (in either the UK, or the US) and instead have various levels of restricted speech; the concepts of slander and libel as a crime, and the concept of free speech, are mutually exclusive ones.

It's outrageous to think ANY entity would NOT be held responsible for publishing the information in this lawsuit. It's no surprise at all the EFF would support the abuse of people under the guise of free speech. Apparently some folks do not understand that ALL speech is not free and that this is a perfect example of where an entity is liable for their negligence in allowing these ads by crims for illegal behavior to be posted. There are responsibilities associated with mass publication and these folks clearly are negligent in allowing these ads to be published.

I appreciate that the subject matter here is immensely emotive, but while the EFF are doing themselves no favours getting involved in this one, the actual decision was not theirs; it was the judge. An actual legal Judge, made a legally binding decision in a court of law, that people (including yourself) disagree with. You are free to disagree (unless you make slanderous or libellous comments about the judge, obviously), but don't blame the EFF for any perceived travesty of justice; blame the judge who disagrees with your interpretation of the law.

It would also be nice if you didn't blame me for pointing this out, as well, although I understand that for immensely emotive subjects like this, it is easy to get into the "anyone who disagrees must be destroyed!" mindset.

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This post has been deleted by a moderator

+5 ROOTKIT OF VENGEANCE defeats forces of gaming good

NumptyScrub
Silver badge
Trollface

Re: Streaming does have its advantages

Fuck everyone else in the game. If I can afford a better PC that can display better graphics and higher framerates, why should I be punished just because other people can't?

I just buy the developers, and they write the game to always put me in top spot regardless, because it is not cheating if it is all part of the legitimate game code. That's how you pay to win :P

You are saying that you should be able to pay to win, right? That's how I'm interpreting your statement anyway... ^^;

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Tech troll's podcasting patent blown out of the water by EFF torpedo

NumptyScrub
Silver badge

Re: Basically no, as he settled out of court.

One thing that would change that is making all of their settlements related to the patent chargeable back to them if the patent(s) or even parts of it are invalidated.

Easily circumventable by ensuring all profits leave via dividend as soon as they get the payout(s), and then filing for bankruptcy if they ever get told to pay money back. Your "new", "completely unrelated" company then gets to buy the remaining patent portfolio for a song off the old one, and back to BAU.

I can't see it making any perceivable to the existing patent troll companies, even if it were implemented that way :(

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BOFFINS: Oxygen-free, methane-based ALIENS may EXIST on icy SATURN moon Titan

NumptyScrub
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Re: Saturn's moon Titan...never had a dinosaur....or a fern.

Hydrogen is the most abundant element in the universe, and carbon is a natural by-product of the stellar fusion process. Methane is found in interstellar clouds (apparently) so having a planetary body with a high proportion of it is easy to explain just by aggregation from the protoplanetary disc...

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NumptyScrub
Silver badge

Re: Thx to you, too

If we scooped it all up, it would probably all fit inside 1km2, out of a total 38 million km2 surface area. Also, lifting off with a toilet full of poop requires more reaction mass, I can't say I am surprised that they flushed before setting off ^^;

We apparently have a giant floating mass of plastics larger than Texas in the Pacific, in that context a few broken landers, lunar rovers and some bags of effluent seem pretty tame.

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Theresa May: Right, THIS time we're getting the Snoopers' Charter in

NumptyScrub
Silver badge

Re: Good - Forces me to get off my arse and encrypt everything

Of course, as far as GCHQ is concerned, if they can't trivially get all your data with little to no effort, you suddenly become a person of extreme interest. You are aware that all security services operate on the premise that everyone is guilty until proven innocent, right?

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Love-rat fanboi left bobbing for Apples in tiny Japanese bath

NumptyScrub
Silver badge

Re: his beloved collection of overpriced blahware

I'd like to see you try running Windows on a PowerBook, you need an Intel CPU for Windows.

Well, except the ARM builds of Windows (various Windows Phone / Windows CE versions, Windows 8 RT, Windows 10 for Pi) which don't require an Intel CPU. ;)

Windows 10 for Pi is by far the most bizarre press release I've seen from MS yet...

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Turkey PM bans Twitter, YouTube as 'tools of terrorist propaganda'

NumptyScrub
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Re: So....

So you don't think circumstances make a difference? Is the guy holding shotgun at a bank teller no different to the clay pigeon shooter? Don't be a twat.

Compare one 5-year old in a Batman costume standing at my door demanding sweets with menaces, with one of those Anonymous chucklefucks spending 3 hours holding a placard (while wearing a mask) and then going home. Do circumstances make a difference? Nope, they both completely legally wore a mask in public and committed no crime.

No, but wearing a mask in public at a demonstration is probably a good indication you might have intent to do something wrong or you don't want to police to know its you there. Why would someone who has nothing to hide bother?

Utter bullshit and literally a specific logical fallacy (fyi in this case P is "is a criminal" and Q is "wearing a mask"); as well as being trivial enough to refute using actual events. "Criminal" and "wearing a mask" are not commutative, and they are not causal, and I challenge you to provide logical proof of your statement.

Wearing a mask in public simply means you are wearing a mask in public. If you seriously believe that anyone who chooses to wear a mask (or balaclava, or hoodie) in public is "probably" a criminal then petition your MP to make balaclavas illegal, because until that point (where the mere act of wearing one is itself a crime) your argument is as leaky as a colander.

ISIS are terrorists, and ISIS are Muslim. If you can see why equating "Terrorist" and "Muslim" is a bad thing, I'm hoping you can see why equating balaclavas and rioters is just as bad. Lots of people wear balaclavas, but only a tiny percentage are rioters, and tarring us all with the same brush is really fucking annoying (not to mention bigoted as fuck).

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