* Posts by Phil W

673 posts • joined 10 Mar 2010

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SMS delivery reports for international numbers

Phil W
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If you're trying MMS you could use Read Reports instead of/as well as delivery reports. I believe the Read Reports are sent from the receiving device so may be more useful, the downside of course being that MMS messages cost more to send.

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Phil W
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Re: SMS delivery reports for international numbers

I'm assuming that you are using the built in "request delivery report" function on your phone?

Have you tried not using this, but starting your message with *0# instead. For me at least, this result in a text message from the SMS handling system telling me the status of the message. Where as the "request delivery report" function just puts a tick next to the message when the delivery report is returned and I've found that sometimes if the receiving phone was off when the message was sent I won't get the delivery report until hours after the phone was turned on again or sometimes not at all.

With the *0# approach, if the message couldn't be delivered I immediately get a report back saying it couldn't be delivered but further attempts will be made, once the receiving phone is turned on I get another message to say it has been delivered.

Not entirely sure what the difference is to be honest, or if the *0# function is universally supported, but may be worth a go.

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Employees love their IT departments (almost very nearly true)

Phil W
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"equipment can be down for days when they schedule the MS updates for in hours"

In fairness to them Windows update can be unpredictable, I've had 2 identical server builds side by side that I've done clean Windows installs on and kicked off the exact same set of updates at the same time and had one finish in an hour and the other finish in 3 hours for no good reason.

I'm guessing if budget is non-existant they probably aren't paid to do the updates out of hours either.

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YOU ARE THE DRONE in Amazon's rumoured new parcel delivery plan

Phil W
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Re: This sounds exactly like the UK 'Amazon Logistics' operation that delivers prime stuff

Not really anything like that from what the article says. The article implies any one at all who has an Amazon account, delivering a parcel because they feel like it.

In the UK parcels delivered by Amazon Logistics are generally delivered to you by one of three sets of people

A. A courier company employee in a liveried van

B. A contractor working for a courier company in a van, possibly liveried possibly not, which they rent or own (sometimes battered but usually ok, since they're contracting for a branded courier company)

C. An independent individual courier in their own van (more likely to be battered)

In all of the above cases though the person delivering to you is a professional courier (for a given value of professional) who do this for a living and will have insurance of one form or another.

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Phil W
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"I'd probably limit it to long-term Amazon customers."

And just how would you define long-term customers?

If you just mean they've had an account for ages then I know plenty of people who've got dormant accounts because they haven't bought anything through Amazon in years. They're not going to be worried if Amazon cuts them off after 1 high value item went missing in their care.

If you stipulate that they have to have bought something in the last few months, fine, but there's plenty more who buy 1 or 2 very low value items every few months. They're not going to care about getting cut off either.

You could perhaps say they have to have spent a certain amount in the last 30/60 days and spread over a certain number of purchases, but their limits your potential human drones significantly.

Maybe just Amazon Prime customers? Even fewer, but at least these people are more likely to want to keep on good terms with Amazon.

Genuine questions here though. In the UK this would be a major problem from an insurance point of view, since by delivering parcels for Amazon for pay would invalidate any vehicle insurance that doesn't cover business use (most people don't bother and just stick with social, domestic, pleasure and commuting cover). Would a similar problem exist in the US?

Also what about parcels which rather than going missing, get damaged while in the care of the "human drone"? Who is responsible for that?

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HMRC ditches Microsoft for Google, sends data offshore

Phil W
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Re: HMRC ditches Microsoft for Google, sends data to NSA

Or a return address, meaning that it will end up sat in a Royal Mail sorting office, forever.

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Sysadmins rebel over GUI-free install for Windows Server 2016

Phil W
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Re: All of a sudden, my decision to learn Linux

unless you've been burnt to ash for being a heathen.

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Phil W
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Re: Growing up is tough

You can fire up nano (or vi or emacs, if you are a masochist).

Sorry, couldn't¹ resist.

¹ Not that I tried at all.

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Intel adopts 40Gb per SECOND USB-C plug for Thunderbolt 3.0

Phil W
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Re: Optical Networking?

I think the only intention of the fibre option is for long runs of cable, hence why the article mentions runs of up to 60 metres.

Fibre has some advantages, not least of which is massively increased range compared to copper. However the one problem it always has is latency, because at the end of the day the devices at each end have to convert photons on fibre to electrons on copper, and that's always going to take time not necessarily huge amounts but why bother unless you really need to.

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Phil W
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Re: Square peg round hole

Hey I'm just going by the article

"Intel's sort of given up on the Thunderbolt interface - but it's also found a way to help increase its relevance by making it a superset of USB 3.1"

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Phil W
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Square peg round hole

This sounds like a recipe for confusion to me.

A new Thunderbolt device using a USB Type C connector could perhaps be converted back to an old Thunderbolt connector, but what about the backward compatibility to DisplayPort and FireWire?

A new USB device using a USB Type C connector could be converted back to a USB 2.0 or 3.x connector, but not to a Thunderbolt/DisplayPort/FireWire connector.

Would it not make more sense to include the Thunderbolt feature set in USB 3.1, but not call it Thunderbolt at all and avoid any confusion.

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Facebook flings PGP-encrypted email at world+dog. Don't lose your private key

Phil W
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Coat

As is double penetration testing.

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Fedora 22: Don't be glum about the demise of Yum – this is a welcome update

Phil W
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Re: plus ça change, plus c'est la même chose

Are you suggesting that Shift+Del for permanent deletion is a bad thing?

It's a fairly common key combo for that effect in a variety of systems, it exists in Windows explorer and Outlook. It's not like the 2 keys are close together and you could accidentally press both.

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Creationist: The Flintstones was an accurate portrayal of Dino-human coexistence

Phil W
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Re: God give me strength

I suspect that in reality, most of the leaders of the older core religions (i.e. Judaism, Catholocism, Islam) don't take certain things like their stories of creation literally. It is the more modern (relatively speaking) off shoot religions that seem to have a harder time with this.

Didn't the Pope make a statement a few years back saying the Bible is not meant to be taken literally? I was sort of hoping, probably in vain, that him saying that may have been the beginning of a shift toward a slightly more enlightened age for religion.

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100s of Virgin Media customers hit by handset repair glitch, telco admits

Phil W
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Re: I know I'll get downvoted but...

Partly because you were expecting downvotes and partly because I agree, have an upvote.

My Virgin broadband, phone and TV service has been pretty much flawless since it was installed 3 years ago. The one time I had an outage of any significance it turned out that it was scheduled maintenance and I'd thrown away the notification they sent me thinking it was junk mail.

The cause of the outage was obvious when I went outside and saw 2 VM vans down the street with dozens of cables hanging out of the cabinet.

My only slight gripe was that when my contract was up I had to ask them to put me on a different tariff that gave me faster broadband for less money, they had no problem doing it when I mentioned it though.

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Phil W
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Guestimating customer service

"I reckon there should be around 100 cases which haven’t been processed"

I reckon you should find out before making public statements rather prefacing them with "I reckon".

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Ha! Win 10 preview for Raspberry Pi 2 pops out of the Microsoft oven

Phil W
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Re: Tipping Point

Yeah Intel took a risc and lost their arm....

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Facebook serves up shaved, pierced, tattooed 'butterfly' as CAPTCHA

Phil W
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Re: Machine recognition

Yes but the implication is that the set of valid butterfly images was also selected automatically, not just that the whole set was automatically selected as being butterflies.

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Phil W
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Machine recognition

If, as is implied, the images used in the captcha were selected by a computer which matched them as being a butterfly then what is the point in using them?

The whole point of captcha is to prevent forms being completed by automated computer systems, if the images are selected as being a butterfly by an automated system then surely another automated system could pick them out the larger set of butterfly and non-butterfly images as well, it would know it was looking for butterflies since it is identified in the question text.

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E-voting and the UK election: Pick a lizard, any lizard

Phil W
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I come in peace. Take me to your Lizard.

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Microsoft's top legal eagle: US cannot ignore foreign privacy laws

Phil W
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Joke

Re: "US cannot ignore foreign privacy laws"

Yes but the thing is, if you're going to ignore foreign laws or violate their sovereignty in this way, you're supposed to do it in secret and pretend it's not happening not issue warrants to US companies trying to force them to do it.

Openly ignore the laws and rights of other countries who are supposed to be your friends is just bad form!

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Daniel Radcliffe to feature in GTA biopic flick. Well, it's work at least

Phil W
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Indeed. A young doctor's notebook is what I assume you're referring to, it is pretty good.

The Woman in Black is not a fantastic film especially, but Radcliffe's acting in it is not half bad.

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Microsoft uses Windows Update to force Windows 10 ads onto older PCs

Phil W
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Re: Confused author

Also agree on the not forcing them thing. But given that Windows 10 is supposedly going to be a free upgrade for 7,8 and 8.1 users is forcing the less technically astute to upgrade to a more up to date and supported OS a bad thing necessarily?

But more crucially from what I can tell the idea in the article that this is an update that's basically adware trying to get you to install Windows 10 is pure speculation. It may well simply be boot strapper for starting the Windows 10 install of you choose to do it, especially on Windows 7 where there isn't the option to present it through the store like they did for the 8 to 8.1 update.

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Dot-com intimidation forces Indiana to undo hated anti-gay law

Phil W
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"I would be LGBT!"

What, all four?

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Phil W
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Legislating for the zealots/stupid

Obviously the amendment is a good thing but in many cases it's just made the bigots harder to spot.

For the most part this amendment will only prevent businesses run by the stupid or extremely fanatical zealots who are unable to do anything other than talk about how they are "a good Christian business" from discriminating.

The smart (I use the term loosely) ones will do what they've always done and make a convenient excuse such as "oh I'm sorry we can't cater your wedding we're already booked on that date".

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WIN a RockBLOCK Mk2 Iridium sat comms unit

Phil W
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LOHAN: COCK TEASE

Complete Onboard Component Knowledge Testing Endeavour And Survivability Experiment.

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Assange™ lawyers demand Swedish prosecution files or no London interview

Phil W
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Re: Statute of limitations ...

Have an upvote purely for the use of the phrase "get all rapey with the natives"

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Droidberry dangles: Why the BlackBerry-Samsung alliance is big potatoes

Phil W
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Failings and hope

'Microsoft recently splashed out $200m on a calendar and email apps for Android and iOS – but these aren’t “best of breed" '

They aren't even an acceptable part of the breed. My company, along with many others, have had to take steps to block the use of Microsoft's newly acquired Outlook app because it violates not only our data policy but also potentially the law as well. It stores the user's data and credentials in a public cloud service potentially taking their data outside the country.

As for the BlackBerry Samsung partnership, I hope that it at least results in the availability of a new, decently specced Android device with a hardware QWERTY keyboard.

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Rosetta probe to try contact with Philae lander on Thursday

Phil W
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Re: Fingers crossed!

Or perhaps it will have merged with some giant spaceborne entity, some of the letters will have worn off and it will claim to be a god named P'lae?

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£280k Kickstarter camera trigger campaign crashes and burns

Phil W
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Re: Risk?

I'm not sure if it still is, but it used to be possible to create a project on Indiegogo such "The make me rich project" who's stated purpose was "to get people to give me some money for no reason"

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BOFH: The ONE-NINE uptime solution

Phil W
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Re: Badgers?

I thought it was badgers. Badgers, mushrooms and a snake.

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Samsung buys LoopPay ... to be better at bonking than Apple

Phil W
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It wouldn't be that surprising for it to be free, the benefit to Samsung is in it being a selling point for the device.

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The Order: 1886 – Round Table gaming's all right on the knight

Phil W
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Lethality

"then move in for a lethal execution"

As opposed to non-lethal executions?

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First HSBC, now the ENTIRE PUBLIC SECTOR dodges tax

Phil W
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Re: "while no one would go to prison for false VAT claims"

In fact it will probably cost the tax payer more to sort it out, given the man hours required to unpick it all.

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Over 50? Out of work? Watch out because IT is about to EAT ITSELF

Phil W
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Re: Say what?

You've really hit the nail on the head for the most part there. No matter how wonderful and automated the software at some point there always needs to be hardware to run it, and that hardware still needs physically installing and does not always play well together particularly in a business culture where major purchases go out to tender and the cheapest always/usually wins.

Some argue that because of "the cloud" hardware is a thing of the past for most businesses but the reality is due to management/business culture still liking having someone to blame or go to for answers when things don't work, in house servers and datacenters still have their place. I don't believe that will substantially change in the next decade (or even 2 or 3 decades) regardless of the developments in technology.

The other issue is legal and political limitations such as Data Protection, requiring data to be kept in country meaning servers and storage are necessary to house it. Sure certain cloud services offer to let you pick where your data gets located but how many of these also have fine print saying backups may be stored elsewhere not to mention current political issues like the USA trying to force MS to hand over data stored in Ireland. Until or unless the landscape of these services changes a responsible company/ legal department is going to insist data is kept in house.

Fundamentally the longevity of IT departments and their staff is dependent on human issues not technological ones.

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Top smut site Flashes visitors, leaves behind nasty virus

Phil W
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Re: @ Phil W: "campaign leveraging the recent Adobe Flash zero day vulnerability "

If you believe my use of Muphry rather than Murphy was down to autocorrection you are incorrect, I suggest you consult Google.

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Phil W
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Re: @ Phil W: "campaign leveraging the recent Adobe Flash zero day vulnerability "

Indeed, I blame auto correct and muphry's law. As is often the case I was typing on my phone where i use "it's" far more often than "its".

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Phil W
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Re: Adblock plus is your friend...

That's an awful lot of effort setting up a sandbox VM just to watch porn?

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Phil W
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Re: "campaign leveraging the recent Adobe Flash zero day vulnerability "

You calling it pretentious doesn't make it's use any less correct and appropriate.

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Breaking news: BBC FINALLY spots millions of mugshots on cop database

Phil W
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SAR

Since the photos are apparantly covered by the DPA along with presumably other data the police hold on you, perhaps we should all issue Subject Access Requests to the police asking for copies of any and all data they hold on us.

Either they will be forced to waste their time finding and supplying the data or in fobbing us off.

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Planning to upgrade your Lumia to Windows 10? NOT SO FAST

Phil W
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Re: Low end will probably be dropped

I agree, I think the 1GB RAM marker will be key. Devices like yhe Lumia 620 already work poorly with Windows 8.1 for some things such as making video calls. Dropping Windows 10 support for them will help push them out of the ecosystem and raise the baseline.

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Telefónica to offload O2 to Three daddy Hutchison for £10.25bn

Phil W
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Re: Li Ka-Shing?

To be honest I would of just Li was Cashing in on an opportunity.

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EE data network goes TITSUP* after mystery firewall problem

Phil W
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Re: Whole country?

Same here no problem here across 30 miles of Cheshire at any point this morning.

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'If you see a stylus, they BLEW it' – Steve Jobs. REMEMBER, Apple?

Phil W
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Detached

"any pointing device other than a human finger attached to a human arm"

This would seem to imply that using a human finger which is not attached to human hand is specifically disallowed, as is a non-human finger attached to a human hand. That must have been one hell of a focus group.

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This could be a case for Mulder and Scully: Fox 'in talks' to bring back The X-Files

Phil W
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Re: Anal probes all round then?

Then we'll have a new use for Toblerone.

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Phil W
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Reboot

It's rare for me to say this as I think classic Sci-Fi should be left alone however in the case of The X-Files I think a reboot would likely work better. Have new agents come in to run the X-Files division with Mulder and Scully having left the agency for one reason or another.

The whole Mulder and Scully storyline has been worn out by now I'd say.

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HD and SSD Prices not declining - why ?

Phil W
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Terminator

Come on... if you're going to say that at least use the appropriate icon!

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Spammers set their sights on WhatsApp – that's that ruined then

Phil W
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Although receiving spam messages might be a pain unless it becomes massively wide spread it won't be that much of a problem since whatsapp has the ability to block contacts.

Although some phones allow you to block SMS messages from particular numbers SMS has the major flaw that it allows messages to be sent with the number replaced with arbitrary text preventing most devices from blocking them. Since whatsapp requires a number for use you should always be able to block unwanted senders.

As for the charge. If the above doesn't convince you the tiny fee is worth it, maybe it's not for you. Personally I find it worth it as I have international contacts and whatsapp messages are much much cheaper than international SMS messages.

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