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* Posts by Phil W

588 posts • joined 10 Mar 2010

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HBO shocks US pay TV world: We're down with OTT. Netflix says, 'Gee'

Phil W
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Re: It's So Obvious It's Sad

Is there really much of a market for porn on blu-ray? I'd be very surprised if so, the uptake of Blu-ray very Did in mainstream media is still slow.

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SCREW YOU, EU: BBC rolls out Right To Remember as Google deletes links

Phil W
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Re: Brilliant!

"If it's not on a search engine, it does not exist."

Hardly a 100% accurate statement. It may be true of information on small sites and blogs etc, but if I want to find a story on the BBC news site or on El Reg I don't Google it I go to that website and use their own search feature.

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Will.i.am gets CUFFED as he announces his new wristjob, the PULS

Phil W
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Definition

"I built something that fits on your wrist, and you don't need a phone to make it work,"

So you built a smart device that runs apps, connects to a mobile network and makes phone calls that goes on your wrist. What you've got there Mr AM is a phone, with a strap (sorry, cuff) on it.

So what you're telling us is, you've made a phone "and you don't need a [another] phone to make it work,"

Congratulations on this groundbreaking work, no longer will we all need to a second phone to make our first phone work.

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Spies would need SUPER POWERS to tap undersea cables

Phil W
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Re: No need to splice fibres to evesdrop

"What you do instead is bend the fibre to tap it."

" you'd likely have to shave off the cladding.

This is not impossible"

Am I the only one who read the article and/or has seen the inside of deep ocean cable before?

Aside from the fact that those heavily armoured, extremely thick, multi-layered cables of fibre, poly and steel will have a limited amount of bend in them (which may not be sufficient bend for this type of tap) you're still having to cut through the high voltage electrical feed to get to fibre pairs where you've bent it.

Assuming that there's redundancy in those electrical cables and cutting them at one side for your splice doesn't take out one or more repeaters you've still got the danger and inherent problems in cutting through a live high voltage cable, whether that be a diver under the water or inside a hypothetical winch equipped submarine.

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Drupal SQL injection nasty leaves sites 'wide open' to attack

Phil W
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Don't worry, little Bobby Tables will patch it for you.

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A drone of one's own: Reg buyers' guide for UAV fanciers

Phil W
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Re: Ignore the licence requirements

While I agree with the sentiment of your post, it would be worth pointing out that the article author didn't say to ignore the rules or the insurance, only not to bother getting a licence.

Assuming that you had insurance, and were flying responsibly beyond all the required distances from people, buildings and "congested areas" I think it's highly unlikely you'll be prosecuted.

Unless of course something goes wrong and you crash and injure someone, but I doubt having the necessary CAA licence would make the slightest difference in that event, you would likely be prosecuted with similar results regardless.

As an aside, it would be eminently sensible for the rules (or lack there of) regarding the sale of drones to be changed, depending on what the CAA do with their new regulations on the matter.

It wouldn't seem unreasonable to me that you should have to prove, or at least complete a form stating, you hold the necessary licence before being allowed to buy one.

While ignorance of the law is never an excuse as such, the fact that you can walk into high street stores (Maplin did sell the DJI Phantoms) and buy one would not make the average buy think a licence or insurance are required, anymore so than they would be when buying a toy remote control car.

I recently bought a new car (of the normal road-going variety) and was unsurprisingly asked for my driving licence before being allowed to drive off in it, I'm not sure there's any law requiring that but if not there should be.

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Radiohead(ache): BBC wants dead duck tech in sexy new mobes

Phil W
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Re: Ofcom .. concluding that it would be unfair to make the UK’s then 4.6 million receivers obsolete

Indeed, there are a great many users of analog FM receivers however the vast majority are those listening in cars.

An uptake in mobile manufacturers including DAB in their devices may well reduce that number however as cars with built in Bluetooth music streaming and/or 3.5mm Aux in connectors is on the rise, not to mention replacement head units for older cars with Bluetooth/Aux in being substantially cheaper than those with DAB.

Another good plan for the BBC to increase uptake of DAB would be to produce (ok contract out and re-badge) cheaper DAB units for cars.

DAB has one inherent flaw that digital terrestrial TV didn't, the cost to consumers to upgrade.

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Twitter sues US government for right to disclose NOTHING

Phil W
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There is a difference between the rights of an individual and the rights of a corporate entity. Sometimes this is a good thing, in this case perhaps not so good.

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Phil W
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I demand rigidly defined areas of doubt and uncertainty!'

I demand that I may OR may not, have received NSLs.

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No tiles, no NAP – next Windows for data centre looks promising

Phil W
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Re: Defender is not AV

Defender is effectively a light and less managed version of System Center Endpoint Protection, a lot of the core file are in fact the same between the two as I recall.

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Marriott fined $600k for deliberate JAMMING of guests' Wi-Fi hotspots

Phil W
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Re: A small step in the right direction

De-authing networks does have it's legitimate uses though. For instance in a business environment where people shouldn't be using their own Wi-Fi or plugging in unauthorised equipment in your buildings but do so anyway.

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Windows 10 Preview - First Impressions?

Phil W
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Re: It's an improvement

Have just installed, with network cable unplugged and no Microsoft account required (obviously need to add one if you want to use the Store)

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Phil W
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Re: It's an improvement

Not tried it yet but if it's anything like 8.1 you can circumvent the online account requirement by simply disconnecting frim the network during setup.

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We're not Mr Brightside: Asda Car Insurance broker hacked

Phil W
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Re: Default Comment

Quite. It's annoying when they say this so early on, they can't possibly know the impact or scale of the breach so soon.

I'm not a customer of any of their sites but if I were in the event of breach I would be happier to be told "At this time we are confident that no customer data was accessed, but are performing a thorough investigation to verify this. We will inform you if any of your data is affected." than to be told my data isn't affected initially and then told it is later.

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EU probes Google’s Android omerta again: Talk now, or else

Phil W
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"they should not claim it is Open Source"

They don't, and never have.

The Android OS is open source, and is available as such through the AOSP (Android Open Source Project).

Google's app store and other proprietary software is added on top and is quite decidedly closed source.In much the same way as HTC Sense, Samsung TouchWiz or all of Amazon's Kindle stuff on the Fire.

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Phil W
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Re: All or nothing

' "Security through Obscurity" is no security at all. '

It annoys me when people say this because is demonstrably untrue. It would be more accurate to say "Security through obscurity is generally poor and easily circumvented, but can hamper efforts to break the underlying security".

It also depends on the obscurity, hiding your spare key under the doormat is security through really poor obscurity. Hiding your door key up the arse of model pelican you keep by the front door is also security through obscurity but far more likely to be effective.

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Phil W
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"Also of the binary blob that Google wants people to implement? Why not have that in open source format?"

Security for one, exposing the authentication systems contained within might put customers at risk perhaps. Also (and this is more likely) the DRM systems for apps and music/video content, compromising that would negatively affect their relationship with rights holders thus making it harder to licence content for streaming/download.

I don't really see a problem here, Google are entitled to stipulate requirements of including their app store and other services on devices. Just as manufacturers are entitled to choose to go with AOSP and use their own app store instead.

Really this is only happening because of the market share Android has. You don't see them investigating Microsoft because their phone OS forces you to use their app store and services, or specifying the hardware required to be allowed to licence it.

MS do this for much the same reason as Google's requirement to include a full array of software, that is to ensure as consistent a user experience as possible across devices and there by protect their software brand image.

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Microsoft WINDOWS 10: Seven ATE Nine. Or Eight did really

Phil W
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Re: Here we go again..

Microsoft will off this free to poorer hospitals in Spain to try it out.

Being Windows 10 it will suffer from the Blue Screen Of Diez.

N.B. This only really works if you pronounce it the Spanish way rather than the Mexican/colonial way.

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Phil W
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Re: cynical remark

In fact the kernel may be quite different but the version number was kept at 6.x for compatibility. Some developers make their software perform prerequisite checks based on the NT kernel number. It was left at 6 after vists to help compatibility with such software.

This is an old issue. Some 32 bit apps wouldn't install in XP 64 bit because they checked for kernel version 5.1 and 64 bit used 5.2.

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Microsoft on the Threshold of a new name for Windows next week

Phil W
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Dated

Back to dated names perhaps, Windows 2015 ?

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Le whoops! Microsoft France boss blows lid off 'Windows 9' event

Phil W
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Re: Stop! Take a breath...

Indeed, Windows 2000 was essentially 50% of the development from NT4 to XP, all the nice stable backend improvements and stuff with a rather spartan GUI on top.

Windows ME was the other 50%, i.e. all the bells and whistles and fanciness without the backend and reliability to support it.

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Oh God the RUBBER on my SHAFT has gone wrong and is STICKING to things

Phil W
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Texture

"what feels like a coating of caster sugar dissolved in PVA glue and jizz."

Speaking from experience of that texture Mr Dabbs?

If so I daren't ask the circumstance.

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Vodafone to buy 140 Phones 4u stores from stricken retailer

Phil W
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If it's not a word it certainly should be. It has far more right to be in the OED than some of the other Internet slang that has been added of late.

I think the BOFH would approve of the term out-bastarded.

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JINGS! Microsoft Bing called Scots indyref RIGHT!

Phil W
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AbelSoul I think you need to reread the post you're replying to. It asks why the English don't get on vote on Scotland staying, not on English independence.

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Phil W
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Re: Microsoft Prediction

Heh, amusingly Windows 8 and Scottish independence may well work out the same way.

Do it (in the event of a Yes tomorrow) or try to do it (in the event of a No), then realise that no-one is entirely happy with the result and try and fix it later like Windows 8.1

Where this comparison falls down of course is that with Windows 8 people had the choice to go back to using Windows 7.

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Phil W
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Re: Margin of error

"The No campaign seems to be entirely FUD, without any actual positives"

Partly, but this is natural because independence is change and fear and uncertainty in regard to change (particularly major change) is a natural human reaction.

There are some actual positives, the number of actual positives depends on how much you believe various politicians.

The 'Yes' campaign may not be FUD, but it's certainly got the UD. Uncertainity because some things have not been properly planned and disinformation because of things that Alex Salmond and the SNP claim they will absolutely be able to do that everyone else says the can't (including the people who would actually be responsible for allowing it).

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Phil W
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Re: I'm fine with Scottish independence if it's what they want.

Because he's seen as some kind of Scottish hero by many of the 'Yes' zealots, despite not really having achieved very much and being just as much of slimey lying weasel as every other politician.

Like you I don't object to Scottish independence, just the SNP and it's leader.

The best effect a 'No' result could have tomorrow is causing Alex Salmond to be forced to resign.

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Phil W
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Margin of error

Presumably Bing's predictions have some margin of error in their values?

If so those results are somewhat close together to be of much use surely.

Bing's prediction essentially tells us what those of who are don't fall within the Venn diagram of 'Raving luncatics' and 'Politicians' already knew, that the vote is looking like it may be too close to call.

Whichever way it goes, it's probably going to result in demands of recounts, legal challenges and accusations of misconduct from one side or the other.

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Bonking with Apple has POUNDED mobe operators' wallets

Phil W
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Zapp

I'm far more interested in if this will have any impact on the services Zapp are supposed to be bringing to market.

For those unaware they are working with most major banks to bring contactless payment support into the banks own mobile apps, thereby allowing you to make contactless payments direct from your current account rather than having to top up a third party wallet.

For me this will be the most useful implementation of mobile NFC payment.

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'Windows 9' LEAK: Microsoft's playing catchup with Linux

Phil W
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Re: A little help required from somebody with a better memory ...

I beleive GEM on the Atari520/1040 had this as well, though my memory is a little hazy.

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Brit telcos warn Scots that voting Yes could lead to HEFTY bills

Phil W
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Re: Obligations

You mean if BT abandon it? Or are you implying they could force BT to hand over ownership of the cables and ducts?

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Phil W
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Obligations

In the UK BT are, as the now corporate owner of state installed infrastructure, under certain legal obligations to support and maintain the cabling and ducting that is in place.

I realise they probably wouldn't even if they could, but would they be able to simply abandon the Scottish infrastructure claiming that is now in a foreign country and not their concern?

Also, would First Minister Alex "I can do whatever I want" Salmond decide that Scotland being dependent on British Telecom for their telecoms infrastructure and try and force BT to give it up?

Again, not saying this would happen, but I wouldn't be totally shocked.

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Be your own Big Brother: Monitoring your manor, the easy way

Phil W
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Re: weakness in this story

Yup they're awful really. Only to be used where there's no other option, for instance if you rent your home and can't do a proper cable installation.

Doing a nice neat and hidden away Cat5e/6a is not especially challenging and can be the work of a few hours or a weekend depending on the type of house.

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Read The Gods of War for every tired cliche you never wanted to see in a sci fi book

Phil W
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Re: Want to see the film version?

"SyFy throw a shark, octopus or tornado it could even get better!"

How about a creature with the head of a shark and the legs of an octopus that shits tornados?

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SanDisk's record-busting 512GB SD CARD will fit perfectly in your empty wallet

Phil W
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Waterproof...

...maybe, though likely tested by sticking it in a beaker of vlean water. But will it survive a trip through a washing machine at 60 degrees and 1600 rpm?

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PayPal goes crypto-currency with Bitcoin

Phil W
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Re: Investing in bitcoin

"assets that are dependent on what someone else values them in the future"

So that would be all assets ever. Including any conventional currency you care to pick, given their value in trade for goods and services as well as against other currencies changes all the time.

Any item be it a posession or currency is only worth what someone else will give you for it.

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IT jargon is absolutely REAMED with sexual double-entendres

Phil W
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This t-shirt...

http://www.thinkgeek.com/product/a651/

That is all...

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Phil W
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Re: SCSI port...

"Was one of my ex's nickname for her down-belows."

Was it Ultra Wide?

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BBC: We're going to slip CODING into kids' TV

Phil W
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Re: Perhaps they can teach CS grads as well?

This comment tickled me. From my experience education institutions do not like teaching relevant skills. I'm a CS graduate, with decent problem solving skills which were largely acquired before starting my further and higher education.

However during my National Diploma (the BTec ND for IT Practioners, now defunct I believe) which I studied for prior to the degree those without English and Maths GCSE at grades A-C were required to study for and take the equivalent level Key Skills exams in literacy and numeracy. The flaw in this was that they included it in the ND timetable not as a separate course so even those of us with A-C GCSEs in everything had to attend.

When we requested to be allowed to do a different Key Skills course with the time, namely "Problem Solving", we were refused on the grounds of it not being important or relevant to our ND.

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Apple reportedly inks deal with American Express for its iPhone payments system

Phil W
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Will be entertaining if it's true and also applies to the UK.

Sooo many places don't take American Express due to their insanely high handling fees.

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Like condoms, data now comes in big and HUGE sizes

Phil W
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Re: not like condoms, like beer

Surely if it's in packets it's more like the peanuts you have to go with your beer?

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Phil W
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Joke

Pushing the simile (to breaking point)

Does encrypted data count as "extra protection"?

Does data with sensitive content removed correlate to "latex free"?

Does information such as a husband's credit card information correlate to "for her pleasure"?

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EE fails to apologise for HUGE T-Mobile outage that hit Brits on Friday

Phil W
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The content lock is bizarre. In my case when it's set to off it's actually on and vice versa.

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Reg man looks through a Glass, darkly: Google's toy ploy or killer tech specs?

Phil W
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Re: car

Oddly the door wedge is the thing I noticed most to.

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Rejoice, Windows fans: Stable 64-bit Chromium drops for Win 7 and 8

Phil W
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Re: Same story as yesterday

Not really, that story is about patches and security fixes. The fact that those fixes are included in the 64 bit release is purely coincidental.

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Phil W
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It exists but is really only for devs, it's produced internally at Mozilla as part of overnight code builds for testing. There are also third party releases based on this such as Waterfox but these are not supported by Mozilla. https://www.waterfoxproject.org/

However the real question is why do you want or need a 64 bit browser? The performance benefits are negligible to non-existent for general purpose web browsing, it would only really be of use for specific applications.

The other problem is most browser plugins will get broken if you use the 64 bit version of the browser, I'm sure with the release of 64 bit Chrome this will start to change but for now it is the case.

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DNS cockup locks Virgin Media customers out of ntlworld.com email

Phil W
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Re: @Angela Taylor

"So if an email server tries to send an email, and there's no MX record the email still gets sent?"

Potentially yes. There is a section of the RFC for smtp/email which refers to "fallback to A" meaning that if there is no MX record but there is a DNS entry for the domain with an A record then the A record address should be treated as a mail server and attempt to send the message to it. That of course may not work but in some cases it can, admittedly it wouldn't of helped in this case.

It is my understanding though that not all email systems implement the "fallback to A" process, be that by design or oversight.

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Phil W
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Re: dig ntlworld.com mx

It's not as simple as someone cocking up a record from what I can tell.

Looked into it briefly this morning after a user couldn't email an ntlworld.com address, and discovered differing results from nslookups against various servers.

Some came back with a whole list of name servers and nothing else, some insisted the domain didn't exist. Having checked again now one of the DNS servers that claimed it didn't exist this morning looks to have a proper record with the correct MXs.

Perhaps a registration expiry/renewal cock up?

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AMD unveils 'single purpose' graphics card for PC gamers and NO ONE else

Phil W
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Re: Sorry, what's it thirty years of?

As Eddy says, its because this is ATIs 30th year.

Businesses and other organisations tend to celebrate anniversaries in the year leading up to the exact date rather than the 12 months following.

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Is it an iPad? Is it a MacBook Air? No, it's a Surface Pro 3

Phil W
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Re: One inconvenient design flaw...

Thanks for the info wdmot, I was not aware of that. Still not all that keen on the design personally but it does seem fairly well thought out. Did the previous Surface models also do this?

P.S. To the downvoters of my previous post.....really? Down voting me for that? It was a genuine question about what would seem to be a problem without the less than obvious information wdmot posted.

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