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* Posts by Phil W

501 posts • joined 10 Mar 2010

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Yorkshire cops fail to grasp principle behind BT Fon Wi-Fi network

Phil W
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First question:

a,b and c because they're all the same thing don't you know.

Also since movie piracy clearly they're also guilty of e by proxy.

To to the second question:

Since the only purpose of the internet is to illegally download films, and arrange terrorist acts it must be a and e.

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Phil W
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Re: I have to defend the police here...

Khaptain

Your ideas are totally unworkable I'm afraid.

Due to privacy and confidentiality laws an ISP, in this country at least, would not or should not provide the police with information about the type of activity coming from your connection without a warrant/court order. Plus given what I pointed out previously about the number of ISPs, the police wouldn't be able to get warrants for that information because they wouldn't know which ISPs to get warrants issued to.

Unfortunately the police won't know how many ISPs there are they need to contact, the only way to find out would be for BT to tell them which properties lines are routed to which ISP, which they won't do without a warrant (assuming they could even do it without getting an engineer to check locally, which knowing BT is unlikely).

That's an awful lot of work and expense to simply check if there happens to have been any suspicious network activity. Assuming they could even get a warrant issued in the first place, which I would think unlikely without some decent cause beyond a nosey neighbour's speculation.

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Phil W
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Re: I have to defend the police here...

Khaptain, not sure if you're in the UK or not? If not ignorance is an excuse I suppose.

With the exception of the town of Kingston, there really is no such thing as a "local" ISP in the UK. Your options are Cable from Virgin Media in areas they operate, or ADSL/FTTC from any number of other ISPs. BT operate pretty much all of the last mile infrastructure for ADSL/FTTC sure, but it is then wholesaled off to countless other ISPs, literally dozens, who all operate nationwide.

Perhaps all the people in that street are with 1 or 2 ISPs, but it's equally possible that every single house is with a different provider.

Also as for your point of checking if the locals use the Fon network, that makes no sense. The whole point of Fon is that you can legitmately piggy back on someone's home broadband connection when you're not near your home.

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Phil W
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Re: I have to defend the police here...

Policing is like disciplining a class of children sometimes. Especially when it comes to areas some people are not well educated in such as technology.

Child A says that he saw Child B with a sweet that belonged to Child C, Child C has not complained and is not aware of any problem. Child A doesn't actually know who Child B is or where he is now.

Do you:

A: Do Nothing.

B: Interrogate Child A and Child C, and any other children in the class to try and establish what happened and who Child B is.

C: B + search everyone for sweet wrappers to see who did it.

D: Decide that there appears to be no evidence that anything was actually taken, and the supposed victim has not complained, so just remind everyone to take care of their things and that stealing is wrong.

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June Whitfield and EE to old folk: Would you like a nice cup of tea and some internet, dear?

Phil W
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Organised by an idiot

Hey you!

Yes you, you old technophobic fart!

Do you want to sign up for a session on learning how to connect to the Internet?

You do? Great!

Just go online to our website and sign up!

What do you mean you don't know how?! What are you? Some kind of old technophobic fart?

*Yes I realise that's not the only way to sign up, and that they do drop-in sessions, but frankly it doesn't even need to be an option. In the majority of cases if they're tech savvy enough to register for the session online (regardless of the poor design of the web form) then they probably don't need any tech help from EE anyway.

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Say goodbye to landfill Android: Top 10 cheap 'n' cheerful smartphones

Phil W
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Re: 75 bucks? WTF?

surely if he looks more like Jabba the Hutt you in fact get a lot more Buck?

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Phil W
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Re: 75 bucks? WTF?

"I think you meant "accept"."

Unless of course he meant that they don't accept them, in which case it would be correct to say they except them as a form of payment.

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Phil W
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Re: 75 bucks? WTF?

Or 75 Gil Gerards

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Gust catches Amazon's skirt, reveals glimpse of 'Netflix for books'

Phil W
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Re: So...

"A large number of libraries are being deliberately run down..."

Either this is true or there is some serious regional variation in library usage.

The library where I live has recently been heavily invested in, both cosmetically and with new RFID book check in/out and shelf checking systems and self service terminals.

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Listen: WORST EVER customer service call – Comcast is 'very embarrassed'

Phil W
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Re: At least you can tell what he's saying

I've always got through to UK operators when calling VM I think it relates to time of day and load at the UK centres. I'd suggest approximately 10:00 - 12:00 and 14:00 - 16:00 on weekdays are best as most customers are in work and can't call.

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Phil W
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I dont know, in this case I think the guy would of just tried to offer parental controls be turned on or something.

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Gartner: To the right, to the right – biz sync firms who've won in a box to the right...

Phil W
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Please see article headline

So everyone should be Crazy In Love with EMC and help them Run The World?

I like to keep all my Irreplaceable data such as Halo saved games in a backup Partition for save keeping until the End of time

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ISPs 'blindsided' by UK.gov's 'emergency' data retention and investigation powers law

Phil W
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I may be wrong here, but won't they already have the infrastructure in place now in order for them to have been complying with the recently abolished Data Retention Directive.

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New Doctor Who episode leaks online as proper trailer debuts

Phil W
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Re: Omnishambles

Yes he f***ing would!

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Phil W
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I believe you'll find he was referencing Peter Capaldi's some what expletive filled lines in The Think Of It.

Search YouTube for "Malcolm Tucker - A Tribute to Brilliant Swearing" for prime examples.

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Murdoch calls for ISPs to be liable for users' activities

Phil W
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Re: FIRST AGAINST THE WALL

Not really, in the tradition of developers and sysadmins if the product/system we like is bought by a company we don't like or who intend to abuse it, we'll simply build our own fork of it.

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NEW Raspberry Pi B+, NOW with - count them - FOUR USB ports

Phil W
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Re: Composite Output

Is there a standard that encompasses this though? Or at the very least an informal but commonly agreed way of wiring it?

It's something that's been done for quite a few years, I believe the Nokia N95 (and I'm sure other models) did this with a 4 pole 3.5mm jack to 3 RCA output and that same cable worked on some other devices including a digital camera and a tablet I had.

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No more sprawl: Let us consider the benefits of blade servers

Phil W
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Re: phuzz

Dont assume he has 8 blades, it could be a c3000 compact enclosure or similar which only takes 8 blades total and 6 PSUs. That will quite happily run 4 or 5 blades on 4 power supplies in 2+2 mode.

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Phil W
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Assuming you have a HP c-Class enclosure....

I'm guessing you have your power configuration wrong in general you have 3 choices between AC redundant, Power Supply redundant and no redundancy.

Have a close look in your Onboard Administrator web interface under Power and Thermal -> Power Management for what is most suitable based on your power usage in Power and Thermal -> Power Meter.

Also check the model numbers of all your power supplies. I've seen an issue in a c-Class enclosure with 4 power supplies, 2 of one model number and 2 of another, where in certain combinations the power meter would display the current usage as something ridiculous like 14MW, though still showing the power limit at the normal level.

Of course as always, make sure both your OA firmwares and your blade iLO firmwares are fully up to date.

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Silent Circle takes on Skype, Viber, mobile telcos with crypto-VoIP

Phil W
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Re: "Encrypted" PSTN calls?

"Only the member's leg of the call is protected"

Which is the equivalent of no protection at all.

If a call to a PSTN user is tapped at the PSTN end, the listener can still hear what both parties are saying.

I'm not saying Silent Circle calls are useless, app to app calls are no doubt secure. But the difficulty there is you can only call someone who has a compatible device and the app, and there are already plenty of solutions for secure app to app calling.

This makes me think that the model of providing Out-Circle calls as paid service is either aimed at taking money from those who are daft enough to think it's any more secure than a normal call, or at those who are too lazy to use more than one app for calls.

My point on the comparison to Lavabit is not so much that any data is at risk but more that as a service specifically providing secure communications to prevent interception, Silent Circle is likely to find itself a target of government pressure from one nation or another both legally and through more covert means to shut down.

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Phil W
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"Encrypted" PSTN calls?

How is a call that's made "Out-Circle" really encrypted? Sure the internal VOIP leg of it inside the Silent Circle system may be, but as soon as the call goes out onto whatever nation's PSTN services it's as unencrypted and open to intercept as any other call.

As for the internal element of this that actually is encrypted, how long until the company goes the way of Lavabit?

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UK gov rushes through emergency law on data retention

Phil W
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Re: What's the emergency?

The 'emergency' is that the European courts decided that the arrangements that were already in place didn't have to continue, one of the numerous downsides to being in the EU as it stands (in the sense that they have effectively decided what our national laws are. Potential down voters please note, I am not a UKIP voter nor am I specifically anti-EU or pro-EU but I am pro EU reform).

I'm not in favour of excessive unnecessary surveillance but, I am impressed by the way this bill has been introduced in that it has relatively short, in political terms, time limits built in.

This seems to demonstrate a degree of common sense that I would previously of thought Cameron/Clegg incapable of.

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'iPhone 6' survives FRENZIED STABBING. Truly, it is the JESUS Phone

Phil W
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Re: But will it blend?

I think it would actually.

Certainly as the video demonstrates the flat surface on the front (and presumably back) of the panel are very durable. But I suspect repeated high speed impacst from sharp blades in the Blendtec blender to the thin edges of the panel would do some more serious damage.

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Cambridge Assessment exams CHAOS: Computing students' work may be BINNED

Phil W
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Re: "Those two skills are fairly unimportant in my business."

Exams closed book exams at any level are massively flawed in numerous ways.

As has been said above they inherently favour those with good memories, but as most educational institutions still insist on having students lined up in rows of desks in a hot stuffy hall hand writing exams, they also favour those with good tolerance for uncomfortable working conditions and who have legible handwriting that they can produce quickly.

I recall doing the final exams of my BSc at University in this fashion and not completing what I wanted to write in the allowed time and leaving the room with severe cramp in my hand, I hadn't been required to hand write anything of significance for at least 5 years prior to that, my HE college had allowed us to type our exams on suitably locked down PCs.

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REVEALED: The sites blocked by Great Firewall of Iraq

Phil W
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Re: Not Too Bad

Did I miss something or did you?

"He said: "Porn sites are still blocked, [but] social media websites were unblocked in Baghdad"

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Ofcom to BT Openreach: From now on, you'd better kill 70% of gremlins within 2 days

Phil W
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You should of asked if your package also lacked supported for TCP/IP.

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BlackBerry's Passport will be the WEIRDEST mobe of 2014

Phil W
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If this was an Android device

I would buy this no question. I loved my note 2 and love my note 3 but I still miss having a hardware keyboard as I used to on my desire z and n900.

Hardware qwerty keyboards still have their place among those of us who's primary mobile use is email and texting, even more so in the slightly smaller subset of users I fall into who heavily use their phone for remote desktop and telnet/ssh sessions.

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Got a botnet? Thinking of using it to mine Bitcoin? Don't bother

Phil W
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Re: Flawed

They're worth less, not worthless. While that is true they can be mined significantly faster so in the same period you end up with more value.

You try cpu mining bitcoin for a week (or even 24 hours), then try cpu mining any of the currently popular Scrypt N coins for the same period and then trade it for bitcoin on an exchange, see which gets you the larger sum of bitcoin.

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Phil W
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Flawed

I believe their calculations are flawed as it sounds like they're based on mining bitcoin with CPUs on compromised systems, which is all but pointless even when the hardware and electricity aren't yours.

However if they were mining some other coin, based on Scrypt for example, which is more CPU friendly then I suspect the profitability would increase significantly.

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Sci-fi series withdrawal

Phil W
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Re: @Phil W

Are you aware of the tissue box campaign?

When SG-1 was initially cancelled, a significant number of fans sent tissue boxes with "send more" written on them to MGM as a campaign to get them to do more seasons. One presumes as a fan of the series you will get the significance of this.

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Phil W
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In Andromeda's case I agree with you. Andromeda suffered in later seasons through the fact Robert Hewitt Wolfe was effectively forced off the development of the show because the producers thought his plots were too complex.

I feel Andromeda had/has the potential for spin off series in the style of Star Trek, taking place on different ships either before the fall, or after the events of the final season of Andromeda.

In SG1's case, I'm not sure if I agree with you or not. There were weaknesses to the last season or two, but those 2 seasons only exist due to demand. It had originally been cancelled two seasons earlier and brought back due to popular demand. Also the feature film that wrapped up the story, particularly Ark of Truth rounded things out nicely.

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Phil W
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Andromeda. Gene Roddenberry cheese in the vein of Star Trek TOS good as long as you can live with it having Kevin Sorbo as the lead.

Earth Final Conflict (though the plot wanders a bit and the last season is ropey)

Continuum

Awake

Personally I'm still wishing they'd finish SGU but I know it's not going to happen.

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DON’T add me to your social network, I have NO IDEA who you are

Phil W
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Re: Swirling JDs??

I'm often of the opinion that if you've tried Scotch and not liked it, you simply haven't found the right one for you, the variety is extensive.

I personally find very peaty whisky hard to stomach.

Given your description of it giving you heartburn, may I suggest you try Balvenie Doublewood or Signature should the opportunity present itself, very light on the palette and may suit you better.

(Also stepping away from Scotch but still whisky is the Welsh whisky, Penderyn Madeira, also a pleasant tipple).

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Phil W
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Revenge

An alternative approach on LinkedIn is to simply accept the connection request, but then endorsement bomb their profile.

For the uninitiated, on LinkedIn you can add an endorsement to someones profile to confirm that they have the skills they claim to have.

However you can also endorse them for skills they don't already have listed. I am not certain whether these still get publicly displayed without their consent but they did used to. This of course allows you to endorse someone as having skills in "Being a complete pillock" and any other negative skills of your choice.

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Android to drop Dalvik VM for high-performance ART in next version

Phil W
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Re: Strange...

The Best Thing Ever is only a valid title while there remains nothing better. At one time a 486 DX4 100 was The Best Thing Ever in home computing.

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Apple SOLDERS memory into new 'budget' iMac

Phil W
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Joke

Re: Horses for courses

I suggest you stop applying blowtorches to your Windows laptops then.

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Phil W
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Unneccessary lock in saving a few pence of build costs, but....

...I can't see that you'd actually want to upgrade beyond 8GB on this particular machine.

Given the rest of the spec, what task are you likely to throwing at this machine that would be able to take advantage of more than 8GB of RAM?

Chances are if you need that much RAM, the rather weak 1.4Ghz dual core CPU in this machine would rule this machine out for you so the fact it has hardwired RAM would never be an issue.

8GB is more than enough for anything this CPU could reasonably be used for.

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BT and TalkTalk BOTH claim victory as Ofcom tackles fibre price row

Phil W
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Re: That old horse:

Indeed not only is the existing ducting a major advantage to BT in terms of cost, since they just push the fibre through the same ducts, but in certain geographical locations it grants them an effective monopoly still.

There are a number of areas, particularly historic cities, where regulations and the location of listed buildings and archaeological sites etc don't practically allow for new ducts to be run and BT's already occupy the only available space.

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Daft business ideas.

Phil W
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The Perth (Australia) Snow Plough rental company.

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Phil W
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Rent-a-dodo(.com)

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Women are too expensive to draw and code – Ubisoft

Phil W
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Simple Solution

The simple solution would be to create a female character called Arna, who is a very masculine looking, flat chested, female assassin with a very deep voice.

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UK govt preps World War 2 energy rationing to keep the lights on

Phil W
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Yes, because all 4 of those would make a huge difference.

I can't find the exact figures for the MW output on the reactors used on the Vanguard class subs, but I believe it is around 20-25MW (perhaps another commentard can find an accurate figure for this?).

Even being optimistic and saying it's 30MW, you're looking 120MW for the whole fleet.

Barely with bothering with, even before you account for the security concerns of keeping all of them docked in known locations at the same time.

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Everyone can and should learn to code? RUBBISH, says Torvalds

Phil W
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Joke

Alternative

They may not have aptitude but what if they have emerge or yast?

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NeoPost: This is how you DON'T do PIN security

Phil W
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Errors

While I can tell from the article that clearly this device, it's manual and the supplier are a bunch of useless idiots, there are some flaws in your complaints.

Media is a perfectly common term for a physical data connection between devices, it certainly is used in a variety of areas of networking for instance Cisco switches differentiate between RJ45 and fibre interfaces with a property called "media-type". Obviously this device isn't intended for use by network technicians so more care could have been taken in the wording, but it is a perfectly valid term.

As for the credit charges of 3%, this is no surprise many many companies charge 3% on credit cards and I beleive the larger companies that don't are absorbing the cost rather than getting a better deal from their payment handler. You may find that there is a lesser or no charge for debit cards as opposed to credit cards, as the handling charges from payment providers tend to be lower and are often a fixed fee per transaction as opposed to a percentage of each transaction.

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Ukrainian teen created in lab passes Turing Test – famous nutty prof

Phil W
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The 13 year old boy in me....

...sniggered at the headline saying "beats off".

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Tech talk bloke compares girlfriend to irritating Java tool – did he deserve flames?

Phil W
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The modern world...

...seems to have had a sense of humour bypass. He was simply making a light hearted comparison intended to disparage the product, not any particular person or people in general.

If the comparison has been entirely positive "Is beautiful, helps keep my life happy and stress free, is entirely wonderful in it's own right", would there have been this many complaints?

If the comparison had been to some drunk guy down the pub "Gets in the way, is loud and annoying, hampers my efforts in what I'm trying to do", would there have been this many complaints?

If the presenter was gay, and had been making this comparison to his same sex partner using the exact same phrasing, would there have been this many complaints?

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Game of Thrones scribe George R R Martin will KILL YOU for US$20K

Phil W
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Yeah but in your case, George wouldn't kill you until you'd already tried to kill him in a chronologically misplaced revenge bid.

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Euro judges: Copyright has NOT changed, you WON'T get sued for browsing the web

Phil W
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Serious implication

So temporary copies that are 'essential' to the process of delivering the content to the user are fine. But what about temporary copies held as part of the delivery process such as ISPs monitoring your web traffic for security/advertising reasons?

Obviously there are all kinds of other reasons to be concerned about that happening but could an ISP be sued for copyright infringement over that?

Same goes for the NSA and GCHQ et al. While they may have disturbing legal protections allowing them to snoop our email and storage etc. Could they be sued for copyright infringement over the content they've snooped (assuming of course you some how knew they had snooped it).

It would be hard to argue (though I'm sure both ISPs and security agencies respectively would try) that any of the temporary copies are 'essential' to the process of content delivery.

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TrueCrypt hooked to life support in Switzerland: 'It must not die' say pair

Phil W
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Re: CryptTrue

or simply separate the words and replace them with alternatives of the same meaning

For instance:

TrueCrypt

True Crypt

Factual Mausoleum

Ladies and Gentleman, I give you the name for the forked version.

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How I poured a client's emails straight into the spam bin – with one Friday evening change

Phil W
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Re: Your mistake was...

I never claimed it was a GOOD solution.

Unfortunately Exchange like most Microsoft products is built to be operated at command line through Powershell these days, with the GUI tacked on afterwards, and usually poorly tacked on.

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