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* Posts by Phil W

567 posts • joined 10 Mar 2010

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Oh God the RUBBER on my SHAFT has gone wrong and is STICKING to things

Phil W
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Texture

"what feels like a coating of caster sugar dissolved in PVA glue and jizz."

Speaking from experience of that texture Mr Dabbs?

If so I daren't ask the circumstance.

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Vodafone to buy 140 Phones 4u stores from stricken retailer

Phil W
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If it's not a word it certainly should be. It has far more right to be in the OED than some of the other Internet slang that has been added of late.

I think the BOFH would approve of the term out-bastarded.

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JINGS! Microsoft Bing called Scots indyref RIGHT!

Phil W
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AbelSoul I think you need to reread the post you're replying to. It asks why the English don't get on vote on Scotland staying, not on English independence.

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Phil W
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Re: Microsoft Prediction

Heh, amusingly Windows 8 and Scottish independence may well work out the same way.

Do it (in the event of a Yes tomorrow) or try to do it (in the event of a No), then realise that no-one is entirely happy with the result and try and fix it later like Windows 8.1

Where this comparison falls down of course is that with Windows 8 people had the choice to go back to using Windows 7.

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Phil W
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Re: Margin of error

"The No campaign seems to be entirely FUD, without any actual positives"

Partly, but this is natural because independence is change and fear and uncertainty in regard to change (particularly major change) is a natural human reaction.

There are some actual positives, the number of actual positives depends on how much you believe various politicians.

The 'Yes' campaign may not be FUD, but it's certainly got the UD. Uncertainity because some things have not been properly planned and disinformation because of things that Alex Salmond and the SNP claim they will absolutely be able to do that everyone else says the can't (including the people who would actually be responsible for allowing it).

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Phil W
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Re: I'm fine with Scottish independence if it's what they want.

Because he's seen as some kind of Scottish hero by many of the 'Yes' zealots, despite not really having achieved very much and being just as much of slimey lying weasel as every other politician.

Like you I don't object to Scottish independence, just the SNP and it's leader.

The best effect a 'No' result could have tomorrow is causing Alex Salmond to be forced to resign.

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Phil W
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Margin of error

Presumably Bing's predictions have some margin of error in their values?

If so those results are somewhat close together to be of much use surely.

Bing's prediction essentially tells us what those of who are don't fall within the Venn diagram of 'Raving luncatics' and 'Politicians' already knew, that the vote is looking like it may be too close to call.

Whichever way it goes, it's probably going to result in demands of recounts, legal challenges and accusations of misconduct from one side or the other.

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Bonking with Apple has POUNDED mobe operators' wallets

Phil W
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Zapp

I'm far more interested in if this will have any impact on the services Zapp are supposed to be bringing to market.

For those unaware they are working with most major banks to bring contactless payment support into the banks own mobile apps, thereby allowing you to make contactless payments direct from your current account rather than having to top up a third party wallet.

For me this will be the most useful implementation of mobile NFC payment.

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'Windows 9' LEAK: Microsoft's playing catchup with Linux

Phil W
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Re: A little help required from somebody with a better memory ...

I beleive GEM on the Atari520/1040 had this as well, though my memory is a little hazy.

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Brit telcos warn Scots that voting Yes could lead to HEFTY bills

Phil W
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Re: Obligations

You mean if BT abandon it? Or are you implying they could force BT to hand over ownership of the cables and ducts?

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Phil W
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Obligations

In the UK BT are, as the now corporate owner of state installed infrastructure, under certain legal obligations to support and maintain the cabling and ducting that is in place.

I realise they probably wouldn't even if they could, but would they be able to simply abandon the Scottish infrastructure claiming that is now in a foreign country and not their concern?

Also, would First Minister Alex "I can do whatever I want" Salmond decide that Scotland being dependent on British Telecom for their telecoms infrastructure and try and force BT to give it up?

Again, not saying this would happen, but I wouldn't be totally shocked.

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Be your own Big Brother: Monitoring your manor, the easy way

Phil W
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Re: weakness in this story

Yup they're awful really. Only to be used where there's no other option, for instance if you rent your home and can't do a proper cable installation.

Doing a nice neat and hidden away Cat5e/6a is not especially challenging and can be the work of a few hours or a weekend depending on the type of house.

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Read The Gods of War for every tired cliche you never wanted to see in a sci fi book

Phil W
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Re: Want to see the film version?

"SyFy throw a shark, octopus or tornado it could even get better!"

How about a creature with the head of a shark and the legs of an octopus that shits tornados?

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SanDisk's record-busting 512GB SD CARD will fit perfectly in your empty wallet

Phil W
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Waterproof...

...maybe, though likely tested by sticking it in a beaker of vlean water. But will it survive a trip through a washing machine at 60 degrees and 1600 rpm?

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PayPal goes crypto-currency with Bitcoin

Phil W
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Re: Investing in bitcoin

"assets that are dependent on what someone else values them in the future"

So that would be all assets ever. Including any conventional currency you care to pick, given their value in trade for goods and services as well as against other currencies changes all the time.

Any item be it a posession or currency is only worth what someone else will give you for it.

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IT jargon is absolutely REAMED with sexual double-entendres

Phil W
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This t-shirt...

http://www.thinkgeek.com/product/a651/

That is all...

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Phil W
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Re: SCSI port...

"Was one of my ex's nickname for her down-belows."

Was it Ultra Wide?

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BBC: We're going to slip CODING into kids' TV

Phil W
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Re: Perhaps they can teach CS grads as well?

This comment tickled me. From my experience education institutions do not like teaching relevant skills. I'm a CS graduate, with decent problem solving skills which were largely acquired before starting my further and higher education.

However during my National Diploma (the BTec ND for IT Practioners, now defunct I believe) which I studied for prior to the degree those without English and Maths GCSE at grades A-C were required to study for and take the equivalent level Key Skills exams in literacy and numeracy. The flaw in this was that they included it in the ND timetable not as a separate course so even those of us with A-C GCSEs in everything had to attend.

When we requested to be allowed to do a different Key Skills course with the time, namely "Problem Solving", we were refused on the grounds of it not being important or relevant to our ND.

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Apple reportedly inks deal with American Express for its iPhone payments system

Phil W
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Will be entertaining if it's true and also applies to the UK.

Sooo many places don't take American Express due to their insanely high handling fees.

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Like condoms, data now comes in big and HUGE sizes

Phil W
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Re: not like condoms, like beer

Surely if it's in packets it's more like the peanuts you have to go with your beer?

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Phil W
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Joke

Pushing the simile (to breaking point)

Does encrypted data count as "extra protection"?

Does data with sensitive content removed correlate to "latex free"?

Does information such as a husband's credit card information correlate to "for her pleasure"?

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EE fails to apologise for HUGE T-Mobile outage that hit Brits on Friday

Phil W
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The content lock is bizarre. In my case when it's set to off it's actually on and vice versa.

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Reg man looks through a Glass, darkly: Google's toy ploy or killer tech specs?

Phil W
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Re: car

Oddly the door wedge is the thing I noticed most to.

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Rejoice, Windows fans: Stable 64-bit Chromium drops for Win 7 and 8

Phil W
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Re: Same story as yesterday

Not really, that story is about patches and security fixes. The fact that those fixes are included in the 64 bit release is purely coincidental.

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Phil W
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It exists but is really only for devs, it's produced internally at Mozilla as part of overnight code builds for testing. There are also third party releases based on this such as Waterfox but these are not supported by Mozilla. https://www.waterfoxproject.org/

However the real question is why do you want or need a 64 bit browser? The performance benefits are negligible to non-existent for general purpose web browsing, it would only really be of use for specific applications.

The other problem is most browser plugins will get broken if you use the 64 bit version of the browser, I'm sure with the release of 64 bit Chrome this will start to change but for now it is the case.

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DNS cockup locks Virgin Media customers out of ntlworld.com email

Phil W
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Re: @Angela Taylor

"So if an email server tries to send an email, and there's no MX record the email still gets sent?"

Potentially yes. There is a section of the RFC for smtp/email which refers to "fallback to A" meaning that if there is no MX record but there is a DNS entry for the domain with an A record then the A record address should be treated as a mail server and attempt to send the message to it. That of course may not work but in some cases it can, admittedly it wouldn't of helped in this case.

It is my understanding though that not all email systems implement the "fallback to A" process, be that by design or oversight.

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Phil W
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Re: dig ntlworld.com mx

It's not as simple as someone cocking up a record from what I can tell.

Looked into it briefly this morning after a user couldn't email an ntlworld.com address, and discovered differing results from nslookups against various servers.

Some came back with a whole list of name servers and nothing else, some insisted the domain didn't exist. Having checked again now one of the DNS servers that claimed it didn't exist this morning looks to have a proper record with the correct MXs.

Perhaps a registration expiry/renewal cock up?

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AMD unveils 'single purpose' graphics card for PC gamers and NO ONE else

Phil W
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Re: Sorry, what's it thirty years of?

As Eddy says, its because this is ATIs 30th year.

Businesses and other organisations tend to celebrate anniversaries in the year leading up to the exact date rather than the 12 months following.

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Is it an iPad? Is it a MacBook Air? No, it's a Surface Pro 3

Phil W
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Re: One inconvenient design flaw...

Thanks for the info wdmot, I was not aware of that. Still not all that keen on the design personally but it does seem fairly well thought out. Did the previous Surface models also do this?

P.S. To the downvoters of my previous post.....really? Down voting me for that? It was a genuine question about what would seem to be a problem without the less than obvious information wdmot posted.

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Phil W
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Re: One inconvenient design flaw...

Interesting, do you not have any problems with buttons being accidentally pushed while doing that?

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Phil W
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Re: One inconvenient design flaw...

"From the article - "The cover attaches magnetically and folds up to protect the screen, or back to enable tablet use without detaching it completely.""

Thus preventing use of the tablet, with the kickstand but without the keyboard.

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Phil W
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One inconvenient design flaw...

...is the keyboard.

Yes it's detachable, but the problem is what do you do with it once detached? If i'm out and about with just a Surface Pro 3, no bags or anything else with, and I'm sat on a train or where ever watching a film or using it in some other way that doesnt require the keyboard what am I supposed to do with it?

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The Return of BSOD: Does ANYONE trust Microsoft patches?

Phil W
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Linux - more stable.

It is, and yet equally it isn't.

I'm very fond of Linux for many purposes but no distro is really well suited for end user desktop use at present, at least on the scale that Windows is.

Sometimes, with the right hardware and the right distro, Linux as a desktop just works out of the box and that's fine.

Sometimes however you have to do endless fiddling, swapping distro provided video drivers for vendor ones or vice versa, or blacklisting driver modules to get other driver modules to load so that your audio works properly. That's not so fine, and presents some very real potential problems for many typical users.

As for updates, I've known package updates from a main repository break systems before, and sometimes with Linux this can be harder to fix as removing the package doesn't put it back as it was and stops the previous version working again.

The real problem is Linux grew from being aimed at and used by computer experts and sysadmins, and has had a large portion of it's development aimed towards servers and specific applications. This means it's not ideal for more general purposes or more general users, and developing it to be so is hard and slow.

Windows was developed right back from Windows 3.1 and it's predecessors to be a system for the average end user and to be easy to use and designed in such a way as to bread familiarity. This makes it a good general purpose OS usable and easily taken to by any user, but makes developing it as a reliable server or specific application platform harder.

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Spin doctors crack 'impossible' asteroid hurtling towards Earth

Phil W
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Re: Prof. Hubert J. Farnsworth

Or push the Earth into a slightly wider orbit, fixing global warming and taking us out of the asteroid's path.

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EE network whacked by 'PDP authentication failure' blunder

Phil W
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Rare problem

I've been with EE about a year (on T-mobile for about 7 years prior to that) and this is the first problem there's been that has affected me.

No pop-ups or authentication messages for me though (Galaxy Note 3) just not data for an hour or 2. Wasn't a big deal for me though as I'm at work, so I was just briefly without data as I walked between buildings, WiFi everywhere else.

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What's the nature of your emergency, Vodafone?

Phil W
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Re: What exactly is the point?

Two points most likely

1. Basic one-upmanship between Vodafone and Telefonica's Marketing/PR departments.

2. Telefonica attempting to generate bad publicity toward Vodafone, it may only be minor and most people will forget it, certainly the details of it. But if they happen to remember in the future "Hey, don't I remember Vodafone getting in trouble with lying in their ads" then it might get O2 some customers. For all the effort it takes to lodge the complaint why wouldn't O2 complain on that basis.

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£100m DMI omnifail: BBC managers' emails trawled by employment tribunal

Phil W
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Re: At least it's not my money these buffoons are burning

Indeed, as above, a TV licence is only required to watch TV as it is broadcast (or record it yourself). Watching them on iPlayer post broadcast doesn't require a TV licence, though using iPlayer to watch the few things they show live on there does.

If you own a TV but dont have it connected to receive live broadcasts then the TV licencing agency will send you a letter acknowledging that if you write to them about it.

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New Forum Wishlist - but read roadmap first

Phil W
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Re: Concerted and Determined Campaign to educate the masses about British Telecom

I don't see that petition going anywhere, for one thing it's poorly written and doesn't even make sense for instance wtf is "superset broadband"? It seems that you (and whoever started the petition if different) need to be educated about BT as much as the general public

BT has for some time been composed of a number of separate companies, these are not divisions of one company but separate registered businesses (albeit owned by a parent group) that interact with each other at an operational level just like they do with any company not called "BT <something>".

Lodging a complaint about one that is the responsibility of another is daft, like complaining to Volkswagen that your Skoda is crap or complaining to Virgin Trains that your flight on Virgin Atlantic was rubbish.

BT Openreach look after the infrastructure, BT Broadband provide your ADSL/FTTC connection, but they get this done just like any other ISP by requesting it as a BT Openreach customer. In general BT Openreach's only customers are ISPs and other Telcos, and maybe some businesses. If you are a home broadband user, you are not a BT Openreach customer.

BT Openreach won the contracts for the BDUK money, and are actually meeting the obligations of rolling out rural broadband. Somewhat slower than some people would like but they are getting there. The moderately sized rural village where my parents live was recently upgraded to Infinity.

BT Broadband are a business and residential ISP, who provide broadband connections to users. It is them who you can be a customer of. They are not responsible for the installation of copper of fibre cabling, upgrading your exchanges or cabinets.

They have no requirement to provide good customer service as such, apart from certain regulatory requirements, their motivation to provide good customer service is largely to maintain market share and stay in business. The BDUK money has nothing to do with the customer service that BT Broadband provide.

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Top Ten 802.11ac routers: Time for a Wi-Fi makeover?

Phil W
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Re: Shoot marketing!

@Dan 55

Some places will help in this regard if you ask, I've been into PC World and explained I was after a particular revision of something and they happily cut the security seals off and opened the box to let me check.

Some smaller (relative to Amazon etc) online retailers will also be helpful. I once asked CCL what revision a motherboard they had listed was, where there were 5 revisions on the manufacturers site. They sent someone down to the warehouse to check what revision their stock was, told me and update the product on the website to include it as well.

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Ex-Apple man Sam Sung - for it is he - sticks namebadge on eBay

Phil W
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Re: Apple property

It's not stated the the article, but I wouldn't be at all surprised if he sought permission before listing the stuff.

If you want to be really cynical you might even think it was Apple's PR department that came up with the idea rather than Mr Sung himself.

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HTTP-Yes! Google boosts SSL-encrypted sites in search results

Phil W
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Re: $10/yr is the tip of the iceberg

"Plus the time spent/wasted coordinating with contractors and subs, explaining arcane bullshit, getting certs purchased, installation, configuring crazy old backend stacks to work with SSL"

Much of this is true but is not due to any problem with SSL but purely down to poor management, planning and organisation.

Expired certificates won't be a problem if you put reminders on your calendar when you issue/install them.

Chasing certficates isn't an issue if you have more than one person with access to your CA account etc.

"with a certificate signed by a CA you are not assured that the person you are talking to is trustworthy, merely that they were prepared to splash the cash for that certificate."

True but once fraudulent use of a CA issued certificate is discovered the CA can revoke the certificate, keeping end users safe.

If you click past the warnings and accept a self-signed certificate it's accepted forever (unless you know how to remove it which your average user doesn't)

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Microsoft KILLS Windows 8.1 Update 2 and Patch Tuesday

Phil W
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It's not that I don't care about home users, on the contrary. It's just that I haven't yet met a home user who was excessively baffled or inconvenienced by any cosmetic or functional updates delivered to them either automatically or through them clicking to accept them.

I frequently support a number of largely computer illiterate friends and family who mostly managed to use Windows 8 (moving from Windows 7) with no great problems, just some minor grumbles about it being different, they were perfectly happy with it within a month.

Moving from 8 to 8.1, caused them even less grief, they barely noticed the Start button had been added, but they did start using it. Similarly with 8.1 Update 1, they noticed no difference and it caused them no problems.

For the type of person incapable or uninterested in managing and monitoring their updates at home, installing them all automatically will generally not cause them any problem, but may well offer them some performance or security benefits.

For non-home users their are a variety of tools and methodologies available for managing updates.

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Phil W
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"I suspect that the next step from this will be to remove the separation between feature updates and security updates"

Won't happen, simply because of the rage it would cause from Microsoft's large corporate cash cow customers, many of whom will only ever install security updates.

At worst they may remove the separation between them in the Home efitions of Windows, but I don't see it happening in Professional and Enterprise or Server editions.

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Phil W
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"effective configuration management and testing become impossible."

Are you talking in a personal and/or small business context? Then maybe, but only if you have your update settings set to automatically download and install all updates.

In an enterprise environment proper change management of software updates and testing can easily be managed. Turn off automatic updates in Windows and all your other software and deploy all your updates and patches with either a simple WSUS set up for purely MS updates or with even greater granularity and support for deploying other application updates using SCCM.

You can't complain about Microsoft's update release strategy causing chaos if you don't use the available tools to manage it. Default automatic installation of all updates is only really a suitable approach for individual and small group users who don't care about managing their environment and experience.

Don't want to check what each update does before installing? Just stick to only installing security updates, which can easily be done, as these rarely have any impact on UI/UX.

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African samba queen: Don't cut off pirates' net connections – cut off their FINGERS

Phil W
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Suffering

"making the person suffer without getting anything from all the money he invested in the works?"

Since digital piracy doesn't directly inflict suffering on artists, and only at worst deprives them of some portion of potential income, then I assume the suffering she refers to must be the actual performance work.

If you work in the performing arts where digital piracy is an issue and consider that your actual work is causing you mental or physical suffering regardless of income then it's time for a career change.

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Microsoft blasts sueball at Samsung over Android patent royalties

Phil W
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I wasn't suggesting that the court would invalidate the patent, or even invalidate the contract.

But it may well bring to light what the patents are that Android supposedly infringes.

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Phil W
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That depends what they're suing for and if the contract specifies the patent.

If they're suing for breach of contract they would be suing for a penalty for the breach.

They appear to be suing to get Samsung to continue paying the fees as per the contract, if that is the case then the court will want to see the contract most likely.

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Mars rover 2020: Oxygen generation and 6 more amazing experiments

Phil W
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Re: Aaargh 2.0

I'm looking forward to when they start struggling for catchy single word names and go for Exasperation.

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The Register is HIRING technology hacks for the WORLD

Phil W
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Re: A tabloid journalist for El Reg with Fluency in English eh

A Greater-Pedant writes..

The word tabloid was not invented for this purpose at all, but is in fact substantially older. As the OED will tell you it is from the late 19th century originally the name of a proprietary medicine and later used as a generic term for any medicine in tablet form.

Apparently "the current sense reflects the notion of ‘concentrated, easily assimilable’." which may well explain the use of tabloid in relation to size of newspapers, given their smaller size.

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Multipath TCP speeds up the internet so much that security breaks

Phil W
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Re: to undetectably (sic) alter or sniff your traffic

How about a hyphenated prefix of non- just like you get for non-biological washing powder.

As I pointed out previously, in the development of modern language it's whatever people like the sound of best that wins, not what scholars say is correct. Especially as the OED has taken to adding all kinds of linguistic turds to it's contents as long as someone is using them, such as "srsly", "ridics" and "whatevs".

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