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* Posts by JimmyPage

1247 posts • joined 5 Mar 2010

Telly psychics fail to foresee £12k fine for peddling nonsense

JimmyPage
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@Greg J Preece

The Daily Mail lost because they alleged Psychic Sally used a particular technique of defrauding which they had no proof of. This is a specific claim which is a slur, and hence Sally (rightly) won when she accused them of libel.

If they had simply said "Psychic Sally is a fraud - no one can speak to the dead" then it would have been a different outcome. Mainly because I bet if they did print that, all of a sudden Psychic Sally will be nowhere to be found.

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Google gets gentle Street View slurp slap from UK data cops

JimmyPage
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FAIL

I suspect that it will be impossible to delete this data ...

Even if it was only one column in a database, you would still have to locate, restore delete and re-backup those old databases. And that's before we consider the possibility that the data might be in key-related tables which need to be present for the database to work ....

There needs to be some ISO standard for what to do in these instances ... maybe *replacing* the data with zeros, or spaces, or whatever is needed ...

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Pussy galore: Bubble-bath webcam spy outrage

JimmyPage
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all webcams I know have a light on them to indicate if they are active..

surely if the webcam can be turned on without your knowing, the light could also be disabled ?

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Not all data encryption is created equal

JimmyPage
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*Properly* implemented encryption ...

8192 bit encryption is worthless if a user chooses "password" as .... well, as their password.

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Offensive, iconoclastic internet trolls will NOT be prosecuted, says DPP

JimmyPage
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Joke

Re: Does this mean ...

only if you like queueing ....

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Julian Assange: Google's just an arm of US government

JimmyPage
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Unhappy

Re: "Assange, who referred to himself in the third person throughout the keynote"

Shit ! I'm fucked :(

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JimmyPage
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"Assange, who referred to himself in the third person throughout the keynote"

Surely that's reason enough to ignore him ?

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Google flings another £1m at online child sex abuse vid CRACKDOWN

JimmyPage
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FAIL

Yet curiously ...

we are told it's not possible to identify orphan works ...

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REVEALED: The gizmo leaker Snowden used to smuggle out NSA files

JimmyPage
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FAIL

No security system should have a single point of failure

Which is what has happened here. Someone who had access to the data *also* had access to the means to smuggle it out.

On another thread, I commented that IT admins should not be able to read the data under their control. I've seen it done with Windows ... (I apologise for vagueness, I am not a SysAdmin) it involved creating a folder with an account which was then deleted, having given access to the management, and denied to the administrator. So they could not look inside the folder, (nor take ownership).

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Jaguar to open new car-making factory in Blighty (virtually)

JimmyPage
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Re: "return car manufacturing to Britain"

Indeed. And have just built a brand new powertrain factory in Wolverhampton ....

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CRINGE! Home Office wants to know whether your boss BEATS YOU

JimmyPage
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Oh FFS !

And we pay taxes for this ?

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MySpace zaps millions of teens' tearful rants, causes wave of angst

JimmyPage
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Black Helicopters

"The Cloud" .. exactly what the man wants

with more and more content going into the cloud, it becomes *much* easier to wipe out content you don't like ....

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Eurogeddon? Pah. UK banks are more terrified of hackers - big banker

JimmyPage
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FAIL

"Banks are really IT companies that just happen to do banking"

this was stated last year, after the NatWest fiasco. Was anyone listening ?

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Thanks, NSA: Amazon sales of Orwell's 1984 rise 9,500%

JimmyPage
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How about "A Clockwork Orange" ?

I would argue we're looking more like the future imagined in that book ...

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UK.gov's £530m bumpkin broadband rollout: 'Train crash waiting to happen'

JimmyPage
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FAIL

Seems an awful lot of money

to enable access to government websites that only work in IE6

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Ex-CIA techie Edward Snowden: I am the NSA PRISM deepthroat

JimmyPage
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Re: Ignore the terrorists ...

in a way, I believe that's what happened. The IRA spent the best part of 20 years bombing the population of the UK, who in that time did absolutely nothing whatsoever to indicate they had any interest in the problem.

I started Uni, sharing with an Irish chap in 1984. The Grand Hotel bombing happened, and he pointed out that a week later - as usual - absolutely no one had asked him anything about "the troubles".

The same will happen with Islamic terrorists. The great British Public will simply astound them with their total and utter lack of desire to learn anything about their "cause".

Willful, pigheaded ignorance - that's how we will beat them.

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JimmyPage
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@404

If IT Admins can access whatever they want, it's a shit organisation.

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JimmyPage
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FAIL

Six degrees of Kevin Bacon ...

The more data that is hoovered up (strangely appropriate term, given the circumstances) then eventually *everybody* will be connected to *everybody else*.

At which point it becomes pretty useless.

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So, who ought to be the next Doctor Who? It's up to YOU...

JimmyPage
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Happy

or

Gerry Dorsey ....

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All major UK ISPs prepping network-level porn 'n' violence filters

JimmyPage
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So, presumably, premium-rate phone numbers

will be blocked by default ?

No.

Hypocritical cant then.

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Cameron eyes 'non legislative options' for more spook snoop powers

JimmyPage
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Unhappy

@NukEvil

and what *can* we do? We live in a society where governments can steamroller us into an illegal war, despite millions of people marching against it (in fact the only notice they took of that was to make it illegal to march in Westminster).

I suppose we could vote Labour - oh, wait a moment - they are pledged to support this too !

For myself, I'd set up a VPN through my router, and let them try and track me. As I suspect those that are talking here will do. I don't mind leaving thick criminals to the mercies of UK plod, as I am very concious that "criminal" is what the government says it is - like reading out a list of names - rather than anything absolute

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JimmyPage
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Mushroom

Re: @User McUser (again)

are you being thick ?

I was just suggesting situations which *will* (not may, will) arise which will scupper the whole "we need to keep records of who's calling who" argument. In a similar vein, my mother-in-law lives locally, and occasionally we run errands for each other. So a call between her landline and mine could have been between me, my wife, or our son, and her and her partner. Now you scale that up to two houses of multiple occupancy phoning each other, and keeping all the records you like won't help you know *who* was talking to *who*. Given that this is exactly what we are being told these new powers are for, I find my suspicions immediately aroused ... what do they really want these powers for ?

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JimmyPage
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What will probably happen ...

a lot of hot air, and then someone will gently point out to the befuddled MPs that when they talk about everyones web/phone usage being logged, they mean *everyone*.

At which point I suspect MPs will suddenly find something much more interesting the other side of the room.

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JimmyPage
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FAIL

@User McUser

you totally failed to read the question. Unless you actually record the conversation point to point, you don't know WHO was speaking.

My sons phone died a few days ago, so I let him use my work phone to call his mate. Something I will probably have forgotten in 6 months time, should plod come-a-swooping. Things would get even more interesting if the number he called for his mate turned out to be his mates Dads phone. Or (even more worrying if you have a suspicious spouse) his mates *Mums* phone.

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JimmyPage
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Meanwhile, in the real world ...

most routers can happily support a VPN natively. Certainly mine can. So for around $50/year (use of dollar symbol deliberate, to emphasis where the money will go (or €40 if you prefer)) it's trivial to insulate my entire household from UK plc. That's everything then. Web traffic. VOIP traffic. Emails. Social media traffic (although they are welcome to my sons drivel). With the added bonus that you escape your ISPs traffic shaping. Win-Win I believe.

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Obama: Just call me Billygoat Gruff the Third, patent trolls

JimmyPage
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Re: It occurs to me...

you could even crowdsource it ....

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Ecuador: Let's talk about not having Julian Assange on our sofa

JimmyPage
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Re: They could have done that in England.

Downvoted because (as has been pointed out many times - including El Reg) Swedish law doesn't allow for extra-territorial questioning.

Dunno if anyone remembers, but a few years ago a US guy killed a girl here, and left her body in a car boot before flying off to the US. He was identified, we issued a warrant for his arrest, which translated into a request for extradition which a US court happily compiled with (he's now serving life in the UK).

Would you have been happy if instead of that, the US said "no, we won't extradite him, but feel free to pop over and ask a few questions" ?

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JimmyPage
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Meh

Sigh. This whole "the US are out to get him" line ...

is really a bit thin now. The US have made absolutely no legal moves to try and get Assange into the US. (Hot air doesn't count, btw).

*Even* if they should whip up an extradition request (which would require charges be laid, which they haven't), under the EAW, the *UK* would need to OK a further extradition from Sweden to the US.

That decision would be subject to the UK Supreme Court, under the HRA. Currently, the UK supreme court has bigger balls than Teresa May (passim). In fact, I suspect the last thing the UK *government* wants is for the US to request JAs extradition, and have the supreme court veto it.

JA knows all of this, and is supposedly an intelligent man. Therefore his motives for dodging the warrant are questionable, and appear to have a lot more to do with self aggrandisement, and fear of jail, than any possible "threat" from the US.

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Look out, fanbois! EVIL charger will inject FILTH into your iPHONE

JimmyPage
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@MACWINLINO

downvoted because there's a world of difference between physically gaining access to a server room, and gaining access under a false flag.

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Doctor Who? 12th incarnation sought after Matt Smith quits

JimmyPage
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Re: Fountain of Youth

or his Mum ;)

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JimmyPage
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Re: Pull the plug

Er ... haven't they already ?

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JimmyPage
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@EddieD

thanks for saying that - I thought it was just me that thought that.

Back in the 70s/80s, wasn't the reason given for the Masters terrifying appearance (the story where the Doctor goes back to Gallifrey to run for president) that he had forced regenerations, and gone beyond his 12th ?

Presumably the 12-limit regeneration will go the way of the prime directive ....

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How Microsoft shattered Gnome's unity with Windows 95

JimmyPage
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FAIL

A *single* example of how things work ....

I had my [virtual]* machine running Ubuntu 10.04 with GNOME. Upgraded to 12.04, and got Unity. Immediately discovered my "system monitor" taskbar applet stopped working. Why ? Because Unity panels apparently can't support animation.

End of line for system monitor then. As the discussion I briefly read surmised, it's simply not possible to code a replacement.

Just fundamentally change the framework for the desktop, and tell users to whistle ? Great strategy.

*Now you know why I did it in a virtual machine first.

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Peak Facebook: British users lose their Liking for Zuck's ad empire

JimmyPage
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Never say never ..

Mrs JimmyPage and I aren't "on facebook" (or son is ... although he says it's "boring" nowadays). I didn't see the point in it, and have *needed* to use it for anything. I/we haven't ruled it out, but we've both said the only way we'd sign up is if there was something in it for us. So that would be some kind of special offer that you couldn't get any other way. Materially. So maybe a 10% discount on £1,000 purchase. That kind of thing.

If facebook is to continue, I suggest they try and leverage the businesses who have invested in it so far to open their wallets and start to make it pay to be a facebooker.

As I said our son, and his teenage mates are all "on facebook". They are also permanently skint.

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JimmyPage
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FAIL

How do DPA requests work

with US companies ?

Just curious.

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Happy 23rd birthday, Windows 3.0

JimmyPage
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Windows

Windows 3.1/3.11 - you could zip into a file

My first proper IT job was developing an installation routine for our companies software. I worked out you could install Windows, zip up the C:\WINDOWS directory, test my install routine, and then restore the C:\WINDOWS back to a virgin install. A godsend .... totally impossible nowadays ...

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FLABBER-JASTED: It's 'jif', NOT '.gif', says man who should know

JimmyPage
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Coat

@Stevie

I saw that and had this brief flicker in minds ear ...

"Kettle, Klutch, Kings Bollege Bambridge. Ah, silly bunt !"

proving that Monty Python were the inspiration for KDE

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If you've bought DRM'd film files from Acetrax, here's the bad news

JimmyPage
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Alert

Re: illegal download sites

Aha, but because the government needs the post to deliver their shit, the legal situation is proof of posting is proof of receipt. Otherwise you'd have to sign for your tax demand, or NIP for speeding ...

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WW II U-boat attacks prompt new US response

JimmyPage
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Unhappy

oops - my bad

I meant 1940s ...

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JimmyPage
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Boffin

Trivial factoid

The ships sunk in WW1 - like the ones in the battle of Jutland - actually have a commercial value. Or rather the metal they are made of has. Apparently it's uncontaminated by nuclear fallout which has dusted the planet since the tests in the 30s onwards.

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The bunker at the end of the world - in Essex

JimmyPage
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Thankfully a relic

growing up in the 70s, the threat of nuclear war was somehow "normal". So much so, that when the great hurricane hit London in 1987, for a few moments I was convinced the USSR had bombed us - howling winds, eerie darkness, and telephone and radio out. After frantically spinning the radio dial, I finally hit radio Essex - 5 minutes of which was enough to make me wish they *had* dropped the bomb ....

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Irish deputy PM: You want more tax from Apple? Your problem, not ours

JimmyPage
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Two can play at that game ...

In the event of Scots independence, I would hope *English* politicians would have the balls to follow a policy of keeping income tax, corporation tax, and VAT just a little bit lower than Scotlands. Oh, and only pay a market rate for any energy they want to try and sell us from their wind farms.

Given the relative size and wealth of the two countries, who do you think could keep it up the longest ?

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A backdoor into Skype for the Feds? You're joking...

JimmyPage
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Big Brother

they can suspect all they want

they can't *prove* it. That's the whole point. Although in the UK, the Home Secretary can lock people up without proof, so it's a redundant exercise.

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Schmidt: Don't like our tiny tax bills? Google this... 'Change the law'

JimmyPage
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Mushroom

Oh dear oh dear

Don't know about you, but I rather like the idea that the law is what it says it is, not what people think it says.

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Intel's answer to ARM: Customisable x86 chips with HIDDEN POWERS

JimmyPage
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Z80 ?

IIRC, wasn't one of the dangers of using undocumented opcodes that they could vary across fabrications ? Just because a Zilog processor worked didn't mean an OEM one would ?

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Mobile tech destroys the case for the HS2 £multi-beellion train set

JimmyPage
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Upping motorway speed limit

is a total waste of time if there are going to be vehicles on it that don't do the maximum.

The *effective* speed limit on most motorways is about 60mph. Why ? Because you get 2 dickbrained HGVs neck-and-necking for miles, and the traffic builds into an ever lagging line of cars getting up to 56mph, and then trying to overtake, pulling into L3, thereby slowing *that* down to the pre-overtake speed of - guess what - 56mph.

I have driven for 10 miles, stuck behind two HGVs on the 2 lane A34.

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Google 'DOES DO EVIL', thunders British politician

JimmyPage
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Re: An open letter

AIUI proceedings of parliamentary committees are covered by parliamentary privilege, so if Ms. Hodge chooses to call Google liars, she can, although I suspect there are etiquettes around this sort of thing (like MPs can't call each other liars).

I see this whole exercise as a little bit of grandstanding ... maybe a warning shot across the bows. It sounds like HMRC have pulled their finger out and found *something* to beat Google with, and this is a very public way of telling Google they might not want to press the issue. At least I'd hope so. Otherwise the message the entire world is getting is "UK plc is run by a bunch of powerless tossers". Which may be true, but I'd rather it wasn't.

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JimmyPage
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This was always going to happen ...

tax law being so labyrinthine, Google were always running a risk that if they didn't play nicely, HMRC will find *something* to hit them with. Same for Amazon.

(It's the same principle as never *ever* piss off a traffic cop. You could be driving a brand new car out of the showroom, and he'd find something you can be charged with.)

Returning to the fray, I can't help but feel rather than trying to twist and crowbar the existing system to fit the emergence of the online universe, our politicians should be DOING THEIR FUCKING JOB and working on devising a new paradigm. And no, I don't have any answers ... but then I'm not paid to.

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Ten years on: How did that cloud strategy pan out?

JimmyPage
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subtle distinction ...

are you renting hardware which runs your apps, or an app which provides a service?

The latter is fraught with danger, from the company going tits up, to a forced upgrade to a version which loses functionality, or breaks *your* way of doing things.

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JimmyPage
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Re: "building your own cloud".

I've always taken "cloud computing" to be more akin to a thin-client paradigm, where something remote to the user does the heavy lifting.

Funny, when I started at Uni in 1984, series PC computing was a nascent science, and 90% of work was done via terminals which connected to a mainframe (even the BBC micros were used as VT10x emulators ;) ).

Then everyone had their own PC and ran apps locally.

Now they use their PC to connect to the cloud and a remote server runs the app.

Plus ca change ...

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