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* Posts by JimmyPage

1442 posts • joined 5 Mar 2010

Parent gabfest Mumsnet hit by SSL bug: My heart bleeds, grins hacker

JimmyPage
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The best one was the story about a WiFI AP that someone named "My Neighbour is a cunt" ...

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France bans managers from contacting workers outside business hours

JimmyPage
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Stop

To be fair

look at what the Germans did to Oradour sur Glane.

Maybe you can understand the French attitude.

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Spy-happy Condoleezza Rice joins Dropbox board as privacy adviser

JimmyPage
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Pirate

A chance for internet democracy ...

Maybe if enough people *really* closed their accounts, in reaction to such moves, there would be some power to the people ...

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USB reversible cables could become standard sooner than you think

JimmyPage
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Firewire ?

Very surprised no one has mentioned the fun of having a firewire port next to a USB (like my laptop). Hours of fun thinking you just have to line it up straight to connect, and then realise it's the *other* side.

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TripAdvisor for the disabled: Euan's Guide quietly launches

JimmyPage
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Now *this* is what the net is good for.

MrsJP has MS, and can I add that phoning ahead is generally a waste of time.

We recently stayed in a hotel at a friends wedding. I emailed *and* phoned to check accessibility. Was told it was completely accessible.

1) The "accessible" room (distinguished by having a floppy grab rail in the bathroom) was in a separate lodge from the main building. True it was on the ground floor, but surrounded by gravel, except for one car parking spot (not reserved). Luckily MrsJP has some mobility.

2) The lodge was separated from the main building by a gravel drive. Try wheeling up that. Luckily we had a car.

3) Inside the main building there were 4" steps everywhere (I've since been told this is a hallmark of several buildings being knocked into one).

4) The disabled toilet was used as a store room.

5) The fire instructions in the lodge were to "assemble by the main building" - see point 2.

Complaints were duly made to the owners (a well known TV chef) and local fire authority.

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Jack the RIPA: Blighty cops ignore law, retain innocents' comms data

JimmyPage
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Big Brother

Terrorists, criminals, national security

All defined by - wait for it - the government.

So on no accounts associate with anyone who plans to read out the names of the war dead in public.

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How Brit computer maker beat IBM's S/360 - and Soviet spies

JimmyPage
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English Electric Lightning

Don't know about their computers, but the Lightning jet interceptor has to be one of the most striking and iconic aircraft ever flown. 100% British, and gave the Yanks a scare when one *over*flew a U2.

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'Bank couriers' who stole money from OAP cancer sufferer jailed

JimmyPage
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Re: Best common sense tip?

So banks use *our* money to refund victims of fraud ?

Cheers !

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Money? What money? Lawyer for accused Silk Road boss claims you can't launder Bitcoin

JimmyPage
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Headmaster

"For the purposes of the act ..."

is an oft-used preamble to UK laws, where something gets defined so as to make it fall under the law.

Drink-driving (for example). You'd think that if you drove pissed on your own land, you'd be immune to the charge, in the same way as you would for speeding. Not a bit of it. The law starts by defining "public road" as any road the public has access to - even if it's on private property. I believe there has been precedent set where people have been convicted even when the land had a closed gate, as the court decided the public could still access the land by climbing the gate.

Yet you try and get your local council to tarmac your drive, and it instantly becomes "private property".

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NSA plans to FREE YOUR DATA with range of cloud services, analytics

JimmyPage
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TEMPEST ?

wasn't that for CRT screens ? So last century.

Thumbs up for the smile, but what a missed opportunity for some clever acronyms ... (I'll have to re-read the article now to make sure I didn't miss any ;) )

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Snowden leaks made us look twice at cloud suppliers – biz bods

JimmyPage
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Megaphone

It's not just server location

it's what jurisdiction is the company bound to. Remember, the PATRIOT act enables Uncle Sam to point to *any* company with a US presence, and demand the keys to the kingdom, irrespective of *where* they have located their servers.

It is (still) a worry that a lot of IT "professionals" appear to think that a Google server in Europe is immune to a US snoop or takedown. It isn't.

What is more worrying, is that a lot of firms don't have a rolling overview of their suppliers, meaning that you could contract with a nice EU-centred supplier, who then gets bought by a US company. (Or a company with a US arm), and immediately falls under the spell of the PATRIOT act.

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Boss at 'Microsoft' scam support biz told to cough £000s in comp

JimmyPage
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Trollface

Here's an idea for a cloudy app ..

how about a call exchange, where you can divert one of these call when it comes in ? The exchange just randomly pairs two calls so the scamsters can have a happy time talking to each other.

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JimmyPage
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Pirate

My preferred route

is to pretend to misunderstand their first sentence, and pretend they have called *me* for advice on getting their computer fixed.

It's very easy, if you pretend your grasp of English is as good as theirs.

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Crack CERT warriors arrive to save UK from grid-crippling hack attacks

JimmyPage
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Headmaster

Your subtle humour would have worked

if you hadn't included the misspelt "there" (should be "their")

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JimmyPage
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Re: What's that sound ?

Oh, I wasn't referring to the actually technical staff, who doubtless will be paid as close to NMW is a possible.

I was referring to the possibilities for consultancies, and preferred bidders, and cozy firms like Capita, ATOS et al to get involved.

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JimmyPage
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WTF?

What's that sound ?

It's snouts hitting troughs.

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UK cops: Keep yer golden doubloons, ad folk. Yon websites belong ta PIRATES

JimmyPage
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Stop

@WibbleMe

without a court order ?

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JimmyPage
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FAIL

Oh Yeah ?

888.com and BetFred both advertise on TPB, and I'm pretty certain they know exactly where their dollars are going.

Isn't this what bitcoins were invented for ?

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Amazon is decompiling our apps in security gaffe hunt, says dev

JimmyPage
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*Definitely* further

I was picking apart binaries on PR1MEs in the early 80s. When caught doing it by a lecturer, I was told how they did it in the 70s ...

Now you know why Unix has the "X" permissions as well as "R".

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China's rare earth supply crimp plan ruled to be illegal

JimmyPage
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WTF?

and ?

unless there are any teeth to WTO rulings, the whole thing is grandstanding.

The icon is to say "What's the point?"

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ISPs CAN be ordered to police pirates by blocking sites, says ECJ

JimmyPage
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Big Brother

@Mad Mike

Yes, but what is "illegal" exactly. And more importantly, where ? Whilst laws on CP have become fairly aligned in the past decades, there are lots of other areas where laws vary wildly. The UK is a particularly dangerous place in that respect, since a lot of laws rely on "context"[1]. I hope you haven't got a road atlas of the UK, because it could be of use to a terrorist in certain cases.

It's axiomatic that "illegal" will become more widely defined as "stuff the state doesn't want you to know".

[1]For an excellent demonstration of how context affects things, in a humorous setting, may I respectfully suggest you watch "Stewart Lee's Comedy Vehicle" shown on 22/3/2014

(iPlayer link here, but obviously it won't last forever)

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JimmyPage
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Re: Next up.....

This.

Why do you think - despite the whining of the anti-porn brigade over "net filters", the default for access to adult service lines is ON ? Surely if they want consistency and really are "thinking of the children" then they would insist that all landlines have access to premium rate numbers disabled by default.

Mysteriously this hasn't happened.

Icon, because we had to pay £20 when our (then) 8 year old son quite innocently called an 0898 number on a game for "tips". Then we had to pay £1/month for the "privilege" of having premium rate calls barred.

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JimmyPage
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Re: In other news...

I can see a new game along the lines of "Cheese Shop" developing.

("Cheese Shop" is a game for two players, celebrating the famous Monty Python "Cheese Shop" sketch. One player is the customer, the other the owner. The customer has to list as many different cheeses as he can, whilst the owner has to have a different excuse as to why they haven't got it. The game is lost when a player repeats a cheese, or excuse. Best played after a few bevvies).

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Judge throws out lawsuit lobbed at Facebook for using kids' pics in targeted ads

JimmyPage
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@All names taken

care to provide a cite for that, please ? It's a rather extraordinary claim.

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JimmyPage
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Mushroom

@ItsNotMe

Downvoted for not getting it.

Yes AN ADULT can be expected to be responsible for their own actions, and should suffer the consequences. But we're not talking about ADULTS here.

Despite what you may think about 13 year olds (and younger) finding FB "cool" and wanting to go on it because their friends do, they are not capable of understanding the T&Cs.

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JimmyPage
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FAIL

Re: T&Cs are not contracts

But they have to be *lawful*. Just because "The T&Cs" say something, doesn't necessarily make it so. How about a T&C which says that in the event of <x> MegaCorp has the right to burn your house down ?

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Passport PIN tech could have SAVED MH370 ID fraudsters

JimmyPage
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FAIL

Lost or stolen (or dead)

If, like me, you don't go abroad too often, then how can even know when a passport is lost/stolen ? Mine (and MrsJPs) are kept in a drawer in the "office". I can't remember last time I actually saw they were there (it's now 30 seconds ago ;) ).

So it's quite feasible to acquire a passport not reported stolen, or lost.

Also, what about a dead person ? Does a death certificate automatically notify the passport office ?

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Forget sledgehammers – crooks can CRACK ATMs with a TEXT

JimmyPage
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Bank employee ? How quaint.

AFAICT most ATMs in the UK are serviced by security companies - mainly G4S. Given their *cough* competence in other areas, I wouldn't be too hopeful they'd spot anything amiss in an ATM.

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Stop fondling that slab and shag, says lover rubber-glover

JimmyPage
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Headmaster

Re: Phnar!! Phnar!!!"

surely "Fnarr Fnarr" ?

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It's 2014 and you can pwn a PC by opening a .RTF in Word, Outlook

JimmyPage
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Facepalm

Microsoft Word 2003, 2007, 2010, 2013

See Icon ->

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Middle England's allotments become metric battlefield

JimmyPage
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Re: Lost Acres@VinceH

Thank you indeed. Saved me digging out my "A Choice of Poets" from schooldays (where, ironically, I was the only pupil in 1982 to *fail* Eng Lit. My teacher would be proud of me !)

However the obscurity of the location is intriguing .... is Graves still in copyright ?

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JimmyPage
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Coat

Two whales

Ah, but how do you get *four* whales in a mini ?

And more importantly, how do you know if there's an elephant in the fridge ?

These are the issues we need to grapple with.

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JimmyPage
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1863 - a dark year ...

incredible to think, we could have solved this all over 150 years ago ....

http://en.wikipedia.org/wiki/Metrication_in_the_United_Kingdom

and reading that article, metric has been legal for use in the UK since 1896.

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JimmyPage
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Re: US Independence

also explains some of the words they use.

"fall" *used* to be English, until we had a fad for things French, and started using the poncy "autumn" (from l'autumne). I blame Keats.

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JimmyPage
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Headmaster

US gallons

are smaller, because US *pints* are smaller. They stick with the 1707 definition (16 fl. oz), whilst the UK had an "upgrade" (to 20 fl.oz) in 1824.

Also "stone" (14 lbs) is unknown in the states.

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JimmyPage
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Black Helicopters

Lost Acres

by Robert Graves ...

I wanted to post this poem here, but it seems absent on the interwebs ....

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TV sales PLUMMET. But no one's prepared to say what we all know

JimmyPage
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Develop, expand, consolidate, decay

Nothing new here, let's move on.

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They want me to install CCTV to see what YOU did in the TOILET

JimmyPage
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RE: Only temporarily.

1) It only has to be temporary. One scrote blinds the camera, whilst another takes it out with a tin of spray paint. As said, you can blind it from such a distance where it can't make out features. Which in my experience of CCTV footage (3 break ins, and it's been useless) is about 20cm.

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JimmyPage
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Childcatcher

Re: Virgin

I'm sure a brief letter to your local news provider might provoke some action ->

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JimmyPage
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Alert

Except ...

a well aimed laser pointer (->)

can knock a camera out well beyond the resolution to make out a face.

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Microsoft exec: I don't know HOW our market share sunk

JimmyPage
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Boffin

Cycles ...

Microsoft are where they are today, because they thought they could manage the markets. They may as well have tried to manage the weather.

All things go in cycles. You have development, expansion, consolidation, and decay. Where the decay starts, you get development expansion, consolidation, and decay. Incidentally these aren't necessarily linear - you can have development continuing, while expansion starts...

1970s - development of microprocessors. Computing scaled down

1980s - expansion. Microprocessors become more available. Concept of PC becomes reality

1990s - consolidation. More people use PCs at work - home market grows

2000s - decay. Concept of PC outdated as phones, tablets become extant.

Now of course phones started in the 80s, expanded in the 90s ....

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NSA 'hunted sysadmins' to find CAT PHOTOS, high-level passwords

JimmyPage
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WTF?

Alice in wonderland ...

when the lawmakers are busy breaking the laws they make to uphold the law ...

Makes "Spycatcher*" look positively tame

*Where a former MI5 agent revealed how he "burgled and bugged" his way across the UK - completely illegally.

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Every little helps: Dirty MOLE BANDITS clean out Tesco ATM from BELOW

JimmyPage
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Dye bombs ?

I thought the caddies were protected with those dye bombs that explode if you try and force them open ?

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QUIDOCALYPSE: Blighty braces for £100 MILLION cost of new £1 coin

JimmyPage
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FAIL

@jzlondon

Except, we know how it will go.

£100million = £95million on consultancy, advertising, palm-greasing, and "doing business"

£5million between 5,000 people to work weekends and late nights in all weathers on minimum wage, whilst reading grumbles in the papers about "can't get the staff"

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JimmyPage
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Happy

Round our way

Sainsburys give them away free.

I don't know if they're *supposed* to be free, but when I wanted one, the lady at customer services just pointed at a little bowl that had loads of "Nectar" tokens (with a little keyfob) and said "help yourself".

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JimmyPage
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Maybe this will incentivise operators

to stop taking ****ing coins. Maybe I am an odd minority, but because I rarely use cash, I don't have a pocketful of assorted coins available at the drop of a hat. I'm less bothered by vending machines, but parking machines are the worst.

Big up for RingGo here, who run the parking at my local station (Warwick Parkway) and let you pay by card, via a phone call. And QPark who run the parking at the new QE in Brum. They take cards too. Very helpful when you have to rush your son into A&E at no notice, and have no cash.

And don't get me started about machines that don't give change - if I ever have any time left on a ticket I always try to give it to a new arrival.

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Monkey steals iPod touch, loses interest in minutes

JimmyPage
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Facepalm

"Stormi-Lee"

(see icon ->)

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FORCE gov.uk suppliers to stick to 'open data principles' – MPs

JimmyPage
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Government and competence

Imagine awarding a contract to build a hospital to a firm who instead of using IEEE approved wiring decided to implement it's own system, with custom made cabling (different colours) and plugs and sockets, maybe with triangular pins, you can only get from one supplier.

Because not using open standards in software is just the same.

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Osbo's booze, bingo, biz and big data Budget

JimmyPage
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Why have I suddenly remembered that R.E.M.

started life as "Bingo Hand Job" ?

Showing my age now ...

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