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* Posts by JimmyPage

1379 posts • joined 5 Mar 2010

Queen's Speech: Computer Misuse Act to be amended, tougher sentences planned

JimmyPage
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Headmaster

And the first question to make ££££ for the lawyers

Underage when

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'THERE'S BEEN A MURRRDER!' Plod probe Street View 'slaying'

JimmyPage
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That advert

should be required viewing at school, every year from age 5 to 18. It should also be shown daily across all channels. Oh, and all jurors should be shown it before a case starts

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Please be seated at your FOUR-LEGGED PC

JimmyPage
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plus ca change ...

Back in the early 80s, this was the *only* way you could have a decent computer for a small business. A friend of my Dads got one, and used to sit behind it. It had 2 8" floppy drives which took up one half of the drawer space.

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REVEALED: GCHQ's BEYOND TOP SECRET Middle Eastern INTERNET SPY BASE

JimmyPage
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Re: 2008: undersea cables cut

Hmmmm

In 1914, just before it all kicked off, the UK cut Germanys undersea telegraph cables, forcing them to route all international traffic through their London embassy, which - surprise surprise - military intelligence had already compromised.

Very good site here

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JimmyPage
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NOT "random"

When GW Bush inserted his foot into his mouth by originally calling operation "Enduring Freedom" "Crusade", there was a lively discussion in the UK media about how operational codenames are assigned. Someone from the MOD said that whilst there should be no connection between a codename and the nature of the operation, names were vetted so that in the event of the operation going wrong, there could be no unintentional humour attached to the operation. They also try to avoid incremental alphabetical codenames (cf hurricane naming) as that could tip of the enemy about the scale or pace of operations.

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EBAY... You keep using that word 'ENCRYPTION' – it does not mean what you think it means

JimmyPage
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FAIL

@AC

how did you work out issuing customers with new passwords would cost £500,000 ?

Are you interested in a bridge ?

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JimmyPage
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Unhappy

Sigh ...

Hashing was know about 30 years ago (at least - that's when I discovered it as a fresh faced computer science undergrad). Yet I still see designs where passwords are stored either in plain text, or reversibly encrypted (with routines which *de*crypt the password to compare with the supplied).

I still gets looks of "huh" when I suggest one-way hashing.

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TV body seeks attractive mobile operators for mutual action replays

JimmyPage
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Paris Hilton

Maybe separate the display from the device ...

Watching TV on a mobile screen = dead loss.

Using a mobile to store and/or access TV content and share it with a big screen = possible interest ?

Icon because it has a question mark ....

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Don't snap SELFIES at the polls – it may screw up voting, says official

JimmyPage
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Except

there are several reported cases where police *have* deleted images on the spot, and faced absolutely no censure whatsoever.

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Space hackers prepare to reactivate antiquated spacecraft

JimmyPage
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This is soooooo coooool ....

this ->

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Peak thumb drive is coming in 2016

JimmyPage
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Home networking ...

indeed. I can shift 32Gb across 10 metres in about 4 seconds. My home network might do that in 16 hours ...

reminds me of an exercise we did at Uni .... up to what radius is a floppy tied around a St Bernard faster than a 300 baud connnection ....

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Creepy Facebook urges users to pester friends about their SEX LIVES

JimmyPage
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FAIL

Re: They can do what the fuck they like

You don't need to. Your friends will do it for you.

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JimmyPage
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Re: Ha!

Sorry to burst your bubble, but unless everyone you know, or ever knew is also not on Facebook, it doesn't really matter. Facebook can work out a hell of a lot about the people who aren't on Facebook, simply by cross-referencing their friends who *do* use Facebook.

If some marketer somewhere discovers that "people who are not on Facebook" is a population worth targeting, then Zuck and the boys can probably deliver a list of 99.9% of their names and email addresses, thoughtfully harvested from your friends Hotmail, Gmail, Yahoo etc accounts.

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Urinating teen polluted 57 Olympic-sized swimming pools - cops

JimmyPage
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Meh

Re: only poor people drink tap water

Well, that's the French for you. In the UK, tap water is probably amongst the cleanest in the world.

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Our Reg reader 'mutt's nuts' dictionary is le chien's biens

JimmyPage
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Headmaster

Re: Nadsat?

IIRC Nadsat was loosely derived from Russian (Burgess created a future where the youth aped Russian culture, rather than US culture).

So it would need a more slavic flavour.

'fraid that's all I can contribute - my Russian is non-existent

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JimmyPage
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Coffee/keyboard

"Don Coglioni"

this ------->

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GCHQ's 'NOSEY SMURF' spyware snoops dragged into secretive tribunal

JimmyPage
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WTF?

Nosey smurf ? Foggybottom ? Gumfish ? Tracker Smurf ?

Is this GCHQ or the Chuckle Brothers ?

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Tick-tock, Jock: Dock schlock for mock-stock in ad-hoc shop squawk

JimmyPage
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Mushroom

@Bunbury

You know those old ladies who push shopping trolleys down the street, and shout at cars ....?

That's your mum, that is.

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Google CAN be told to delete sensitive data from its search results, rules top EU court

JimmyPage
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@TopOnePercent

First of, in the UK, under the CRB (yes I know it's been replaced) legislation, a lot of offences are effectively lifelong anyway. So we're already in a world where the concept of spent convictions is hazy.

The real problem is what is the purpose of the criminal justice system ? If it's just to punish, and protect. Fine. However, I subscribe to the rather quaint notion that it's also to rehabilitate. That is to turn an offender into an upright citizen. If you foster a system where a conviction for (say) graffiti effectively marks you as a criminal for the rest of your life, and you are unable to ever get a job, then where do you think society will go ? If 50% of the population has a criminal record for something, sometime, then you devalue the concept of a criminal record. Much as the concept of speeding has been devalued. So many people have at least 3 points on their licenses, most insurers ignore it. It's meaningless. It's the same thing with the 3,000+ criminal acts the last Labour regime bought in.

It's axiomatic, of course that these pettifogging convictions will be no bar to the rich and powerful.

The idea of "spent" convictions is that they allow a person a chance to go straight. 10 years, no trouble, they are considered rehabilitated.

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JimmyPage
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WTF?

The elephant in the room ...

is what *is* a search engine ? OK, Google is most peoples Search Engine Of Choice (SEOC ?). However DuckDuckGo ? Bing ? Yahoo! ?

Or, alternatively, how about a site which isn't a "search engine", but simply a static list of links ? Presumably Google (et al) would be prevented from returning that in a list of results, but another simple static web page pointing to it would be OK ?

You know, when people used to ban books, I don't think they just ripped the index out, and left the content there....

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We're from the SAME DUST CLOUD, BRO: Boffins find Sun's long-lost sibling

JimmyPage
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I like the idea

of naughtyboffins ?

Sounds like there should be a website devoted to it ....

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Vinyl-fetish hipsters might just have a point

JimmyPage
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NTNOCN

"I'd like to buy a gramphone, please"

.

.

.

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UK's pirate-nagging VCAP scheme WON'T have penalties – report

JimmyPage
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FAIL

What amused me

was the rather quaint notion that pirating is done with torrent. Anyway, didn't they block the Pirate Bay ?

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Traffic light vulns leave doors wide open to Italian Job-style hacks

JimmyPage
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Facepalm

Re: Hack away you can't do worse than Bristol City Council

Or Birmingham. Look at the abortion that is the Northfield "bypass" (it's actually quicker to go through than use the bypass). When collared at a local council meeting, a councillor admitted that the traffic light timings could be optimised and allow traffic through much faster. However there were national guidelines that prohibit councils making private travel easier - the mantra is "use public transport".

We need an Alice-in-Wonderland icon ;)

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Look out, sysadmins - HOT FOREIGN SPIES are targeting you

JimmyPage
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Headmaster

2 Blackadder quotes in 13 posts !

*and* from different series !

This must be a record.

Somewhere.

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Steelie Neelie's 'Airbus of chips' plan taxis for June take-off

JimmyPage
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Socialist DRAM

Consumes vast amounts of power, is slow, and forgets the last 10 years.

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Source code for world's first MUD, Essex Uni's MUD1, recovered

JimmyPage
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Memories ...

going to school in London in the early 80s, we had a dial up to Essex. Previous Computer Science students had to write their code offfline, onto paper tape, then go into the terminal room, dial up (acoustic coupler anyone) load the program and run it.

Then we got an ITT 2020 ;)

We managed to load MUD once, and had no idea what to do .....

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Everything you always wanted to know about VDI but were afraid to ask (no, it's not an STD)

JimmyPage
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Re: Not so long ago...

The problem with that approach is even with remote management tools and processes, you end up with what is effectively a single point of failure - the PC. And with the best will in the world, the best discipline in the world, you will end up with a failed PC that can't just be swapped out. You'll need to image a replacement PC. Probably apply updates. Then install the niknaks the user has to have that aren't in the image. No so bad in a small organisation, but if you have hundreds of users, across multiple sites ...

Much better to give the user a terminal, and concentrate on a reliable datacentre.

That said, it does bring a smile to my face ... one of the first uses of PCs was as smart terminals to mainframes, as they were cheaper. (Can't recall how much the fancy DEC and Wyse terminals were in the 80s, but you could probably have bought a car for a pair).

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Quid-a-day Reg nosh posse chap fears for his waistline

JimmyPage
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Calories aren't all ...

The Horizon "documentary" back in 2012 with Michael Mosley, about fasting and low-calories diets had a guy who had eaten 25% less than the recommended daily allowance of calories for *years*.

Does good things to the body chemistry, apparently. A doctor who gave him a full physical and blood chemistry workup described him as "a new species"[1].

[1]Now you see why I put "documentary" in quotes

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So, just how do you say 'the mutt's nuts' in French?

JimmyPage
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Pint

@Uffish

Merci bien, cul sec !

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JimmyPage
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Headmaster

Idiom ?

If we're trying to achieve the *sense* of mutts nutts, then ISTR (certainly in Paris) a common equivalent would be "C'est les pieds" (It's the feet).

No, I don't know why.

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Hackers attempt to BLACKMAIL plastic surgeons

JimmyPage
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Joke

SQL injection ?

Botox injection, more like

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Lost your credit card PIN? No worries! Get a new one - over SMS

JimmyPage
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The problem here ...

is that the phone is likely going to be kept physically with the card. So a stolen handbag will contain the card and the key to getting the PIN.

I wonder what the correlation is between "people who forget their PIN" and "people who don't lock their phones" ?

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Parent gabfest Mumsnet hit by SSL bug: My heart bleeds, grins hacker

JimmyPage
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Coat

depends

on whether you think Android is a load of old cock.

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JimmyPage
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Stop

Penis beaker

surely we can't have a thread about Mumsnet without a penis beaker reminder ?

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JimmyPage
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The best one was the story about a WiFI AP that someone named "My Neighbour is a cunt" ...

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Thanks, Amazon – we'll take it from here: SAP muscles in on cloud subscriptions

JimmyPage
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Black Helicopters

The cynic in me

would suggest that is is another move to facilitate the authorities data grab ....

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France bans managers from contacting workers outside business hours

JimmyPage
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Stop

To be fair

look at what the Germans did to Oradour sur Glane.

Maybe you can understand the French attitude.

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Spy-happy Condoleezza Rice joins Dropbox board as privacy adviser

JimmyPage
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Pirate

A chance for internet democracy ...

Maybe if enough people *really* closed their accounts, in reaction to such moves, there would be some power to the people ...

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USB reversible cables could become standard sooner than you think

JimmyPage
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Firewire ?

Very surprised no one has mentioned the fun of having a firewire port next to a USB (like my laptop). Hours of fun thinking you just have to line it up straight to connect, and then realise it's the *other* side.

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TripAdvisor for the disabled: Euan's Guide quietly launches

JimmyPage
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Now *this* is what the net is good for.

MrsJP has MS, and can I add that phoning ahead is generally a waste of time.

We recently stayed in a hotel at a friends wedding. I emailed *and* phoned to check accessibility. Was told it was completely accessible.

1) The "accessible" room (distinguished by having a floppy grab rail in the bathroom) was in a separate lodge from the main building. True it was on the ground floor, but surrounded by gravel, except for one car parking spot (not reserved). Luckily MrsJP has some mobility.

2) The lodge was separated from the main building by a gravel drive. Try wheeling up that. Luckily we had a car.

3) Inside the main building there were 4" steps everywhere (I've since been told this is a hallmark of several buildings being knocked into one).

4) The disabled toilet was used as a store room.

5) The fire instructions in the lodge were to "assemble by the main building" - see point 2.

Complaints were duly made to the owners (a well known TV chef) and local fire authority.

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Jack the RIPA: Blighty cops ignore law, retain innocents' comms data

JimmyPage
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Big Brother

Terrorists, criminals, national security

All defined by - wait for it - the government.

So on no accounts associate with anyone who plans to read out the names of the war dead in public.

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How Brit computer maker beat IBM's S/360 - and Soviet spies

JimmyPage
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English Electric Lightning

Don't know about their computers, but the Lightning jet interceptor has to be one of the most striking and iconic aircraft ever flown. 100% British, and gave the Yanks a scare when one *over*flew a U2.

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'Bank couriers' who stole money from OAP cancer sufferer jailed

JimmyPage
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Flame

Re: Best common sense tip?

So banks use *our* money to refund victims of fraud ?

Cheers !

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Money? What money? Lawyer for accused Silk Road boss claims you can't launder Bitcoin

JimmyPage
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Headmaster

"For the purposes of the act ..."

is an oft-used preamble to UK laws, where something gets defined so as to make it fall under the law.

Drink-driving (for example). You'd think that if you drove pissed on your own land, you'd be immune to the charge, in the same way as you would for speeding. Not a bit of it. The law starts by defining "public road" as any road the public has access to - even if it's on private property. I believe there has been precedent set where people have been convicted even when the land had a closed gate, as the court decided the public could still access the land by climbing the gate.

Yet you try and get your local council to tarmac your drive, and it instantly becomes "private property".

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NSA plans to FREE YOUR DATA with range of cloud services, analytics

JimmyPage
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TEMPEST ?

wasn't that for CRT screens ? So last century.

Thumbs up for the smile, but what a missed opportunity for some clever acronyms ... (I'll have to re-read the article now to make sure I didn't miss any ;) )

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Snowden leaks made us look twice at cloud suppliers – biz bods

JimmyPage
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Megaphone

It's not just server location

it's what jurisdiction is the company bound to. Remember, the PATRIOT act enables Uncle Sam to point to *any* company with a US presence, and demand the keys to the kingdom, irrespective of *where* they have located their servers.

It is (still) a worry that a lot of IT "professionals" appear to think that a Google server in Europe is immune to a US snoop or takedown. It isn't.

What is more worrying, is that a lot of firms don't have a rolling overview of their suppliers, meaning that you could contract with a nice EU-centred supplier, who then gets bought by a US company. (Or a company with a US arm), and immediately falls under the spell of the PATRIOT act.

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Boss at 'Microsoft' scam support biz told to cough £000s in comp

JimmyPage
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Trollface

Here's an idea for a cloudy app ..

how about a call exchange, where you can divert one of these call when it comes in ? The exchange just randomly pairs two calls so the scamsters can have a happy time talking to each other.

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JimmyPage
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Pirate

My preferred route

is to pretend to misunderstand their first sentence, and pretend they have called *me* for advice on getting their computer fixed.

It's very easy, if you pretend your grasp of English is as good as theirs.

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