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* Posts by JimmyPage

1247 posts • joined 5 Mar 2010

Hate the Windows 8 touch UI? Try Kinect-like finger shaking instead

JimmyPage
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Instead of reacting to hand gestures ...

why not get it to lip-read ?

"Open the pod bay doors, HAL"

Didn't there used to be a Rise Of The Machines icon ?

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The iPHONE 5 UNDERMINES western DEMOCRACY: 5 reasons why

JimmyPage
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Re: Reason for Apples success....

Indeed ... I consider it a duty to quote Mencken as often as possible ...

"The only good bureaucrat is one with a pistol at his head. Put it in his hand and it's good-bye to the Bill of Rights."

"Puritanism: The haunting fear that someone, somewhere, may be happy"

"Laws are no longer made by a rational process of public discussion; they are made by a process of blackmail and intimidation, and they are executed in the same manner."

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Online dole queue tech 'not grounded in reality', say councils

JimmyPage
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Options for the boss

1) Works

2) On time

3) On budget

pick any two.

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Health minister warns ISPs: Block suicide websites or face regulation

JimmyPage
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Unhappy

Re: Bah

I think it's pretty obvious the LibDems left their principles by the door in 2010. I honestly can't seen any sign that they have in anyway managed to dent the increasingly loopy direction the Tories are lurching in.

Leaving us with no credible choice at all.

Note to USians .... seems like you're catching up with the UK .... having absolutely no one worth voting for,.

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NASA's spy sat snaps Curiosity rover burning tracks on Mars

JimmyPage
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NASA - missing a trick here !

How much do you think they could charge, to write a company logo, name, or marketing slogan on Mars ?

Enough to fund the manned mission ?

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It's time to burn the schedules and seize control of OUR TVs

JimmyPage
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Stop

Re: re: advertising

You are aware that we're already there ?

SFW link

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Wales: We'll encrypt Wikipedia if reborn gov net-snoop plan goes live

JimmyPage
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FAIL

@Spearchucker Jones

Ah, evidence-based policy making. Not the way we do things in the UK, old bean.

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You'll be on a list 3 hrs after you start downloading from pirates - study

JimmyPage
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Re: Not hard to get around...

ISTR there is a defence to a password request, if you can demonstrate good reason why you can't provide the key - after all, your emails are probably encrypted by your employer in their exchange database. *You* wouldn't be expected to know they key. This is why the smart alecs who send "Oh, send Jack Straw an encrypted email and get him locked up for not knowing the password" were wrong.

Regarding repeated jailing for the "same" offence ... well Scotland managed to keep the naked rambler locked up for over a year, on repeated "contempt of court" charges. So I imagine, yes, if you get 2 years, and then come out of jail and refuse to hand the password over, it'll be 2 more years for you. Pour encourage les autres and all that.

The REAL scandal about RIPA (as previously highlighted) is that it gives the authorities access to EVERYTHING, including what used to be privileged. Under RIPA, any correspondence between you, your lawyer, your MP, your doctor, is completely fair game.

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JimmyPage
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Big Brother

Re: Not hard to get around...

They are. The Law Lords (as were) ruled that privileged communication does fall under RIPA. There was a court case in Northern Ireland a few years back.

I've won a few pints on that one.

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JimmyPage
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FAIL

Re: Not hard to get around...

If they ask you for a password to your storage say "no its got all my personal information in their, like homemade porno's, some sexy pics of my wife and a load of my passwords in files. im not letting you see that.." or "shit i forgot it..."

One word: RIPA. Two years in chokey for you.

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'World's first' dog to sniff out pilfered cabling is Brit black lab

JimmyPage
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FAIL

Harsh sentences

The problem is you can only go so far before juries start getting nervous about convicting. Which is why, despite apparent public approval, we don't get the draconian punishments for death by dangerous driving we could have - juries simply stop convicting.

It's one of the reasons the death penalty got abolished.

Not that I don't agree with the sentiment (yours that is, not about the DP which I am opposed to).

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BBC dishes out fanboi-only telly downloads ahead of ITV plans

JimmyPage
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Re: Strange, the article

What do you think a WP7 owner is going to do, if he discovers that WP7 is obsolete ?

I would humbly suggest they would not consider WP8, making it a moot point.

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Amazon: Time for a new Kindle Fire, this one's sold out

JimmyPage
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Unhappy

So the UK never got a look in ?

Bit of a rum do, eh ?

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Brummie plod cuffed in Facebook troll hunt

JimmyPage
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Joke

Re: Times are changing

You should have stopped writing *before*

"in their day -to-day work in pursuing criminals"

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Number-plate spycams riddled with flaws, top cop admits

JimmyPage
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And another problem ...

all of this technology (with it's associated eye-watering price tag) is only as effective as the database it sits on. I challenge anyone here, to tell me they can believe a non-trivial database can be anything more than 95% accurate at any given time. And that's before you start to look at people who *deliberately* salt it with duff data.

An ex copper I knew explained some of the tricks the more pikey among us use to evade the law using a round-robin of address changes mainly. End result - the car looks legal, but you would never find the owner.

On a related note, I wonder if they have done any sanity analysis on the data ? I would be curious to know what (if anything) would happen if the same vehicle was clocked in Glasgow and Penzance in the same hour ? Also, in arrangements, where all traffic has to pass in and out of an area via ANPR, do they have any orphaned records, where a car went in, but never came out ?

I have always wanted to have a number plate changer, and drive past the first SPECS camera with one, and the second with another ...

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RIP Brian Wynne Oakley: Saviour of Bletchley Park

JimmyPage
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I know it seems incredible to us now

but Britain in the early 1980s was a world leader in IT teaching.

RIP

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Going viral 9,500 years ago: 'English descended from ancient Turkey'

JimmyPage
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Joke

Re: or ...

Maybe it's an anagram ? No reason to believe Microsoft are any good at them either ?

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'United States must renounce its witch-hunt against WikiLeaks'

JimmyPage
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Re: How to solve the Assange problem

Given the public assurance given by the Ecuadoran ambassador that they will not smuggle him out of the UK, why bother with *any* police presence ? Save the money. I suspect that the second he leaves the embassy, Ecuador will suddenly not want him back again.

I read on another forum an interesting observation that given the Ecuadoran ambassador is quite foxy, and Assange is notoriously permanently on heat, and the embassy is a small flat, the situation might be resolved quicker than we think ....

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JimmyPage
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Re: Straw man

IANAL but I believe you can extradite for capital offences, as long as the prosecuting authority (State or Federal) give undertakings not to seek the death penalty. Understandably, prosecutors intensely dislike this (as do the US public) as it highlights the fact that the US is one of the few "civilised" countries in the world that executes people.

I believe there have been a few cases where suspects have fled to Canada, who also will not extradite if the death penalty is a possibility.

There was a guy wanted in the US for child porn offences that the UK refused to extradite recently, as the state prosecutor refused to give assurances he wouldn't be put on some sort of "program" which the ECHR had determined was a cruel and unusual punishment.

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UK.gov's minimum booze price dream demolished

JimmyPage
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JimmyPage
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On a wider note

this is what happens when governments start to meddle in "social policy". It will invariably end up with people with influence regulating other peoples behaviour. Unfortunately, in the UK "people with influence" tends to be a small minority of a small minority.

If you stopped and realised how many laws there are that criminalise harmless behaviour, in the name of morality, you would question the statement the UK is a free country.

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New nuclear fuel source would power human race until 5000AD

JimmyPage
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Re: Thorium rocks

To be more specific, the biggest roadblock to nuclear is the oil industry.

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Nikon snaps first Android-based camera crown

JimmyPage
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Re: Won't anyone think of the Police ?

But the police don't seem to know.

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McAfee puts Barnaby Jack on car-jacking hackers' case

JimmyPage
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Re: Vehicle Security

You'll need an environmental impact assessment. And an equal opportunities policy.

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Apple now most valuable company OF ALL TIME

JimmyPage
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Gimp

Re: IBM

Thank you sir! (Or madam) - Clearly I am in the upper bracket of El Reg commentards, as I remember when IBM held this crown, and various articles pointing out that they were in effect richer than several countries by miles ... this was in the 70s. I was surprised I had to read so many comments before it was mentioned.

Contemporary fanbois might do well to ponder this, and look where IBM is today.

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Assange calls for help from … Quakers?

JimmyPage
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Holmes

Re: I don't understand

Question: Why haven't the US authorities tried to pick him up in the UK? Our government is even more likely than the Swedes to bend over for the Americans.

I really wish people would stop pointing this out, since it brings the entire Assange circus crashing to the ground. Can't somebody at least try to pretend the US have asked ?

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Amazon UK to offer collection service at corner shops

JimmyPage
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Hmmm wasn't this announced recently?

anyway, my prediction:

1) Amazon will tie up with one, or more major supermarket to piggyback onto their online shopping deliveries

2) As above, but to offer some sort of locker facility at the mega-stores.

Tesco have already subbed their cafe service to Costa, so I would suggest they are the more adventurous of the retailers.

As far as I can see it's a win-win for the retailers. Maybe I should patent the system ?

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Vodafone and pals can't kick the habit of cheap mobe prices

JimmyPage
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Alert

The elephant in the room ?

Surely the bottom line is the market is just completely saturated ? Apart from the dearth of apps, my Windows Phone (January 2011) isn't missing anything that would make me go out and get a new phone.

Ditto the Mrs HTC Wildfire (bought Dec 2011).

Ditto the lads Nokia 5800 (bought March 2009).

Therefore, for this household, it's completely irrelevant what the price of handsets is. We can't be the only one.

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Not a Cloud in my holiday sky

JimmyPage
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It gets better

Obviously, if your house is burglarized, it was done by a burglarizer. And obviously, a burglarizer burglarizes.

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Microsoft upping Office 365 fees for resellers AGAIN

JimmyPage
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Meh

Would *anybody* trust their business to the cloud ?

given the Patriot act, and the willingness of US judges to slap takedowns left right and centre.

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Radio hams unite to fight off new powerline comms standard

JimmyPage
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Black Helicopters

Tin foil hat time ?

you have just neatly encapsulated all the reasons why governments around the world would rather radio hams weren't allowed.

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Size does matter: Outlook.com punters want meatier passwords

JimmyPage
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Re: Passwords, hashing,salting...

It depends ...

done *properly*, when the password is created, the app also creates a hashed code for each letter in the password. When you are prompted - it compares your input with the hash. Systems like this should be more secure, because even if you speak to an agent - you never give them your whole password (so they can't hightail it out back and hijack your account).

However, you highlight one thing: once you have entered your password, and pressed "return" you have absolutely no idea what happens to it. Which is why you should NEVER reuse passwords.

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LinkedIn shows webtastic social media firms how it's done

JimmyPage
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FAIL

LinkedIn losing the edge ?

funny, coz I care much less about my LinkedIn profile, since I started getting loads of agencies trying to connect.

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UK judges quietly declare text chat can be obscene

JimmyPage
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And so we have another law

where no one needs to complain, for someone to get banged up.

I for one, am heartily sick, of seeing the criminal justice system being used to dictate some arbitrary morality upon society. I really have no interest in what people watch, or do amongst consenting adults, as long as no one else gets hurt. Endof.

Remember the extreme porn law ? Just taking a screencap of certain films, despite being BBFC approved will get you banged up. And you're forbidden to mention the clip came from a BBFC approved film in court.

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Microsoft dumps Metro from Windows 8

JimmyPage
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I would have thought the solution was obvious

throw open a competition to crowdsource a name via the new Outlook.com userbase.

Both of them.

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British Gas parent to grab £500m North Sea gas tax break

JimmyPage
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Back to school for you

you misunderstand what "profit" means.

To most people, profit is what you have, AFTER you have spent money on running your business - including things like R&D, and investing in infrastructure. In this meaning companies cannot whine that making less profit means less investment, because the investment is what you put in before profit.

However, on the basis, I have never heard a journalist bitchslap a pasty-faced spokesperson who dares to wibble on that without massive profits, you won't get investment, it must mean something different on planet corporate.

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Lords call for the end of TV transmissions

JimmyPage
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Big Brother

more about knowing *what* you watch

When I posted that comment, I was thinking more of a slightly creepy marketing dimension.

VM customers with TiVo are already in the vanguard of this. VM knows not only what you watch, and when, it also knows how you skip the ads, and how you channel surf. Put all that data together, and you have enough for some pretty smart targeted marketing.

Now, who do you think are behind the Lords ?

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JimmyPage
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Big Brother

80 posts, and no one mentions ...

(OK I skimmed them)

the fact that the proposed system means that someone, somewhere, will know *exactly* what you watch. Which is of course impossible under the present system.

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Outlook.com launch a gold rush for jokers, spammers

JimmyPage
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WTF?

One thing that I don't understand

are MS going to simply stop @hotmail.xxx emails working - just like that ? Surely not ?

Anyway, have grabbed new @outlook.com accounts to match mine & Mrs Pages @hotmail.com accounts, so we're happy.

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Beak explodes at Samsung's evidence leak in Apple patent spat

JimmyPage
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Happy

Is anyone

writing this as a screenplay ?

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Tesco in unencrypted password email reminder rumble

JimmyPage
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Re: Epic fail

If you know what his 1969 Christmas present to the entire Zeppelin road crew was, you'd know why you haven't got it

(It was a bottle - singular - of scotch).

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JimmyPage
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FAIL

Epic fail

passwords should be stored via a one-way hash. Forgotten passwords need to be reset.

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Microsoft unveils fondle-ready keyboards, mice

JimmyPage
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Re: Am I the only

you're not. But do you swap buttons too ?

I went for a job interview recently, where they wanted you to sit a technical test. The PC was locked down, and the poor interviewer had to dig someone out of IT support to log in to change mouse settings.

One massive FAIL with Windows, is when you RDP into a box, it uses the boxes settiings, not the terminals - so you have to change settings on the box. Which is a real nuisance, if you are sharing a server, as I used to in a team. Every time I logged in, I had to swap buttons.

Also the Windows login screen defaults to right-handed.

Now Linux - or at least the NX protocol is much more sensible, and inherits mouse settings from the client.

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Virgin Media nukes downloads after SuperHub 'upgrade'

JimmyPage
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Unhappy

Virgin seem to cripple their kit before letting it out the door

Start of the year they upgraded me, and send me a new modem/router (not the superhub, the one down from that).

I have set my network up to be 192.168.1.x . Their poxy router simply couldn't be configured to take that - and it couldn't be put into modem mode to allow me to use my existing router. Repeated calls to overseas just put me through the same steps again and again, with the "technician" expressing surprised when I got the error message about not being able to use that address.

In the end I had to reconfigure my network.

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Ever considered putting a rocket up someone's backside?

JimmyPage
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Coat

If you can't sit down

a put down will have to do ....

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Big biz 'struggling' to dump Windows XP

JimmyPage
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Boffin

Re: If I tried to migrate them to Linux

one of the tricks which most impressed me was their realising that because the number of entries in the data structure was limited to quite a small number, they could shrink the index from 2^16 to 2^4, which left them 12 extra bits in the datastructure to cram with other data, thus reducing the memory footprint, and being able to load into the Extended Memory.

Kids today, really have no idea.

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JimmyPage
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Re: If I tried to migrate them to Linux

reminds me of my first company ... logistics software, written in DOS, under a windows wrapper. We had an issue where the reporting package (Foxpro) just would not run in under 16Mb (yes, Mb !!!!!) of RAM. So we had to up the minimum spec - I had to put a check in the installation script.

Anyway, one of DOS programmers pointed out that when the DOS code needed more memory, they had to rewrite it (remember Memmaker ?). But when the windows code needed more memory, they just upped the spec. These were real old-school coders who got excited by trimming a byte of a routine in assembler ...

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JimmyPage
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Re: I don't hear anyone...

The only reason I could think of is to get onto the IE9+ stream. But corporately, why do that ? The excuse of "security" with IE6 only holds water if you are using it in the wild. I would imagine a great deal of companies using it (like HMRC) will be driving in-house intranet apps, so much less risky than just surfing the web in general.

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JimmyPage
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Mushroom

I'm sorry, but WALOB

The key test for *anything* is (1) does it work ?, and (2) is there any reason not to continue using it ?

With hardware, then (2) tends to rear it's head with age, until you get the answer "we might not be able to fix it again" - at which point a replacement is mandated.

However, software can't "wear out", so judging (2) tends to be harder.

Your comment was immature in the extreme, and marks you out as someone who has never worked in the real world (I guess it's Uni holidays now). Any change is a risk. So unless you are changing to mitigate a bigger risk, then you shouldn't be changing at all.

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