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* Posts by JimmyPage

1247 posts • joined 5 Mar 2010

YES! It's the TARDIS PC!

JimmyPage
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Presumably they have paid the Beeb ?

for the use of the design (as a "TARDIS")

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Deputy PM: Rip up Snoop Charter, 'go back to the drawing board'

JimmyPage
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Pirate

Should have stolen it.

Or put it in a pigeon coop ( (c) "The Wire").

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JimmyPage
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Re: Julian Huppert did well

Of course what la May really wanted was the additional benefits of all this data ...

"People who visited X also visted Y and Z"

"People who emailed A,B, and C also emailed D,E and F who visited X and then visited Y"

"After IMing K, Q IMed L. L emailed M. Last week M visited the UKIP website."

and so on.

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Last moon landing was 40 years ago today

JimmyPage
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Yet ....

the number of humans who have walked on the moon still exceeds the number of humans who have descended into the Mariana Trench .....

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Court ruling means Kim Dotcom can sue NZ spooks

JimmyPage
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I salute Canada

for refusing to extradite in capital cases, unless the death penalty is taken off the table.

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Facebook takes aim at SMS with new Messenger app

JimmyPage
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Stop

So....

Facebook get's it's users to give it phone numbers of people who still haven't drunk the kool-aid ? No doubt from their address book, so now Facebook knows their phone number AND their email address and name.

Nothing bad about that.

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Start the clock! Public sector web MUST be disabled-friendly by 2015

JimmyPage
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Bring it on

if it finally pushes people to abandon whizzy flash non-W3C compliant websites with yellow-on-white text that only work in IE (6) then <Al Pacino>Bring it on</Al Pacino>

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Voyager 1 arrives on ‘magnetic highway for charged particles’

JimmyPage
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How many of it's designers has it outlived ?

amazing engineering.

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Who's using 'password' as a password? TOO MANY OF YOU

JimmyPage
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Re: The golden rule of passwords is to assume that they can be seen by anybody ...

Ah, fair point, but having read their spec, it's as secure as it could be given life itself.

As I said, the vault is only one element of password security. Regular changing of passwords is essential too.

To be honest, there are several trivial things that could be done to greatly improve online security. My suggestion would simply be an SMS and/or email every time your credit/debit card is used, or a payment goes from your account. I'd guess that would cut fraud by 90% ? But then the banks would be liable for more than they are now, so that's never happen.

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JimmyPage
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Re: The golden rule of passwords is to assume that they can be seen by anybody ...

Not sure what you mean ...

Password vault can be stored locally and backed up. I've been able to use LP even when the website has been down (or uncontactable).

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JimmyPage
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Stop

The golden rule of passwords is to assume that they can be seen by anybody ...

until we have an ISO approved standard for database and system design for holding and authenticating user details.

Personally, I can't big up LastPass enough (not just because it's free). It's password generator means a unique complex password for every site I use. The only way it could be improved (and for all I know this feature exists in the paid for version) would be to expire passwords every <x> days and nudge you to change it on the relevant site.

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Clap Google, Amazon in irons to end tax shenanigans - MPs

JimmyPage
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Re: @Pete 2 Unintended consequences

"So what we're left with is higher prices to consumers, increased tax take to the government, a little extra profit to the newly "ethical" tax-paying companies and a larger one for all the others. In due course, those prices rises will feed through to increased inflation, slightly higher interest rates and a small, probably imperceptible rise in unemployment. Those would be the unintended consequences."

I say again: You believe that would be unintended ?

In a related topic, about the HomeSec snooping laws, it's being suggested that if they were to become law then more people (plus the baddies, natch) would use VPNs and drop off the grid, as if that's some unintended consequence. I would say that is *exactly* the intended outcome. Because then we'll have the government saying "it's dreadful, bad people are doing bad things. We need MORE powers".

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JimmyPage
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WTF?

Playing devils advocate ...

How can you change the system ?

If we're not careful, we're going to end up with a system where companies will be expected to pay the tax HMRC *thinks* they should pay, rather than the tax they should pay, based on a set of codified rules.

A lot of these tax wheezes were set up by governments in which successive ministers left to take up highly paid directorships with firms who are taking advantage of said wheezes.

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JimmyPage
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@Pete 2

*unintended* consequences ?

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Twenty years of text messages: We've reached Peak SMS

JimmyPage
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SMS - useful, but disposable

I once added an SMS facility to the emergency engineer system I worked on. Wished I hadn't, as they started relying on the damn things.

Individually, you probably don't realise SMS isn't a guaranteed medium. But when you deal with hundreds a week ....

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Sex offender wins case against Facebook vigilantism

JimmyPage
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Re: Bad decision by naive court

absence of evidence is not evidence of absence.

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YouView: 'Public service catch-up telly should belong to us alone'

JimmyPage
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Flame

Re: Do they ?

Bad form to follow one's own post, but this is really starting to get on my tits ...

VM make a big marketing point about getting iPlayer, 4OD etc etc. Then the second any of their customers complain (read their forums !) you get this mealy mouthed "iPlayer problems are down to the BBC, 4OD content is controlled by Channel 4" and so on).

So what *exactly* is the point of paying Virgin ?

Reminds me of the Fawlty Towers scene where the guests go to complain, only to have Basil complain more ("You think I don't know ? You're just staying here, we have to live with him.")

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JimmyPage
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Unhappy

Do they ?

"But the four broadcasters also punt these catch-up services to rivals Sky and Virgin Media, who bundle the services into their broadband packages. "

really ?

Because of a snafu'd TiVo series link (it failed to realise that "Part 2" of Derren Brown followed "Part 1") I was forced to try and watch if THE DAY AFTER on catch-up. Nowhere to be seen. So obviously I downloaded it. A call to VMs customer service revealed that it's the broadcaster, not VM who decide what appears on the VM catch up.

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America planned to NUKE THE MOON

JimmyPage
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Re: Note on Sagan

From what I remember of Carl Sagans comments on religion was the great quote:

"Extraordinary claims require extraordinary proof"

which is kinda cool.

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TVShack O’Dwyer strikes deal to avoid US extradition

JimmyPage
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Would *you* go ?

The US has a long and very public history of ignoring international law - what makes anyone they will honour their word ?

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A tweet too far: UK contempt law reform push begins

JimmyPage
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Meh

Wasn't there a case

a while back where a juror researching a case uncovered a patent untruth from the police which made it impossible for the defendant to have committed the crime ?

Maybe people would research less if they felt they could trust the system ?

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Man facing rare refusal-to-unlock-encryption charge: Court date set

JimmyPage
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Re: Very interesting case ....

So *any* assemblage of random bytes can be assumed to be encrypted ?

God help anyone researching radio white noise.

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JimmyPage
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Very interesting case ....

I'm curious as to what would happen if a computer were seized with - say - a file of data from SETI, and the police asked you to "decrypt" it.

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Amazon's secret UK sales figures revealed by Parliamentary probe

JimmyPage
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Mail order tax ?

If you can't catch them when they sell it, maybe you can catch it when they deliver ?

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Drop Box and Dropbox, begs new sync 'n' share start-up

JimmyPage
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FAIL

*Any* venture calling itself "Egnyte"

deserves to fail.

("Ignite" - geddit ?)

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WANTED: Actual HELPFUL info on price-comparison websites

JimmyPage
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Re: Work cut out

Believe it of not, OFCOM has dummy phone numbers you can use for testing. Well, to be more precise they publish a list of numbers that will never be assigned. Not sure about Royal Mail.

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Legal wigs to sort out rules on internet defamation, contempt

JimmyPage
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what will happen

is the legal system will be used to make what you or I say irrelevant, whilst what the ruling classes want to say valuable.

There *is* a precedent for this. The introduction of printing in the C14th. Which transformed how - and moe importantly what people communicated about. It's no mystery the inquisition and Jesuits go back to these times. And if you look at the creep of laws we've got in the past 15 years, you'll have an idea of where we are going.

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JimmyPage
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How about quoting ?

A lot of forums and newsreaders helpfully include the original post when replying. So where does a person who might *rebut* a libellous post, but ends up repeating it stand ?

Also, how about a poster who doesn't repeat a libel, but then posts in a manner which makes it clear they believe it ? Previously with no forum, they were irrelevant. However, with the TwitBook effect, they are recorded for posterity.

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JimmyPage
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Re: I don't get this.....

Because it's *identifying* not naming the individual, which exposes them to defamation. Going back, you could have been done for libel if you had suggested a "well known former Radio DJ renowned for running marathons for charity", even though you hadn't actually said "Jimmy Savile". Of course the ultimate judgement would be in court.

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Speaker Bercow's loquacious wife finally silenced - On Twitter

JimmyPage
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Why I love El Reg

Where else would you read the word "loquacious" in a headline ?

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Glorious silicon globes could hold key to elusive PERFECT kilogram

JimmyPage
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Boffin

Just to complicate things .... radioactive decay ?

Isn't there an experiment somewhere, where a mass becomes lighter over time, as it decays ?

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'The People's' cell operator to offer expensive data - but it's for cheridee

JimmyPage
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I read a lovely quote recently

Someone said they'd know when they lived in a better world, when schools and hospitals have all they need, and the army has to do a sponsored walk if they want a tank.

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JimmyPage
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Unhappy

Sadly

"I really thing the chugging model is wrong, and would love to see it stop (I'm not sure how, or rather "why" we could ban it though)."

is to tax charities.

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JimmyPage
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There aren't many charities I give to nowadays

I refuse to give any money to a charity who either uses chuggers, or makes marketing calls to me. I feel desperately sorry for the good folk who actually collect money by freezing their 'nads off shaking a bucket, when you realise that the "charity" is then going to spend that money with a commercial outfit, and on directors salaries.

A few months ago, working from home, I noticed a car pull up outside (we live in a cul de sac). Out got 4 guys, clipboards and lanyards at the ready, and they proceeded to flashmob the street, for .... Macmillan Cancer. Won't take a penny, but are *very* pushy to get a monthly DD signed up. I haven't checked, but I suspect that if the DD is cancelled before the collectors made any commission off it (why do you think they do it) then they will be able to clawback a fee from the charity.

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Restaurateur jailed for customer sex profile revenge plan

JimmyPage
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Criminal libel in the UK

is a very nasty charge to face (luckily only rich people can do it). Basically it's an accusation that the originator of the libel is so deliberately defaming, they need jailing. It also makes any part of the distribution chain responsible. For those interested, read up on the "Goldenballs" incident from the 1970s, where Private Eye was sued by Sir James Goldsmith. He launched a criminal libel writ, and had W H Smiths prosecuted (which is why they stopped selling Private Eye for years in the 70s and 80s).

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Author of '80s classic The Hobbit didn't know game was a hit

JimmyPage
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Indeed

For my final year project, in '87, before I could work on the software, I had to write the assembler. On a VAX.

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Cashless Comet to close 41 stores, axe 500 jobs

JimmyPage
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FAIL

Found myself in Comet yesterday

they were next door to the shoe shop the Mrs wanted to go to (!). Busy, but hardly queuing out the door. Had a walk round. Most stuff was still at 10% of the MRP, so still more expensive than a 5 minute google.

Given they're already over-burdened with older models, I can see a lot of stock being left in the stores when the shutters go down. And despite the Dixons/Maplin thing, I suspect very few will ever re-open in any guise. Every retail park near me has at least one empty cathedral-sized unit. And the nearest shopping centre has empty units where JJB, TJ Hughes, Peacocks, Alders, Woolworths, Clinton, Millets, Past Times were, to say nothing of the smaller units. I wonder how it works with business rates ... because looks to me like you're going to have to squeeze more from less.

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Brit retailers tell Amazon and Google to pay their taxes

JimmyPage
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Boffin

On radio [4] last week

Tuesdays PM, some expert made a very shrewd point about Starbucks. He said that they claimed to HMRC they hadn't made a profit, whilst at the same time publishing shareholder accounts (in the US) showing how much profit they were taking (since shareholders like profit).

He also made the point that HMRC *already* had the powers to use such documentation in calculating tax liability.

But when Vodafone can write of billions of tax over a cosy afternoon tea with the head of the HMRC (remember the guy who tried to tell the select committee he didn't have to answer them) what's the point ?

There is absolutely zero incentive for HMRC themselves to simplify the tax system - the more complex it is the more of them you need.

Just blue-sky thinking, but why not abolish all taxes, and simply take a %age of every single transaction made with currency . Imagine the Pound as the IP of the UK government, and every time it's used they get a licensing fee.

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Police mirth after plastic plod puts out call for 'PC World'

JimmyPage
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Coat

Very disappointed

no one has mentioned Mike Hunt yet

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Boss wrong to demote man over anti-gay-marriage Facebook post

JimmyPage
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Alert

No, it WAS permitted early on in the bible, and was then forbidden.

unlike slavery.

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Thought you'd escaped Twitter? Think again as Twits get email button

JimmyPage
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WTF?

More ways

people can be sued for libel ....

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'Spend police USB stick data loss mega-fine on IT lessons for cops'

JimmyPage
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Unhappy

However, bear in mind, UK public policy

is rather than fix the potholes, pay for the punctures.

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Lord to sue Twitter users who falsely accused him of abuse

JimmyPage
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FAIL

er...

you'll find there *is* a criminal libel. And you really, really, really, really, really, really would not want to be charged with it, let alone found guilty. Ask Private Eye about "Goldenballs".

Criminal libel makes every person in the chain guilty. That's why WH Smiths stopped selling Private Eye for ages in the 70s and 80s. They were found guilty of criminal libel, and had to pay quite a bit.

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JimmyPage
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FAIL

If you're relying on HIGNFY as legal gospel ...

I'll come visit you at Her Maj's pleasure.

UK libel laws are incredibly subtle, and easy to fall foul of. Just saying "allegedly" before a scurrilous statement would be no defence whatsoever, if a court felt you clearly intended to defame someone. Also, bear in mind that in the UK, veracity is not an automatic defence to libel. Which maybe why Jimmy Savile went unreported for so long. You could have found yourself facing a libel suit if you said "Jimmy Savile does a lot of work for childrens charities, and is famous for being surrounded by young girls on TOTP" in a context implying something less wholesome. Both statements true. But you could go down.

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Hold it! Don't back up to a cloud until you've eyed up these figures

JimmyPage
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Boffin

where managers earn their money

circuits and lines are assessed as part of a businesses BCP plans. If you have predicated your business on a single telecoms provider and circuit then it needs to be flagged as an issue and either rectified (get a second supplier and circuitry) or devise a compensating control (which may be to power your entire internet pipe through a 3G dongle). Our BCP has an off site war room setup with a 3rd party (Sungard) where essential staff would be transferred in the event of a building becoming compromised (i.e. no internet access).

BCP/DR is a serious business - getting it wrong can result in going under.

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JimmyPage
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Doesn't surprise me ...

Storage is cheap, processing is expensive (and slow). So if you are into *big* data analysis, you'll build massive cubes to cut down on the processing needed for slice-n-dice multi-dimensional reports.

Company I worked for could easily build a 10Gb series of cubes overnight. Each one is unique, so no differential possible.

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Sydney Uni boffin wants database to track smokers

JimmyPage
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Stop

Doesn't work that way.

The "healthier"[1] the population, the longer they live. And there's pretty much universal research which shows that the cost of providing healthcare rises exponentially as you start going over 40. Or in other words 80% of your heath spending will be on the 20% of the oldest of your population.

The longer people live, the more chance they have to develop (expensive) cancers that they would have died not knowing anything about, if they died younger.

"Logans Run" ... if you can get over the 70s-ness of it all made a serious point.

[1]Depending how you define healthy.

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So you broke our encrypted files? Ha! They were DOUBLY encrypted

JimmyPage
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Boffin

Re: If you encrypt something more than once...

I have a very vague memory that multiple encryption can weaken the resulting ciphertext. Can't remember why. It will also become increasingly (and exponentially) harder - and therefore slower.

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Android and Apple OS shares show mountain MS must climb

JimmyPage
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FAIL

Ironically

having had WP7 foisted on my, by an evangelical IT department (who have now canned it, for the reasons I shall list), I have actually grown used to it. And to be fair, it pretty much does the job with a couple of glaring exceptions:

1) can't record calls (although I have since learned that iOS can't either, and it's a limitation of the OS architecture no being able to run a background app while the phone is active)

2) no bluetooth file transfer

The fact that WP7 won't be upgraded to WP8 is a massive slap in the face. It's clear that MS regard WP7 as a stopgap, like WP6.5 was to WinCE, so there is a sense of being lumbered with WP7.

However, the biggest killer, is the total lack of apps. I refer people to a lack of BBC apps for WP7 for a start. There have been a few occasions when I've notice useful business apps that aren't available for WP7. It's this app-free feature which (IMHO) is going to do for WP8.

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